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Old November 5th, 2009, 08:11 PM   #21
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The landmark Residence Île Verte, popularly referred to as "the Three Towers of Grenoble," (France) was built within a park in the Île Verte district between 1963 and 1967, on a plan by Roger Anger and Pierre Puccinelli. At a height of 98 meters (not counting the antenna), the three towers were the highest inhabited buildings in Europe when they were completed, with a total of 504 apartments spread among 28 inhabited floors, each tower containing a total of 33 stories. The towers are named Belledonne, Vercors, and Mont Blanc.





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Old November 5th, 2009, 08:22 PM   #22
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Centre Point (London)

Centre Point is a substantial concrete and glass office building in central London, England, occupying 101-103 New Oxford Street, WC1, close to St Giles' Circus and almost directly above Tottenham Court Road tube station. The site was once occupied by a gallows.[1] The building was designed by Richard Seifert with engineers Pell Frischmann and was constructed by Wimpey Construction from 1963 to 1966. It is 117 m (385 ft) high, has 32 floors and 27,180 m2 (292,563 sq ft) of floor space and is the joint 27th tallest building in London. It was one of the first skyscrapers in London. It is a grade II listed building.





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Old November 5th, 2009, 09:13 PM   #23
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To celebrate the 75th birthday of the Philips company in Eindhoven in 1966, a special exhibit on science and technology was opened in the Evoluon, a futuristic building looking like a flying saucer that has just landed. It was built for this purpose on a piece of land at a prime location, a triangular terrain at the crossing of three main roads, donated by the city of Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

James Gardner (1908-1995) was the most important British post-war museum- and exhibiton-designer. Many important events of British government and large firms were designed by him. He did not only design the Evoluon exhibition of 1966, but also the additions of 1985.









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Old November 5th, 2009, 10:25 PM   #24
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The Barbican, London...





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Old November 5th, 2009, 10:30 PM   #25
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Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 1960-63, Louis Kahn

The institute is housed in a modernist complex, design credit is given to the firm of Louis Kahn. Michael Duff of the Kahn firm was the supervising architect and a major design influence on the structure that consists of two symmetric buildings with a stream of water flowing in the middle of a courtyard that separates the two. The buildings themselves have been designed to promote collaboration, and thus there are no walls separating laboratories on any floor.









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Old November 5th, 2009, 10:46 PM   #26
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Edward Durrell Stone House

In a staid district of late-nineteenth-century town houses on New York City's Upper East Side, the romantically lacy, stark-white concrete grille in front of the Edward Durrell Stone house has raised a ruckus since it was constructed in 1956. When the facade fell into disrepair in the late 1980s, Stone's widow removed the screen--and promptly got slapped with a Landmarks violation penalty.





home built by famed architect Edward Durell Stone in New Canaan, Connecticut in 1959. This peaked roof mid-century modern went through a major restoration in 2006/07. The home has four bedrooms and there are 12 pyramid skylights total.








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Old November 5th, 2009, 11:10 PM   #27
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Pimlico School is a gun-metal grey battleship adrift amongst the genteel stucco Georgian terraces of Pimlico. Built between 1965 and 1970, and designed by a team headed up by GLC architect John Bancroft, Pimlico School was initially well received, winning a clutch of awards for its daring glass and concrete structure. Yet fast forward to January 2008 and the future of this innovative slice of late period Brutalism hangs in the balance. Demolition is imminent - minor works have already begun.
Not even the vocal support of Richard Rogers have managed to swing the balance.









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Old November 5th, 2009, 11:17 PM   #28
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Liberty Hall (Irish: Halla na Saoirse), in Dublin, Ireland is the headquarters of the Services, Industrial, Professional, and Technical Union. It was formerly the tallest storeyed building in Ireland at 59.4 m (195 feet) high. The current building was constructed between 1961 and 1965. At 16 storeys, the structure was originally built with non-reflective glass, however a 1972 bomb explosion led to this being replaced with a reflective variety, as most of the original windows had been destroyed in the attack. This is said to have reduced the aesthetic appearance of the building. The viewing platform, which had only recently opened, was also closed.

On 19 October 2006, it was announced that SIPTU were seeking planning permission to knock Liberty Hall and build a new headquarters in the same location.





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Old November 5th, 2009, 11:34 PM   #29
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The pool area of 400 E Randolph Condominiums (1963), Chicago

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At night.

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Old November 5th, 2009, 11:42 PM   #30
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Post Office Loop Station, Chicago

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Old November 6th, 2009, 11:13 PM   #31
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Robin Hood Gardens is a council housing complex in London designed in the late 1960s by architects Alison and Peter Smithson. It was intended as an example of the 'streets in the sky' concept: social housing characterised by broad aerial walkways in long concrete blocks, much like the Park Hill estate in Sheffield; it was both informed by, and a reaction against, Le Corbusier's Unité d'Habitation.
The estate covers about two hectares and consists of two long blocks, one of ten storeys, the other of seven, built from precast concrete slabs and containing 213 flats, surrounding a landscaped green area and a small hill made from construction spoil. It is a visible examples of Brutalist architecture.

In May 2009 the Minister of Culture issued his decision not to list this estate and the structure cannot be considered for listing for at least 5 years. Leaving the way open for Tower Hamlets Council to proceed with its demolition and redevelopment. Zaha Hadid was in the campaign to save this building







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Old November 6th, 2009, 11:25 PM   #32
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Boston City Hall is a 9-level, horizontally-oriented brutalist building designed in 1962 by Kallmann McKinnell & Knowles and located at the heart of a brick-paved Government Center plaza in downtown Boston, Massachusetts. It is rectangular in plan, but is an inverted pyramid in elevation.

After viewing the building for the first time, some Modernist architects praised it. It is listed among the "Greatest Buildings" by Great Buildings Online, an affiliate of Architecture Week

On December 12, 2006, Boston Mayor Thomas Menino proposed selling the current city hall and adjacent plaza to private developers. On July 10, 2008, Landmarks Commission official said the petition to grant the building special landmark status had been recommended for study, but probably would not be considered by the panel unless a plan to demolish the structure was imminent







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Old November 6th, 2009, 11:48 PM   #33
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Beth Sholom Congregation is a synagogue located in Philadelphia. Its building is the only synagogue designed by famed architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, who accepted the commission in September 1953. The building was completed and consecrated in 1959. With its steeply inclined walls of translucent fiber glass and plastic projecting skyward like a "luminous Mount Sinai" (in Wright's own description). During the day, the interior is lit by natural light entering through the translucent walls overhead. At night, the entire building glows from interior artificial lighting.

The design is considered by critics to be the "most expressive" drafted in Wright's career for any house of worship. It has been listed by the American Institute of Architects as one of the 17 American buildings which are to be preserved as an example of Wright's contribution to American architecture.









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Old November 7th, 2009, 12:02 AM   #34
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Mid-Century Modern LA:











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Old November 7th, 2009, 12:13 AM   #35
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1962
BERNARD JUDGE
Judge Residence
“Bernard Judge, who created this domed house in the Hollywood Hills, was a great admirer of Buckminster Fuller’s triangular forms,” Shulman says. “This house looked ideal at night. It was like being inside a giant soap bubble. It was beautiful, but it didn’t exercise any means of controlling the heat coming through the top. So Judge tried to make a layer of fabric over the top part of the dome, but that didn’t give insulation throughout the rest of the house, so they added openings in the glass.”



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Old November 7th, 2009, 12:25 AM   #36
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The Eduardo Catalano House in Raleigh, built in 1954 by the young Argentinian architect for his own use and one of the few buildings ever praised by Frank Lloyd Wright, was offered by Preservation North Carolina for sale with protective covenants. Unfortunately, they did not find a buyer to preserve it, and the protective covenants proved to be worthless. The lot sold and the house was leveled to the ground.









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Old November 7th, 2009, 12:39 AM   #37
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The Marina City complex in Chicago was designed in 1959 by architect Bertrand Goldberg and completed in 1964 at a cost of $36 million financed to a large extent by the union of building janitors and elevator operators, who sought to reverse the pattern of "white flight" from the city's downtown area. When finished, the two towers were both the tallest residential buildings and the tallest reinforced concrete structures in the world. The complex was billed as a "city within a city"







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Old November 7th, 2009, 12:42 AM   #38
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The Gateway Arch, is an integral part of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial and the iconic image of St. Louis, Missouri. It was designed by Finnish-American architect Eero Saarinen and structural engineer Hannskarl Bandel in 1947. It stands 630 feet (192 m) tall, and is 630 feet (192 m) wide at its base, making it the tallest monument in the United States.Construction of the arch started on February 12, 1963 and was completed on October 28, 1965.The monument opened to the public on July 10, 1967.









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Old November 7th, 2009, 01:11 AM   #39
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The Fernsehturm (German for "television tower") is a television tower in the city centre of Berlin, Germany. Close to Alexanderplatz and part of the World Federation of Great Towers, the tower was constructed between 1965 and 1969 by the former German Democratic Republic administration who intended it as a symbol of Berlin, which it remains today, as it is easily visible throughout the central and some suburban districts of Berlin.

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Old November 7th, 2009, 08:51 AM   #40
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Mid-century modern unfortunately did not age very well. Part of this has a lot to do with the materials used - this was a time of exploration of new materials, and some of them still needed to be developed further. In particular, the heavy use of concrete at the time, was difficult to keep up. Also, many of these buildings have become "background" buildings, and owners and cities have not really focused on upkeep.

Mid-century modern also suffers from issues of their surroundings. In many cases they simply were never finished with proper landscaping or other environmental design. They often did not fit well with other buildings. Boston's city hall is a great example - much the criticism it receives is as much due to the expansive brick plaza and brick entry, as well as poor interior furnishings.

A it's worst, mid-century modern looks old and worn, impersonal and boring. But with proper restoration, and proper attention to landscape and signage, as well as proper attention to interiors, can turn many of these buildings into proud assets to the city.
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