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Old October 14th, 2009, 06:22 PM   #1
DarJoLe
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Bromley-by-Bow Tesco redevelopment | Tower Hamlets | Proposed

Tesco town planned next to 2012 site
Abul Taher
14.10.09

Tesco is building a new “supermarket suburb” next to the Olympics site which will house hundreds of families and come with its own high street, park, library and primary school.



The 11-acre site will have a 24-hour Tesco Extra hypermarket at the centre, with 18 other stores that will make up a pedestrian high street.

There will also be a 90-bed budget hotel on the site, and Tesco will build a library, called Idea Store, for the community. It will create a local park on the bank of the river Lea, and a plaza area for residents.

Tesco will also part-build 460 homes in the area by securing “costly” planning permission for them. Social housing bodies are expected to build the homes, but Tesco may retain the freehold.

The retailer will also buy land and get planning permission for a primary school for hundreds of pupils. The school, next to its store, will be built and run by Tower Hamlets council. But, again, Tesco may retain freehold of the land.

The news comes after its chief executive Terry Leahy described Britain's school system as “woeful”. A spokesman said the new project in the Bromley-by-Bow area will produce at least 200 additional jobs in the hypermarket alone.

“The design of the store, community benefits and the phasing of the development have been designed to meet local needs,” he added

Tesco, which would not reveal the cost of the scheme, held a two-day public consultation with residents last month, which it said was “positive”. It is likely to submit formal planning applications to London Thames Gateway Development Corporation by the end of this month.

Tim Archer, a Tory councillor and parliamentary candidate for Limehouse and Poplar, said: “There are a number of benefits.” But he added: “Tesco dominates Tower Hamlets, in that there are already 10 stores built in the last two or three years.”
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Old October 14th, 2009, 06:31 PM   #2
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Number 9 is the tower proposed as part of the St Andrews site on the western side of the Blackwall Tunnel Approach, but number 7 is a new proposal on this side of the road.

The straight 'street' runs from the Bromley-by-Bow station underpass, which is to be enlarged, to the front of Three Mills, which opens the view of the Grade-1 listed mill from the station.
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Old October 16th, 2009, 11:02 AM   #3
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Great location right on the canal. Will have to go past next week and get a better look at the current location.
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Old October 17th, 2009, 05:55 PM   #4
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Is this close to the Stratford City proposed CBD? Could someone post a map showing the distance relation of the two? Cheers
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Old October 17th, 2009, 06:16 PM   #5
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Not the best map but gives an idea of how close Bromley-by-Bow is to Stratford.

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Old October 17th, 2009, 06:37 PM   #6
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this is a bit of a guess but from what DarJole says the site is here (not sure about the northern edge but the other three sides are pretty well defined by Blackwall Tunnel Northern Approach, the Railway line and the river Lea )



Part of the site was subject to a planning application in 2004;

http://194.201.98.213/WAM/showCaseFi...ber=PA/04/1055





which was slated by the mayors office for its "unacceptably poor quality" - in fact it was criticised on almost every aspect! So let's hope nothing of that scheme survives into the current one;

http://www.london.gov.uk/mayor/plann..._e3_report.pdf
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Old October 20th, 2009, 04:10 PM   #7
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The current store at the site is dreadful and attracts too many hoodies. It attracts many shoppers from Stratford High Street inc people from Central House.
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Old December 4th, 2009, 09:48 PM   #8
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ColladoCollins’ massive regeneration scheme for a Tesco store at Bromley-by-Bow, London, was this week submitted to Tower Hamlets planning officials

Completion of Tesco’s proposed East London scheme is scheduled to take place in time for the 2012 Olympic Games. It will replace an existing Tesco supermarket with a new superstore, a hotel, an ‘Idea Store’ community library, 403 residential units and 18 shops.







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Old December 5th, 2009, 11:46 AM   #9
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i would highly recommend the nearby canal walk, and the Three Mills island right next to the proposed development has some great old buildings.

Quote:
Today there is a visitor centre and several of the most elegant waterside buildings anywhere in London. The most important is House Mill (1776). It is Britain's oldest standing mill - and there has been a mill of some description on the site since before the time of the Doomsday Book.
from http://www.waterscape.com/in-your-ar...e-mills-island
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Old December 5th, 2009, 12:46 PM   #10
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from a recent walk to Three Mills island:
image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


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image hosted on flickr
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Old December 5th, 2009, 09:20 PM   #11
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Oast houses?
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Old December 6th, 2009, 01:13 AM   #12
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They used to grind grain which was used to distil alcohol for the west end gin palaces.
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Old December 6th, 2009, 05:30 AM   #13
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The new Bournville or Saltaire. Fantastic ambition! However the high rise element needs some work. It's too dark, is separated from its base, and the windows are a bit on the small side.
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Old December 16th, 2009, 01:22 PM   #14
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Documents online

http://194.201.98.213/WAM/weeklyApplications.do
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Old May 13th, 2010, 03:02 PM   #15
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CABE Design Review
Tesco store, Bromley-by-Bow (2)
Tower Hamlets

A new district centre including a replacement Tesco store together with other shops or community uses; a hotel; a primary school; 460 new homes; a new public park and riverside footpath; and connections across the A12 motorway. Designed by Collado Collins.

7 May 2010
Planning reference: PA/09/02574

We also reviewed this scheme on 3 February 2010.



Summary
We applaud the brief for the project, including large and small-scale retail, residential and hotel, community uses and public space, that proposes an appropriate mixture of uses for a successful regeneration project. We also welcome the aspiration to create an exemplar store design. In our view, any large and complex superstore-led regeneration project should be genuinely plan-led. However, whilst we acknowledge the planning and design guidance underpinning this scheme (Land Use and Design Brief), the project is driven primarily by the Tesco-led investment opportunity. We are concerned that the size and positioning of the superstore proposed on this site compromises the chances of this development integrating with the surrounding community and regenerating the area.

If the supermarket is driving the redevelopment of the area, we think it is essential that it is based on a convincing masterplan. Regrettably, this scheme lacks a clear masterplan idea to inform the location and character of the different elements; as currently proposed, they do not work well together to create a convincing new district centre and residential community. The site layout lacks coherence and is problematic at its edges. The conflict between traffic and the character of the residential streets and public spaces is also unresolved. We support the aspiration to create east-west connections through the site, but further work is needed to integrate the development into the existing neighbourhood. The architectural approach is disjointed and divides the scheme into distinct quarters which, at times, conflict with one another. A convincing case has not been made for the tall building, in terms of its location, uses or the quality of the architecture; this can only be made in the form of a detailed planning application.

We are therefore unable to support the current hybrid planning application. It is disappointing that CABE was not consulted at an earlier stage when we could have contributed more constructively to the design development process.

Edges
The strongly defined boundary conditions of a major road, railway and river provide the opportunity to create a coherent masterplan. However, the proposed relationship of built form to these edges is, at times, ill-considered and fragmented. In our view, the new district centre should have a strong visible urban character and presence on this major highway. The revised scheme’s response to the A12 is much improved on the original submission. We welcome the introduction of active ground floor uses to this frontage and the decision to bury the petrol filling station within the residential block. However, our overriding concern about the suitability of a tall building in this location remains. We are also concerned that the footprint of the retail shed infringes on the river frontage. It pinches the river walk, making it potentially unnerving and even unsafe for pedestrians unable to see beyond the corner of the projecting service yard. A smaller store would allow a more positive relationship to its context, not least by releasing valuable park space on the river walk.

Streets and spaces
We are concerned by the impact of the site layout on both the character of the streets and the quality of the living environment. Whilst we think the perimeter block now proposed is a considerable improvement on the original proposal, a large proportion of the homes, including the tower, are located directly overlooking heavily trafficked roads or the expansive roof of the store. The local authority should satisfy itself that the block configuration proposed has the capacity to provide homes with good access to daylight. The nature of the new streets was not clear from the material provided, Lea Avenue in particular. It will need to be demonstrated that its intended London street character will not be undermined by its lack of context or the amount of traffic generated by the supermarket carpark and servicing entrance that terminates it.

The intensity of vehicle movements through the site and the points where this conflicts with pedestrians at different times of day needs to be clearly understood and addressed in the proposals. We are particularly concerned by the conflict between school children and cars and delivery vehicles at the intersection of Lea Avenue and Imperial Street. Although we support the use of the site section to create level access to the carpark, the design of this junction will need to be carefully handled to ensure that Lea Avenue functions primarily as a pleasant pedestrian route to school, rather than as a carpark entrance. The character of Imperial Street will be defined by the presence of the large footprint store and the degree of permeability and activity along its street frontage. The small-scale independent retail and community uses fronting the new street and square have, however, the potential to create a high street character. The nature of this street and Imperial Square needs to be explored in both day and night time conditions.

Connections
Making safe and attractive pedestrian connections back to existing communities to the west of the A12 will be essential to ensure that it functions as a viable district centre. We would expect more significant improvements to the critical underpass connection than are currently proposed to create a more generous route activated by retail concessions. The all-movements junction will also be essential to integrate this new community with the wider neighbourhood, and the routes to and from the new at grade crossing need further thought.

We continue to question the decision to structure the new district centre around the major boulevard on axis with Three Mills. The strong axial route it sets up is a rather heavy-handed response to the charming historic asset and ends in an anti-climax without being able to cross over the river directly. Making straightforward connections through the site to Three Mills and the Lea Valley Park beyond will be critical in generating the animation needed to make the park work and should form the brief for its detailed design. The involvement of a skilled landscape architect will be essential to ensure the park achieves its potential to become a valued riverside green space at detailed design stage.

Tall building
We remain unconvinced by the justification for the tall building that a ‘marker’ is required to locate the new development; based on the masterplan diagram, the key junction within the scheme is at the intersection of Lea Avenue and Imperial Street. The residential tower is sited where noise, air quality and outlook will be at its worst next to the A12. The local authority should also consider the impact of overshadowing on the homes and public space to the northeast. The location of residential entrances will also need careful consideration to ensure that they are overlooked. Based on the current proposition, we think the development would feel more in tune with its river context and the listed buildings without a tall building.

We are also concerned that the tall building now falls within the outline planning submission. The joint CABE and English Heritage Guidance on tall buildings states that outline planning applications for tall building proposals are appropriate ‘only in exceptional cases where the applicant is seeking to establish the principle of a tall building as an important element within a robust and credible masterplan for an area to be developed over a long period of time’. Our reservations concerning the masterplan underscore the need address such a high profile element of the development in a detailed planning application. Notwithstanding the shortcomings of the masterplan, the relatively short build–out period of three years would still warrant a detailed submission at this stage. To protect their brand, Tesco will need to retain control of the build and spatial standards when developers take forward the hotel and residential elements. Embedding the standards required in the current hybrid planning application is an opportunity for both client and planning authority to ensure quality is achieved in subsequent phases.

Supermarket
In terms of the store design, there is strength in the idea of a wave-form roof in relation to the open space of the river. We continue to think it would be valuable for a store of this size to employ a green roof to act as an urban heat sink as well as visually enhancing the building. As an exemplar store for Tesco, there is an opportunity to exceed current regulations and to commit to a high performance passive building. We also remain concerned about the store’s blank frontage to the railway, which seems to have been ignored altogether. We would have expected a more thoughtful and imaginative response to this boundary to have been developed.

Although we think the proposal to build the primary school against the end elevation of the store could work in principle, we continue to have reservations about this, particularly regarding access arrangements. How the frontage of the school addresses the street, activates the park and achieves safe access, particularly out of school hours, will need to be carefully considered. The relationship between the store’s service yard and the school will also need careful attention to ensure the school does not suffer from its proximity to this potentially disruptive neighbour. In our view, the school would also need to respond to the strong roof form of the supermarket in a more convincing manner than proposed in the indicative drawings. If the local authority considers the location of the primary school to be satisfactory, it should assure itself that the design codes submitted will allow sufficient control over such issues and secure a high standard of design across the development.

Whilst we maintain our support for the redevelopment of this site to provide a new district centre for Bromley-by-Bow, given the shortcomings of the current proposal we think that it should not be approved in its current form.
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Old May 13th, 2010, 03:02 PM   #16
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Tesco blasts Cabe in development row
13 May 2010

Tesco has accused Cabe of ignoring local residents after the design watchdog savaged its plans for a development in east London for a second time in three months.

The scheme, designed by Collado Collins in Bromley-by-Bow, is one of the supermarket giant’s new-style developments involving homes and community spaces as well as a new store at its core.

The architect made changes after Cabe complained in February that the scheme had an “incoherent” layout and residents would look out on gridlocked traffic.

In its latest review, Cabe again said the site lacked coherence and a clear masterplan and highlighted a string of failures — from traffic problems to the supermarket’s size.

It added: “It is disappointing that Cabe was not consulted at an earlier stage when we could have contributed more constructively.”

The £62-billion-turnover supermarket giant said it would press on and that Cabe was out of touch.

“Our consultation included local residents, community groups and the area’s elected representatives,” a spokesman said. “The response has been overwhelmingly positive. Many local people see the scheme as a valuable opportunity to maximise jobs and training.”

The retailer said it had made “significant changes” to the £160 million development and added: “We believe we have fulfilled the Development Corporation’s land use and design brief’s aspirations. Many of the points made by Cabe are contrary to the brief.”
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Old May 14th, 2010, 06:12 PM   #17
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from what i understand the application has been effectively split into two bits now and a new application went in for the store in april.
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Old May 28th, 2010, 11:51 AM   #18
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Boris and 'conservation bodies' have sent this to a PI.
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Old May 28th, 2010, 03:13 PM   #19
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First reaction is that it is like some strange dystopian near-future. Though thinking about it, this isn't a new idea. As people have mentioned, Bournville and Saltaire.

Then I think about Fordlandia...

Opinions will obviously be tainted by the stigma against Tesco which has proliferated over recent years.
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Old May 29th, 2010, 12:14 AM   #20
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I still think having the river frontage taken up by a supermarket is truly awful planning. Tescos should of been in the centre of the site hidden within the mass of housing not taking centre stage as a massive ugly shed with tall residential buildings looking down on it. Hardly desirable.
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