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Old April 4th, 2012, 04:36 PM   #181
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Washington Miners’ Heritage Memorial targeted by thieves
by Rachel Wearmouth, The Journal, April 4th 2012



A MONUMENT TO the region’s proud mining history has been targeted by metal thieves just days after it was unveiled. The attempted theft of part of the Miners’ Heritage Memorial came after it was opened to the public at Front Street, Concord, in Washington, on Saturday.

The statue depicts a miner with his wife and son, and is the product of years of careful planning by Washington’s Miners and Community Heritage Group, Sunderland City Council and other community groups. Overnight on Tuesday, opportunist criminals tried to saw off the legs of the boy in the statue in an attempt, it is believed, to sell the metal on for scrap. The thieves almost succeeded, sawing two thirds of the way through.



Yesterday the heritage group’s secretary, Derek Sleightholme, compared the crime to “digging up a grave”. He said: “It was unveiled on Saturday and it was a magical, really good social event. But this morning, just after breakfast, I got a phone call from a colleague to tell me the news.

“All of Washington is up in arms about it. Everyone is very, very annoyed. It is like digging up a grave or pushing a gravestone over.” Mr Sleightholme has met with others in the group and insisted the statue, which cost tens of thousands of pounds, will be repaired.

“It will be repaired this week,” he said. “We are not going to give up. That statue will remain there as long as we can keep it there.”


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz1r5979npY
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Old April 5th, 2012, 08:33 AM   #182
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As a Washington lad, I'm nothing but disappointed that a brand new piece of civic art has been vandalised so quickly
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Old April 5th, 2012, 11:36 AM   #183
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Quote:
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As a Washington lad, I'm nothing but disappointed that a brand new piece of civic art has been vandalised so quickly
Aye what a disgraceful act, ---but we shouldn't be surprised, nothing is sacred anymore.
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Old April 7th, 2012, 03:04 AM   #184
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I "opted out" of Washington a couple of years ago and won't live there again.

It happens all over, though, and it's such a shame.
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Old April 7th, 2012, 10:50 AM   #185
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I "opted out" of Washington a couple of years ago and won't live there again.

It happens all over, though, and it's such a shame.

Aye it's a real shame, --but as you point out, --it happens all over, --btw, --I read they are trying to renew/fix the Statue.
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Old April 7th, 2012, 01:42 PM   #186
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Further to
.
Evening Chronicle, Saturday 7th April 2012
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Old April 13th, 2012, 09:55 AM   #187
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Epiacum - a hidden slice of Roman history at Slaggyford
by Paul Tully, The Journal, April 13th 2012


IT HAS LONG been one of the great hidden secrets of the Romans in Northumberland. But now, an isolated Roman fort in the remote North Pennines is set to become more widely known as an essential part of the empire. Whitley Castle stands in the 1,000-acre Castle Nook Farm, two miles south of Slaggyford, the last farm in the county looking west to the border with Cumbria.

The site also contains the remains of several bastle houses but the fort, with seven layers of defences and bath house, headquarters building and civilian settlement remains, is largely unknown to the world.

Farmer’s wife Elaine Edgar has worked for years to raise the profile of the fort, known to the Romans as Epiacum and now her efforts have been rewarded with a £49,200 Heritage Lottery Fund grant. It’s the breakthrough Elaine wanted in order to promote the fort and, working with English Heritage which manages the site, turn it into a larger attraction.

“The fort is virtually unknown to the world,” said Elaine.

“It is effectively the gateway to the Roman Empire in Northumberland. Until now we have only had two or three visitors a year, mainly academic researcher types who knock on the farmhouse door and ask if they can walk across and take a look at it, but now, with the Lottery Fund money, we will be able to develop and promote the site and give it the prominence it deserves but has never had.”


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz1ruAGAVNX
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Old April 17th, 2012, 10:09 AM   #188
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Durham Cathedral wins bid to display St Cuthbert Gospel
by Neil McKay, The Journal, April 17th 2012


A SEVENTH-CENTURY book that lay buried in a saint’s coffin for hundreds of years has been saved for the nation – and the North East – after a multimillion-pound fundraising effort. The St Cuthbert Gospel – the earliest surviving European book – will be displayed on a 50:50 basis between the British Library in London and Durham’s Unesco World Heritage Site after £9m was raised to secure the 7th Century manuscript.

The acquisition of the Gospel by the British Library involved a formal partnership with Durham University and Durham Cathedral and an agreement that the book will be displayed to the public equally in London and Durham.

The first display in Durham is anticipated to be in July 2013 in Durham University’s Palace Green Library when the Lindisfarne Gospels will also be exhibited on a three-month loan from the British Library. The £9m purchase price for the Gospel was secured following the largest and most successful fundraising campaign in the British Library’s history.


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz1sHc3N4RY
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Old April 17th, 2012, 10:28 AM   #189
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The little St Cuthbert Gospel is the greatest artwork that has ever been produced in the region. It's takes your breath away when you see it, it's that astonishing.
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Old April 18th, 2012, 10:38 AM   #190
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Its amazing how it ended up for sale in the first place. Surely historical artefacts like this should be in the public domain, owned by the people and never allowed to be sold.
Would other national treasures like the Crown Jewels ever be allowed to be put up for sale?
I doubt it.
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Old April 20th, 2012, 02:45 PM   #191
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Tynemouth and District Electric Traction Company

During road works at the junction of Marden Avenue and Beverley Terrace in Cullercoats a link to the past was revealed when lines used by trams were revealed.

This set of photographs were taken on 20th April 2012 but unfortunately the lines had by then been cut and removed leaving only an imprint and the cut off ends. However it is fascinating to learn that the rails are still there. hidden underneath the road.

The tramway was operated between 1901 and 1931 by the Tynemouth and District Electric Traction Company. The line ran from New Quay, North Shields to terminate at the Victoria Hotel, Whitley. In 1904 the line was extended from Whitley Front Street to the bandstand on the Links. The length of the line was 4.23 miles and was a gauge of 3 feet 6 inches.

The first services ran on the 10th March, 1901 with electrical power being provided from the generating station on Tanners Bank, North Shields. The last tram ran on 4th August 1931.

Photographs hosted www.steve-ellwood.org.uk











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Old May 3rd, 2012, 11:01 AM   #192
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Actor Robert Hardy walks Flodden battlefield
by Tony Henderson, The Journal, May 3rd 2012


ACTOR and military historian Robert Hardy walked one of Northumberland’s most evocative battlefields yesterday – and then issued a plea for its continued preservation. Mr Hardy, who is patron of the Battlefields Trust, toured Flodden Field where, 500 years ago next year, an estimated 10,000 Scots lost their lives, including the Scottish King James IV, as they were routed by the English.

Last night Mr Hardy, an expert on the longbow who has written books on the subject, gave a talk on the role of archers in the Battle of Flodden. The event at Lady Waterford Hall in Ford village, near the battlefield, was a 130-seat sell-out, with another 80 people on the list for tickets. Mr Hardy, 86, had travelled from his home in the Cotswolds at the invitation of Battlefields Trust member Clive Hallam-Baker, chairman of the Remembering Flodden project.

The actor is best known for playing vet Siegfried Farnon in the much-loved TV serial All Creatures and Small as well as playing Alec Stewart in the long running BBC series, The Troubleshooters. He has played Winston Churchill on many occasions and also appeared as Cornelius Fudge, the Minister for Magic, in the Harry Potter films.

Today Mr Hardy was visiting the scene of the Battle of Homildon Hill – now known as Humbleton Hill – near Wooler in Northumberland where in 1402 a force led by the Earl of Northumberland and his son Hotspur defeated the Scots army. He is also calling at the site in Northumberland of the Battle of Halidon Hill in 1333, where the Scots were again defeated and in which the longbow proved itself once more.


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz1tnNBkXRi
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Old May 3rd, 2012, 12:09 PM   #193
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Actor Robert Hardy walks Flodden battlefield
by Tony Henderson, The Journal, May 3rd 2012


ACTOR and military historian Robert Hardy walked one of Northumberland’s most evocative battlefields yesterday – and then issued a plea for its continued preservation. Mr Hardy, who is patron of the Battlefields Trust, toured Flodden Field where, 500 years ago next year, an estimated 10,000 Scots lost their lives, including the Scottish King James IV, as they were routed by the English.

Last night Mr Hardy, an expert on the longbow who has written books on the subject, gave a talk on the role of archers in the Battle of Flodden. The event at Lady Waterford Hall in Ford village, near the battlefield, was a 130-seat sell-out, with another 80 people on the list for tickets. Mr Hardy, 86, had travelled from his home in the Cotswolds at the invitation of Battlefields Trust member Clive Hallam-Baker, chairman of the Remembering Flodden project.

The actor is best known for playing vet Siegfried Farnon in the much-loved TV serial All Creatures and Small as well as playing Alec Stewart in the long running BBC series, The Troubleshooters. He has played Winston Churchill on many occasions and also appeared as Cornelius Fudge, the Minister for Magic, in the Harry Potter films.

Today Mr Hardy was visiting the scene of the Battle of Homildon Hill – now known as Humbleton Hill – near Wooler in Northumberland where in 1402 a force led by the Earl of Northumberland and his son Hotspur defeated the Scots army. He is also calling at the site in Northumberland of the Battle of Halidon Hill in 1333, where the Scots were again defeated and in which the longbow proved itself once more.


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz1tnNBkXRi
Heaven forbid that there are any attempts to build on Flodden Field.

Been a few years since I was last at Flodden but recall it as a really peaceful and quiet setting which must have been the opposite of the events that took place in September 1513.








Photographs hosted on www.steve-ellwood.org.uk

More photographs @ http://www.fototime.com/inv/B94800A88857B69

The Flodden 1513 Project web site - http://www.flodden.net/index.aspx
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Old May 21st, 2012, 09:59 AM   #194
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Army hut’s long service in Civvy Street comes to an end
by Kate Proctor, The Journal, May 21st 2012


BEHIND the doors of what appears to be a small wooden hut lies a family tale of Northumberland life from a bygone era. Quirky Broomhaugh Cottage, at Riding Mill, measures just 42 square metres and has been in the hands of the Forster family for almost 100 years. Its last occupant Edwin Forster died aged 87 in 2010 and now his niece and nephew have decided to put their cherished family home on the market – with a price tag of £100,000.

The unusual house which overlooks the River Tyne has planning permission for a bungalow to be built in its place. However, the original wooden cottage is believed to have been brought down from Otterburn Army Camp by landlord and overseas diplomat Sir Percy Lorraine for people to live in. Edwin’s niece, Susan Stephenson, 52, of Haydon Bridge, said: “It was our family home from the early 1920s.

“My grandad bought it after coming home from the First World War. They had a huge garden and grew all their own fruit and vegetables. It was very sad when we had to clear it out. My brother Robert and I spent all of our youth there because it was down by the river. My dad tells the stories of how Sir Percy Lorraine used to come up in a light aircraft and check out the properties. I think it was an army hut made into a house."


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz1vUN7Ak7b
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Old June 6th, 2012, 10:15 AM   #195
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Calls to safeguard historic Jarrow building
by Sonia Sharma, The Journal, June 6th 2012


Balgownie House, Bede Burn Road, Jarrow

A HERITAGE group is calling for an historic North East building to be saved for future generations. Conservation charity SAVE Britain’s Heritage has placed Balgownie House, in Jarrow, South Tyneside, on its catalogue of buildings at risk.

The annual report throws a spotlight on around 100 structures in need of repair throughout England and Wales. The study aims to restore the crumbling properties to their former glory. Balgownie House, on Bede Burn Road, has been empty for several years. Campaigners say that any new plans to develop the site should seek to retain and safeguard the building. The property was built in 1875 for surgeon Frederick O’Neil and was later converted for use as a dentist’s surgery. Its next use was as council offices.

A spokesman from SAVE Britain’s Heritage said: ““Balgownie House is an imposing historic building in Jarrow. It is made of brick with stone dressings. It has extensive gardens and an enclosed yard. The building, which was recently sold, has been empty since 2008. No planning permission has been submitted but there are concerns that, despite the fact that there is room elsewhere on the site for new development, a residential scheme might involve the destruction of the building.”


Read More (Two Pages) - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz1wzzq6zLV
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Old July 8th, 2012, 10:43 AM   #196
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St Mary's, Gateshead

I feel sorry for Gateshead, so much history but so little left. I went by St Mary's on Wednesday by Church Walk at about 8.30 am, I stopped and paid my respect to the stones. My mum is 74 and didn't even know they existed, my sister is oblivious that there was even a fire.

Maybe I'm being too harsh having a keen eye on local history, But then again, maybe not?

Steve
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Old July 8th, 2012, 11:16 AM   #197
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Originally Posted by Squipper View Post
I feel sorry for Gateshead, so much history but so little left. I went by St Mary's on Wednesday by Church Walk at about 8.30 am, I stopped and paid my respect to the stones. My mum is 74 and didn't even know they existed, my sister is oblivious that there was even a fire.

Maybe I'm being too harsh having a keen eye on local history, But then again, maybe not?

Steve
Yes it never ceases to disappoint me that so many locals know very little about the history of the area in which they were born and live.
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Old July 9th, 2012, 01:30 AM   #198
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Yes it never ceases to disappoint me that so many locals know very little about the history of the area in which they were born and live.
Indeed Steve, when I explained it to my mum she was fascinated and wanted to learn more. I'll take her to the stones and to the Quayside where it happened and to the blue plaque on the side of the Tyne Bridge tower (Bottom of Bottle Bank,west side). Why is the date of 6th of October 1864 carved in my mind and nobody elses?

From the Wiki:

The High Level Bridge once more provided a first-class platform for the observation of the effects of the explosion and fire. Looking east from it the eye could span the whole sphere of devastation, taking in the still-smoking wreckage of property levelled to the ground.
Besides the less serious damage to property in the outskirts of the town, the force of the explosion left its marks in blown off roofs, thrown down walls and gable ends, broken staircases, shattered doors, demolished windows, framework and sashes, making complete havoc of properties it did not entirely destroy. So widespread was the damage that scarcely a house in the lower and middle part of Newcastle escaped unscathed. On Sandhill, nine out of every ten shop fronts was blown in. In The Side, Dean Street, Mosely Street, Collingwood Street, Grey Street, Market Street, Pilgrim Street and even in Clayton Street west, the same effects were to a considerable extent observable. In Gateshead the same effects were produced in Pipewellgate, Bridge Street, Church Street, Bottle Bank, Canon Street, Oakwellgate and streets beyond.
The area was thronged as if on a fair day, throughout Friday and for the rest of the weekend. It is estimated that 20,000 people arrived by train on Saturday; special trains were laid on, running every hour.
Loss of life and injury

The scale of injury and loss of life was smaller than might be imagined from such an infernal night. Some 53 people were accounted as having died, including Alexander Dobson, the 26-year-old second son of the renowned Newcastle architect John Dobson; Charles Bertram, owner of the exploding warehouse; and William Davidson, scion of the mill-owning family. Figures for the injured are less reliable, but it is supposed that from 400-500 people were injured, some horribly, and many receiving treatment at the Gateshead Dispensary and the Newcastle Infirmary. At the latter hospital, the beds of the existing in-patients were given to the newly injured, and the existing in-patients—where able—tended the new charges in their beds, under the direction of the medical staff.
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Old July 14th, 2012, 06:03 PM   #199
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Marley Hill Pit

Opened: 1841
Closed: 1983
Pits: 1, Lodge Pit

Location: Off the A692 Lobley Hill/Consett Road, 1/4 mile SE Sunniside.





There's some good stuff in the Wiki about this place:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marley_Hill


No special equipment or clothing required, an easy walk around without difficulty.

First thing you see is the gate and a warning sign:



So much for the 'No Tipping' warning!



The Site Offices remains are what you see first, this was them in 1972:



And now:





Also some Peruvian lilies are still where some flower beds used to be:



There was originally several buildings along from the office including a Post Office and a Store but alas no sign apart from rubble remains.

Carry on down the road and it sweeps to the right into a large tarmacked area.

First thing I spotted was the main shaft cap:





"After closure, the headgears and other machinery at Marley Hill Colliery were scrapped and the buildings leveled. A hole was knocked into the wall of the square building which enclosed the top of the upcast shaft, and the rubble from the rest of the buildings tipped in to backfill it. This process having been completed, the building was demolished and a large concrete cap placed over the mouth of each shaft." (Wiki).

Shaft head showers:





Site of coking ovens with metal tiled floor:



In the first photo showing the mine as it was this would have been facing the photographer just in front of the main shaft building in the centre.



Again, In the first photo showing the mine as it was you can see some houses, this street was known simply as 'The Hole'.



Now there's just some hard standing and a lot of pieces of sink ceramic and broken glass to show it was a more domestic setting. In that area I found this brick:



Mean anything to anybody?

Tanfield Railway sheds are just below:





Heading back towards the main road the first couple of houses on the left used to belong to the Pit bosses:





Most of the terraced houses lining the main road of the village were colliery houses with the ones adjacent to the community centre being for elderly ex miners. Each one is dedicated and all have three stones on the front saying who it is dedicated to and who laid the first stone etc.



All in all a pleasant walk around and If you are ever up that way I recommend you have a look!


Steve

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; July 14th, 2012 at 07:24 PM. Reason: Re-sized two over-large IMAGES
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Old July 15th, 2012, 08:24 AM   #200
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A fascinating post , thanks for that Squipper.

I love the old and recent photo comparisons, it looks like you had a very interesting visit there!

This forum is now developing quite a 'database' of Mining and Mining-related knowledge and information, listed under "M" for Mining, as shown below . . .

Quote:
MINING (COAL MINING / PITS / COLLIERIES) ALL RELEVANT TOPICS AND ISSUES . . .

B
Beamish Museum
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...9&postcount=45
Burradon Pit Disaster - 1860
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=130
D
Delaval / Benwell Colliery
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...5&postcount=98
Durham Miners Gala
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1246
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1251
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1252
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1254
E
Easington Pit Disaster - Evening Chronicle of Tuesday May 29th 1951
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...9&postcount=28
Easington Pit Disaster - 60th Anniversary (29th May 1951-29th May 2011)
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=129
F
Felling Colliery - Where were the Mineshafts located and what is there today?
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=2164
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=2553
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=2554
Felling Pit Disaster, 25th May 1812 - Banner for 200th Anniversary in 2012
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=156
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=166
Felling Pit Disaster, 25th May 1812 - Play to be performed on 200th Anniversary in 2012
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=2869
Felling Pit Disaster, 25th May 1812 - Events on the day of the 200th Anniversary in 2012
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=126
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=129
H
Hartley (New Hartley) Pit Disaster of 1862
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...1&postcount=66
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=170
Heaton High Pit Colliery Disaster - 1815
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=2026
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=2027
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=2028
L
Life in North East Collieries 100 years ago - DVD
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...5&postcount=80
M
Many posts about 'Mines, Mining & Mineworks' are on the "Victoria Tunnel, Quayside Railway Tunnel & other Subterranean Newcastle" Discussion Thread.
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1308595
Marley Hill Pit - A recent visit (new photos) and it's past (historical photos)
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=199
Montagu View Pit Disaster, Scotswood - 1925
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=2619
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=2620
N
North Elswick Colliery / Hutton Coal Seam (used to be on the 'Newcastle Brewery' Site)
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1583
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1584
North of England Institute of Mining and Mechanical Engineers, at Neville Hall (see MANY more entries under "N" for Neville Hall)
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1256
Northumberlandia (a 410 metre-long landform in the shape of a naked reclining female) at former Shotton Mine near Cramlington
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...1&postcount=66
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...1&postcount=67
S
Scotswood Drift
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=100
Segedunum Exhibition - 2012 Exhibition at Segedunum recalls North Pit Disasters
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=263
Still the Sea Rolls On: The Hartley Pit Calamity of 1862 - A BOOK by Keith Armstrong and Peter Dixon
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=373
T
Temporary Mineworkings, in 2012, at the "Science Central/Science City" site, near Barrack Road
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=223
Thomas Hepburn - Nineteenth Century Miners rights campaigner and Trades Unionist
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=143
V
Victoria Tunnel, Quayside Railway Tunnel & other Subterranean Newcastle - Discussion Thread, which includes numerous 'Mining' discussions
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1308595
W
West Stanley Pit Disaster of 1909 - 103rd Anniversary
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...7&postcount=92
Woodhorn Colliery Mining Heritage Museum
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...7&postcount=63
.

Please, if anyone is aware of any factual discussions on this forum about 'Mines and mining', not referred to in the above, then let me know so that I can add it to the Index Thread.

If it is a 'long' debate (in any particular case) the Index works by my linking the MAIN post, and when you follow the link, click the 'Hyperlink' for the thread at the top right corner to open up the full thread and the rest of any relevant posts.
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Last edited by Newcastle Historian; July 15th, 2012 at 10:38 AM.
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