daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Forums > Architecture

Architecture news and discussions on all buildings types and urban spaces
» Classic Architecture | European Classic Architecture and Landscapes | Public Space | Shopping Architecture | Design & Lifestyle | Urban Renewal and Redevelopment



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old November 18th, 2009, 06:38 PM   #81
TomTack
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 545
Likes (Received): 121

UCSD's Geisel Library, William Pereira, 1969, California, San Diego:



image hosted on flickr




image hosted on flickr
TomTack no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old November 18th, 2009, 06:46 PM   #82
tpe
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Chicago & NYC
Posts: 3,562
Likes (Received): 3069

Chicago Real Estate Defined: The Four Plus One (4 + 1)

http://www.yourwindycityguide.com/?p=1218

Excerpt:

Your guide had not had much interaction with the “Classic 4 + 1″ here in Chicago in quite some time as the property lends itself to the rental industry more than as condominium homes. But as the Lakeview neighborhood has become ever more popular to live in, the conversion of these buildings into condominiums has become more common.

Dreaded for their ugly curb appeal, the buildings were commonly constructed during the 1950’s, 1960’s and tapered off in the 1970’s. The building style was designed to maximize revenue – namely rent – while still providing a bare minimum of modern amenities – namely parking.

The construction style was designed without regard to style, and in fact seems to reflect the “modern” style of architecture. Just badly.

The whole point of a 4 + 1 is designed to provide four floors of living (the “four”) on top of a partially sunken level of parking, a small lobby and the elevator (the “plus one”). 4 + 1’s seem to line the side streets most prevalently in East Lakeview where there must have been land available to develop during the near infancy of the neighborhood. East Lakeview was not exactly the cool and stable neighborhood that it is today back in the 1960’s and 1970’s. These apartments were clearly designed as affordable and densely packed housing.

The 4 + 1 takes up about as much space as a traditional Vintage Courtyard from the 1920’s. The last major housing push must have been during the 1920’s as East Lakeview has as many Courtyard Buildings as 4 + 1’s, and there appears not to be very much architecture in between the major growth spurts of these two styles of building.

Although sitting on about as much land as a typical Vintage Courtyard, the 4 + 1 can have as many as double the number of apartments of a courtyard on the same piece of land. Typically, though, they have about 1/3 more units. But in addition to the increase in units is the parking – which, of course, is available for additional rent...



image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr
image hosted on flickr
tpe no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 18th, 2009, 06:48 PM   #83
TomTack
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 545
Likes (Received): 121

Futuro House, is a round, prefabricated house designed by Matti Suuronen, about 100 were built during the late 1960s. The distinctive flying saucer like shape and airplane hatch entrance has made the houses popular among collectors. The Futuro is composed of polyester plastic and fiberglass, measuring about 3 meters high and 8 meters in diameter. (architect Suuronen, 1968)







TomTack no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 18th, 2009, 06:49 PM   #84
tpe
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Chicago & NYC
Posts: 3,562
Likes (Received): 3069

Quote:
Originally Posted by TomTack View Post
UCSD's Geisel Library, William Pereira, 1969, California, San Diego:

I remember this library very well, and have fond memories of it. Seeing it here puts a smile on my face.
tpe no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 18th, 2009, 07:03 PM   #85
TomTack
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 545
Likes (Received): 121

La maison de Radio France, PAris, Henry Bernard, 1963:




Last edited by TomTack; November 18th, 2009 at 07:14 PM.
TomTack no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 18th, 2009, 07:05 PM   #86
TomTack
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 545
Likes (Received): 121

Oral Roberts University, Tulsa, Oklahoma, Frank Wallace, 1963:









[IMG]http://www.***************/06/3/oral3.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.***************/06/3/oral12.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.***************/06/3/oral11.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.***************/06/3/oral5.jpg[/IMG]
TomTack no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 18th, 2009, 07:08 PM   #87
TomTack
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 545
Likes (Received): 121

Capitol Records building, Hollywood, California, Welton Becket, 1956:





even in Terminator

TomTack no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 18th, 2009, 07:18 PM   #88
TomTack
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 545
Likes (Received): 121

McDonnell Planetarium, Saint Louis , 1963, Gyo Obata:





TomTack no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 18th, 2009, 07:42 PM   #89
TomTack
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 545
Likes (Received): 121

New York State Pavilion, 1964-1965 World's Fair, Philip Johnson & Richard Foster Architects :

One of the few structures from the Fair to remain standing today.

The New York State Pavilion consists of three main components, each with its own purpose, rather than being one single building intended for multiple uses. The largest structure in the complex is an elliptical plaza measuring 350 feet by 250 feet. This space is surrounded by 16 steel columns (each one hundred feet high), which once held up a colorful canopy that covered the plaza underneath.

An oversized map of the state of New York, which is made up of 567 mosaic terrazzo panels weighing about 400 lbs. each, largely covers its floor. The map is said to have cost one million dollars at the time, and displays the locations of all Texaco gas stations in the state of New York. Paintings and murals are on the outside of the Circarama, by the hand of Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein and Robert Indiana!

Today, the New York State Pavilion is perhaps more impressive than it was during the World's Fair. It stands as a piece of architectural ephemera; a relic that somehow continues to stand decades after its intended use has passed.

Efforts have been made to save the Pavilion by using it once again, and at least one of them has been successful. The Queens Theatre took over the circular Circarama adjacent to the towers in 1994 and continues to operate there. As for the rest of the Pavilion, many uses have been proposed, including an air and space museum but no concrete plans have been made for the decaying structure yet. As a result, the towers and the large elliptical plaza that was once covered remain unused and padlocked.





image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr




image hosted on flickr











Last edited by TomTack; November 18th, 2009 at 09:29 PM.
TomTack no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 18th, 2009, 08:00 PM   #90
TomTack
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 545
Likes (Received): 121

overview work Kezo Tange, period 50-69:

He was one of the most significant architects of the 20th century, combining traditional Japanese styles with modernism, and designed major buildings on five continents. Kenzo Tange was also an influential protagonist of the movement structuralism. He said: "It was, I believe, around 1959 or at the beginning of the sixties that I began to think about what I was later to call structuralism"

















TomTack no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 19th, 2009, 01:48 AM   #91
minneapolis-uptown
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 812
Likes (Received): 47

Quote:
Originally Posted by TomTack View Post
Oral Roberts University, Tulsa, Oklahoma, Frank Wallace, 1963:

that picture reminds me of the ING building in Minneapolis. I am not sure if it was built in that era though.





minneapolis-uptown no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 19th, 2009, 05:30 PM   #92
Annibale
Registered User
 
Annibale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Ar-Raqqa []; Ar-Core []; Ar-Megiddo []; Ar-Luno [x]; Ar-Trove []
Posts: 1,374
Likes (Received): 666

Remind me of Niemeyer
Annibale no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 20th, 2009, 03:25 AM   #93
Chibcha2k
XPC Fagua chinanuca
 
Chibcha2k's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Altiplano Cundiboyacense
Posts: 6,585
Likes (Received): 464

Torres del Parque, a symbol in Bogotá.
image hosted on flickr

gab(: @ Flickr

Designed by Rogelio Salmona, a close friend of Le Corbusier, during the mid-1960's, soon became symbolic and a national monument due to their unique design, mixing with the nearby bullfight ring "La Santa María" and the green of the "cerros orientales" and the Parque Nacional.

The whole complex consists in 3 towers, the tallest reaching 117 metres high, holding 300 flats.

The towers
image hosted on flickr

[SIZE="1]SLRookie @ Flickr[/SIZE]
image hosted on flickr

Oh my little [email protected] Flickr

The surroundings, look how it relates to the bullfight ring
image hosted on flickr

Gatuzo @ Flickr

In the CBD Skyline
image hosted on flickr

robertalani @ Flickr
image hosted on flickr

philipbouchard @ Flickr

Rogelio Salmona was famous for the way in which he used red brick claddings, his works are always out of the ordinary use of the material.
image hosted on flickr

marialuisavela @ Flickr

http://www.arquitour.com/torres-del-...lmona/2009/10/
image hosted on flickr

Elisa Izquierdo @ Flickr

The use of urban spaces is also outstanding

http://www.arquitour.com/torres-del-...lmona/2009/10/
image hosted on flickr

bar Moloko @ flickr
image hosted on flickr

the glitch @ flickr
image hosted on flickr

Elisa Izquierdo @ flickr

If you wish to see more pictures check this link : http://www.arquitour.com/torres-del-...lmona/2009/10/
__________________
WAYUU
Jemeishi taya julü’ü wane mma warattüsiü
Kepiashi taya ja’aka jorottüi, jaitairü apain.
Taya juwaralain wane lapü jumaiwajatü
Vito Apüshana
Chibcha2k no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 22nd, 2009, 10:06 PM   #94
TomTack
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 545
Likes (Received): 121

The train station in Eindhoven (Netherlands, hometown of philips) was build in 1956, by architect Koen van der Gaast and resembles the philips radio of that time. Today it's filed as a Dutch monument:



















Another station of the same architect in Tilburg, 1965:







TomTack no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 1st, 2009, 10:06 AM   #95
TomTack
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 545
Likes (Received): 121

The Copan Building, Oscar Niemeyer, designed 1951, completed 1966

Designed in 1951 for the then booming city centre, it was, like the New York Rockefeller Centre, to be a model of high-density urban living, incorporating shops and restaurants, a hotel and places of entertainment. A model of the project can be seen as the cover photograph in the Architectural Review of July 1953; it may not be surprising that a British architectural journal should take current Brazilian architecture so seriously after the New York MOMA exhibition ‘Brazil Builds’ in 1943. As built, the project has a 32-storey block of flats, offices on lower floors, an arcade of shops and a cinema: the hotel disappeared and was replaced by an office block designed later by a different architect. It does serve, however, to obscure the Copan’s double curve. One side of it is curtain-walled, the other faces north and thus the full sun, and there are the relentless lines of the ribs of the brises soleils that Niemeyer designed and which make the block so distinctive. So its rhythm of horizontal lines, accompanied by the concave and convex shape of the massive block itself, makes the façade a play of optical effects, surely the real architectural reason rather than the exclusion of the midday sun. Inside the block, life goes on as it has for forty years (it was completed in 1966); now architects and designers have begun to move in. For those resident on its upper floors, it provides a view that no other Paulistanos have, of this city spread out beneath them, framed by concrete ribs covered in grey terrazzo tiles.









[IMG][/IMG]

[IMG]http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_uC9AWuzUn-c/SHCq40gB4UI/AAAAAAAACHQ/qwU5O20hgbQ/s400/*P1018340.jpg[/IMG]



TomTack no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 1st, 2009, 10:33 AM   #96
luci203
Registered User
 
luci203's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 4,129
Likes (Received): 1202

Lever House - New York City

Built in 1951-1952 was the first skyscraper with glass cladding...





image hosted on flickr
luci203 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 11th, 2009, 04:42 PM   #97
TomTack
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 545
Likes (Received): 121

Church of Notre-Dame (Royan, France), 1958

www.notre-dame-royan.com

Built in three years by the architects Guillaume Gillet and Marc Hébrard, the church Notre-Dame of Royan is considered as one of the leaders of work of the contemporary architecture.Finished from 1958, it is completely built in raw concrete. The church was classified as historical monument in 1988. His dimensions are: a nave in ellipse, 45 metres long on 22 metres wide which can contain approximately 2000 persons, flanked by an ambulatory and by a stand situated in three metres of the ground.



image hosted on flickr






TomTack no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 11th, 2009, 11:02 PM   #98
Concrete Stereo
Registered User
 
Concrete Stereo's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Lyon
Posts: 1,599
Likes (Received): 599

it's starting to become a great collection
Concrete Stereo está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old December 17th, 2009, 12:44 PM   #99
TomTack
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 545
Likes (Received): 121

The Egg, which was designed by Wallace Harrison, is a building constructed between 1966 and 1978. It is an amphitheater - a performing arts venue in Albany, New York that looks like an egg. Peter Steinborn is the engineer responsible for the applicationof the design, along with any changes to it. This unique building is situated in the northeast corner of the Empire State Plaza. Architecturally, there are no other known buildings like The Egg in the world.












The Alcoa Building,Pittsburgh, Harrison and Abramovitz , 1953

The Alcoa Building is the most prominent of the new structures that face onto Mellon Square. It is a thirty-story skyscraper that was designed as a showpiece of the use of aluminum in building construction. Aluminum was used wherever possible, from the skin of the building to its utilities, reducing the weight of the building so those substantial savings could be made in the structure's steel frame.





image hosted on flickr




Alcoa Building, 1967, San Francisco, , Skidmore Owings en Merrill:

A challenge arising from the parking structure (built partially above ground due to water-table problems) gave way to an elegant and iconic solution utilizing diagonal bracing offset from a glass curtain wall. This design maximized usable interior space while minimizing columnar interference with the existing parking structure.

Building Height: 395 ft
Number of Stories: 25





image hosted on flickr
TomTack no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 17th, 2009, 01:00 PM   #100
TomTack
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 545
Likes (Received): 121

Centenary Pool, Spring Hill, Brisbane, 1960, James Birrell

Centenary Pools centre, Brisbane's first Olympic-standard swimming and diving pools, is one of the highlights of Australian architecture of the 1950s and 1960s.

It features a series of geometric forms loosely arranged about a raised podium, tucked into the side of a hill overlooking a park. Mr Birrell's design incorporates a raised restaurant - now a fitness centre - of reinforced concrete, steel and glass that is built out over the main pool.





TomTack no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:14 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu