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Old September 12th, 2009, 01:36 PM   #21
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Old September 15th, 2009, 03:49 PM   #22
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Proud to be venetian
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Old September 22nd, 2009, 06:25 PM   #23
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Old September 23rd, 2009, 12:20 AM   #24
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How do people currently get from the mainland to Venice?
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Old September 23rd, 2009, 09:54 AM   #25
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If you came from west (e.g. Milan), take A4 (dir. Venice/Trieste), than A57, follow directions to "Venice" (SR11 - Regional Road n°11) than cross "Ponte della Libertà" (Liberty bridge) and you are in Venice

From south (Bologna, Rome), A13, A4, A57, than the same streets

From East (Trieste) A4 (dir. Milan), A57, than the same streets

From North (Treviso) A27, A57, than the same streets

If you arrive by plane, there're shuttle bus and waterbus (expensive!) from Venice Airport to Venice

If you arrive by train, the last stop is "Venezia S.Lucia". You are inside Venice
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Old September 23rd, 2009, 11:31 AM   #26
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there is a bridge to some parkings located on islands:

http://maps.google.ch/maps?f=q&sourc...09602&t=h&z=17

There are roads up to Piazzale Roma and Rampa San Basilio. From there there are no more roads and you can only walk or take boats.

There are some islands south of Venice that can be reached by car using ferries:

http://maps.google.ch/maps?f=q&sourc...19205&t=h&z=16

The railway ends in Piazzale Roma. Buses are replaced by boats that follow regular lines and timetables:

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Old September 23rd, 2009, 06:17 PM   #27
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If you come from the airport, definitely take the waterbus. Yes, it is expensive, but you will find the Venetians to be complete Vultures as far as your wallet goes anyway. It is the only city I believe on the planet which has different public transport fares for locals and foreigners (fair and complete rip off). They even have different menu's in the restaurants. One for locals (fair prices that compare with the rest of the developed world) and one for tourists (rip off). They sometimes even have segregated rooms in restaurants to keep the dirty foreigners from their lovely locals. For a city that owes it's entire survival and existence today to tourists, instead of welcoming them, it treats them with complete and utter contempt.

That said, still take the boat. It is a beautiful way to arrive at Venice and how one is supposed to arrive. For all it's offensive attitude to tourists, it is still one of the most amazing and beautiful places on the planet. And it is not supposed to be reached by bus. Besides, the Venetians of the past were amazing architects, designers and builders. The Venetians of today are not. You can see this by how incredibly horrible the mainland urban area is compared to the islands. No matter how much I think about it, I simply cannot conceive how a people who once could create possibly the most beautiful and stunning urban landscape on the planet, turning what was once nothing more than a muddy swamp into a work of art itself, can now build possibly the ugliest city in the developed world - mainland Venice - and choose to live there rather than the islands themselves.

Being ripped off aside, if you have any heart or soul you will fall in love with Venice. Photos never do this city true justice. In reality it floats on the water like no other place I have seen. And there is something so special whilst walking the empty streets at night, through the narrow lanes, with only your footsteps and the sound of lapping water to be heard.

Just two tips here.
1) Avoid at all costs, St Marks Square, with the exception of a quick fleeting visit. It is crowded with tourists, 95% of who would never move beyond the closest of lanes surrounding it, or the Rialto Bridge. Visit this square and then spend the rest of your time in every other part of Venice. It is much nicer, not crowded with tourists and the real parts of the city.
2) Buy a good guide which has a good recommendation such as the Time Out Guides. if you just "pop" into a restaurant you will probably walk into a tourist trap. But get a guide that directs you to the better places. I had the best Seafood Pasta in my entire life in Venice in a restaurant hidden away on a street without a name, overlooking the lagoon which I would never have found without the Time Out guide. I have never, and never expect to have a nicer Seafood Pasta.
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Old September 23rd, 2009, 11:13 PM   #28
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Very interesting!!!
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Old September 24th, 2009, 12:28 AM   #29
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@Justme

You know probably a lot more about Venice than me as I had been there only for a single day and of that day I spent half the time on Murano. I thought it to be much cozier and you could flee the tourist crowds much easier there by simply leaving the main canal.

I think the rip off with with the public transport basis on the concept that you need a long time ticket to get decent fares. Of course thats only feasible if you are staying long term. If there would be open double pricing, I would go to court in Luxembourg, that would be obvious discrimination.

I think one has to understand those people who still dare to live in the old town. It certainly is very hard to live a normal live there amongst these gigantic tourist masses. Of course the city lives from these tourists, but at the same time are the dimensions of the tourism already far beyond what would be good for a town of this size.

Regarding Mestre. I do not think you do it justice. It seems to have a lovely main square and while the modern parts may not win a prize for beauty, they do not seem that terrible at all.
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Old September 24th, 2009, 06:49 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slartibartfas View Post
@Justme

You know probably a lot more about Venice than me as I had been there only for a single day and of that day I spent half the time on Murano. I thought it to be much cozier and you could flee the tourist crowds much easier there by simply leaving the main canal.
I also found Murano to be lovely. But don't discount the rest of Venice. As long as one stays away from St Marks square, the tourists almost completey disappear and it becomes a wonderful experience.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Slartibartfas View Post
I think the rip off with with the public transport basis on the concept that you need a long time ticket to get decent fares. Of course thats only feasible if you are staying long term. If there would be open double pricing, I would go to court in Luxembourg, that would be obvious discrimination.
It really is double pricing. They don't actually advertise the fact they are ripping off tourists. But on the public transport website you can see the differences in prices for residents or non residents.

Azienda Consorzio Trasporti Veneziano
I think one has to understand those people who still dare to live in the old town. It certainly is very hard to live a normal live there amongst these gigantic tourist masses. Of course the city lives from these tourists, but at the same time are the dimensions of the tourism already far beyond what would be good for a town of this size.
[/quote]
Not really. Tourists are generally dumb, uneducated animals. 95% never leave the area around St Marks Square (or Rialto Bridge). When in Venice, you can find this and it is so amazing. St Marks Square is completely saturated by tourists. Two or three streets away and there are almost none at all. Rialto Bridge also has quite a few and the link roads in between. But 95% of the rest of Venice is not inundated by tourists

Azienda Consorzio Trasporti Veneziano
Regarding Mestre. I do not think you do it justice. It seems to have a lovely main square and while the modern parts may not win a prize for beauty, they do not seem that terrible at all.[/QUOTE]
Maybe I was a bit hard on that city. I still find it horrible compared to Venice, and still wonder how on earth they could do it so wrong when they had something so right sitting next to them. But I guess it isn't maybe as bad as I portrayed.
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Old September 24th, 2009, 12:11 PM   #31
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Several years ago I got the lucky opportunity to know Venice very well thanks to some friends of mine livin' there (Venetians? No, Armenians )
I experienced the city not like a tourist but by the inhabitants point of view

And I got something to say about the points you're debating...
First of all: the streets packed of tourists are really a problem for people livin' in Venice. Obviously any Venetian knows very well shorcuts through unknown (by tourists) streets, but in some points you ought to walk in messy streets just because you have no choice. For istance if you have to cross on the opposite side of the Canal Grande, there are only 4 bridges (the fourth one is the recently built Calatrava's); the most jammed of all is Rialto one, and sometimes you simply have to walk on it, packed with tourists
To be completely honest there are even points where you can bring a gondola to cross Canal Grande in few dozens of seconds paying a low fare. They're used pratically just by Venetians: they're the only gondole (pl. of gondola) in Venice which make a true public service and not a touristic one

Then, a suggestion for visitin' Venice: if you don't want to go to Murano, Lido, Giudecca or any other place you have to bring a boat to reach it, try to walk instead of bringing a 'vaporetto'
And in any case if you ought to, try to avoid Canal Grande lines, even express lines: they're terribly slow (due to traffic and the conformation of the canal)
Last suggestion: don't follow the crowd; open a Venice map (if you don't know the city yet) and try to identify the shortest way... you will be going to get lost for sure (no way: it is impossible not to get lost the first times ) but you'll experience a true exploration of the city
Very last suggestion: in your Venetian exploration take care to what Venetian call sotoporteghi (sing. sotoportego), little 'aisles' through the buildings joinin' the various roads. They're essential for a succesful shortcut
Unforunately for you there is nothing as easier as missing 'em
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Last edited by GENIUS LOCI; September 24th, 2009 at 12:21 PM.
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Old September 24th, 2009, 01:30 PM   #32
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Getting lost in Venice is one of it's many charms. I consider myself pretty damn good with a map, but no matter how detailed a map I bought, and I kept buying more detailed ones as the earlier ones just were not good enough, I was still defeated. I never found a map, no matter how detailed, which showed every street or lane. So, if you are walking and following a map and you plan to turn left on the 5th street. Don't expect there to actually be 4 streets before it ;O)

But as I said, that was part of the charm and fun of the city. To really get lost no matter how hard one tries. I guess the best option maybe the GPS map on your phone if it still works in the narrow lanes.

The tip with the Gondola to cross the Grand Canal is very good. I think the "ferry" version was called a traghetti. They are much simpler than the tourist ones. And only cost 50cents to cross. Used many by locals who pay 50times less than the tourists (yes, free for them from memory). But it's a good way to get across.

You stand on these traghetti though, so make sure you get a good footing.
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Old September 24th, 2009, 03:33 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Justme View Post
Not really. Tourists are generally dumb, uneducated animals. 95% never leave the area around St Marks Square (or Rialto Bridge). When in Venice, you can find this and it is so amazing. St Marks Square is completely saturated by tourists. Two or three streets away and there are almost none at all. Rialto Bridge also has quite a few and the link roads in between. But 95% of the rest of Venice is not inundated by tourists
Maybe my experience was misleading. After leaving the railwaystation we just headed into a random direction and went on. Somehow we had the fealing however that there were still a lot of tourists in each and every street we chose. That could have been by accident, even though we rather chose those streets that seemed to be not the main corridors.

Well, to be honest I do not remember the details so well anymore. We also came across the main building University of Venice, I sincerely hope that the students overpower the tourists in terms of ambience and also number.

Still I got the impression that we had to go very far until we had the feeling that we were in an area where tourists where a rarer sight. I keep remembering it as the most touristy city I have been to. But maybe this has to do with the fact that a lot of the city life is taking place actually on the mainland.



Quote:
Maybe I was a bit hard on that city. I still find it horrible compared to Venice, and still wonder how on earth they could do it so wrong when they had something so right sitting next to them. But I guess it isn't maybe as bad as I portrayed.
Well, I can not really judge as I have seen it only a glimpse long from the train and what you can find on the Internet. Its certainly not the most beautiful city of Italy but then, Venice would be hard to beat anyway.
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Old September 24th, 2009, 06:10 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slartibartfas View Post
Maybe my experience was misleading. After leaving the railwaystation we just headed into a random direction and went on. Somehow we had the fealing however that there were still a lot of tourists in each and every street we chose. That could have been by accident, even though we rather chose those streets that seemed to be not the main corridors.

Well, to be honest I do not remember the details so well anymore. We also came across the main building University of Venice, I sincerely hope that the students overpower the tourists in terms of ambience and also number.

Still I got the impression that we had to go very far until we had the feeling that we were in an area where tourists where a rarer sight. I keep remembering it as the most touristy city I have been to. But maybe this has to do with the fact that a lot of the city life is taking place actually on the mainland.
What time of the year did you go? I have to admit I wasn't there in the middle of summer. Which I guess is like many places, when most of the tourists come.

We really were not surrounded by tourists in most parts of the islands.

But it is true that tourists are what keeps this city alive today since most of the population have left the beautiful islands for the somewhat ugly mainland.
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Old September 24th, 2009, 07:49 PM   #35
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On mainland you can have a car, a large and warm house (in Venice normally houses are little and wet) with lift and all modern facilities; no problems to go to buy supplies and to carry 'em home, no problems to make a furniture delivery, possibly to reach the workplace is easier (once many people were emploied in industry, and still today a not negligible percentage do; and all factories are on mainland) and so on

Plus: if you own a house in Venice buying a hugly but new house on mainland and to sell or rent the old one could be an investment
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Old September 25th, 2009, 03:01 PM   #36
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Quote:
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What time of the year did you go? I have to admit I wasn't there in the middle of summer. Which I guess is like many places, when most of the tourists come.
I am not sure anymore but it was probably early or middle September. To clarify Venice was not packed full with tourists at that time but still for my personal feeling overrun. But I may be quite sensible in this regard.

Quote:
We really were not surrounded by tourists in most parts of the islands.

But it is true that tourists are what keeps this city alive today since most of the population have left the beautiful islands for the somewhat ugly mainland.
Well in most cases you can't make a living from beauty alone.
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Old November 19th, 2009, 01:22 AM   #37
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Interesting discussions going on. I'm Italian, and I'm also totally appalled by these schemes that guarantee lower prices for locals in public transportation (the thing of dual-priced menus are more of a legend though, tourists and locals just don't go to the same places). I can understand and accept the rationale behind month or annual passes with huge discounts. However, I cannot accept facilities that, on the same basis (single trip, for instance) give discounts only to locals.

If I had the money and pattience, I'd set up a fight in Italian courts against this practice. It's disgunsting, illegal and discriminatory.
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Old November 19th, 2009, 06:36 AM   #38
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THE DESIGN OF THE STATION IS COOL!
I CAN'T SEE SOME OF THE PICTURES~
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Old November 19th, 2009, 09:49 AM   #39
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http://www.funivie.org/cantieri/thumbnails.php?album=98
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Old November 20th, 2009, 11:49 PM   #40
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[IMG]http://i48.************/15n3l8y.jpg[/IMG]

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www.asmvenezia.it
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