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Old September 6th, 2010, 04:50 PM   #1161
Newcastle Historian
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Newcastle Chronicle Ltd
How a Major Newspaper was produced in the 1930s.

Part 10 - 'Bookkeeping, Insurance, Leader Writers, Artists/Cartoonists, and finally 'Some Interesting Facts''.










and finally . . .




Previously, in this series . . .

Part 1 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1061 - Introduction, and The Front Office.
Part 2 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1075 - The Reporters Room.
Part 3 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1087 - The Composing Room.
Part 4 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1101 - The Library, Index and File Rooms.
Part 5 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1107 - The Telephone, Telegraphic and Sub-Editors Rooms.
Part 6 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1109 - The Press Photographers, Process, Stereotype and Stereo Jobbing Rooms.
Part 7 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1118 - The Machine Room.
Part 8 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1127 - The Despatch, Transport, Circulation and Excursion Departments.
Part 9 : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1149 - The Editorial & Works Entrance, Directors Lounge, Chronicle Hall, Canteen, Chronicle Club.

.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; September 7th, 2010 at 12:14 AM.
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Old September 8th, 2010, 08:34 AM   #1162
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THE LOSS OF OUR STREETS, IN THE WEST END . . .

I remember having a long exchange about this a while back, I think it was on the 'West End Projects' thread.

A number of us were saddened by the (almost total) loss of streetscape in the inner West of Newcastle, and how this almost disconnected the area from the City Centre, whereas it all used to be (simply) 'all joined up', with normal civilised streets of buildings.

I used to be able to walk into the City Centre, down endless normal streets and roads, from my parents home in Crown Street, Elswick (near Westgate Hill School) so I know what it used to be like . . and what it is like now.

I have just stumbled across this PHOTO, that really illustrates this actually happening. In this photo (from 1963) you can see the Elswick and Scotswood areas along Scotswood Road, lierally "in transition".

In this photo there are areas of traditional streets left, then there are some brand new tower blocks, built at 'strange angles' (contrary to the existing street-plan) with just 'space' around them, and then there are some partly-demolished areas with flat spaces waiting for more new-builds.

You can actually see the 'old street houses' just (only just) clinging on (sometimes with nothing now behind them) along the side of Scotswood Road, nearest to the City Centre.

It is (to me) so sad to see THE BATTLE underway, and clearly being lost . . .



.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; September 8th, 2010 at 08:57 AM.
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Old September 8th, 2010, 09:46 AM   #1163
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Very sad. Needless destruction just like Shieldfield.
Also now gone from that picture is Elswick Hall. And more terracing is still disappearing to this day just to be reclaimed by nature and further disconnect the West End from the city centre.
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Old September 8th, 2010, 10:20 AM   #1164
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. . . and also now gone, is the body of St Stephen's Church (Clumber Street, left hand side of photo, half way up). The bell tower and spire still stand, oddly sans church.
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Old September 8th, 2010, 10:30 AM   #1165
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What's the large white building in this photo, just beneath Elswick Hall? Looks like a theatre from here, but I'm probably mistaken!

.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; June 21st, 2013 at 12:21 AM.
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Old September 8th, 2010, 10:54 AM   #1166
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Angel of the South View Post
What's the large white building in this photo, just beneath Elswick Hall?

Looks like a theatre from here, but I'm probably mistaken!


It was the "Savoy Cinema" (so nearly a theatre!!) which was on the corner of Westmorland Road and Beech Grove Road (which led down from Elswick Road).

It was a cinema made out of an old church (the 'Beech Grove Road Congregational Church', built 1896) that had been partially painted all white!

It was very cold in there in winter, I can tell you, as it was one of my local cinemas as a small child.

It has since been demolished and is now just an overgrown space with advertising hoardings.

Here it is (painted white on the front as you can see) taken in 1968 . .



.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; June 21st, 2013 at 12:00 AM.
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Old September 8th, 2010, 10:55 AM   #1167
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This is part of the discussion about this same subject that we had previously, on the 'West End Projects' thread. Makes for an interesting read . . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by Seamaster View Post
The single biggest positive step NCC could make for that part of town would be physically reconnecting it to the city centre in some way. The simple fact is that for all the redevelopment that has taken place there, everything west of the Boulevard "feels" rougher than town, just because of being so cut-off. I don't know what the answer is, but simply tarting up Cruddas Park was never going to be it.
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Originally Posted by AngerOfTheNorth View Post
I find that the main problem with the West End is how fractured and low density it feels. You can walk to almost anywhere in the East (Sandyford, Heaton, Byker, possibly Walker) and North (Jesmond, Gosforth etc) of the city from the centre without having to be on a road that isn't a well defined street more than a small handful of times. The city seems to be continuous in that respect and therefore feels connected.

To the West you seem to be able to walk through huge tracts of undefined space (Elswick and Cruddas Park in particular having a lot of this), which like Seamaster's point about the boulevard, makes you feel very disconnected.

If the council looks to start filling in the empty and unused/underused sites closest to town and builds outwards, creating well defined routes to the centre, it would make the West End a much more attractive place to live.
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Originally Posted by Newcastle Historian View Post
Agree entirely with that, and yet it is only a relatively recent situation.

Until the mass destructions of "streets" and replacement of them with a combination of "nothing" and a "big road" and a "one-off buidling" or a "wall" or a "building facing in a different direction to the previous streetscape" (or whatever) that was planned to happen and then happened in the late 60s and early 70s and "contunuously thereafter" - Western Newcastle was every bit as 'connected' together and to the City Centre as North and East Newcastle still is.

To explain that rather long sentence!

When I lived in Elswick in the 60s as a child, I could just walk down decent civilised streets, continuously, down into the City Centre. You would come down (say) Elswick Road (and you could go off in any direction down real joined up "streets", but you could also keep on going up to 'the Big Lamp').

Then, on past the Big Lamp down Westgate Road (the West Road and Elswick Road 'merged' at the Big Lamp heading into town) past an increasing number of shops (including the, still there, bike shops) and into the early parts of the City Centre. You would pass the three cinemas (The Pavilion, The Stoll, The Essoldo) all very civilised . . and then you were into the City Centre.

I chose the 'Elswick Road/Wesgate road' route, but you could use Wesmorland Road (next one South) or Scotswood Road (next one South again) and you could divert off at right angles all the way along ANY of them, and you would still be going down normal civilised STREETS!!!!

OK, it was never a rich/middle class area and a lot of the housing needed replacing (no doubt) but they didn't have to DESTROY the STREETS.

This was a continuous City, it could so easily have remained that, it SHOULD have remained that.

For goodness sake, the MESS it is now in, the separation and the tracts of 'undefined space' are everywhere . . you cannot even walk the short distance to the ARENA (very close to the City Centre) without feeling it!

It is (purely) a 'planned' and 'planning' disaster, continuously (not just 60s and 70s) over the last 40 years or so. It is almost beyond saving. What is worse, I am pretty certain that this separation/devastation/undefined space issue, is not realised /noticed where it matters, and that N O T H I N G is currently being 'planned to be done' to repair it. Nothing.

Rant over . . (not worth ranting, nothing will happen)
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnypd View Post
number of posts that hit the nail on the head there.

Westgate Road is the only 'route' out of the centre that feels like a real city street with a bit of life to it and this stops as soon as you hit the Tower Blocks at the top of the hill. There is some more urbanity and activity further west around the hospital, wingrove road etc, but atm there's a big gap between this and the city. Flatten the huge area of council housing at Arthur's Hill, reconnect the two with dense housing on legible, coherent streets and it would help to spread the positives qualities of the city centre westward.

Scotswood Road is, sadly, probably too far gone now to attempt this. And it's only not because of Cruddas Park, but the more lowrise council flats/maisonettes nearer the city centre, and the College, which treats Scotswood Road as nothing more than a carpark entrance.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcastle Historian View Post
My parents Map of 1950s Newcastle (that I used on the 'Historic Newcastle' thread to show the pre-CME City Centre) now really clearly shows the route I used to walk, that I describe in the above post . . . with normal streets all-the-way!!
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Originally Posted by johnnypd View Post
^wish it still looked like that Historian.

. . . and this photo along Westgate Road, captures what we have lost :

image hosted on flickr
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Old September 8th, 2010, 11:11 AM   #1168
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcastle Historian View Post
It was the "Savoy Cinema" (so nearly a theatre!!) which was on the corner of Westmorland Road and Beech Grove Road (which led down from Elswick Road).

It was a cinema made out of an old church (the 'Beech Grove Road Congregational Church', built 1896) that had been partially painted all white!

It was very cold in there in winter, I can tell you, as it was one of my local cinemas as a small child.

It has since been demolished and is now just an overgrown space with advertising hoardings.

Here it is (painted white on the front as you can see) taken in 1968 . .

This being the site today. Why oh why demolish a building if you're not going to build something in its place
Unless something WAS built, deemed crap, and then demolished. Again.
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Old September 8th, 2010, 07:24 PM   #1169
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How many times would this caught fire had it been left standing?

The West end has a real problem with arson.
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Old September 8th, 2010, 11:27 PM   #1170
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcastle Historian View Post
THE LOSS OF OUR STREETS, IN THE WEST END . . .

I remember having a long exchange about this a while back, I think it was on the 'West End Projects' thread.

A number of us were saddened by the (almost total) loss of streetscape in the inner West of Newcastle, and how this almost disconnected the area from the City Centre, whereas it all used to be (simply) 'all joined up', with normal civilised streets of buildings.

I used to be able to walk into the City Centre, down endless normal streets and roads, from my parents home in Crown Street, Elswick (near Westgate Hill School) so I know what it used to be like . . and what it is like now.

I have just stumbled across this PHOTO, that really illustrates this actually happening. In this photo (from 1963) you can see the Elswick and Scotswood areas along Scotswood Road, lierally "in transition".

In this photo there are areas of traditional streets left, then there are some brand new tower blocks, built at 'strange angles' (contrary to the existing street-plan) with just 'space' around them, and then there are some partly-demolished areas with flat spaces waiting for more new-builds.

You can actually see the 'old street houses' just (only just) clinging on (sometimes with nothing now behind them) along the side of Scotswood Road, nearest to the City Centre.

It is (to me) so sad to see THE BATTLE underway, and clearly being lost . . .



.
Is that some sort of artists impression drawing overlaid on the photo in the 10 o clock position (far left, slightly above middle)?

Looks odd.
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Old September 8th, 2010, 11:40 PM   #1171
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I have now studied an enlargement of the photo, and I don't think it is anything 'overlaid' on the photo - though I can see what you mean!

They just appear to be VERY newly laid (clean) concrete type roads, and if you look at some of the roads near and through the new flats in the centre of the photo, they are much the same in colour and appearance, for the same reason.
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Old September 9th, 2010, 12:12 PM   #1172
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Quote:
Originally Posted by battlefieldjohn View Post
How many times would this caught fire had it been left standing?

The West end has a real problem with arson.
I'm sure it had been on fire at least once before it was demolished.

You are right about the Arson problem in the West End though, particularly the Elswick, Benwell and Scotswood areas.

Until last July, I lived in the lower end of Grainger Park Estate, just off Elswick Rd, and within the previous 18-24 monhts, there were numerous house, shop and car fires either in my own street, or within a few yards.

I'm pretty certain who some of the culprits were, but as with any crime, its catching them in the act thats the problem.

Its sad as I'd lived there all my life, but I'm now so glad I no longer live in Benwell.
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Old September 10th, 2010, 12:18 PM   #1173
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Blue plaques map shows off famous spots
Sep 9 2010 by Linda Richards, Evening Chronicle



PLAYING was thirsty work, back in 1933.

So with no cans of fizzy drinks to be had these children pause for a welcome drink of water (see PHOTO).

Carter’s Well, on Durham Road, Low Fell, Gateshead, was the main water supply for the area until the late 19th century.

People would take buckets to the well and bring them back full to be used for drinking and cooking.

After falling into disuse, the ancient well was restored by Gateshead Council in 1994 and to mark its importance as a part of the borough’s colourful history it was awarded a Blue Plaque.

The plaque is one of 29 put up since the 1970s to celebrate Gateshead’s glorious past.

They are sited around the borough to commemorate historical important people or events linked to a particular place.

They recognise the achievements of some of the world-famous figures who came from Gateshead and mark influential buildings and events.

Famous authors, inventors and musicians have all made the borough their home, and now a leaflet has been produced giving details of all the plaques with handy maps showing people how to find them.

“From legendary industrialists like Sir Joseph Swan and William Clarke of Clarke Chapman fame to feminist Emily Davies and even Daniel Defoe there have been some remarkable people associated with Gateshead over the years,” said Gateshead Council cabinet member for culture Coun Linda Green.

PLAQUES to famous people include:

Robinson Crusoe author Daniel Defoe (1660-1731)

The Blaydon Races composer "Geordie" Ridley (1835- 1864)

Stained glass designer William Wailes (1808-1881)

The Salvation Army founders William and Catherine Booth, and the Dodds sisters, who founded The Little Theatre.

Singer-songwriter Alex Glasgow (1935-2001)

Playwright Katherine Sowerby (1876-1970)

Geo-scientist Arthur Holmes (1890-1965)

William Clarke (1831-1890), founder of Clarke Chapman Engineering Works

Electric lightbulb inventor Sir Joseph Swan (1828-1914).

Places include: the Gateshead Dispensary; the River Police Station at Pipewellgate; the Tyne Bridge and High Level Bridge; also the High Level Bridge Lamps; the summerhouse at the former Stella Hall Estate, Blaydon; Ryton and Crawcrook Pinfold ancient animal enclosures.


FULL ( THREE PAGE ) ARTICLE HERE - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/north...2703-27234399/
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Old September 10th, 2010, 12:54 PM   #1174
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NH, thanks for the article about the Gateshead plaques, for anyone else interested Brian Pears has got photographs of many of them here:

http://www.bpears.org.uk/Misc/Gateshead_Plaques/
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Old September 11th, 2010, 02:17 AM   #1175
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Quote:
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NH, thanks for the article about the Gateshead plaques, for anyone else interested Brian Pears has got photographs of many of them here:

http://www.bpears.org.uk/Misc/Gateshead_Plaques/

Alf, the above is an excellent site!!

I have added it to Section 9 of our Websites Thread.

If you know of any other websites, that are not already listed, please let me know.
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Old September 11th, 2010, 04:04 PM   #1176
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.
We have already (just last week) seen the below two photos of 'Cowens Monument', with (in the second one) the very prominent CROSS HOUSE in the background . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcastle Historian View Post
.
Cowen's Monument - Then and Now . . .





NOW

Here are a couple more photos of Cross House (with Cowens Monument in there too!). They are both HISTORICAL photos, for one reason or another . . .


1 - The devastating fire of 1919, when ten people died . .



2 - The LAST photo of Cross House taken from high up in Westgate House in 2008, just before Westgate House was demolished . .


.
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Old September 11th, 2010, 08:56 PM   #1177
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I was searching through "Images of England - Newcastle Upon Tyne" compiled by Peter Hepplewhite from the Tyne & Wear Archives for an elusive photograph of the city centre when I stumbled across some pictures of Shumac Street which was mentioned earlier in this thread. I checked and discovered that they had already been posted. However on the previous page of the my book was this:



The Gables was later converted in to a private clinic and just happens to be where I was born. It's a small world as the saying goes.

Last edited by alf stone; June 17th, 2014 at 10:14 PM. Reason: Restoring link
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Old September 12th, 2010, 09:22 PM   #1178
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Quote:
Just had to post this video courtesy of 'British Pathe' and the 'See Britain From The Air' series

At about 4'25" and 6'45" there are some great arial panning shots of Newcastle during the 20's

http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=29206
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Originally Posted by AngerOfTheNorth View Post
Great shots, although I struggled to place the first one
The first shots to me looked very much like the old Tyne Dock.
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Old September 12th, 2010, 11:33 PM   #1179
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Cheers Hollow Man, I must admit that I had assumed that it was the Walker ship yards, but it didn't look right in terms of the bend of the river...
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Old September 13th, 2010, 02:30 AM   #1180
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Just spotted these images on the Newcastle City Council flickr account. Interesting now/then comparison.

image hosted on flickr

Haymarket 1966

image hosted on flickr

Haymarket 2010, in the snow.

.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; February 23rd, 2013 at 08:36 PM.
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