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Newcastle Metro Area For Newcastle, N Tyneside, Gateshead, S Tyneside, South Northumberland



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Old January 15th, 2010, 11:19 PM   #541
Newcastle Historian
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Graham56 View Post
I`m sure i`ve seen this photo before and think the building to the right is John Dobsons house, later to become the Oxford Galleries, opposite the Portland PH on Newbridge Street.Or where the Portland used to stand.
I think you may well be correct Graham56.

The location of the house with the adverts, as JAYPKAY analysed it from that 'For Sale' sign (Oxford Street and New Bridge Street) is exactly where "The Oxford Galleries" (and its many subsequent reincarnations) stands . . on New Bridge Street, opposite where the Portland was, and on the plot of land in between Higham Place and Oxford Street.

See my 1950s MAP, below . .



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Old January 15th, 2010, 11:40 PM   #542
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Yeah, that seems about right.

image hosted on flickr


It appears to actually be where that square building adjoining what was Ikon is now, with Oxford Street running up to the left (top centre/right of above picture), but seems to have a storey missing. The brickwork on the building on the left of your photo seems to match too, with the 2 rows of lighter bricks above the ground floor and one sticking out at the top. Chimney matches too. What do you reckon? Ha, I'm a sad fecker, but I love this sort of sleuthing!

And the ornaments above the windows match this too (in red, on the left)...

Last edited by nadj; January 15th, 2010 at 11:53 PM.
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Old January 16th, 2010, 12:00 AM   #543
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Originally Posted by nadj View Post
Yeah, that seems about right.

It appears to actually be where that square building adjoining what was Ikon is now, with Oxford Street running up to the left (top centre/right of above picture), but seems to have a storey missing. The brickwork on the building on the left of your photo seems to match too, with the 2 rows of lighter bricks above the ground floor and one sticking out at the top. Chimney matches too. What do you reckon? Ha, I'm a sad fecker, but I love this sort of sleuthing!
Me too, as it happens!

So, I think we have it pretty well sorted now, but the below article (from Vanessa Histon's 2007 book 'Keys to the CITY') makes it even more certain.

In the 'Adverts Photo' (earlier) . . in addition to the adverts and the For Sale sign, there is also a sign near the gate, that says . .

H DONNELLY.
BEDS 6.


The below article now reveals that a Mr Henry Donnelly ran these same premises (Dobsons house/Oxford Galleries/Ikon) as a Lodging House, after Dobsons time . . case closed!


Last edited by Newcastle Historian; January 16th, 2010 at 11:06 AM.
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Old January 16th, 2010, 12:12 AM   #544
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Ha ha, "just like Donnelly's lodging houses"! Must remember to use that expression to describe my own flat in future...
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Old January 16th, 2010, 01:22 PM   #545
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HOW things have changed . . .



I don't think there is any other area of the Centre of Newcastle where you can still see so many of todays familiar buildings, in an earlier era photo, that has actually changed SO MUCH in appearance and usage, as this area has!

This photo is only from the early 1980s!

The Malmaison Hotel, Pitcher & Piano, Millenium Bridge, many large new office blocks . . and a whole new way of life.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; January 16th, 2010 at 02:25 PM.
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Old January 16th, 2010, 07:57 PM   #546
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nadj View Post
Yeah, that seems about right.

image hosted on flickr


It appears to actually be where that square building adjoining what was Ikon is now, with Oxford Street running up to the left (top centre/right of above picture), but seems to have a storey missing. The brickwork on the building on the left of your photo seems to match too, with the 2 rows of lighter bricks above the ground floor and one sticking out at the top. Chimney matches too. What do you reckon? Ha, I'm a sad fecker, but I love this sort of sleuthing!

And the ornaments above the windows match this too (in red, on the left)...
That is amazing, so the building from the original picture with the advertisements on still stands!! (With an extra floor added), i had no idea when i guessed at the location that the building to the left of Oxford Galleries was the actual building.

Great aerial picture of the area, i hadn't realised that the laing was attached to the library. That explains the odd look of the side of the building today. Shame its gone.

Last edited by JAYPKAY; January 16th, 2010 at 08:02 PM. Reason: spelling error
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Old January 17th, 2010, 12:03 AM   #547
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image hosted on flickr


it is depressing that the dense and complex network of georgian streets in this part of town were just swept away in a few decades, to be lost forever. i hate the loss of individual buidlings - the library for instance, but it is worse when whole swathes of streetscape are flattened and rearranged.
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Old January 17th, 2010, 12:36 PM   #548
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I was reading yesterdays Chronicle and it had a photo from 1973 of a group carrying coffins through the city centre signalling the 'death of good architecture in Newcastle'. They were protesting about how Newcastle was being buried under a mass of steel and concrete.

Im sure historian will know more about this.
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Old January 17th, 2010, 12:51 PM   #549
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image hosted on flickr


it is depressing that the dense and complex network of georgian streets in this part of town were just swept away in a few decades, to be lost forever. i hate the loss of individual buidlings - the library for instance, but it is worse when whole swathes of streetscape are flattened and rearranged.
Maybe.

But this was an era when rates of car ownership were going through the roof. Suppose the city centre layout today were exactly as it were in 1960. You'd have the Royal Arcade (even though it was seriously under-patronised and consisted largely of thrift-type outlets), the old Central Library and a host of other buildings.

But no Central Motorway, no St. James' Boulevard and, in all likelihood, a seriously economically depressed city centre devoid of any commerce bar retail.

I work for a business in central Newcastle that depends on good road access to be able to go and see clients and vice versa at relatively short notice. I wouldn't want to be sitting in traffic on Percy Street for an hour just to get on to the Great North Road. Indeed, if that were the case, then we wouldn't be located in the city centre at all. I don't mean to sound callous there, but it's a reality.

Perhaps the question ought to be one of thinking about what the realistic alternatives to the redevelopment of the 1960s and 1970s were.
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Old January 17th, 2010, 12:53 PM   #550
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Quote:
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I was reading yesterdays Chronicle and it had a photo from 1973 of a group carrying coffins through the city centre signalling the 'death of good architecture in Newcastle'. They were protesting about how Newcastle was being buried under a mass of steel and concrete.

Im sure historian will know more about this.
I'm not sure if I do know about this incident specifically, but from what I remember this is the sort of protest that would have (almost certainly) been organised by, who were founded in 1971/72:

SOC'EM . . .









Last edited by Newcastle Historian; January 17th, 2010 at 01:26 PM.
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Old January 17th, 2010, 01:56 PM   #551
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Originally Posted by wj_gibson View Post
Maybe.

But this was an era when rates of car ownership were going through the roof. Suppose the city centre layout today were exactly as it were in 1960. You'd have the Royal Arcade (even though it was seriously under-patronised and consisted largely of thrift-type outlets), the old Central Library and a host of other buildings.

But no Central Motorway, no St. James' Boulevard and, in all likelihood, a seriously economically depressed city centre devoid of any commerce bar retail.

I work for a business in central Newcastle that depends on good road access to be able to go and see clients and vice versa at relatively short notice. I wouldn't want to be sitting in traffic on Percy Street for an hour just to get on to the Great North Road. Indeed, if that were the case, then we wouldn't be located in the city centre at all. I don't mean to sound callous there, but it's a reality.

Perhaps the question ought to be one of thinking about what the realistic alternatives to the redevelopment of the 1960s and 1970s were.
I can see both sides of the argument here .. Althought many streetscapes have been lost to the CME (Jesmond Rd being the worst example) it wasn't as destructive as a lot of people think (look at the Diversion issues posted by NH) however .. economics aside, the main issue I have with the CME and indeed the Boulevard is how they restrict any city centre growth and further compact the already 'small' city centre.
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Old January 17th, 2010, 04:28 PM   #552
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it wasn't just the motorway that ate away at the streetscape - it didnt actually go through the area pictured above. other building schemes, for bewick court, the library, newcastle building society hq, john dobson street etc ultimately did more damage. though personally i think the motorway has worsened access to that part of town rather than improve it. the motorway as i see it wasnt about improving access TO the city centre but more of a 'bypass' so that traffic could be diverted AWAY from town, thereby reducing congestion and making a more pedestrian friendly environment. there are positives to that, it was built in the times when the a1 went straight up northumberland street and there needed to be an alternate access. the later and superior western bypass made the central motorway redundant as a national route though. and the unforeseen consequence has been to block off access, and an incremental coherent streetscape, from the east. as such, everything east of pilgrim street is a 'dead end' that doesnt have any sort of traffic flow that would increase vitality. for me, the main, but not sole, reason why this area has been suffering for so long is down to the motorway.
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Old January 18th, 2010, 10:00 AM   #553
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Campaign aims to restore historic Newcastle organ
Jan 18 2010 by Liz Walker, The Journal



A "FORGOTTEN" Newcastle organ could be one of the world's greatest if it was restored, say campaigners.

The imposing Grade II listed instrument would have pulled in the crowds to Newcastle City Hall when it was first installed in 1928, a year after the venue opened its doors.

But today the 82-year-old organ, constructed specially for the City Hall by County Durham firm Harrison and Harrison, is tired and worn due to a lack of care and attention.

Now recitals are experiencing a revival, with cities such as London, Liverpool, Birmingham and Manchester all bringing their organs back to life.

And the Newcastle & District Society of Organists (NDSO) believe the same should be done in Newcastle.

Next month they are asking leaders at the city council to come up with a strategy to restore this piece of musical heritage.

“This is the Rolls Royce of organs,” said City Hall manager Peter Brennan.

“If we had it in full working order it would be the most significant organ in the country and one of the most important in the world.

“People would come from miles around to hear and play it.

“There are only two others like it in Europe and three in the world.”

The NDSO have been holding events to try and get people hooked on organ music.

In the latest recital around 30 youngsters from across the region came to the City Hall to try out the instrument for themselves.

The society hope to hold more events of this kind in the future. Mr Brennan said: “It is being increasingly used as people are becoming aware of it again.

“Schools have been holding events in the hall and using the organ, which is brilliant.

“We would like to see the council support a kind of educational programme that would build on this interest.”

Peter Chatfield, vice president of the NDSO said: “Most organs are in churches but the range of organ music is quite phenomenal. They used to be played in cinemas and dancehalls.

“Other cities around the country are restoring them but Newcastle seems to be lagging behind.”

A council spokeswoman said: “We have invited members of the NDSO to meet Coun Pauline Allen next month to talk about the city hall organ.

“We recognise the importance of the organ and are looking forward to discussing its future.”

http://www.iao.org.uk/newcastle/ndso_ch.html
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Old January 19th, 2010, 04:36 PM   #554
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Does anyone know about a couple of buildings in newcastle that were adorned with decorative pagodas on top of them to impress the japanese emperor when he came to buy warships from elswick shipyard,i'm sure i heard that story some years ago or am i imagining it?
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Old January 19th, 2010, 04:48 PM   #555
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that is supposedly the business centre overlooking the mouth of the ouseburn. not sure how true the tale is re the emperor, though high level japanese diplomatic missions visited Newcastle on numerous occasions - the bafuku and iwakura missions for instance. However these came before the Ouseburn School opened in 1893. It is more likely it was built like this for Japanese busissmen/govt officials who made frequent trips to tyneside for trade and shipbuilding purposes, not to mention japanese sailors who were often stationed in newcastle to wait for their ships to be completed at our shipyards.

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here's some info on the Iwakura Mission:

The Iwakura Mission arrived in London in August 1872 and split into smaller groups to visit Liverpool, Manchester, Glasgow, Edinburgh and Newcastle upon Tyne.

In Newcastle upon Tyne they arrived on October 21 staying in the Royal Station Hotel where they met the industrialist Sir William Armstrong. It had been ten years since the Bakufu mission had visited the town.

"The gentlemen were attired in ordinary morning costume and except for their complexion and the oriental cast of their features, they could scarcely be distinguished from their English companions." (Newcastle Daily Chronicle, October 23, 1872)

They visited the Elswick Engine and Ordnance Works with Captain Andrew Noble and George Rendell, inspected the hydraulic engines and the boring and turning departments and examined the construction of Armstrong and Gatling guns. They also visited the Gosforth Colliery, descending into the mine itself. Further visits were made to Bolkcow and Vaughan Iron Works in Middlesbrough and iron-ore mines in Cleveland. The Newcastle and Gateshead Chamber of Commerce arranged a river trip on the Tyne, taking in the New Tyne Bridge, the Tharsis Sulphur and Copper Company Hebburn and the Jarrow Chemical Works.
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Old January 19th, 2010, 04:52 PM   #556
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thanks,there is a building with a similar "pagoda" at the top of bath lane just off the boulevard i wonder if that was for the same thing.?
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Old January 19th, 2010, 04:56 PM   #557
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^good spot. looking at it on google maps it looks like it was designed by the same architect as there's similar features, detailing. though being next to chinatown the japanese bits couldve been added later? Maybe Historian knows more...

btw there are also 19th century japanese graves in the west end cemetery.
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Old January 19th, 2010, 05:36 PM   #558
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this is the bath lane building:

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Old January 19th, 2010, 05:42 PM   #559
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Newcastle has a disproportionately high number of domes, cupolas, and similar structures IMO
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Old January 19th, 2010, 05:53 PM   #560
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Newcastle has a disproportionately high number of domes, cupolas, and similar structures IMO
These amongst many others . . .



I will look, but I don't think I have anything further on the Bath Lane one . .

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