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Old March 5th, 2008, 05:32 PM   #81
adrimm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanfan89 View Post
Vancouver has three so-called BRT lines which are actually express buses. All of them are constantly jammed, and they're pushing forward with replacing all three with metro lines asap. BRT turned out as a failure in the inner core of Vancouver, as a half-baked solution to an urgent problem. But a genuine BRT network is planned to link suburbs with rail stations to improve dismal service

Toronto doesn't have any BRT lines except for VIVA, a glorified suburban bus system to lure suburban snobs onto buses. But many city bus routes have headways of 3 minutes, bus lanes, and express service. They could market those as BRT, but they don't. Many of those express bus routes are targeted for conversion to light rail in the next few years.

More often than not, I see BRT as inadequate as a solution to rapid transit problems. If they do not have dedicated bus lanes and genuine stations, then they are just a glorified regular bus. If they do have those features, the additional cost of laying rail tracks is well worth the increased ridership from people who simply don't like buses.

The Bogota system is a major exception to my thoughts.

I agree completely with urbanfan.

Bogota model = awesome, definitly a different something. It would work in my Canadian city.
typical Canadian model = glorified bus... I don't want it.

The problem with BRT is that the acronym "Bus Rapid Transit" is becoming a catchall "it" word that everyone is jumping on to describe their bus systems. It's sort of like the word "sustainable", which has now been rendered totally useless, becuase now suddenly everything can be sustainable.

This is a huge problem for the BRT concept. The complete BRT systems, the ones like what Bogota (7 Million), and many other Latin American cities have, work exceptionally well.. but in North America, despite much lipservice to alternatives, most so-called BRT systems have only a few of the features actually required to make it work at highest potential... therefore everyone has a very different idea of what BRT is.

I personally was totally opposed to it until I rode the Bogota system.. which literally blew me away, it's fantastic (ok maybe the routeing information could be better)... they clearly looked at it from a metro/subway perspective rather than improved bus when developing it. Now I am careful to make a distinction between what most North Americans call BRT and a full BRT system, such as what they have in Bogota, etc.

Anyone using the word BRT should have to append the city that comes to mind so we all know what their perception of BRT is.

aka Vancouver-model-BRT (= express bus)
Bogota-model-BRT (yes is a BRT).

It should come as no surprise that anyone who thinks of the current Vancouver model would be unhappy with it, while anyone who thinks of Bogota model would be happy with it.

The thing that pains me is that despite a globalising world, North American transit planners can't seem to look beyond our continent when designing BRT systems.. however planners in other areas do.... and guess what? They are *not* looking to North America for BRT inspiration. Goungzhou in China, and other Asian cities are looking to the south american systems, South Africa is looking to the south american systems. With no thanks to hollywood, there is an arrogance that prevents the general public in North America from accepting that there can be very progressive ideas coming from developing countries.

Although closed systems, turnstiles, etc all matter One of the most visible differences to me is in the stations, and this goes for any sort of rapid transit (rail or bus).. places that get winter and rains and unpleasant weather deserve a comfortable, enclosed professional looking environment.

Proper stations not only add to the accessibility for the elderly (and think of how many baby boomers there will be relying on transit as they get too old to drive), strollers, and to the attractiveness of the system and indicate the commitment to the develpment community. You can tear out a bus shelter, but once you put half a million dollars into a station, it's probably going to say "I'm not going anywhere". The stations can give BRT systems permanence. Bogota **has** seen shopping centres & malls spring up next to stations.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UA4IR7PvO6I

Last edited by adrimm; March 15th, 2008 at 08:36 AM.
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Old March 5th, 2008, 05:45 PM   #82
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deasine View Post
BRT systems need to be exactly like metro systems in order to perform well.
Exactly.. think of a surface version of Paris's metro (which is run on rubber tires) but then you get the people jumping all over the cost points.

This TRB report has a great graph comparing bang for buck with existing systems in North America. Page 36.. look at the ridership figures and the cost.

http://www.nbrti.org/media/documents...May%202006.pdf


Then look at costs for the Bogota copycat BRT in Periera. -. the primary costs in Bogota have been the massive portals or transfer stations that they have in the suburbs (they're massive). Periera with 500,000 people didn't need such expensive transfer portal systems that Bogota has so their system came out costing $ 2 million per km to build... and this is what it looks like:

[imgl]http://img263.imageshack.us/img263/1228/img1808rf5.jpg[/img]


Last edited by adrimm; April 7th, 2008 at 11:19 PM. Reason: added photos
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Old March 5th, 2008, 08:36 PM   #83
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Well, Ottawa probably has the best BRT system in North America, and if you look at my Ottawa transit options thread in this forum, you can probably see that we now find ourselves struggling to replace it. It seemed like a great like idea when it was built, but now it's seen as a relic of the 1980s.

All that said, it is a good system, compared to most BRTs. The Transitway is grade separated with stations spaced-out fairly regularly. The major routes (the 95 and the 97) run with headways of 3-5 minutes during daytime hours, while the secondary routes (the 96 and the 101) run with headways of 15-20 minutes. Back door boarding is allowed on 60' buses, which are the majority running on the Transitway. The biggest problems are the fact that it becomes a surface route through downtown, in mixed traffic, slowing service, as well as the fact that station platforms are not POP zones.
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Old March 5th, 2008, 08:51 PM   #84
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Well, the Vancouver BRT's may not be as fancy as Bogota's but it does hold up with its ridership. One line sees 70,000 passengers daily, and the other 40,000.
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Old March 5th, 2008, 10:46 PM   #85
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\ The biggest problems are the fact that it becomes a surface route through downtown, in mixed traffic, slowing service, as well as the fact that station platforms are not POP zones.
Those are some pretty major gaps... to me open "BRT" systems entirely defeat the concept of BRT. How on earth is it going to be smooth-functioning when portions get clogged in with mixed traffic? It defeats the cost if the separate ways. Ditto for POP.. what's the point if fare-paid stations aren't across the system.

Stations.. well I've already blabbed on about those. Rapid Transit anything passengers (Bus or Rail), deserves proper enclosed stations that deposit people right into the bus, especially in the land of snow or rain.

We're just not getting it right.

Last edited by adrimm; March 6th, 2008 at 07:49 AM.
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Old March 6th, 2008, 01:17 AM   #86
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Auckland (NZ) has recently completed a new busway. It began operation in February 2008 and is 11km long with 5 stations on it.

It has the first integrated ticketing in Auckland in the form of the Northern Pass and (very poor, generally infrequent) feeder buses from the surrounding suburbs which the Northern Pass allows seemless connection to. It has park and ride facilities on a few stations (Constellation Dr and Albany to name the major ones) that are very well used.

The busway with two stations opened transported almost 1 million passengers a year, but this number is expected to grow now that all five stations are operational.

Service is every five minutes at peak (uni-directional so morning peak towards city 5 minute intervals and afternoon away from city at 5 minute intervals) and every 10 minutes off-peak. After 19:30 the service drops to every 15 minutes. After 20:30 service drops to every 30 minutes with service stopping at 11:15.

On Saturday and Sunday, most of the time the service is every 10 minutes, however, after 18:30 the timetable changes to every 15 minutes and becomes every 30 minutes after 20:00 with service ceasing at 23:00 (sat) and 22:00 (sun).

The Northern Express is by far the most frequent bus route in the whole of Auckland with most bus routes being serviced by 30 minute services** offering increased frequency on well trafficked routes during peak.

** NB: some services are as frequent as every 15 minutes, others run only hourly. Some services only run two or three times a day but these tend to be crosstown, low patronage routes.
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Old March 6th, 2008, 05:31 AM   #87
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Hartford is getting a BRT line soon, it may start construction next year. It will be one line, going from our Union station downtown to New Britain, a satellite city which is about 15km to the southwest of Hartford.

I think that it's a half-hearted attempt that isn't ambitious enough because the state is too stingy. Ironically, the route will rip a large portion of abandoned rail (a large portion will be next to the railroad currently used by Amtrak), a la GM conspiracy style.

We're losing the opportunity to creating a light rail network. We have enough abandoned or rarely used ROW to create a genuine network that would connect plenty parts of the metro. We could even create a light rail connection to the Airport (a rail link is thought of, ATM).

Hopefully if ridership is decent, the new Department of Mass Transit thinks of converting the BRT to Light rail. I doubt that though, our state would rather spend billions on bridges or highways.
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Old March 12th, 2008, 05:15 PM   #88
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There is a Youtube video of the Mexico city BRT system.. nice video, nice system.

Not as slick as Bogota (I really love the sliding glass doors in Bogota), but with the essential ingredients (busways, solid stations with turnstiles, level-platforms, busway). This video definitely makes a solid case that buses are more efficient than cars,


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVRriKqXaIs
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Old March 12th, 2008, 09:38 PM   #89
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As Adrimm said, 3 of South Africa's cities will implement the BRT and that is Port Elizabeth, Pretoria nd Johannesburg

Johannesburg's BRT

Quote:
By: Irma Venter
Published: 7 Dec 07 - 0:00

The City of Johannesburg’s new bus rapid transport (BRT) system, named Rea Vaya, or “we are moving”, will introduce a sea change from the current public transport system South Africans have come to know.

One of the most noticeable changes when the system becomes operational in 2009 will be the absence of minibus taxis – or, at least, on the trunk (main) routes which will be serviced by the new BRT system.

City of Johannesburg transportation executive director Bob Stanway says the only buses allowed on the trunk routes will be those of the BRT system.

The trunk routes in this system will make use of large buses travelling in dedicated median lanes on current roads, with smaller complementary buses operating on BRT routes without dedicated lanes, feeding commuters into the trunk routes.

Buses will stop at special stations to be constructed every 500 m to 750 m along the trunk routes. This means a current four-lane road will typically see the two middle lanes taken up by the BRT system, with the remaining lanes allocated to other vehicles.

Phase 1A, comprising a 40-km route with 48 stations, will be completed by April 2009, ahead of the FIFA Confederations Cup, while Phase 1B will add 86 km and 102 stations to the system ahead of the 2010 soccer World Cup. The estimated cost of phase 1A and B is R2-billion.

Further phases will be constructed in a step-by-step manner.

The shareholders in the various companies set to operate the bus system will be the current operators active on the routes forming part of the BRT, says Stanway. These will include minibus taxi operators, the city’s own Metrobus service, and any other bus services, such as Putco.

Buy-in from taxi operators, rather notorious for shunning any attempt to reform their industry – as demonstrated by the taxi recapitalisation project, which is still struggling to get off the mark after being announced in 1999 – may be the biggest obstacle to the project.

The recapitalisation project aims to modernise the current fleet of taxis by setting minimum standards for the vehicles used by taxi operators. Despite several agreements between government and the taxi industry, some rogue elements still refuse to comply.

By June this year, after a fresh recapitalisation programme was announced in 2004, only 4 271 old taxi vehicles (about 4,2% of the current fleet) had been scrapped as part of the taxi recapitalisation programme.

Department of Transport public transport strategy director Ibrahim Seedat says gaining the support of taxi operators is the most important aspect of ensuring a successful BRT implementation effort, and that all cities implementing systems such as these will have to give it the requisite attention and planning budgets.

These local authorities will have to develop a business proposition that (subject to operator performance) guarantees incumbent taxi owners and drivers improved profit margins and working conditions, should they become part of the BRT system.

Seedat also notes that the refusal by some taxi operators to cooperate with the taxi recapitalisation project can be linked to the perceived financial risk of change, especially in terms of profits and employment numbers.

A NATIONWIDE EFFORT
BRT systems are being rolled out across the country, in a bid to alleviate congestion and promote public transport ahead of the 2010 soccer World Cup, which should see an influx of visitors dependent on such transport.

At least three other cities – Tshwane, Cape Town and Port Elizabeth – are to introduce initial phases of BRT systems to be operational before 2010.

The City of Tshwane, for example, will develop a R1,9-billion BRT system of 92 km, to be operational in time for the World Cup. Construction is to start mid-2008, and to be concluded in 2010, City of Tshwane transport system planning and forecasts deputy manager Jaco van den Berg tells Engineering News.

Stanway says global best practice has shown that conflict is minimised when existing operators are drawn into BRT systems.

“The city of Bogota, in Colombia, faced a similar challenge with its taxi industry, and managed to avert conflict by making them shareholders in the operating companies responsible for running the BRT system.”

He emphasises that no new operators will be brought into the system, and that the operation of the BRT will revert only to current operators.

Stanway says an operating company may be responsible for any one specific route, or may be limited to portions of different routes. The latter provides leverage to the city – again similar to Bogota.
Phase one, for example, has seven routes.

“If any one operator strikes, there will be no buses available on that entire route. However, when operators are responsible for portions of routes, no one route is affected in its entirety, making it possible to ask nonstriking operators to extend their services to the affected parts,” explains Stanway.

He says the City of Johannesburg signed a memorandum of understanding with one major grouping of taxi operators in October, in preparation for the introduction of the BRT system.

“It is important to understand that we are not taking taxis off the road – we are simply incorporating taxi operators into a new public transport system,” says Stanway.

He notes that operating companies will only be announced in 2009.

“A substantial budget has been allocated to train drivers to operate within a BRT,” adds Stanway.
“Taxi drivers have code 8 licences, and would need licences for much larger vehicles.”

To those commuters anticipating a bus system representing the rather haphazard minibus taxi service, Stanway says they need not fear.

Operating companies will be paid by the kilometre, and not by commuter, meaning the emphasis is on a quick and efficient point-to-point service with no deviation.

Minibus taxi operators currently wait for their vehicles to fill up before they depart, not adhering to any set time schedule.

A POSSIBLE BOOST TO THE LOCAL BUS INDUSTRY
“We may place a pre-emptive order for the buses we require, so they can be ready when we roll out the system,” says Stanway.

Bus companies will not only supply the buses, but will also be involved in the maintenance of the vehicles, playing an important behind-the-scenes role.

Current planning is that the Rea Vaya system will make use of 188 long buses (between 18,5 m and 22 m), 102 8,5 m buses, and 350 13,9 m buses.

In a local market which sells around a thousand buses a year, numbers such as these have piqued the interest of the entire bus industry.

For example, DaimlerChrysler South Africa (DCSA) Mercedes-Benz Commercial Vehicles divisional manager Kobus van Zyl said earlier this year his company may grow capacity at its East London chassis plant, allowing it to cater for BRT demands.

However, nothing is set in stone yet – neither what the buses will look like, nor where they will be sourced from.
Stanway says there are a few ongoing projects which could still influence the City of Johannesburg’s decision on which buses to use.

One of these is a process by which the Depart-ment of Transport is set to introduce minimum standards for BRT buses, to be finalised in the first quarter of next year, says Seedat.

The South African bus industry consists typi-cally of vehicle manufacturers which assemble chassis imported from their parent companies, such as DCSA. These chassis then go to bus body builders, which construct bodies onto the chassis, such as Marcopolo.

Importing already built-up units means higher import duties, which could influence the price tag.

Seedat says the proposed minimum standards for BRT buses will include aspects such as axle weight (this influences the number of passenger the buses can carry), length (which influences seating capacity); door width; the number of doors (buses in Bogota have three to four doors for quick entry and exit); entry height (the bus entry point and the platform must be aligned); and wheelchair access.

“One example of aspects which will not form part of these minimum standards include air conditioning,” says Seedat. “Implementing cities can decide on this themselves.”

He says the reasons for the proposed minimum standards are to ensure consistency across the country, in order to bring down costs through economies of scale.

Any one city’s BRT procurement is too small a market to leverage international investment in new bus plants, notes Seedat. Hence, the challenge is to align basic standards so that the entire country is seen as one large potential market that can sustain competition from multiple manufacturers supplying a standardised product, which can then be tailored to meet the needs of different cities.

A minimum standard also provides certainty to the local bus industry, allowing it to gear up capacity in advance in order to provide the products required.

Seedat adds that the Department of Transport would prefer to have as many of the buses produced locally as possible, as this would create job opportunities.

“In the end, parts of the system will overlap, such as between Tshwane and Johannesburg. We cannot afford a situation where a Tshwane BRT bus cannot dock at a Johannesburg station, because the platform and the bus door do not align.

We need some form of standardisation,” he explains.

POLLUTION BUSTER
Stanway says one minimum specification the City of Johannesburg will demand from buses operating within the Rea Vaya system will be the use of Euro 3 engines.

This refers to a standard of engine which is cleaner-burning and which, therefore, emits less pollution than many vehicles currently on South Africa’s roads.

“If 15% of car users alongside the phase-one corridor switch to the BRT system, it would mean a 270-t drop in the carbon monoxide released into the city’s atmosphere every year,” says Stanway.

This is especially important as Johannesburg is a member of the C40 group of cities, which are working towards mitigating climate change.

“Transport is one facet of this programme,” explains Stanway.

The C40 group – consisting of 40 global cities – is linked to the Clinton Foundation, the brainchild of former US President Bill Clinton.

This foundation is in advanced discussions with most of the world’s largest bus manufacturers – in an attempt to negotiate discounts for BRT bus buyers – as it is shown that these public transport systems reduce pollution within cities, says Stanway.

“If the size of the environment-friendly global order can be guaranteed, manufacturers have indicated that they may be able to offer between 30% and 40% discount on bus prices.”

Stanway says Johannesburg is also tentatively looking at the introduction of one or two hybrid buses, as exhibition models.

Hybrid buses are viewed as green vehicles, with their combination electric/combustion power source emitting less pollutants than the pure combustion engine of a standard vehicle.

TICKING CLOCK
Apart from buy-in from the minibus taxi industry, the largest challenge remaining may be to beat the clock. For Johannesburg and some other cities, the 2010 curtain-raiser – the 2009 FIFA Confederations Cup – is looming.

The 17-km Chinese BRT system built in Beijing for the 2008 Olympics took 16 months to complete from conceptualisation to implement-ation. South Africa has 30 months remaining to kick-off, and this for much larger systems.

At least the largest portion of phase one of the Rea Vaya system already has environmental approval from the Gauteng government. Still outstanding, though, is the portion between Industria and Parktown, largely owing to concerns byParktown residents that the system may cause noise levels to increase.

Phase one will also require the expropriation of a number of existing houses, which can become a drawn-out process if challenged in court.

Environmental approval is not necessary for all parts of the route, though, especially in areas where the BRT system will operate within existing road reserves, which means the footprint of the road remains exactly as it currently stands.

Stanway expresses the hope that BRT systems across the country will soon be able to operate under a special dispensation, allowing their environmental-impact assessments (EIAs) and approvals to be fast-tracked.

“We are hoping to get some special dispensation, not only because of the time constraints, but also because BRTs actually have a positive environmental impact, as they reduce pollution levels.

“However, to be on the safe side, we are working within a planning framework where we expect EIAs to run their normal course.

“We are positive phase 1A will be ready in time for the Confederations Cup,” says Stanway.


Source: www.engineeringnews.co.za
BRT intergrating with Rapid Rail System
Quote:
FAST, RELIABLE PUBLIC TRANSPORT BECOMING A REALITY
Gautrain will be accessible through a dedicated bus feeder network that will transport passengers to and from stations within a 15km radius. These will be linked to Integrated Rapid Public Transport Networks (IRPTNs) planned for metropolitan areas.

A prominent feature of these networks will be integrated Rapid Rail and Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) priority corridors. These will provide city-wide, rapid public transport corridors together with feeder systems of smaller buses, taxis, bicycles, pedestrian access as well as metered taxis and park and ride facilities. As set out in the Department of Transport’s Integrated Transport Plan BRT systems offer fast, comfortable and low cost urban transport.

Gauteng Transport MEC, Ignatius Jacobs, recently launched the BRT system for 2010 FIFA World Cup host cities which include Johannesburg and Tshwane. The BRT corridors will service both the central business districts as well as townships.

With integrated, fast, reliable and safe public transport becoming a reality, spatial development spin-offs will have sustainable long-term economic benefits for the Province. New investment and business opportunities are already in full swing.

Suburbs and cities are undergoing major upgrades, restructuring and rejuvenation.

Integrated public transport in Johannesburg
Johannesburg’s R2-billion Rea Vaya rapid bus transport system will be ready for 2010. Rea Vaya means we are going. The new system will consist of 325 kilometres of special public transport lanes and intersections, running north and south of the city, and west and east. It will link townships and suburbs with the Johannesburg inner city.

Commuters will be able to seamlessly switch from one form of transport to another using a single ticket.

Nearly 150 stations will feature ticketing machines, pedestrian overpasses for commuters to reach the stations and real-time travel information displays. Larger stations will offer park-and-ride facilities, drop-off zones, bike parking, information kiosks, metered-taxi ranks, and bathroom facilities.

Three stations will provide integration with Gautrain, namely Park, Rosebank, and Sandton. To provide commuters with peace of mind, all stations will be monitored by closed-circuit television.

Source: www.gautrain.co.za
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Old March 13th, 2008, 09:36 AM   #90
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Quote:
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More often than not, I see BRT as inadequate as a solution to rapid transit problems. If they do not have dedicated bus lanes and genuine stations, then they are just a glorified regular bus. If they do have those features, the additional cost of laying rail tracks is well worth the increased ridership from people who simply don't like buses.
It does majorly depend on the quality of the system and the layout. Here (Brisbane, Australia) we have somewhat of a reverse, the trains are old and dirty and people don't really like them, the busses are new and clean and service the more expensive suburbs. (whereas in the outer city the areas surrounding the train stations is fairly poor and crime filled). - Inner city of course is different as the property prices there have really pushed out alot of people. That said the train stations are mostly 20-30 years old, while the bus stations are less than 10.

Here's the things that I think makes it better than light rail:

- Services begin and terminate off the BRT corridors, which means that you can get a much wider catchment
- People do not have to change modes, they get on the bus near their homes, and when it arrives at the start of our Busway the bus just keeps going, you would otherwise need to get off, and change to a tram
- Stations have a passing lane: ! - This is very important as it means that express services can run without being held up behind services that stop at all stops.
- If there was ever an accident, busses can still pass and will not get held up

Here are some of the things that it has that I think 'makes' the system need:
- Modern well lit stations, express services that are all pre-paid ticketing
- Total traffic seperation almost all of it is on a raised concrete roadway, or seperate roadway. It is 20 something KM long, and for the most part unsignaled (only signals at the city end for 3 intersections, with Bus priority).
- They are low-floored wheelchair accessable busses and stops

When it was first built the stop closest to the city was only 2 lanes (only stop without a passing lane) As it was the intention to allow for light rail at that stop later, at that time there were headways of 24 seconds, and it has since been upgraded to dual lanes. I can only imagine at the moment that headways at that stop are <10 seconds, the flow of busses is pretty staggering.

The main advantage this has had is that there are now alot more services and express routes. So many people can get on a at one of the city stops and have it power away at up to 90kph until it gets right to their stop. (It is actually faster than the train, as the train has 19 stops in the same distance the express bus can have as little as 3. The express rail services start from further out.)

The system originally started the furtherest stop had 15minute frequencies in peak, now it's getting frequencies of a just a few minutes (no more timetable needed). And of course so many of the services start from suburbs that are too sparse to have heavy rail, or even light rail.




^ That stop and the busway around it is actually enclosed with a mesh because it cuts past a golf course !

image hosted on flickr



This is one of the underground terminals in the city center, most services terminate here, it is right in the middle of the city under a large shopping centre / and pedestrian mall. It has apparently been much upgraded as they are connecting it to one of the northern busways directly underground (meaning that people will be able to come from the north right into the city without traffic lights on a bus) (the picture is old, I need to get one with the new upgraded station).

A new stop is also being built along the route of the tunnel under the square right next to city hall:



Hmm. All this shows me is that I need to go and take some more pictures myself, as it's hard to find up to date ones.

Some more images here:
http://www.dtarchitecture.co.nz/ta_01.htm
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Old March 13th, 2008, 03:16 PM   #91
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In Rouen, it works perfectly, it is joined in city centre by light metro ! Also each BRT line is well dedicated, and so separated from traffic jams ...







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Old March 13th, 2008, 05:56 PM   #92
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In Rouen, it works perfectly, it is joined in city centre by light metro ! Also each BRT line is well dedicated, and so separated from traffic jams ...
I think that is a good combination for transit, use the BRT for longer distance travel with fewer stops, (ie suburbs to centre) and something like a trolley or light rail network with frequent stopping points for the city centre.

To me, closed dedicated busways are *essential*, but still only one component of BRT (others include proper stations with level platforms, mode integration, signal priority).

I for one would never dream of bestowing the label of BRT on a system that didn't have closed busways and some other BRT essentials.
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Old March 13th, 2008, 07:59 PM   #93
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My city has some express routes, which only differ from normal line in that they have less stops on the same route. Some have buslanes,some dont,but the lanes are never separated form the rest of the traffic. These express buses usually traverse those routes where there should be at least trams. Most are result of the downgrade of the tram network in the commie era.
some of these lines have about 4-7min frequency in rush hour,and 7-10 minutes out of rush hour,but the majority has about 10 min frequency in rh. The most frequent(and most used)line will be replaced(hopefully) by the u/c metro.
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Old March 14th, 2008, 02:26 AM   #94
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I think that is a good combination for transit, use the BRT for longer distance travel with fewer stops, (ie suburbs to centre) and something like a trolley or light rail network with frequent stopping points for the city centre.

To me, closed dedicated busways are *essential*, but still only one component of BRT (others include proper stations with level platforms, mode integration, signal priority).

I for one would never dream of bestowing the label of BRT on a system that didn't have closed busways.




T1, T2, T3 = BRT lines
M = light metro

Well, as you can see here there is as much stops as for the light metro here... in fact in beginning, rouen wanted a light metro east-west, the actual one is north-south, the problem is that in east and west of the city, there is hills, and it was economically very hard to do (there is only 500.000 inh.), and so they transformed light metro lines directly to BRT lines, with same distance for stops. I would like to add that a light metro is different from tramway (trolley) and light rail because it's running on exclusive right of way (that's surely why the combination of both systems here work well, they have exclusive ways, one on rails and the other on tires... eheh).

Rouen has another project that is for longer distances, it will use heavy rail and it will turn a light metro in cities centres.
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Old March 14th, 2008, 05:24 AM   #95
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I think that is a good combination for transit, use the BRT for longer distance travel with fewer stops, (ie suburbs to centre) and something like a trolley or light rail network with frequent stopping points for the city centre.

To me, closed dedicated busways are *essential*, but still only one component of BRT (others include proper stations with level platforms, mode integration, signal priority).
The alternative we have to level platforms is low-floor busses (ie there are no stairs except at the back). So they are fully wheelchair accessable even using normal height stops. Signal priority is the case, but there are not many signals, for the most part it is entirely seperated and doesn't require them.
They are slowly moving exclusively to pre-paid tickets, previously while most people had pre-paid now on many services it is a requirement. (They also just got the tag-on /off cards launched too so that you don't need to even work out what fare/ticket you need, you just tag on and off and don't have to think about it)

One of the benefits is that so many of the services start from further away from the city than the busway runs, or even are feeder services, but then may simply continue on without stopping once they reach the busway. The alternative is feeder busses that stop 20+ times, then a core rail system that also stops 20+ times. I have a service locally than runs 30km and stops at most twice before it reaches my destination in the city center. This is great because it is actually faster than using the car (in peak). The local heavy rail service requires driving a car to the station, getting out, waiting for a train, then stopping 20 times on the way to the city. It takes twice as long as just driving.

That's what we need here locally, services faster than using the car, because pretty much everyone has one, and that is what public transport needs to be competitive with.
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Old March 14th, 2008, 05:28 AM   #96
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The bare minimum of what **all** BRT & LRT stations ought to look like: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UA4IR7PvO6I ..... and if it is anything less I don't want it in my town.
We don't really need the screen doors here, it never gets particularly cold, and while it gets warm enough to require air-conditioning on the busses themselves, well shaded and ventillated stops are ample to keep people happy. There are fences in the middle to stop people crossing from one platform to the other, and the busses are low enough to the ground that they are wheelchair accessable (a choice in busses rather than the platforms). It also means that any bus can use the platforms, not just special busses with exactly the right openings. (which is important in a system that services busses from not only the city council but from multiple external operators (they have to be licenced to use it, it's not for coaches or the general public)

(Note the two city center stops do have closed platforms with screen doors, but they are likely to be the busiest stops, the others have alot of glass and light used in their construction so that they feel very safe (nowhere that is dark and secluded)
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Old March 14th, 2008, 05:35 AM   #97
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The Brisbane busway system looks exactly like the extensive network of transitways in Ottawa: segregated roads, passing lanes at BRT stations, one-stop buses from anywhere in the suburbs to the centre, and full-fledged stations. But it's become a failure chiefly because buses run on surface streets in the centre and because of sheer overcrowding. There are finally plans to create a tunnel and convert the system to rail to alleviate congestion (e.g. it's better to have six-car trains running every six minutes than to have a bus every one minute) and encourage TOD around stations.
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Old March 14th, 2008, 05:36 AM   #98
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In Minneapolis-St. Paul we have 1 BRT line. It runs between the Minneapolis U of M campus to the St. Paul U of M campus. It opened in 1992, and it is free of charge. It runs Monday-Friday every 5 minutes from 6 AM to 7 PM, with limited-stop versions every 15 minutes. From 7 PM to 12 AM, and on Weekends it runs every 15 minutes. There is some service between 12 AM and 3 AM, and I think it is every 60 minutes. Since 2005 it has been considered as part of the regional transit system and is route number 121.

There is also a so-called BRT line on Interstate 394 which opened between 1986 and 1992. There are HOT lanes and buses have to exit the freeway to access the "stations" (park and rides with glorified bus shelters). There are departures every few minutes during rush hour, but midday, evening, and weekends the buses are every 60 minutes. Route numbers are 643, 649, 652, 663, and 671-675.

Planning for I-35W and Cedar Avenue Freeway BRT is under way. They are scheduled to open in 2009-2010. There will be a new median freeway station at 46th Street. A station has existed at Lake St. since the 1970's, but is not in good condition. Recently new bus shelters were installed, and the lanes were repaved. Several new curbside stations will be constructed, as well as appx. 1500 new park and ride spaces.
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Old March 14th, 2008, 05:55 AM   #99
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jr841...eature=related < That's actually the inner city bit. The first part is being replaced eventually so that the busses avoid that intersection, and go right onto a new bridge.

They're also building alot more tunnels for the inner city part. You can see in that clip the 3 traffic lights (bus priority but traffic lights none the less), before it turns onto the busway proper where there is only 1 down the entire length (busses only, and is only red when busses are entering the corridor from another station that is off to the side.)

Heavy rail is ultimately better if it's done right (modern driverless trains, good well laid tracks etc). But the resumptions needed for heavy rail would have been far more, and the route would have had to be much straighter. This is much better than light rail, but it just doesn't have the capacity of heavy rail.

The northern busway (sourthern was the one shown) is just now having an underground bit connected right to the city center (previously it was all seperated then required city streets for the last very short distance, but it will be saving 20 minutes on a trip with just this fairly short tunnel, as they will be able to exit the city without any surface traffic or traffic lights. It will be a completely seperate system.

As for 1 every six minutes being > one per minute, that depends, if you maybe have to wait 3 minutes and you get a bus that takes you right to your door, it's much better in my opnion than waiting 6 for a bus that takes you to a station where you then have to wait another 5 for a bus to take you to your door. Every minute counts, the entire system was doing 'ok' but when they increased the frequency from 15 minutes to 5 minutes the patronage inceased even more to match it (all of a sudden having not needing a timetable made it attractive). Also people hate waiting at stations. They would rather drive a car that takes 5 minutes longer than spend 5 minutes at a station, because the illusion of progress on your journey make it seem shorter than waiting.
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Old March 14th, 2008, 05:58 AM   #100
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There is some service between 12 AM and 3 AM, and I think it is every 60 minutes.
Friday and Saturday nights the core services run along the busway 24 hours (hourly services after midnight > 5am). They had a trial where train services ran those hours also, but people did not feel safe on trains at those hours. A bus with a dozen people on it feels much safer than a train with the same.
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