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Old November 7th, 2009, 09:48 PM   #1
Chadoh25
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My photos of the cities and towns of the Buckeye State! Welcome to Ohio!

I figured since we didn't have an Ohio Thread I would create one. Also, I want to show everyone that there is much more to Ohio than the Big C's!

We begin our tour of the Buckeye State in Chillicothe, Ohio, the first capital of the Great State of Ohio. But first a brief history.

Chillicothe (pronounced /ˌtʃɪlɨˈkɒθi/ CHILL-uh-KAW-thee) is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Ross County. The municipality is located in southern Ohio along the Scioto River. The name comes from the Shawnee name Chalahgawtha, meaning "principal town." Plotted by General Nathaniel Massie on his own land, Chillicothe was the first and third capital of Ohio.

The population was 21,796 at the 2000 census. According to the US Census 2008 estimate, Chillicothe has a population of 22,296, while the Columbus-Marion-Chillicothe, OH Combined Statistical Area has 2,002,604 people. The city is the largest in Ross County, and the center of the Chillicothe Micropolitan Statistical Area (as defined by the United States Census Bureau in 2003).

This was the center of the ancient Hopewell tradition, which flourished from 200 BCE until 500 CE. This Amerindian culture had trade routes extending to the Rocky Mountains. They built mounds for ceremonial and burial purposes throughout the Scioto and Ohio River valleys. Later Native Americans who inhabited the area through the time of European contact included Shawnees.

It was after the American Revolution that most European settlement came to this area. Migrants from Virginia and Kentucky moved west along the Ohio River in search of land. Chillicothe served as the capital of Ohio from the beginning of statehood in 1803 until 1810 when Zanesville became the capital for two years. The capital was moved to Zanesville as part of a state legislative compromise to get a bill passed. In 1812 the legislature moved the capital back to Chillicothe. In 1816 the state legislature voted to move the capital again, to Columbus to have it near the geographic center of the state, where it would be more accessible to most citizens.

Migrants to Chillicothe included free blacks, who came to a place with fewer restrictions than in the slave states. They created a vibrant community in Chillicothe, where they aided runaway slaves coming north. As tensions increased prior to the breakout of the American Civil War, The free black community at Chillicothe became an important stop for refugees on the Underground Railroad. Slaves escaping from the South traveled across the Ohio River to freedom, and then up the Scioto River to get more distance from their former homes and slave hunters. White abolitionists aided the Underground Railroad as well.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chillicothe,_Ohio



Paint Street











East Second Street





















































Intersection of Paint and Second Street



Main and Paint Street

This is the Carlisle Building. It caught fire a few years back and while there have beeb many proposals to fix it, nothing has worked out thus far.









Ross Country Courthouse.


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Old November 7th, 2009, 09:48 PM   #2
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More from Chillicothe.

Main Street













Paint Street
















































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Old November 7th, 2009, 09:49 PM   #3
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Chillicothe

Last set

Paint Street

Ross County Courthouse























Gay Pride in Southern Ohio!!!







The end.....

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Old November 7th, 2009, 10:03 PM   #4
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Groveport, Ohio. Part One

Pioneers began settling near the portion of Madison Township in what would become Groveport in the early 19th century.

In 1812 Adam Rarey opened a tavern, on what is now Groveport's East Main Street, to serve travelers moving back and fourth between Columbus and southeastern Ohio. By 1831 two settlements-Wert's Grove and Rareys Port began to form side by side along the banks of the Ohio and Erie Canal. The open of the Canal on September 25th 1831 proved to be a boon to the two settlements as warehouses, tanneries, mills, a canal boatyard, and other enterprises sprang up as part of the canal and agriculture economy.

A rivalry developed between Jacob Wert and William Rarey, the two settlement founders. Wert, acting as postmaster, would change the address from Rarey's Port from any mail recieved to Wert's Grove. Rarey would encourage businessmen and residents to list "Rarey's Port" as their home. Rarey, a prosperous businessman and landowner, officially laid out the plat of Rarey's Port in 1844 anlong the western bank of the canal. Wert, who also proved to be a successful businessman and landowner, officially lais out Wert's Grove in 1845 west of Rarey's Port with only College Street separating the two towns.

Confusion emerged as to which town was the principal settlement in the area. Citizens found having two towns located side by side to be cumbersome and decided to merge the two towns in 1847 with Dr. Abel Clark suggestinf the name "Groveport", a combination of the suffixes of the two towns.

Goveport proved to be an adatable community growning and changing along with new forms of transportation. When the canal began to wane as the dominate form of shipping transportation, the village secured a railroad right of way in 1868. Goveport also took advantage of the new electric traction line railroad wheb it opened in 1904.


"A walking Tour of Historic Groveport"

Groveport United Methodist Church, 512 Main Street.

Built in 1907, this is the third Methodist Church on tis site. The first was constructed in 1836.The church is noted for its unusal treatment of church architecture, including multiple gables, arched doors and windows, and the distinctive cranberry red brick. The bell in the tower was donated by John. R. Rarey, the "Horse Whisperer". vvvv





Groveport Town Hall, 648 Main Street.

Constructed in 1875-1876 as a joint effort by the Village of Groveport, Madison Township, the Masons, and the International Order of Odd Fellows, the three story high Victorian Italianate brick hall originally featured a dry goods and grocery store on the first floor, with Township and Village offices on the second floor.The restored building currently houses the Groveport Heritage Museum, a Cultural Arts Center, Art Gallery and meeting/social space. vvvv





Inside the museum. vvvv





























Second Floor. vvvv







Looking out the window onto Main Street. vvvv





Third Floor. vvvv



Looking out onto Main Street. vvvv



Back on the First Floor. vvvv





































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Old November 7th, 2009, 10:12 PM   #5
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Groveport, Ohio. Part Two

Walking up Main Street.











William Rarey Home, 628 Main Street.

Built in 1840, this private federal-style residence was once the home of one of the towns founders. Rarey established the town of Rarey's Port on the Ohio and Erie Canal which flowed just east of the home. vvvv













United Methodist Church again. vvvv





Groveport Presbyterian Church. 275 College Sreet.

Constructed in 1853, it is the oldest church in continuous use in Groveport and features beautiful art glass windows. vvvv







Methodist Church once again. vvvv



Dr. John H. Saylor Home. 462 Main Street.

Currently a private residence, this home was built in 1870 as the Dr, saylor residence and office. During the village's agricultural past, Saylor was known to store gain in the front room. vvvv



The name of this church escapes me right now. vvvv



Veteran's Park. 421 Main Street.

Dedicated in 1997 to honor the nation's veterans. vvvv





















Stained glass window from that same unknown church. vvvv





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Old November 7th, 2009, 10:15 PM   #6
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Groveport, Ohio. Part Three

Jacob Wert Homes. 481-485 Main Street.

These federal style homes were built in 1844 by Jacob Wert, one of the twons founders. The homes are currently private residence. vvv



rear of the home. vvvv





walikg up Main Street. vvvv





Methodist Church. I know you are getting sick and tired of seeing it! lol vvvv













Madison House. 576 Main Street.

Built in 1830, this structure is one of the earliest buildings in Groveport and orginially served as an Inn and tavern for trabelers along the old Columbus and Lancaster Road, now known ad Main Street. It is currently a private residence. vvvv















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Old November 7th, 2009, 10:17 PM   #7
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Groveport, Ohio. Part Four

Groveport Log House, Wirt Road and College Street.

Believed to have been built between 1815-1825, the log house is one of the earliest homes in the village. It's orginal site was at Main and Madison Streets, where the Post Office now sites. In 1974, the house was moved to its current site and restored. The Heritage Nature Center, located in the smaller of two rooms, was created in partnership with Columbus Metro Parks.















Groveport Cemetery















Front Street. vvv







Lock 22, Blacklick Park.

The park was once the site of a canal boatyard where canal boats were built and repaired. The abandon Ohio and Erie Canal ditch is still visible in the park.

Lock 22 is located a quarter of a mile from the park along the former Scioto Valley Traction Line right of way. The stone lock was built in 1830-1831 and is the only canal lock in Groveport. vvvv















Walking back to the car.



Interurban, or former Scioto Valley Traction line tracks. Blacklick Street. vvvv







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Old November 8th, 2009, 12:08 AM   #8
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.
.

...nice pictures of small towns America....keep up good work, more please....
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Old November 8th, 2009, 12:20 AM   #9
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Williamsport, Ohio and Deer Creek State Park

Williamsport, Ohio is a small farming community of about 1,000 people located about 30 miles Southwest of Columbus. Its also my hometown. I included it with my Columbus album because its in Pickaway County, which is one of the conties which make up the Greater Columbus region (I believe 7 counties make it up).


Deer Creek State Park

This road was named after my family, which was the first family to live on this road. Although, we now spell our name with only one "n" and not two.



Old Hanawalt Farm (Its gone down hill since my family sold it=-0( )vvvvv










Deer Creek State Park







My dog Corky running through the parking lot vvvv











Mom and Corky vvvv










































Hebron Cemetery, Crownover Mill Rd

This cemetery is the final resting place of my Great-great-great grandparents Christopher Hanawalt Sr (1809-1869) and Rebecca Cory (1812-1886). Christopher is the son of Henry Hanawalt (1789-1831) and Mary Caughty (?-1846) and the grandson of Henry George Hanawalt (1721-1794) and Catherine Lehman (?-?) of McVaytown PA, and formerly of Ulm, Germany.

Mary Anne Hanawalt (1836-1907. Never married)








CHRISTOPHER C. HANAWALT, whose fine farm of 202 acres, all in one body, is situated on the Foster road in Monroe township, belongs to one of the pioneer families of Ohio and lives on land which was settled on by his maternal grandfather when all this country was the abode only of wild beasts and Indians. Mr. Hanawalt was born on this farm, on March 10, 1853, and is a son of Christopher and Rebecca (Corry) Hanawalt.

The story of the development of any new section has much to interest any true lover of his country, and it is both pleasant and profitable to recall the efforts of the indomitable pioneers who, through their courage and industry, converted this beautiful part of Ohio into the land of peace and prosperity which is exemplified on every side. The Hanawalt family originated in Germany, where Henry Hanawalt, the paternal grandfather of our subject, was born and married. As his family increased, he was led to think of establishing a home across the Atlantic, where many of his countrymen had found comfortable homes awaiting their industry and where conditions were less difficult than in Germany at that time. The Hanawalts came to Ohio and settled in Ross County, and there with German thrift they prospered until the father was accidentally drowned in Paint Creek. He had a numerous family but all the names preserved to us are : Samuel, George, John and Christopher.

Christopher Hanawalt was born in Ross County, Ohio, and his boyhood and youth passed as do those of children who are early bereft of a father. That he grew into an exemplary young man is sufficiently proved by the fact that his father-in-law, Stephen Corry, so highly thought of him and had such confidence in his ability and honesty, as to will him one of his most valuable farms, this being the property on which our subject now resides. To the original tract Christopher Hanawalt added until he owned 202 acres. His death occurred October 30, 1869. He married Rebecca Corry, who was born in Ross County and was a daughter of Stephen and Rhoda Corry.

Stephen Cony was a very early pioneer in Ross County, Ohio. He came to America from England with his wife and two brothers, and settled first on the present site of the newer portions of Chillicothe. Here he cleared a number of acres of land, which he later exchanged for 300 acres in what is now Frankfort. Mr. Corry assisted in building many of the early homes in Chillicothe, many of these being of logs, and he nailed on the first clapboard roof ever used in that city. When he removed his family to Frankfort, the trip was made in an ox cart, through an almost unbroken forest. It was' partly the result of an obstruction in the path that caused the Corry family to locate just where they did. A great elm tree had been blown down and when Mr. Corry saw that it would furnish sufficient bark with which to construct a shanty that would provide shelter for the night, he hastened to utilize the building material at hand and that night the family slept under a roof. The light of the morning showed the location a desirable one and Mr. Cony decided that it would be unnecessary to go further and began to make preparations to establish here a permanent home.

The whole extent of this sketch might be filled with interesting incidents relative to the establishing of this pioneer home, including visits of many curious but not otherwise offensive Indians, while the father was on a trip to the distant mill, and the unwelcome visits.

http://www.heritagepursuit.com/Picka...awayBio590.htm

Christopher Hanawalt Sr. vvvv





Rebecca Cory Hanawalt vvvv













The Village of Williamsport














































My old house on Allen Street vvvv







Methodist Church vvvv









Springlawn Cemetery is just outside of town on Rt 22. My Great-great grandpartents, Christopher Hanawalt Jr (1853-1935) and Anne Grice Hanawalt (1870-1896) are buried there, along with aunt Rebecca (1851-1938).










Williamsport Christian Cemetery was recently restored and surprisingly, has alot of vets. Even a few from as far back as the Revolution.
































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Old November 8th, 2009, 12:30 AM   #10
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In keeping with the Pickaway County theme I figured it would be a good idea to post pics of the county seat, Circleville.

History

Noted frontier explorer Christopher Gist was the first recorded European visitor to the Circleville area. Gist reached "Maguck," a small Delaware town of about 10 families on the east bank of the Scioto River and the south side of Circleville, on January 20, 1751, and remained in the town until January 24.

Circleville was founded in 1810. It derived its name from the circular portion of a large Hopewell culture earthwork upon which it was built. The original town plan integrated Circleville into the preexisting land with a street layout of concentric circles. An octagonal courthouse stood directly in the center.

Dissatisfaction rose with Circleville's layout, however, and in 1837, the Ohio General Assembly authorized the "Circleville Squaring Company" to convert it into a conventional grid. By 1856, this had been completed in several phases. No remaining traces of the original earthworks remain, though a few old buildings retain curved walls that were part of the original circular layout.

On October 13, 1999, an F-3 tornado hit the city. A squall line moving through the region spawned several tornadoes in the county, including the F-3 that hit town. The tornado touched down on the north side of town doing substantial damage to a barber shop and a masonry building. A furniture store was also damaged with a hole in its roof where it was reported that items from inside the store were sucked out. Damaged to nearby buildings also occurred as the tornado moved east across the north-central part of town.

The tornado then moved into a residential area in the Northwood Park neighborhood where several homes along Fairlawn Drive were destroyed. Heavy damage to trees and vehicles also occurred in this area. The tornado would lift as it crossed Edgewood Drive, but snapped the tops of some nearby trees as it lifted and moved on.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circleville,_Ohio



Looking down Main Street vvvv

































































Memorial Hall on Main Street vvvv

















The American Hotel on North Court Street. It caught on fire back in October of 2008 and was torn down just before the Pumpkin Show. It was a tragic lose. It turns out, a group of local kids robbed the furniture store on the first floor and then set a couch on fire to destroy any evidence.

Before vvvv







After vvvv



Looking up North Court Street vvvv



Our one and only theatre. It only has two screens LOL vvvv





New Pickaway County Historical Society building on North Court Street vvvv



Banks on North Court Street vvvv





Intersection of North Court and Main Streets vvvv





Main Street vvvv


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Old November 8th, 2009, 12:56 AM   #11
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Erie Canal, Circleville, Ohio. I













State Dam and feeder Canal Park on Canal Road vvvv















Scioto River in the background vvvv



















Alitte ways down Canal Road vvvv



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Old November 8th, 2009, 01:07 AM   #12
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Erie Canal, Circleville, Ohio II





Across the Scioto River vvvv











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Old November 8th, 2009, 01:11 AM   #13
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Very nice.
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Old November 8th, 2009, 01:18 AM   #14
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Excellent tour of Ohio! Thanks for posting these photos.
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Old November 8th, 2009, 01:39 AM   #15
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Lancaster (is not pronounced LAN-ka-ster but LANG-kiss-ter by most locals) is a city in Fairfield County, Ohio, in the United States. As of the 2000 census, the city population was 35,335. It is located near the Hocking River, approximately 33 miles (53 km) southeast of Columbus, Ohio. It is the county seat of Fairfield County. The current mayor of Lancaster is Republican David S. Smith, who took office in January 2004. In November 2007, Smith won reelection to a second four-year term commencing in January 2008.

The earliest known inhabitants of the southeastern and central Ohio region were the Hopewell, Adena, and Fort Ancient Native Americans, of whom little evidence survived, beyond the burial and ceremonial mounds built throughout the Ohio and Mississippi valleys. Many mounds and burial sites have also yielded archaeological artifacts. (See also: Serpent Mound and Hopewell Culture National Historic Park, which though not located in Fairfield County proper, are very close by.)

Prior to and immediately after European settlement, the land today comprising Lancaster and Fairfield County, Ohio was inhabited variously by the Shawnee, Iroquois, Wyandot, and other Native American tribes. It served as a natural crossroads for the inter-tribal and intra-tribal wars fought at various times (See also: Beaver Wars). Noted frontier explorer Christopher Gist reached the vicinity of Lancaster on January 19, 1751, when he visited the small Delaware town of "Hockhocking" nearby. Leaving the area the next day, Gist rode southwest to "Maguck," another Delaware town near Circleville.

Having been ceded to the United States by Great Britain after the American Revolution by the Treaty of Paris, the lands north of the Ohio River and west of the Appalachian Mountains became, in 1784, incorporated into the Northwest Territory. White settlers began to encroach on Native American lands in the Ohio Territory. As the new government of the United States began to cast its eye westward, the stage was set for the series of campaigns that culminated in the Battle of Fallen Timbers in 1794 , and the Treaty of Greenville in 1795. With pioneer settlement within Ohio made legal and safe from Indian raids, developers began to speculate in land sales in earnest.

Knowing that such speculation, combined with Congressional grants of land sections to veterans of the Revolution, could result in a lucrative opportunity, Ebenezer Zane in 1796 petitioned the US Congress to grant him a contract to blaze a trail through Ohio, from Wheeling, West Virginia, to Limestone, Kentucky, (near modern Maysville, Kentucky) a distance of 266 miles (428 km). As part of the deal, Zane was awarded square-mile tracts of land at the points where his trace crossed the Hocking, Muskingum, and Scioto rivers. Zane's Trace, as it has become known, was completed by 1797 , and as Zane's sons began to carve the square-mile tract astride the Hocking into saleable plots, the city of Lancaster formally came into being in 1800. It predated the formal establishment of the State of Ohio by three years.

The initial settlers were predominantly of German stock, and emigrated from Pennsylvania. Ohio's longest continuously operating newspaper, the Lancaster Eagle Gazette, was born of a merger of the early Der Ohio Adler, founded about 1807, with the Ohio Gazette, founded in the 1830s. The two newspapers were ferocious competitors—they were on opposite sides of the Civil War, as was the split populace of the city itself—until they merged in 1937. This was shortly after the Gazette was acquired by glassmaker Anchor-Hocking. The newspaper is currently part of the Newspaper Network of Central Ohio, which is in turn a unit of Gannett, Inc.

Initially known as New Lancaster, and later shortened by city ordinance (1805), the town quickly grew; formal incorporation as a city came in 1831. The connection of the Hocking Canal to the Ohio and Erie Canal in this era provided a convenient way for the region's rich agricultural produce to reach eastern markets.

Modern Lancaster is distinguished by a rich blend of 19th-century architecture (best evidenced in historic Square 13, part of Zane's original plot) and natural beauty (best evidenced by the famous Standing Stone, today known as Mount Pleasant) with all the typical modern accoutrements of a small-medium-sized American city.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lancaster,_Ohio


Downtown. Part One

Courthouse vvvv















St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church vvvv





















Sherif's Office vvvv

























































Decorative Arts Center of Ohio on East Main Street vvvv







Sherman House on East Main Street vvvv



















Municipal Building vvvv

















Municipal Building vvvv






























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Old November 8th, 2009, 02:38 AM   #16
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Lancaster

Downtown. Part Two







































































General William T. Sherman. A great Civil War Hero and native son. vvvv









Glass Museum (there use to be a factory on Main, but it closed a few years back and the buildings were leveled.) vvvv






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Old November 8th, 2009, 02:39 AM   #17
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Lancaster

Downtown, around the square. Part Three







Sherman Statue vvvv

















































OHHH, now THIS is comforting! lol vvvv



Municipal Building again vvvv





























Sherman House again vvvv























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Old November 8th, 2009, 11:46 AM   #18
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Amazing, great towns of Ohio looking very nice, epsecially Chilicothe
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Old November 9th, 2009, 10:03 PM   #19
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Newark, Ohio. November 9th, 2009. I


Indigenous peoples lived along the river valleys for thousands of years before European contact. More than two thousand years ago, from 100 BC to 500 AD, people of the Hopewell culture transformed the area of Newark. They built many earthen mounds and enclosures, creating the single largest earthwork complex in the Ohio River Valley. The Newark Earthworks, designated a National Historic Landmark, have been preserved to document and interpret the area's significant ancient history. The earthworks cover several square miles. The Observatory Mound, Observatory Circle, and the interconnected Octagon earthworks span nearly 3,000 feet (910 m) in length. The Octagon alone is large enough to contain four Roman Coliseums. The Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt would fit precisely inside Observatory Circle. The even larger 1,180-foot (360 m)-diameter Newark Great Circle is the largest circular earthwork in the Americas. The 8 feet (2.4 m)-high walls surround a 5 feet (1.5 m)-deep moat. At the entrance, the walls and moat are of greater and more impressive dimensions.

Contemporary archaeogeodesy and archaeoastronomy researchers have demonstrated that the Hopewell and other prehistoric cultures had advanced scientific understandings which they used to create their earthworks for astronomical observations, markings and celebrations. Researchers analyzed the placements, alignments, dimensions, and site-to-site interrelationships of the Hopewell earthworks to understand what had been done. Today, the Ohio Historical Society preserves the Great Circle Earthworks in a public park near downtown Newark, called Mound Builders Park (or the Newark Earthworks) located at 99 Cooper Ave, Newark, Ohio. The area of the Octagon Earthworks had been leased to a country club, but new arrangements in 1997 provide for more public access to it.

Later American Indian tribes inhabiting the area at the time of European contact were distant descendants of the earlier peoples.

After exploration by traders and trappers in earlier centuries, the first European-American settlers arrived in 1802, led by Gen. William C. Schenck. He named the new village after his New Jersey hometown. Later public improvements led to growth in the town, as it was linked to major transportation and trade networks. On July 4, 1825, Governor's Clinton of New York and Morrow of Ohio dug the first shovelfuls of dirt for the Ohio and Erie Canal project, at the Licking Summit near Newark, Ohio. On April 11, 1855, Newark became a stop along the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis Railroad that connected Pittsburgh to Chicago and St. Louis. On April 16, 1857, the Central Ohio Railroad connected Newark west to Columbus, and later Newark maintained a station on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad.

The Heisey Glass Company started in Newark in 1895. The factory operated there until the company's demise in 1957 due to changing tastes. Known for being of exceptional quality and craftsmanship, Heisey glass products continue to be highly sought after by collectors. The National Heisey Glass Museum, operated by the Heisey Collectors of America, Inc., is located on Sixth Street in Newark.

In 1909, the Arcade was opened. Modeled after innovative European buildings, it became one of Newark, Ohio's first successful retail emporiums. Later versions became known as shopping malls. At 60,000 square feet, the Arcade is one-third the size of an average Wal-Mart. The original architecture provides a beautiful setting that attracts shoppers to its businesses.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newark,_Ohio








































































Last edited by Chadoh25; November 9th, 2009 at 10:10 PM.
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Old November 9th, 2009, 10:22 PM   #20
Chadoh25
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