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Old March 15th, 2008, 05:14 AM   #101
adrimm
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The alternative we have to level platforms is low-floor busses (ie there are no stairs except at the back). So they are fully wheelchair accessable even using normal height stops.
yes but the ramp deployment can slow things down especially if it is cumulative.....so the system losses speed for cost of accessibility when you have to deploy ramps. A level platform can let wheelchairs & strollers just roll straight on, more efficient.. so ultimately is an important component in making everything faster.

Page 413 of the BRT planning guide speaks about this trade off in accessibility. I find it very interesting, especially since I think that babyboom generation may be a big portion of transit users as they get too old to drive.

http://www.itdp.org/documents/Part(III)%202007%2009.pdf

Level-platforms are sometimes combined with low-floor buses, I think that the orange-line does this.
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Old March 22nd, 2008, 09:08 PM   #102
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yes but the ramp deployment can slow things down especially if it is cumulative.....so the system losses speed for cost of accessibility when you have to deploy ramps. A level platform can let wheelchairs & strollers just roll straight on, more efficient.. so ultimately is an important component in making everything faster.
Being low floor busses it only takes a few seconds to deploy the ramp, mind you I have see one deployed maybe twice in the last few years. I'm not sure if this means that having anything more would be more than is needed or if it means that people that need it are avoiding the system.

Given that busses behind can pass each other it doesn't pass a hold up to the rest of the system.
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Old March 24th, 2008, 12:16 AM   #103
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In Breda, my hometown, they're developing a so called HOV (Hoogwaardig Openbaar Vervoer --> Rapid Public Transport). It's already in service, but only on the line Etten-Leur --> Breda Centraal Station (Central Station).

In smaller metropolitan area's (we'll say, 300.000 - 750.000 pop.) I think it will really work, but in larger metropolitan area's (750.000+ pop.) I think it will get stuck in traffic jams and get overcrowded.

I think it will definitely work in Breda, the urban area has around 315.000 inhabitants and there will be one HOV line: Etten-Leur (40.000 pop.) - Breda (171.000 pop.) - Oosterhout (55.000 pop.). It's a 15km long line and will run mostly on seperated buslanes. They're are also thinking of a monorail to transferstations on the edge of the city.. but I think that's just one big idea that will not come true in the next 20 years.
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Old March 24th, 2008, 03:25 AM   #104
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In Breda, my hometown, they're developing a so called HOV (Hoogwaardig Openbaar Vervoer --> Rapid Public Transport). It's already in service, but only on the line Etten-Leur --> Breda Centraal Station (Central Station).
Great name. HOV (in Canada & US at least) stands for High Occupancy Vehicle.
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Old March 24th, 2008, 10:05 AM   #105
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Level-platforms are sometimes combined with low-floor buses, I think that the orange-line does this.
The problem with some of the higher floor busses in combination with raised platforms is that they effectively become plaforms for those special busses only, and those busses cannot leave the system (no steps etc). Destroying what is one of the great advantages it has over lightrail/trams etc. Low floor busses can have people step on/off easily even when using normal streets, a slightly raised platform can bring it to level if desired, and maintain accessibility in all situations.

The great advantage of this system is that many busses can exit and leave the system, which extends the usefulness immensely. I move offices abit for work and at one stage I had the bus stop right outside my door for work, it was great. Especially after it had travelled at a far greater speed than car traffic had for most of the journey, and at least equal for the bits that it didn't. Having a PT system that is faster than driving is one of the key reasons for the high uptake it has seen.
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Old March 24th, 2008, 08:03 PM   #106
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New Delhi, India has also started construction on massive bus rapid trans system and every bosy are pretty confident that it willbecome one of the best in coming few years! The construction is massive and so sofisticated,
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Old March 31st, 2008, 05:17 PM   #107
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Great name. HOV (in Canada & US at least) stands for High Occupancy Vehicle.
Well.. it means not Rapid Public Transport. Though it is funny that it falls in the same cathegory. I think HOV vehicles are cars with people working in the same company driving together to work.. aren't they?

Well here HOV is something like Light Rail (tram) and an upgraded bussystem like they're developing here.
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Old April 1st, 2008, 04:07 AM   #108
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The problem with some of the higher floor busses in combination with raised platforms is that they effectively become plaforms for those special busses only, and those busses cannot leave the system (no steps etc). Destroying what is one of the great advantages it has over lightrail/trams etc. Low floor busses can have people step on/off easily even when using normal streets, a slightly raised platform can bring it to level if desired, and maintain accessibility in all situations.

The great advantage of this system is that many busses can exit and leave the system, which extends the usefulness immensely. I move offices abit for work and at one stage I had the bus stop right outside my door for work, it was great. Especially after it had travelled at a far greater speed than car traffic had for most of the journey, and at least equal for the bits that it didn't. Having a PT system that is faster than driving is one of the key reasons for the high uptake it has seen.
I think it really depends on the intended application and on ridership..I see BRT as more of an affordable alternative to rail in a regional system (core-> suburbs). Few stations, fast travel, significant station investment, an easy transfer to your car, bike or local bus transit in the 'burbs.

In this application, having the special bus, swank station closed (no mixed traffic) BRT system accomplishes alot for the identity of the BRT ... and in North America the BRT concept has a huge identity crisis.. It can't decide if it is enhanced bus, or BRT. and usually ends up being express bus of some sort rather than BRT.

Getting people to be able to understand & appreciate the divide between BRT and regular bus, while making it easy & tempting for them to use it (ie have park'n'ride, bike'n'ride plus bus'n'ride) is a key hurdle to garnering ridership.

Special buses, wrong side doors, swank stations, no mixed traffic.. these all contribute to setting BRT aside from "the bus" in the public mind. This can give valuable cues to the development community about how serious the authorities are about BRT.


Sending the BRT bus into mixed traffic & regular routing confuses the concept (it's not "rapid"), and if the idea is to get people to where they live it is hopeless anyhow becuase we are so spread out in 'burbs.
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Last edited by adrimm; April 3rd, 2008 at 03:51 AM.
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Old April 1st, 2008, 05:23 AM   #109
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The stations here are 'special' enough to convince people that they are something different. There are many buses that only serve those stations, however additionally, busses from the surrounding city council areas join the busway and travel into the city center, it is more effecient than a transfer system which would quickly be overwhelmed (would require larger stations, longer busses etc) Already they are planning to move to triple segmented buses for the core services. The busway system is owned here by the State government, while in the major city the council owns all the busses and their services. The outer cities (20+km away from the center) each have their own bus services operated by contracted companies. Some years after the busway was introduced the state government centralised the fares and allowed single tickets to work on all services for a few hundred km large area. This mass of transit simply could not be paid for and achieved by the one authority without doing it this way. Once you go to having to make mode transfers and restricting busses to the busway you might as well spend up and go for heavy rail.
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Old April 1st, 2008, 04:48 PM   #110
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In the Amsterdam Metropolitan Area there are 2 large BRT projects. One of them is the Zuidtangent, the other city transport in Almere.

The Zuidtangent is one of the most interesting BRT's. The main line is 40 km long of which 25 km is a dedicated bus line. Long streches are made in such way that it could be upgraded later to a light rail line. Parts will be upgraded later with more dedicated bus lines, a 2nd line just started, and several extensions are planned.

A typical Zuidtangent bus:


One of the crossings:
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Old April 1st, 2008, 07:46 PM   #111
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some more buses from holland, i think this is the most completed busway system of the netherlands, quite easy to be because it's integrated from the beginning, so they didn't have to make adjustments to the city's infrastructure. no crossings with main (N) roads. And last but not least, in rush hours almost any line rides within any 6, or 7 minutes. and for (almost) any household within this 'low'density town nearest busstop is at a 400 meter walk.
here a outdated picture of the bus'lanes

all lanes in this picture is bus only, or emergencys. with smart trafficlights at any crossing with Par example cyclingpaths, and neighbourhood traffic.
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Old April 2nd, 2008, 05:54 PM   #112
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In Sao Paulo region the best example of BRT is the "Corredor Metropolitano" (Metropolitan Bus way), with an exclusive lane in most part of it, passing through 5 cities (Sao Paulo, Mauá, Santo André, Sao Bernardo and Diadema)

Info:
  • Length: 33km, with 22km electrified for trolleybus operation.
  • Terminals: 9
  • Stops: 56
  • Bus routes: 11
  • Free Transfers: to Diadema city municipal buses in Diadema Terminal and Piraporinha Terminal; to São Paulo municipal buses in São Mateus Terminal
  • Paid Transfers: to CPTM (metropolitan trains) in Santo André Leste and Santo André Oeste Terminals; to Metrô line 1 (subway) in Jabaquara Terminal;
The most busy routes are served by bendy buses (lines 285, 287 and 288), the other lines are served by usual buses.

Here is a map of the system



The red line is under construction
The yellow circles are free transfer terminals
The green circle is a free transfer terminal only for BRT lines
The blue circles are usual terminals

The fare system is controlled by magnetic tickets, like this:





Some pictures:

Bonfim Stop



Bangu Stop (Santo André downtown in the background)



Santo André Terminal



Santa Tereza Stop



São Bernardo Terminal



Inside a bendy bus



System map inside the bus



Inside a low floor trolleybus
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Old April 2nd, 2008, 07:59 PM   #113
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Proper stations not only add to the accessibility for the elderly (and think of how many baby boomers there will be relying on transit as they get too old to drive), strollers, and to the attractiveness of the system and indicate the commitment to the develpment community. You can tear out a bus shelter, but once you put half a million dollars into a station, it's probably going to say "I'm not going anywhere". The stations can give BRT systems permanence.
Absolutely. Another feature that can offer this 'perceived permanence of service' is the presence of trolleybus wires overhead. Even in places where there have been few other BRT-style elements, electric trolleybuses have been proven to attract passengers who would not otherwise travel by public transport.

Combine electric trolleybuses with BRT systems and you have a potential winner, with greater fuel-efficiency, no emissions on-street and quiet, smooth performance.

Here's a trolleybus-based BRT system in Merida, Venezuela:
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Old April 3rd, 2008, 04:16 AM   #114
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Wow, that is nice! Very attractive station design. Probably the nicest I have ever seen for median stations... it looks as though it serves *both* directions of traffic.

I may need to replace my sig link!!
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Old April 3rd, 2008, 01:17 PM   #115
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Hmm, what I don't like about that, and it's probably fine for the location it's at, is that it's missing some of the advantages it has over a tram. If that bus were to break down right there, it would be difficult for another to pass it, blocking the line so to speak. I prefer the stations that have a passing lane and the rest of the busway being 2 lane (1 in each direction) to at least allow for the possibility of a blockage being passed.

The density there does look fairly low though does the bus lane actually give a large advantage over using the road (ie, does it get busy in peak ?).

Here we have alot of services that start off the busway, and then only arrive on the dedicated lanes as they get within 20km of the city. (where it starts to give an advantage over the highway). It will soon be extended out to 25km.

The advantage is that during peak it's actually far faster on the busway stretch, and the relatively sparse areas further out are served with their own services which do pickups before joining the busway, then manage to run express. A tram would require a change of service, so it's ideal, and the frequency of services passes even most metros.
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Old April 3rd, 2008, 01:52 PM   #116
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Hmm, what I don't like about that, and it's probably fine for the location it's at, is that it's missing some of the advantages it has over a tram. If that bus were to break down right there, it would be difficult for another to pass it, blocking the line so to speak. I prefer the stations that have a passing lane and the rest of the busway being 2 lane (1 in each direction) to at least allow for the possibility of a blockage being passed.
I couldn't agree more. As it happens, I made that very point myself, when corresponding with an official from my local transport authority, using that photograph as an example (they want to install a BRT-style trolleybus system in Leeds - cash is a problem though).

In order to preserve the advantages of the tyre-based vehicle, you have to make sure that overtaking is possible. At the very least, a lower profile kerb and an absence of obstructive vegetation would help.

This is one reason why I'm not keen on large-scale bus guidance. I can understand why guidance could be useful at platform stops, for closer docking, but for most other applications I think it's a waste of money.
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Old April 4th, 2008, 06:22 AM   #117
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This is one reason why I'm not keen on large-scale bus guidance. I can understand why guidance could be useful at platform stops, for closer docking, but for most other applications I think it's a waste of money.
I figure if you're paying someone to drive, you might as well pay them to steer. Automated rail systems is where it's at for an improvement over systems like this, reducing the labour cost can mean more services outside peak times and all sorts of nice things like that

The additional advantage of course is that busses can leave the dedicated road when you get to quieter areas that are uncongested even in peak times, saving alot of money and mode-transfers. It makes a bigger difference here where public transport is competing directly with people just taking their cars rather than being public transport for those who cannot afford a car / can't drive. The biggest success comes when public transport is actually faster than driving, not just cheaper. Something quite possible with the express services that run with very few stops over quite a distance (25km, maybe 3 stops), there's nothing quite as irritating as a bus service that has just done 15 'feeder' stops, arriving at a train station, only to have the train make all 20 odd stops into the city.
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Old April 6th, 2008, 05:40 PM   #118
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Absolutely. Another feature that can offer this 'perceived permanence of service' is the presence of trolleybus wires overhead. Even in places where there have been few other BRT-style elements, electric trolleybuses have been proven to attract passengers who would not otherwise travel by public transport.

Combine electric trolleybuses with BRT systems and you have a potential winner, with greater fuel-efficiency, no emissions on-street and quiet, smooth performance.

Here's a trolleybus-based BRT system in Merida, Venezuela:
Too bad cities where a trolleybus network was already there like Tehran and Mexico City didn't use them for their new BRT
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Old April 7th, 2008, 09:45 AM   #119
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Johannesburg's BRT called Rea Vaya. I took this pics from Soweto highway on my way to the CBD. This part of the BRT will be completed before September 2008, I'm not sure if there will be a station next to this stadium as the opening and closing match of the 2010 Soccer World Cup will be hosted there. The Stadium is called Soccer City aka FNB Stadium.

Rea Vaya, BRT











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Old April 7th, 2008, 09:47 AM   #120
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Courtesy of CrazyLoca

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