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Old September 12th, 2009, 05:10 PM   #41
DiggerD21
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Furniture shops and stores like Media Markt have their own home delivery service (sometimes free of charge). No need to take a taxi.
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Old September 12th, 2009, 09:17 PM   #42
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In Innsbruck one of the major supermarket chains (MPREIS) offers a home delivery service together with the local public transport operator IVB. The system works really simple:

You rent a box (refundable deposit), shop right in the store for a value of 35€ or above and it gets delivered home to you the same day for 2,5€ (5€ the first time). If your groceries add up to more than 75€ delivery is free. And the delivery times are in the late afternoon/evening, so you know when to expect them.

Personally I don't need that, as I have two stores next to my apartment and I always shop in small amounts.
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Old September 13th, 2009, 07:25 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DiggerD21 View Post
Furniture shops and stores like Media Markt have their own home delivery service (sometimes free of charge). No need to take a taxi.
Year, but the times I have tried them they never had a customer friendly delivery service. Never on a Sunday, which is the logical day as most people can be home, and they tend to just give a "morning" or "afternoon" at best, or specify a whole day when you need to be at home and off work. If you know a shop that will guarantee a one or two hour window on the day of your choice, please let me know.

So why not just bargin the taxi fair out of the goods you are buying? You can take it home straight away.
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Old September 13th, 2009, 07:51 PM   #44
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Never on a Sunday, which is the logical day as most people can be home
Working on sundays is illegal in Germany without special permission, which can only be given in such fields where e.g. machines have to be operated 24/7.

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If you know a shop that will guarantee a one or two hour window on the day of your choice, please let me know.
Furniture? Try Segmüller, they provided me with a three-hour window on a day of my choice for delivery. Seven weeks later. Free delivery and assembly, but then of course most of their stuff runs for four- or five-digit sums...
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Old September 13th, 2009, 09:05 PM   #45
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Working on sundays is illegal in Germany without special permission, which can only be given in such fields where e.g. machines have to be operated 24/7.
Not quite true. In fact, everything and anything can work on Sundays in Germany except for shops.
* Cinemas
* Pubs
* Cafes
* Restaurants
* Television and Radio
* Internet
* Factorys
* Offices (yeap, you do find office people going in on Sundays to finish off work)
* Taxis
* Public Transport
* Airports etc
* Construction (though only usually when they are behind schedule due to union costs)
* Museums
* Gallerys
* Bakeries
* Entertainment parks
* Hotels

The list goes on. As I said, pretty much any industry except shopping

Quote:
Originally Posted by kato2k8 View Post
Furniture? Try Segmüller, they provided me with a three-hour window on a day of my choice for delivery. Seven weeks later. Free delivery and assembly, but then of course most of their stuff runs for four- or five-digit sums...
See my earlier post. I bought my sofa at Segmüller which was a designer one and certainly not cheap. But they wouldn't give me notice on what day they would deliver until that day and then I had to leave work in the morning and wait all day until they arrived.

I had to wait three weeks. You had to wait seven weeks! Did they have to cut down the trees first?
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Old September 13th, 2009, 09:43 PM   #46
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The list goes on.
Actually it doesn't. And there's a couple items in that list that are already outlawed (office work for example, factories that work on any scheme other than 24/7 triple shift), or need special individual permission for every sunday (e.g. construction).

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You had to wait seven weeks! Did they have to cut down the trees first?
Yes. Individual order, delivery within 10 days of finished production. Like most of what Segmüller sells.
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Old September 13th, 2009, 10:52 PM   #47
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It's usually not really worth the money. If you use these car-sharing schemes only for your weekly shopping trip, expect to usually shell out at least 30-40 Euro per month. Plus a safety deposit and initial charges that when combined you could almost buy a cheap old used car for (local endorsed scheme wants 460 Euro at the beginning, 230 Euro if you hold an annual PT pass, most of that in a safety deposit).
Unfortunately there is no car sharing scheme yet in my town but i've been looking into the ones elsewhere in the UK and they don't seem that expensive, £4 per hour for a car including petrol if you pay a £50 annual membership or £5 per hour without the membership fee, no upfront charges or deposit required.
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Old September 14th, 2009, 06:29 AM   #48
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1. Backpack.
2. Plastic/reusable bags with handles, typically from the establishment from whence purchased.

If it's clothes i usually wear it or pop it in the backpack, if it's food depends on the food and where i'm going. Other stuff usually goes in its own bag or the backpack.

- A
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Old September 14th, 2009, 06:35 AM   #49
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Quote:
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Actually it doesn't. And there's a couple items in that list that are already outlawed (office work for example, factories that work on any scheme other than 24/7 triple shift), or need special individual permission for every sunday (e.g. construction).
It is extremely easy for companys to get 24/7 working permission. The company I worked at did and operates 24/7.

And if special permission is needed for working on Sundays in offices, every single company in Germany ignores this. Office workers will pop in on the weekends when needed to finish off jobs or complete deadlines. This doesn't happen often, but it still happens. This is in complete contrast on the other hand with shops which you do not see just open on a Sunday because they have a bit of extra stock to sell.

And yes, the fact is that nearly any other business or industry can work on a Sunday except shops. I mean, you wrote your reply to this thread on a Sunday and I think you would be surprised how many businesses in Germany your text went through for it to be posted and read here even though the server where the text is stored is in another country.

The sad thing about it which makes this German law so ridiculous is that any shop in Germany can trade on a Sunday on the internet. So the staff needed to maintain the web servers, routing, bank servers and associated telecoms are working that day. But a normal shop can't which gives unfair advantage to online shopping. Of cause, Germany being Germany, you can't have that delivery on the Sunday. But if what you are purchasing is something like an online ticket, software, films or music to be downloaded etc.

Essentially, the German government believes it is essential to allow porn companies to sell porn in Germany 24/7, but if you need food for your children you are restricted ;O)
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Old September 15th, 2009, 11:19 AM   #50
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Thats called granny-tank here,because they use it as a tank on the bus!
LOL! In that case I must use mine like the Italian Army in North Africa in WW2 - I pull it behind me as defence against being attacked from the rear whilst retreating.

In Australia the shopping mall is entirely car-based. The car culture is so entrenched there is often not a pedestrian entrance to the shopping centre! So what a pleasure it was living in Prague for 3 months and doing the shopping entirely by excellent public transport (and I'm talking about a family, not individual). I think the only significant adaptation is that you do the shopping in smaller lots so that you can carry it. With a car you tend to do it in warehouse quantities in the car boot, less frequently. Frankly I prefer the tram and metro.
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Old September 15th, 2009, 03:05 PM   #51
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In Australia the shopping mall is entirely car-based. The car culture is so entrenched there is often not a pedestrian entrance to the shopping centre! So what a pleasure it was living in Prague for 3 months and doing the shopping entirely by excellent public transport (and I'm talking about a family, not individual). I think the only significant adaptation is that you do the shopping in smaller lots so that you can carry it. With a car you tend to do it in warehouse quantities in the car boot, less frequently. Frankly I prefer the tram and metro.
Quite true.

Once I went to visit a mall in the southern part of Sydney (not too far south though) which specialized in furniture stores. The concept was actually quite good. A whole pile of furniture stores under one roof.

I arrived by bus and walked around it before I realized there was no actual pedestrian entrance. Seriously! The only way I could enter the mall was to walk down the road ramp into the underground car park. The oddest thing, was this was still in a fully urban part of the city. It's not like it was an out of town mall where no houses or other dwelling existed.

I guess they thought everyone buying furniture would turn up in a car. But this was rubbish since all the companies had a good home delivery service, and there were still small items you could take home on the bus, or medium sized items where a taxi would do.

But then again, Australia has often done some odd things like this such as suburban streets without even footpaths ;O)
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Old September 15th, 2009, 05:03 PM   #52
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You can even find that in Germany to some extent.

The Famila Center mall in Heidelberg was built in the late 70s with a three-level parking garage next to it. The main entrance directly faced into this parking garage. There were two side entrances from other parking lots that a pedestrian could use though. One of these was basically the entrance from the employee parking lot, the other passed by a sex shop...

The mall was renovated a few years ago to fix that - one of the two side entrances was built up as a full entrance (second one completely removed), although most people still enter directly from the parking garage. Problem is that this new "main entrance" is on the opposite side from any public transport stops - so anyone who goes there by public transport has to enter the parking garage (after crossing a highway), and enter the mall through there...
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Old September 15th, 2009, 05:28 PM   #53
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Yes I do.
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Old September 15th, 2009, 11:30 PM   #54
Justme
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You can even find that in Germany to some extent.

The Famila Center mall in Heidelberg was built in the late 70s with a three-level parking garage next to it. The main entrance directly faced into this parking garage. There were two side entrances from other parking lots that a pedestrian could use though. One of these was basically the entrance from the employee parking lot, the other passed by a sex shop...

The mall was renovated a few years ago to fix that - one of the two side entrances was built up as a full entrance (second one completely removed), although most people still enter directly from the parking garage. Problem is that this new "main entrance" is on the opposite side from any public transport stops - so anyone who goes there by public transport has to enter the parking garage (after crossing a highway), and enter the mall through there...
Sounds like bad planning is quite universal. I do wonder how some people and companies can be so narrow minded.
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