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Old July 12th, 2018, 11:50 AM   #441
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Wits researchers make carbon nanotube discovery



Siphephile Ncube

By chemically attaching nanoparticles of the rare earth element, gadolinium, to carbon nanotubes, the researchers have found that the electrical conductivity in the nanotubes can be increased by incorporating the spin properties of the gadolinium which arises from its magnetic nature. To put it plainly, the presence of a magnet in an electron transfer media introduces another degree of freedom that enhances the electron transfer, but only if tailored precisely.

Discovered in Japan in 1993, carbon nanotubes are the thinnest tubes in the universe, consisting of a cylinder of single carbon atoms. At the time of its discovery it was revolutionary, and it was expected that it could replace silicon in electronic circuits such as microchips and computer hard drives.

“Carbon nanotubes are known for their ability to carry a high amount of electrical current and they are very strong. They are very thin but electrons can move very fast in them, with speeds of up to gigahertz or terahertz, and when coupled to nanomagnets they greatly extend the functionality of the carbon nanotubes, which is required to advance modern technology through the development of high-speed spintronic devices,” says Siphephile Ncube, a PhD student at the Wits School of Physics and the lead author of the study. Her research was published in Scientific Reports on 23 May 2018.

During her PhD, Ncube collaborated with a team of researchers from the University of the Witwatersrand, University of Johannesburg and the Paul Sabatier University in France. The researchers chemically attached gadolinium nanoparticles on the surface of the carbon nanotubes to test whether the magnetism increases or inhibits the transfer of electrons through the system. The measurements to interrogate the effect of magnetic nanoparticles on a network of multi-walled carbon nanotubes were carried out at the Nanoscale Transport Physics Laboratory (NSTPL) at Wits. This facility is dedicated to novel nano-electronics and it was initiated by the NRF Nanotechnology flagship programme.

“We found that the effect of the magnetic nanoparticles is read off in the electronic transport of the nanotubes. Due to the presence of the magnet the electrons become spin polarised and the charge transfer is dependent on the magnetic state of the gadolinium. When the overall magnetic poles of the gadolinium are oppositely aligned, it causes higher resistance in the nanotubes and slows down the flows of electrons. When the magnetic poles are misaligned, it has a low resistance, and assists the electron transport,” says Ncube. This phenomenon is known as the spin valve effect, which finds wide application in the development of hard disk drives used for data storage.

Ncube started her research on carbon nanotubes as a Master’s student at the Wits School of Physics in 2011, where she made single walled carbon nanotubes by establishing a laser synthesis technique. Her work, which led to the publishing of various research articles in the field, was performed on instruments from the CSIR National Laser Centre rental pool programme. She is also the first researcher in Africa to build an electronic device that can measure the electron transfer properties of the carbon nanotubes coupled to magnetic nanoparticles. She was funded by the DST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials.

“Ncube’s research established the great potential of carbon nanotubes for ultra-fast switching device and magnetic memory applications, a realisation we have been working towards since the establishment of the NSTPL facility in 2009,” says Ncube’s PhD supervisor, Professor Somnath Bhattacharyya.

“To date, modified nanotubes have demonstrated good spin transport for devices made from individual nanotubes. For the first time we have demonstrated spin mediated electron transport in a network of nanotubes without incorporation of magnetic leads.”

For more information contact Siphephile Ncube, Wits School of Physics, [email protected], www.wits.ac.za

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Old July 12th, 2018, 04:10 PM   #442
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New system to help Transnet monitor the condition of its locomotives



CSIR and Transnet engineers are developing the first 13 units of a system that monitors the condition of Transnet’s locomotives, following the earlier successful deployment of two prototypes. The system will enable Transnet to implement predictive maintenance and detect rail infrastructure defects.

Transnet Freight Rail requires the ability to track and trace its fleet of locomotives and determine its condition. Currently, the staff offload data from some of the systems on board the locomotives manually.

The newly developed locomotive condition monitoring system provides an alternative, automated solution, which gathers sensor and fault data through a real-time mechanism, which is then sent to the Transnet servers automatically for evaluation. The system has been designed and tested on all applicable rail standards. It has a unique communications module that integrates GPRS/3G, WiFi, satellite and ultra-high frequency radio into a single module, allowing communication even in adverse conditions. An integrated battery back-up system allows the device to function for at least one hour in the event of a power failure.

The platform has been designed to allow easy expansion of both hardware and software capabilities and there are plans to implement on-board real-time data analysis. Through machine learning and computer vision algorithms, the system is used to implement predictive maintenance, as well as detect rail infrastructure defects.

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Old July 13th, 2018, 10:57 AM   #443
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MeerKAT radio telescope inaugurated







After a decade in design and construction, the MeerKAT radio telescope, located about 90 km from Canarvon in the Northern Cape, was inaugurated on Friday.

The MeerKAT is the precursor to the R10-billion Square Kilometre Array (SKA) – an international enterprise to build the largest and most sensitive radio telescope globally. Its infrastructure will be located in Africa and Australia.


The MeerKAT will be integrated into the mid-frequency component of SKA Phase 1 by 2020.

At the inauguration of the MeerKAT on Friday, which was officiated by Deputy President David Mabuza, a panorama obtained with the new telescope was unveiled that reveals extraordinary detail in the region surrounding the supermassive black hole at the centre of the Milky Way galaxy.




According to South African Radio Astronomy Observatory chief scientist Fernando Camilo, the centre of the galaxy is an “obvious target” for demonstrating the science capabilities of the new instrument.

The centre of the Milky Way, about 25 000 light years away, he explained, is unique, visually striking and full of unexplained phenomena. Lying behind the Sagittarius constellation, the centre of the Milky Way is “forever enshrouded by intervening clouds of gas and dust, making it invisible from earth using ordinary telescopes”.

However, the infrared, X-ray and radio wavelengths penetrate the obscuring dust and open a window into this distinctive region with its unique four-million solar mass black hole.

ABOUT MEERKAT

The MeerKAT radio telescope comprises 64 antennas, each about 13.5 m in diameter, located on baselines of up to 8 km.

The dishes are of a highly efficient design with up to four cryogenic receiver systems operating in different bands of the radio spectrum.

The first installed set of receivers operates between frequencies of 900 MHz and 1 670 MHz.

The vast amounts of data from the 64 dishes are processed at speeds of up to 275 Gb/s in real-time by a “correlator”, followed by a “science processor”, both purpose-built.

After further offline analysis, images of the radio sky are generated.

The primary industry partner on the manufacturing of the MeerKAT antennas Stratosat Datacom, leads a technology consortium including international partners US-based General Dynamics Satcom and Germany-based Vertex Antennentechnik.

At least 75% of the components making up the MeerKAT dish have been manufactured in South Africa by several subcontractors.

WHY THE NAME?

The telescope was originally known as the Karoo Array Telescope (KAT) and was designed to comprise 20 receptors.

When the South African government increased the budget to allow for the construction of 64 receptors, the team renamed it MeerKAT, which translated from Afrikaans to English means 'more of KAT'.

The meerkat, or Suricata suricatta, is also a small mammal that lives in the Karoo region.

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Old July 25th, 2018, 08:19 AM   #444
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Quadriplegic Capetonian learns to walk again thanks to a robotic suit



A young quadriplegic Capetonian, who was left paralysed following a gymnastics accident in 2012, is learning to walk again thanks to the Ekso Suit, a robotic exoskeleton.

The suit is a mobility device used around the world in rehabilitation. It is controlled by a trained operator and stabilises patients' joints and helps strengthen weakened muscles.

Robert Evans, a PhD candidate in exercise science and sports medicine at the University of Cape Town, is using the powered exoskeleton to help people walk again. The Ekso Suit, produced by the US company Ekso Bionics, is currently in use at the Sports Science Institute of South Africa in Cape Town.

The suit uses sensors to detect when a patient starts to shift their weight, says Evans. This triggers a step: The suit uses motors in the hips and knees to propel the user forward.

https://www.businessinsider.co.za/th...k-again-2018-7
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Old July 25th, 2018, 01:02 PM   #445
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Researchers build scientific research cloud to process images from the MeerKAT telescope



Three universities are making strides in an extensive project to build a computing infrastructure capable of processing the vast amounts of data that will come from the MeerKAT telescope.

The Inter-University Institute for Data Intensive Astronomy (IDIA) has developed a scientific research cloud to enable astronomers to carry out scientific research on the data generated by large science instruments like the MeerKAT telescope and other Square Kilometre Array (SKA) pathfinder telescopes.

“The SKA is addressing the fundamental questions about the universe in which we live. But these fantastic science goals come with a catch . . . and that is the tremendously huge stream of data. To do the investigations, we need to have the tools to work with that data,” IDIA director Professor Russ Taylor explained during an event at the Iziko Planetarium and Digital Dome, in Cape Town, this week.

He said the universities of Cape Town, the Western Cape and Pretoria had been building a research cloud to allow for this.

With the IDIA research cloud now in place, astronomers in IDIA partner universities and their scientific collaborators are able to process the data coming from the MeerKAT telescope with their scientific analysis tools running in the cloud.


Images screened at the Iziko Planetarium were built on the IDIA computing infrastructure using faint radio waves from a distant part of the universe captured by MeerKAT for the Mightee project. The images result from the illustrated journey of data from the MeerKAT telescope to IDIA, then through the scientific analysis pipelines built by scientists, finally turning the data into images that are used for research.

Taylor said IDIA was very proud that South African universities were spearheading the initiative.

“We need to build the solutions here to work with data. IDIA is about innovation and providing access to data. It’s also about training a new generation of people to work with the data.

“The main users of SKA and MeerKAT will be researchers at universities . . . and South African universities have the opportunity to begin the journey in South Africa. We need researchers to play with the data and test new approaches.

IDIA democratises that process so that researchers can bring their ideas to the data and science.”

IDIA visualisation developer Angus Comrie said speed was essential.

“It's important to give researchers what they want quickly. Cloud computing enables us to give them visual feedback very quickly.”

Masters student Sibusiso Mdhluli said IDIA infrastructure had helped him immensely.

“Astronomers in the old days used to take pictures and assess individual images. Machine learning takes all those images and analyses them in a short space of time.” He said he was particularly interested in seeing how other disciplines such as medicine could benefit from the infrastructure.

IDIA is working with the South African National Research Network, as well as the South African Radio Astronomy Observatory, which has a science processing facility at the Centre for High-Performance Computing.

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Old July 31st, 2018, 08:10 AM   #446
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South Africa has the world’s biggest 3D printer – and it takes up to R7.5 million in titanium powder to fill it



South Africa’s biggest 3D printer is also the largest in the world, and could print a full-sized adult man using titanium powder - although it would be very expensive.

The printer, designed and built as part of a collaboration between Aerosud Innovation Centre and the CSIR’s National Laser Centre in Pretoria, uses titanium powder to build its custom-made products. It was funded by the Department of Science and Technology.

The machine can print parts up to 2m x 60cm x 60cm, says Marius Vermeulen, programme manager at Aeroswift. But it is very expensive - to fill the machine with enough titanium powder would cost in the region of R7.5 million - so the engineers made sure that the machine could also make smaller parts, allowing them to focus on producing parts to customer specifications.

One client is AHRLAC (which stands for Advanced High-performance Reconnaissance Light Aircraft), which is using Aeroswift components in its planes. We are supplying South African parts from South African machines to South African aircraft,” says CSIR National Laser Centre commercialisation manager Hardus Greyling.

https://www.businessinsider.co.za/so...fill-it-2018-7
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Old August 13th, 2018, 12:56 PM   #447
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https://twitter.com/IREMBRIGHT/statu...16793410752512
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Old August 22nd, 2018, 04:28 PM   #448
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What’s stopping young African scientists from achieving their potential

Young African scientists face persistent barriers which cause them to leave their own countries, and even academia. This means the continent’s work force loses highly trained people who are crucial for scientific and technological advancement, and for economic development.

It’s estimated that 20,000 highly educated professionals leave the continent annually, with up to 30% of Africa’s scientists among them.

A number of factors contribute to this trend. The extreme factors include war and political instability. But the more common “pushes” are a desire for higher pay, better opportunities, and the search for a conducive research environment – one where infrastructure and management help drive careers and research potential.

To identify all the barriers and develop strategies to address them, the Global Young Academy – an organisation of 200 talented young scientists and over 200 alumni from 83 countries – established the Global State of Young Scientists (GloSYS) Africa project. Working with local research partners and international higher education experts, the project aims to identify the challenges and motivations that shape young scientists’ career trajectories.

Our initial findings point to a lack of mentoring, resources and funding as key issues young scientists face across the continent. Using this data, we will be able to identify critical areas in which young scientists need support and develop innovative strategies to alleviate these challenges.

The project comes at an important time as, over the past few years, African countries have initiated programmes to increase the number of PhD graduates. But if governments don’t simultaneously develop support structures for graduates, and increase access to critical teaching and research infrastructure, these young scientists are set up to fail.

...



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Old August 22nd, 2018, 04:34 PM   #449
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Old August 31st, 2018, 07:11 PM   #450
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South Africa wins bid to host world’s largest astronomy meeting in 2024

South Africa has won the bid to host the 2024 General Assembly of the International Astronomical Union (IAU), marking its first assembly on African soil in its 105 years of existence.

The next General Assembly will be held in South Korea in 2021, followed by Cape Town in 2024.

The decision was announced by newly-elected IAU president, Professor Ewine van Dishoeck, at the association’s current General Assembly, in Vienna.

Science and Technology Minister Mmamoloko Kubayi-Ngubane on Friday congratulated the bid committee for their work and said securing the hosting rights to the event was proof that Africa is the next big hub for astronomy, with megaprojects including the MeerKAT, Square Kilometre Array, African Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network, as well as the Southern African Large Telescope and the HESS and Hirax telescopes.

This, she said, positions the continent as a destination for cutting-edge multi-wavelength astronomy.

"I am delighted that the international community is recognising the investments and concerted efforts that South Africa has been making in growing the discipline of astronomy in Africa. We welcome this positive endorsement by the IAU and we will do our best to support the planning process to ensure that the 2024 IAU General Assembly, [which will be hosted] in Cape Town [is] a resounding success," she said.

http://www.engineeringnews.co.za/art...024-2018-08-31
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Old September 6th, 2018, 01:49 PM   #451
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Repositioning Africa in global knowledge production

Introduction

Sub-Saharan Africa accounts for 13·5% of the global population but less than 1% of global research output. In 2008, Africa produced 27 000 published papers—the same number as The Netherlands. Informed by a nuanced understanding of the causes of the current scenario, we propose action that should be taken by African universities, governments, and development partners to foster the development of research-active universities on the continent.

Background

The history of modern universities in sub-Saharan Africa dates to the early 19th century with the establishment of Fourah Bay College, Sierra Leone, in 1827. By the end of the 1950s, however, sub-Saharan Africa had few universities.1 At independence, many African countries established universities, albeit with few trained Africans to run them. The political elite in newly-independent African countries valued higher education—seeing it as “a strategic weapon in the fight against poverty, ignorance, and disease”.2, 3 As captured by Mamdani, “At independence, every country needed to show its flag, national anthem, national currency, and national university as proof that the country had indeed become independent”.
4The new governments defined higher education policy within their strategies for national development5—driven by a desire to decolonise the continent and achieve socioeconomic progress.6 Universities were expected to train the professionals needed in the expanding public service, to extend the frontiers of knowledge, and to serve the national economy.7 This link between higher education and national development incentivised governments to fund universities. Consequently, during the 1960s, 10–25% of government expenditure in Africa went to education. Of that, 10–35% went to higher education.8 Political commitment was strong with the first regional meeting of African Heads of State and Government on higher education held in Addis Ababa in May, 1961, and subsequently the conference of African university leaders in Madagascar, in 1962.9 Ironically, the 1962 meeting discussed the same intractable issues animating contemporary discussions about the place of universities in national development: staffing, financing, and content of curricula.6, 10 The 1960s and 1970s were something of a golden era for higher education in Africa.

The 1980s witnessed reversals in the fortunes of African universities. Many spiralled into decline as national economies suffered because of the oil crisis and International Monetary Fund-sponsored structural adjustment programmes;11 university campuses quickly became centres of political opposition and civil unrest.12, 13 Among other outcomes, major cuts in funding for public sector institutions occurred. Poignantly, this coincided with rapid growth in university enrolment and the establishment of more universities in response to growing numbers of young people seeking access to higher education. Enrolment rose steadily from 181 000 in 1975, to 600 000 by 1980, and 1 750 000 by 1995.14 Reductions in funding, amidst growing numbers of students, created tensions between the political elite and academia, which precluded working together in search of solutions. This has had lasting consequences for universities. The growth in demand for higher education continues; between 2000 and 2010, annual enrolment more than doubled from 2·3 million to 5·2 million.15

Over and above structural adjustment demands to reduce overall public spending, education funding was preferentially diverted to primary and secondary education on the belief propagated by the World Bank, subsequently contested,16 that the rate of return from primary and secondary education was greater than that from higher education.17, 18 Top faculty at African universities emigrated as working conditions deteriorated. Africans graduating abroad with post-graduate degrees chose to remain outside Africa to be productive.19 These factors disproportionally affected research and innovation, research training, and policy engagement.

Road to renewal

Since the 1990s, African universities have sought to regain their role as agents of transformation. Under pressure from mounting evidence on the destructive effect of structural adjustment in Africa, the World Bank changed its policy in favour of supporting higher education, thereby affirming universities' significance in political and socioeconomic transformation.20 A 2014 World Bank study21 showed that sub-Saharan Africa has increased the quantity and quality of its research output substantially in the past 20 years: it more than doubled its annual research output from 2003 to 2012; its overall share of global research increased from 0·44% to 0·72% during the same period. Africa's global citations have also grown from 0·06–0·16% to 0·12–0·28%.22 This growth is strongly linked to advances in health sciences research, most of which is externally funded rather than the result of deliberate decisions by African governments. Health sciences research accounts for 45% of all sub-Saharan African research.21 Research output for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) lag behind other disciplines and has been declining annually at 0·2% since 2002. On a per capita basis, African universities remain severely underfunded in view of increasing enrolment, the establishment of new universities, and the declining purchasing power of African currencies.14

...

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/l...068-7/fulltext
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Old September 12th, 2018, 04:51 PM   #452
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South African draft white paper on Science, Technology and Innovation

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Old September 13th, 2018, 04:12 AM   #453
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'Oldest known drawing' found on tiny rock in South Africa




Scientists say they have discovered humanity's oldest known drawing on a small fragment of rock in South Africa.

The drawing is about 73,000 years old, and shows cross-hatch lines sketched onto stone with red ochre pigment.

Scientists discovered the small fragment of the drawing - which some say looks a bit like a hashtag - in Blombos Cave on the southern coast.

The find is "a prime indicator of modern cognition" in our species, the report says.

While scientists have found older engravings around the world, research published on Wednesday in the journal Nature says the lines on this stone mark the first abstract drawing.

The article says the ancient artist used an "ochre crayon" to etch it onto the stone.

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-45501205
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Old September 28th, 2018, 05:44 AM   #454
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Huge new giant dinosaur species discovered in South Africa





Millions of years before the brontosaurus roamed the Earth, a massive relative was lumbering around South Africa.

Scientists think this early Jurassic dinosaur was, at the time, the largest land creature ever to have lived. And unlike the even bigger creatures that came later, they think it could pop up on its hind legs.

They've dubbed the newly discovered dinosaur Ledumahadi mafube, which translates in the Sesotho language to "a giant thunderclap at dawn." And the discovery sheds light on how giants like the brontosaurus got so huge.

The discovery didn't happen quickly — it took years to get this dinosaur out of the ground. "It's quite a long, sort of drawn-out story. It starts, I think, around 1990," says Universidade de São Paulo paleontologist Blair McPhee, one of the researchers who discovered the dinosaur.

McPhee says a few huge bones were discovered near South Africa's border with Lesotho during a construction project. They were brought to the University of the Witwatersrand, where they sat for more than a decade.

https://www.npr.org/2018/09/27/65212...n-south-africa
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Old October 11th, 2018, 01:08 PM   #455
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Fassi Kafyeke, the Congolese engineer who designs the aircraft of multinational Bombardier



Fassi Kafyeke is the Senior Director, Strategic Technologies and Advanced Design, Aerospace Product Development Engineering at Bombardier Aerospace, a subsidiary of Bombardier, the world's third-largest employer and marketer in the field of aircraft construction after Boeing and Airbus.

For 36 years, thanks to an extraordinary technical know-how, Fassi Kafyeke has been working on the design of various Bombardier aircraft: very long-range business jets, regional jets, water bomber planes (ABE) etc.

He is one of the initiators of the current UK-Canada AI Innovation Challenge, which aims to find out how artificial intelligence can improve aircraft performance by making them less expensive and more environmentally friendly.

Start-ups, large-scale companies, SMEs and researchers from Canada and the United Kingdom will present innovative solutions to address a problem targeted by Bombardier. "Artificial intelligence promises significant improvements in all areas of our industry: design, development, manufacturing and operation. Bombardier is working with artificial intelligence experts from Canada and the UK to deliver on these promises and apply these emerging technologies to the development of next-generation rail products and aircraft. With this challenge, we are creating opportunities for potential collaboration that could evolve our ongoing research into icing dynamics and further improve our simulation predictions, "said Fassi Kafyeke.

For the latter, the environment and climate change have become the source of innovation in aeronautics. The cleaner a plane is, the less expensive it is.

Strategic Technologies and Advanced Design

Fassi Kafyeke holds a Civil Engineering Degree in Aerospace from the University of Liege (Belgium), a Master's degree in Air Transport Engineering from the Cranfield Institute of Technology (UK) and a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering. (Aerodynamics) of the École polytechnique de Montréal. He joined the Canadian multinational Bombardier as an aerodynamicist in 1982.

In 1996 he was promoted to head of advanced aerodynamics, responsible for the design and wind tunnel testing of all business jets, regional jets and the CSeries. In 2007, he was again promoted to Director of Strategic Technologies.

Since 2015, he has been Senior Director, Strategic Technology and Advanced Design, and a member of Bombardier's Aerospace Product Engineering Leadership Team. He deals with technological innovation, product innovation and eco-design.

The flagship Global Express

Among his best achievements, the business jet Global Express whose aerodynamics he designed.

Bombardier's Global Express is one of the preferred jets for private aviation passengers thanks to its refined leather interior and engines.

Heads of state and celebrities such as Celine Dion and Steven Spielberg own the site. At its launch in 1993, the Global Express was the first long-range jet model, surpassing its competitors in terms of performance and design.

Comfortable, fast and enduring, it was the only one equipped with such a large cabin and able to fly from New York to Tokyo non-stop.

In addition, Fassi Kafyeke is also the designer of Bombardier's CS100, a 100 to 150-seat aircraft considered to be the most environmentally friendly in its class on the planet.

From metallurgy in the DRC to aerospace in Europe

Born on December 30, 1956 in Moba, Katanga Province, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Congolese engineer based in Montreal has been involved in the creation and design of all Bombardier aircraft since 1982. his secondary education in the DRC, where he lived with his parents (a father judge and a teacher mother) and his three brothers and sisters in the cities of Bukavu, Kinshasa and Lubumbashi.

Passionate about aeronautics, Fassi Kafyeke was a gifted mathematician. The one who dreamed of flying a plane, became an architect of the design of these devices. Yet, in the absence of an aeronautical industry in the DRC at the time, Fassi Kafyeke began by doing engineering studies in metallurgy.

In parallel, in 1976, he applied for a scholarship to study aerodynamics in Europe. That year, 37 files were selected for the award of the scholarship, including his last position ... "the worst". However, Fassi Kafyeke is a brilliant student, thanks, he explains, to his teachers who pushed him to go further than he had imagined.

Turning

After graduating as a civil engineer in aerospace in 1980, at the age of 24, he is preparing to return to Congo, after having successfully completed an interview to join the former national airline Air Zaïre.

But one of his professors suggests that he do a master's degree in air transport engineering in Britain at the Cranfield institute of technology. Fassi Kafyeke takes this opportunity to improve his knowledge of digital aerodynamics. During his studies at this university, a Canadair-Bombardier team visited the campus to recruit engineers.

Once again, one of his teachers advises him to pass the interview, which he succeeds successfully. With a job offer from Bombardier, he moved to Canada, where he has since worked for Bombardier.

He is also a professor at the École Polytechnique de Montréal, vice-president of the Board of Directors of the Consortium for Research and Innovation in Aerospace in Quebec (CRIAQ) and a member of the board of directors of the McGill Institute for Aerospace Engineering (MIAE).

Married and father of three daughters, Fassi Kafyeke is also the author of several publications including the book "Computational Fluid Dynamics for Engineers".

He holds the title of "Fellow" of Engineers Canada, a distinction that honors individuals who have made outstanding contributions to the advancement of the engineering profession in Canada for at least ten years.

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Fassi Kafyeke, l’ingénieur congolais qui conçoit les avions de la multinationale Bombardier

Fassi Kafyeke est le Directeur principal, technologies stratégiques et conception avancée, ingénierie de développement des produits aéronautiques chez Bombardier Aéronautique , filiale de la multinationale canadienne Bombardier , le troisième employeur et vendeur au monde dans le domaine de la construction aéronautique après Boeing et Airbus.

Depuis 36 ans, grâce à un savoir-faire technique hors du commun, Fassi Kafyeke travaille à la conception de différents avions de Bombardier : jets d’affaires à très long rayon d’action, jets régionaux , avions bombardier d’eau (ABE), etc.

Il est l’un des initiateurs de l’actuel « UK-Canada AI Innovation Challenge » (Défi d’innovation en intelligence artificielle, UK-Canada) qui vise à savoir comment l’intelligence artificielle peut améliorer les performances des avions en les rendant moins coûteux et plus respectueux de l’environnement.

...
https://africanshapers.com/fassi-kaf...ets-daffaires/
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Old October 26th, 2018, 04:04 AM   #456
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Human urine bricks invented by South African students



Human urine has been used to create environmentally friendly bricks by university students in South Africa.

They combined urine with sand and bacteria in a process that allows the bricks to solidify at room temperature.

"It's essentially the same way that coral is made in the ocean," Dyllon Randall, their supervisor at the University of Cape Town, told the BBC.

Normal bricks need to be baked in high-temperature kilns that produce large amounts of carbon dioxide.

The engineering students at the University of Cape Town (UCT) have been harvesting urine from men's toilets.

After first making a solid fertiliser, the leftover liquid is then used in a biological process "to grow" what the university calls "bio-bricks".

The process is called microbial carbonate precipitation.

The bacteria produces an enzyme that breaks down urea in the urine, forming calcium carbonate, which then binds the sand into rock hard, grey bricks.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-45978942
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Old December 25th, 2018, 05:45 AM   #457
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Ghana students learning circuit board primary school

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Old December 27th, 2018, 02:38 PM   #458
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ZACube-2 satellite blasts into space to keep an eye on SA’s oceans and veld fires



A nanosatellite, considered to be SA’s most advanced to date, was launched into orbit from Russia on Thursday morning.

ZACube-2, which weighs just 4kg with dimensions of only a few centimetres, is expected to help advance SA’s ocean economy and monitor veld fires. The satellite was launched along with several others belonging to countries such as the US and Spain.

ZACube-2 will track ships off the country’s coastline using an automatic identification system. This is not only aimed at improving the logistics of registered and legally operating ships, but also to detect trespassers.

“The extent of looting of our fish resources, for example, represents a loss of billions of rands to criminal syndicates that can be nabbed through an effective monitoring and enforcement system,” the department of science and technology said in a statement.

The satellite is also part of a natural and man-made disaster monitoring project.

https://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/na...nd-veld-fires/
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Old December 28th, 2018, 05:31 AM   #459
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NicSA View Post
ZACube-2 satellite blasts into space to keep an eye on SA’s oceans and veld fires



A nanosatellite, considered to be SA’s most advanced to date, was launched into orbit from Russia on Thursday morning.

ZACube-2, which weighs just 4kg with dimensions of only a few centimetres, is expected to help advance SA’s ocean economy and monitor veld fires. The satellite was launched along with several others belonging to countries such as the US and Spain.

ZACube-2 will track ships off the country’s coastline using an automatic identification system. This is not only aimed at improving the logistics of registered and legally operating ships, but also to detect trespassers.

“The extent of looting of our fish resources, for example, represents a loss of billions of rands to criminal syndicates that can be nabbed through an effective monitoring and enforcement system,” the department of science and technology said in a statement.

The satellite is also part of a natural and man-made disaster monitoring project.

https://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/na...nd-veld-fires/
Nice, we really need a constellation of these
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Old January 31st, 2019, 06:44 PM   #460
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Yes, Cloud computing is very useful for researchers hosts a network of remote servers on to manage the process and save data through the Internet. To Get more information visit Best Cloud Computing training Institute
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