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Old June 12th, 2010, 05:16 AM   #21
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Ruta Nacional PE-001S / Vía Panamericana Sur near Asia






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Old June 12th, 2010, 05:18 AM   #22
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Ruta Nacional PE-001S / Vía Panamericana Sur near Rocio del Mar




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Old June 12th, 2010, 05:18 AM   #23
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Ruta Nacional PE-001S / Vía Panamericana Sur near San Vicente




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Old June 12th, 2010, 05:48 PM   #24
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Quote:
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Ruta Nacional PE-001SE near Colca Canyon

I doubt that this is RN1. The "zona di vicuñas" and the landscape remind me of RN30 between Arequipa and Juliaca. RN1 does not cross vinuña territory (and does not come really close to Colca Canyon either).

More Peru photos on my Panoramio page.
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Old June 14th, 2010, 09:23 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by -Pino- View Post
I doubt that this is RN1. The "zona di vicuñas" and the landscape remind me of RN30 between Arequipa and Juliaca. RN1 does not cross vinuña territory (and does not come really close to Colca Canyon either).

More Peru photos on my Panoramio page.
The description of the picture said "on the way to the Colca Canyon" so I assumed it was the route that goes from El Pedregal to Chivay (both in the Department of Arequipa). I found different source maps to get the number of this route, but it appears that many of the routes have been renumbered recently, so I chose the most recent map:

Route is RN001E per this 2009 Official Map of the Department of Arequipa by the Peruvian Ministery of Communications and Transportation

Route RN001SE per this 2008 Official Map of the Department of Arequipa by Provias Peru

Route RN001SJ per this 2007 Official Road Map of Peru by Provias Peru.
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Old June 14th, 2010, 11:46 AM   #26
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Ruta Nacional PE-020A in Junin




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Old June 14th, 2010, 11:50 AM   #27
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This route is part of the Vía Marginal de la Selva - an international (Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia) network of roads that circles the western end of the amazon basin.

Ruta Nacional PE-005N / Vía Marginal de la Selva in Huanuco




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Old June 14th, 2010, 10:26 PM   #28
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This is one of three main longitudinal (north-south) roads in Peru. The Longidutinal de la Sierra runs in the interandean valley between the Western and Central Andean Cordilleras. The other two longitudinal roads are the Longitudinal de la Costa PE-001 (i.e. Panamerican Highway along the coastline) and the Longitudinal de la Selva PE-005 (i.e. Via Marginal de la Selva on the Amazon basin).

Ruta Nacional PE-003N (Longitudinal de la Sierra) in Junin









Last edited by JuanPaulo; June 15th, 2010 at 01:38 AM.
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Old June 15th, 2010, 01:42 AM   #29
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Ruta Nacional PE-001N / Vía Panamericana Norte near Sullana




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Old June 15th, 2010, 11:49 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JuanPaulo View Post
The description of the picture said "on the way to the Colca Canyon" so I assumed it was the route that goes from El Pedregal to Chivay (both in the Department of Arequipa).
I'm afraid you misassumed there ... This can't be the El Pedregal to Chivay road, because that is a dirt road (see the detail on the Provias map). The quickest route to Colca Canyon is via Arequipa. From there, you would turn off from RN34 at Patahuasi. That route is almost fully tarmac, so therefore the likely position of this photo. Also because it matches with my recollection of the scenery of RN34.

Regarding the number of El Pedregal to Chivay, road numbers are hardly ever signposted in Peru, so you have to rely on administrative sources rather than signs along the road. Whatever the number of the road, I doubt whether it will appear anywhere along the route.
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Old June 15th, 2010, 10:10 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by -Pino- View Post
I'm afraid you misassumed there ... This can't be the El Pedregal to Chivay road, because that is a dirt road (see the detail on the Provias map). The quickest route to Colca Canyon is via Arequipa. From there, you would turn off from RN34 at Patahuasi. That route is almost fully tarmac, so therefore the likely position of this photo. Also because it matches with my recollection of the scenery of RN34.

Regarding the number of El Pedregal to Chivay, road numbers are hardly ever signposted in Peru, so you have to rely on administrative sources rather than signs along the road. Whatever the number of the road, I doubt whether it will appear anywhere along the route.
Thank you for the description Pino. I'm jealous that you have had the chance to be there and I will go with your recollection of the route and change it to RN34N.

By the way, in looking at the latest official map of Arequipa (the one from the Ministry of Communications and Transportation), I noticed that the portion of RN001E between Chivay and AR113 (north of RN034N) is paved

In regards to the signage of route numbers, the UNASUR and IIRSA have put strong pressure for countries to sign roads by their numbers so many roads have been signed appropriately in the last few years
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Old June 15th, 2010, 11:22 PM   #32
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Good news. But as my visit to Peru was October 2009, results have been scarce so far. I remember one trailblazer near Cusco, one road number on a sign at the end of the autopista south of Lima, and for the rest some references at indicators above toll booths. So lots of room for improvement.

When Peru does start signposting numbers, it might also be good news to improve numbering system. Route 34 being split in 34A, 34B and 34C is bad enough. Numbering all branches of RN1 as 1A, 1B etc. is worse.

Thanks for all your collecting work in South America by the way. Makes up for some impressive reports.
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Old June 16th, 2010, 02:07 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by -Pino- View Post
When Peru does start signposting numbers, it might also be good news to improve numbering system. Route 34 being split in 34A, 34B and 34C is bad enough. Numbering all branches of RN1 as 1A, 1B etc. is worse.
I know, I think the peruvian road labeling is very complicated. The fact that roads have north and south variants (north and south of Lima, respectively) already makes it confusing. For example, one must say: "going north on the north panamericana" or going south on the north panamericana" is too confusing. And then they add the A, B, C, etc variants and branches on top of it!
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Old June 16th, 2010, 02:10 AM   #34
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This route is a variant of the Panamerican Highway. Esentially, it creates a loop that serves coastal communities (usually beach resort-towns to Lima) while the Panamerican Highway runs a bit inland. The dryness of the landscape does not stop to amaze me!

Ruta Nacional PE-001NA / Variante de Pasamayo near Ancón in Department of Lima










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Old June 16th, 2010, 11:21 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JuanPaulo View Post
I know, I think the peruvian road labeling is very complicated. The fact that roads have north and south variants (north and south of Lima, respectively) already makes it confusing. For example, one must say: "going north on the north panamericana" or going south on the north panamericana" is too confusing. And then they add the A, B, C, etc variants and branches on top of it!
In my experience, people will just speak of the Panamericana without mentioning the "Norte" or the "Sur". The difference is there for technical reasons, i.e. making sure that the authorities have one unique km-value for any stretch of road. Without the suffix N or S on the Panamericana, you would be left with two places known as km10, one 10 kilometers North of the Carretera Central and one 10 kilometers South of the Carretera Central. East-West routes (e.g. RN34 from the Pacific coast to Brazil) face a similar issue, as they are constituted by separate roads that all have their independent mileage. Hence RN34A, RN34B and RN34C for that particular route. And then there are the branch routes to add to insult ...

If I were to implement the route numbers in the Peruvian signage system, I would first get rid of the suffixes for branch roads. Those routes would receive three-digit numbers instead, e.g. RN101 instead of RN1NA. The then remaining main routes would just be signposted by their number without the current suffix, e.g. RN34 instead of RN34B. That obviously leaves the mileage issue described above. The solution would be that the current suffix N, S, A, B or C goes into the km-values of a particular section of a route. So what is now RN34B km10 becomes RN34 km10B. Doing so permits the Peru government to retain their unique km-values, but permits drivers to drive on the basis of a clear route numbering system.

Let's see where it all ends up...
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Old June 16th, 2010, 10:18 PM   #36
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I had heard about how the km posts worked (i.e. km 0 at Lima). They should just get rid of the N or S in the route number like you said but for all routes including the single digit ones and just call them, for example, RN-001 km-10N or km-10S instead of RN-001N km 10 and RN-001S km 10! Coming to think about it, I think the system is very centralized around Lima and hence the km 0 location there (luckily Lima is somewhat in the middle of the country in the north south direction). Another alternative would be to re-assign km posts from north to south starting in the Ecuadorian border and ending in the Chilean border.

It is very common for many countries in Latin America to have many portions of highway with the same label. In Ecuador for example Route E35 north and south of Quito is known as the Panamericana Norte and Panamericana Sur, respectively. However, in cities geographically south of Quito, like Ambato and Cuenca for example, the same route is also known as Panamericana Norte and Panamericana Sur depending of whether you are north or south of the city! This condition creates a lot of confusion and hence the transit and infrastructure agencies are fading out this historical road naming in favor of the alpha-numerical nomenclature.

In Ecuador, for example, all routes were renumbered (odd numbers from north-south running roads labeled in increasing number from east to west and even numbers for east-west running roads labeled in increasing number from north to south) so that a coherent nomenclature could be used throughout the country . All km post were renumbered with km 0 starting at the north or east end of all roads. Peru should follow and do the same in my opinion.

Last edited by JuanPaulo; June 16th, 2010 at 10:24 PM.
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Old June 17th, 2010, 05:03 PM   #37
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The numbering grid is already in place in Peru, so it's only about a way of getting rid of those weird suffixes. Moving km0 of all routes could be an option, but I think that that would leave you with a costly operation whilst just adding N, S, A, B or whatever suffixes to the entire km-values would also do the trick without any difficulty.

When at it, I would also slightly renumber the current routes 1, 3 and 5 into 11, 33 and 55. This would leave room to give routes of lesser importance that also run North-South their own number rather than an even number or a branch number of the current 1, 3 and 5.
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Old June 17th, 2010, 09:34 PM   #38
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Ruta Nacional PE-003S from Juliaca to Puno (note lake Titicaca)




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Old June 18th, 2010, 11:41 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by -Pino- View Post
Peru-Brazil: that's the combination of Routes 26 and 34 to the Brazilean border. Route 26 comes from the Nazca region (port of San Juan, also access to Lima) and Route 34 comes from the Arequipa region (also access to port of Ilo). Both routes are in a good state when you are closer to the Peruvian coast. The sections in the Amazone flatland of Peru are open, but an upgrade would be most welcome. On the Brazil end, you'd use existing connections to Manaus and Belem. You could also connect to Rio, but using this connector from Peru to Rio would be silly. You'd use the connector through Bolivia instead, which has a good connection with Peru Route 3 (and thus with Pacific ports).

I think there are three official interoceanic and/or bioceanic corridors in Peru/Brazil: the Carretera Interoceánica Norte (North Interoceanic Highway), the Carretera Interoceánica Central (Central Interoceanic Highway), and the Carretera Interoceánica Sur (South Interoceanic Highway).




I will describe the Carretera Interoceánica Norte and the Carretera Interoceánica Central in later posts. For now, I'll stick to the Carretera Interoceánica Sur. The Carretera Interoceánica Sur actually has 3 branches that start on the Pacific Ocean and converge at the Inambari Bridge near the locality of the same name in the tri-border region of the Departments of Cusco, Puno, and Madre de Dios. From Loromayo to the Brazilian border the highway consists of a single branch. The three branches from the Pacific Ocean to Inambari are as follows:

North Branch: I think this branch starts as PE-030 (not PE-026 as you mentioned) in Port of San Juan de Marcona on the southern end of the Department of Ica. Starting at Nazca, the route follows PE-030A through the Department of Ayacucho and Apurimac. At Abancay in the Department of Apurimac, the route changes to PE-003S to Cusco. Just past Cusco, at the city of Urcos, the route changes once again to PE-0030C. The route continues as PE-0030C all across the Departement of Cusco until it reaches Inambari. From Inambari the route continues across the Department of Madre de Dios to the Brazilian border at Iñapari.

Central Branch: This branch starts as PE-034 at Port of Matarani in the Department of Arequipa. At the city of Arequipa, the route changes to PE-034A and extends to the Juliaca in the Department of Puno. From Juliaca the route changes yet one more time to PE-034B. Finally, the route reaches Inambari where it changes one last time to PE-0030C to the Brazilian border.

South Branch: This last branch starts as PE-036 in the Port of Ilo in the Department of Moquegua. Not to far from Ilo, the route changes to PE-001S in the direction of the city of Moquegua. At the city of Moquegua, the route changes to PE-036A. The route changes next to PE-036B which takes it all the way to the city of Puno in the Department of the same name. From Puno, the route changes to a northbound direction via PE-003S to Juiaca. From there on the branch follows the same route as the central branch.




The Brazil portion of the Carretera Interoceánica Sur starts as BR-317. The route follows the Brazil/Bolivia border until it reaches the town of Rio Branco in the State of Amazonas. From Rio Branco, the route follows BR-364 to Porto Velho in the State of Rondonia. From there on there are two main routes - one north to the fluvial port of Manaus and to the Amazon river waterway thereon and one south to The Port of Santos via Cuiaba and Goiania.

Last edited by JuanPaulo; June 19th, 2010 at 01:14 AM.
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Old June 21st, 2010, 10:32 PM   #40
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I found some pictures of the Interoceánica Sur
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