Philippi Mini-City - 472ha - Philippi, Cape Town - SkyscraperCity
 

forums map | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Continental Forums > Africa > Southern Africa > South Africa > Regional Development and Discussion > Western Cape > Cape Town > Projects


Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old January 29th, 2009, 01:34 PM   #1
Mo Rush
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 28,967
Likes (Received): 80

Philippi Mini-City - 472ha - Philippi, Cape Town

the obsession with "mini-cities". sounds like a low cost Century City. eish

Developer plans mini city for 472ha of 'farmland'



By Anél Powell

A HUGE 472-hectare "mini-city", roughly twice the area of Century City and including 20 000 residential units and retail and industrial space, is being proposed for the Philippi horticultural area, the City of Cape Town has confirmed.

The land borders Mitchells Plain and Strandfontein and is zoned for agricultural use.

Mayoral committee member for housing, Dan Plato, confirmed that developer Rapicorp had applied for rezoning of teh land so it could build an "integrated human settlement" with mixed land uses, including residential, retail, industrial and public facilities such as schools.

But Plato said the application had to go through council processes before any decision could be made.

"We know the sensitivity of the land. We will deal with this application like any other zoning application."

Concerned residents in the area said the development would have "disastrous environmental consequences that would ultimately lead to the demise of the entire horticultural area".

Paul Olden, of consultants Urban Dynamics Western Cape, said that while the mini-city would be developed within the Philippi horticultural area, the land was a "heavily degraded and defunct mining area" and less than 5% of it was used for agriculture.

One resident, who asked that she not be named, said Rapicorp's application would overturn long-standing planning legislation that reserved the land for vegetable farming once the sand mining operations were completed.

But Olden said that, unlike the northern section of the horticultural area where vegetables were grown for consumption, the 472ha were vacant or underused.

"As land suitable for large-scale urban development of this nature is virtually non-existent within the urban edge of the Cape Metropole, the development application presents a substantial opportunity to promote the sustainable development of a natural link to the southern suburbs."

The resident disagreed, saying the land would provide valuable agricultural land once the sand mining had been completed. She said there was more appropriate land the city for development.

"Despite problems experienced in the area, agriculture in the Philippi horticultural area has been expanding over the years and continues to play an important social, environmental and economic role in the city," the resident said.

Residents say the development would threaten the Cape Flats aquifer, but Olden said further agricultural activity on the land would do so.

Olden said the mixed-income residential units would take up about 180ha, with 45ha being set aside for community facilities. The rest of the land would be used for industrial and commercial developments.

But a large portion of the land would remain open space, including sensitive vegetation and wetland areas.

Olden said the development would lead to a substantial investment in electricity, water, sanitation and refuse removal services. He said the Cape Flats sewage treatment works had the capacity to service the entire development.

"That bulk capacity is available to service the entire development at a marginal cost is significant as it presents an unprecedented opportunity to provide housing opportunities at a substantially lower cost."

The housing units will be for lower to middle-income home owners in accordance with the province's urban densification requirements.

Olden said the planned development would provide more than 30 000 jobs, excluding jobs created during construction. Sand mining operations provided less than 100 jobs, while intensive horticulture would only provide 230 jobs.

"Not only is the proposed development a massive and in many ways unique project, but it will also set a new standard for developments of this kind."

[email protected]

Published on the web by Cape Times on January 28, 2009. © Cape Times 2009. All rights reserved.
Mo Rush no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old January 29th, 2009, 02:11 PM   #2
Lydon
Moderator
 
Lydon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 23,035
Likes (Received): 6141

I like Century City, but this is getting ridiculous now.
__________________
CAPE TOWN
Lydon no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2009, 02:57 PM   #3
Mo Rush
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 28,967
Likes (Received): 80

i see they would focus on density which is one positive. Until I see/find plans it sounds like a mini-township.
Mo Rush no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old January 29th, 2009, 03:07 PM   #4
Lydon
Moderator
 
Lydon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 23,035
Likes (Received): 6141

I trust it will be well-kept, which is another good thing.
__________________
CAPE TOWN
Lydon no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2009, 05:09 PM   #5
mike2005
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Sandton
Posts: 1,189
Likes (Received): 15

I cant see this happening for a long time with the current economic downturn. They are going to struggle to find banks willing to lend to such a project.
mike2005 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2009, 05:13 PM   #6
Mo Rush
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 28,967
Likes (Received): 80

Quote:
Originally Posted by mike2005 View Post
I cant see this happening for a long time with the current economic downturn. They are going to struggle to find banks willing to lend to such a project.
the concept will be more interesting. finance is always going to be an issue but more banks are coming on board in Cape Town fund housing projects.
Mo Rush no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 14th, 2009, 08:17 AM   #7
Mo Rush
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 28,967
Likes (Received): 80

City in move to protect Philippi farming area

April 14, 2009 Edition 2

Anél Powell

THE City of Cape Town, concerned about mounting development pressures and a proposal to build a 472-hectare "mini city" on prime agricultural land in Philippi, has developed draft guidelines to protect the horticultural area.

The city council is also to look at getting formal protection status for the area.

In a report to the planning and environment portfolio committee, Kier Hennessy, from the department of strategy and planning, said the Philippi horticultural area was being threatened by increasingly problematic farming conditions, the growing need for land for low-income settlements, and pressure for urban development.

Hennessy said there had been several land use applications for the area, two relating to "major" mixed use developments.

Rabicorp has applied for rezoning to allow a development that would include 20 000 homes.

The other application, submitted by farmers, is for the rezoning of 300ha they say is not viable because of the high salinity of the groundwater.

In a "rapid planning review" report on the area, the department of spatial planning and urban design has recommended that the area be recognised, managed and protected as an agricultural asset.

Hennessy said the Schaapkraal smallholdings and Weltevreden Road sections would no longer be included in the horticultural area and would be available for development.

The city should consider allocating extra staff and resources for the next five years to overcome the effects of six years of neglect, Hennessey said.

In its comment on the report, the housing directorate said there was an "urgent need" for land for housing.

"The directorate feels that every other land use is being priortised over housing."

Brian Watkyns, chairman of the planning and environment committee, said the issue was "thorny". He recommended the committee have a workshop with the housing committee before it considered the plan.
Mo Rush no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 09:25 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us