AMÉRICA LATINA | Buses de transporte público | Ônibus do transporte público - Page 3 - SkyscraperCity
 

forums map | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Latin American & Caribbean Forums > Latinscrapers > Urbanismo y Transporte | Urbanismo e Transporte > Infraestructura y Medios de Transporte

Infraestructura y Medios de Transporte Infraestrutura e Transportes | Transporte Masivo | Vialidades | Puertos | Metros


Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old August 22nd, 2006, 02:11 AM   #41
kamilo rxn
♫ Nota Loka ♫
 
kamilo rxn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: medellin colombia,greenville sc
Posts: 4,604
Likes (Received): 3

sisas vga hoy empezo k bien por pereira
__________________
Colombia

Es Pasion
kamilo rxn no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old August 22nd, 2006, 04:10 AM   #42
Bogota
BANNED
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Bogota
Posts: 3,567
Likes (Received): 6

Yo soy un defensor del Transmilenio por encima del sistema Metro.
1) Uno y principal para mi porque no me gusta andar bajo tierra, me gusta el gozar de la ciudad a medida que viajo por ella.
2) Porque el sistema TM desarrolla todo el sector por el que pasa, ya que la renovación urbana siempre incluye en ancho entero de la calle incluyendo los andenes (aceras), mobiliario urbano etc de lado a lado.
3) Porque existen los buses expresos y superexpresos que pueden usarse para cruzar la ciudad (en especial una ciudad grande) sin tener que parar en cada estación como habría que hacerse en un metro a menos que se construyan dos lineas como en Nueva York.
4) Porque no hay que hacer casi trasbordos ya que los buses cambian de linea algo imposible en un sistema metro.
5) Porque cuando esté terminado el sistema en Bogotá todo el mundo en la ciudad tendrá una estación a menos de 500 metros de distancia.
6) Porque el dinero para hacer una obra de semejantes dimensiones en terminos metro dura mucho y cuesta muchisimo.

Para mi el metro solo debería exisitir en zonas de la ciudad donde no se pueda meter un TM por espacio, nada mas.

Otra cosa es zonas suburbanas en terminos de trenes suburbanos que creo si deben entrar al centro pero con muy pocas paradas y combinando las estaciones con TM.

Aquí uno de los muchos articulos que comparan los diferentes sistemas.

Mass Transit Options for Developing Asian Cities

Rail-based Metros, or Bus Rapid Transit?

By Karl Fjellstrom, GTZ, SUTP-Asia Project Coordinator
Choices about mass transit systems are choices about the future of a city. Yet mention mass transit and most people instinctively think only of rail-based Metros. Ho Chi Minh is the latest city in the region to put forward an ambitious rail Metro expansion plan, in May announcing that agreement had been reached with a private sector consortium to conduct a feasibility study for a metropolitan rail system to be operational by 2009.

There are, however, other mass transit options. In particular, Bus Rapid Transit (BRT), a remarkable new phenomenon in the transit field, is overturning traditional preconceptions about mass transit. This article compares mass transit systems according to various key parameters. Which systems offer the greatest speeds and capacities, positive environmental impacts, shortest construction times, most flexible operation, and greatest opportunities for private sector participation, at the lowest costs?

Triumphs of hope over expectation?

Many wealthy cities in Asia have established successful rail Metro systems, including Japanese cities, Hong Kong, Seoul, Singapore, and elsewhere. Many have also suffered disappointing ridership and large financial liabilities with rail Metros, including recent airport rail lines in Hong Kong, Brisbane, Sydney, and Kuala Lumpur.

While wealthier cities have mixed experiences and can sometimes afford to heavily subsidise their rail systems, rail Metro projects throughout lower income cities in the region often represent triumphs of hope over expectation. There seem to be two main variations in the pattern of urban rail Metro development in low income cities.

According to the first variation, studies are completed and ambitious proposals developed by a consortium of private sector proponents for subway or elevated metros or light rail systems which are subsequently shelved because they are too costly. This has more or less been the path taken by cities such as Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh, Hanoi, Surabaya, and a host of others. Although not implemented, these plans are not however entirely harmless, because they can preoccupy policy-makers for years and 'stunt' the development of bus-based mass transit options. Jakarta, for example, is currently developing a Bus Rapid Transit system, but some officials continue to cling to the hope that a subway may one day emerge phoenix-like from the ashes of previous Metro plans churned out by successive consultant teams. This view - that the busway may be only a precursor to an eventual underground metro - can detract from efforts to establish a world class BRT in the city.

The second variation, which has often proved far more damaging, involves actually implementing rail-based mass transit systems. Again, the path taken by the different cities is similar. Typically a consortium puts together funding for a project, and aggressively promotes a plan which never seriously assesses more cost-effective and sustainable alternatives, underestimates the costs, and overestimates ridership. A small rail Metro of around 20 kilometres in length, costing more than US$ 1 billion, years behind schedule and tens of millions of dollars over budget, is opened amid considerable fanfare. A short time later, reality bites when officials realise that ridership is far below initial projections. Huge losses mount up, and operators go bankrupt and are nationalised.

The end result, sadly, is that the government bears the risk of very aggressive ridership forecasts and ends up being consigned to redeeming ill-conceived projects. These projects are a massive financial burden for the country and city, and often fail to meet the mobility needs of the people. Kuala Lumpur's STAR, PUTRA and the monorail together, for example, which amount to about 65km of rail, carry less than 2.5% of motorised trips in the city; much less than the city's neglected bus system. Another undesirable side-effect of government guarantees for metro projects is that they provide an incentive for high cost megaprojects and dilute normal principles of private sector risk in approaching such projects.

Due to their very high cost these rail-based MRT systems are inevitably extremely limited in length, meaning they usually serve only a small fraction of the total demand for public transport in a city. Bangkok's Skytrain for instance provides an excellent quality of service but serves only around 2.5% of all public transport trips in the city. The new Blue Line, when it opens for normal operation in September 2004, will according to realistic estimates serve another 1.5% of public transport trips. Even if a hugely expensive program of rail expansion covering 100km in Bangkok is achieved by 2010, the entire system will likely not serve more than 10% of public transport trips in the city. The neglected bus system will continue to serve around 85% of all public transport trips.

Yet even in the face of mounting Metro system losses, governments, often with the urging of a powerful rail lobby, continue to adhere to the dream of rail systems offering a magical solution to urban transport problems. Bangkok, for example, in May 2003 saw the release of a new Master Plan which advocates a rail Metro network of 100km by 2010. The Governor boldly announced that "when [rail extensions were] completed in 2009, the city's transport system would shift from roads to railway tracks." In fact, experience shows that only around 10% of metro riders are likely to be previous car users, and over the longer term in rapidly growing cities it is only the Bus Rapid Transit systems such as Curitiba and more recently Bogota which have halted or reversed the decline in the mode share of public transport relative to private cars.

Bus Rapid Transit: an alternative to rail Metros

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) is a form of customer-oriented transit combining stations, vehicles, planning, and intelligent transport systems elements into an integrated system with a unique identity. BRT can be implemented at a fraction of the cost of rail Metro systems. The best known examples are in Latin American cities such as Bogota, Colombia and Curitiba, Brazil, but there are also Asian systems in operation in Taipei, Nagoya, Istanbul, and Kunming, and systems being planned in Bangalore, Seoul, Delhi, Jakarta, and Beijing. Bus Rapid Transit typically involves busway corridors on segregated lanes and modernised bus technology. In addition to segregated lanes, BRT systems - described in more detail in next month's article - also commonly include:

Rapid boarding and alighting
Efficient fare collection
Viable business conditions for bus operators
An effective regulatory and planning body
Comfortable shelters and stations
Clean bus technologies
Modal integration and facilities for non-motorised transport
Sophisticated marketing identity
Excellence in customer service
Comparing the mass transit options

If limited coverage, high cost rail systems do not provide the answer to the mass transit needs of developing cities in Asia, what about Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)? We now compare the options according to some key parameters.

Cost

For any municipality, the infrastructure cost of a transit system is a pre-eminent decision-making factor. Bus Rapid Transit is relatively economical to develop. Without costs of excavation and expensive rail cars, Bus Rapid Transit can be over 100 times less expensive than a Metro system. Typical costs for a BRT system range from Euro 1 million to Euro 10 million per kilometre. Rail Metros, on the other hand, typically cost from Euro 50 million to Euro 200 million per kilometre.

Two systems at the same cost: For the same investment, a Bus Rapid Transit system can serve as much as 100 times the area of a rail-based system. A city with enough funding for one kilometre of Metro might be able to construct 100 km of BRT. The cost difference extends to other infrastructure items, such as stations. A busway station in Quito, Ecuador costs only about US$35,000 while a rail station in Porto Alegre that serves a similar number of persons costs US$150 million. Most rail Metro systems have operating deficits which severely constrain local budgets, as in Bangkok, Kuala Lumpur, Pusan, Sao Paulo, Manila and Mexico City. Rail systems - both Light Rail Transit and Metros - require much greater initial financial outlays than BRT, and ongoing subsidies. Though the advent of private sector concessionaires was expected by many to change this situation, the evidence is that the various new Build-Operate-Transfer projects are all in financial trouble and are nowhere achieving profitability. Alone among rail MRT systems, the Hong Kong Metro covers all its costs from farebox revenues.

Passenger capacity

There is a common misperception that Bus Rapid Transit cannot serve high passenger numbers. The results in Colombia and Brazil show that Bus Rapid Transit can handle passenger flows in the range of 20,000 to 35,000 passengers per hour per direction. In fact, BRT is forcing transport planners to re-think the way they look at passenger capacity. Traditional assumptions are based on a linear correlation between investment costs and passenger capacity. That is, they suggest that high passenger volumes are possible only with very large investments in fixed rail systesm. These assumptions have been debunked by BRT systems, which transport large numbers of people at a fraction of the cost of rail systems. At a cost of Euro 134 million per kilometre (and doubtless requiring ongoing operational subsidies), Bangkok's Blue Line when it opens in 2004 will, combined with the existing Skytrain, be approximately equal in length to Bogota's TransMilenio Bus Rapid Transit system. Yet TransMilenio, which cost only Euro 5 million per kilometre, will carry roughly double the number of passengers of the two rail systems combined, without any operational subsidies and providing a comparable or even superior quality of service at a similar fare.

Speed

A recent comparative study between by the US General Accounting Office considered travel velocity of BRT and Light Rail Transit systems in six US cities which had both BRT and LRT systems. In all but one of the cities, bus speeds on segregated lanes actually exceeded the LRT speeds. Thus, low-cost bus systems can match the travel times of expensive rail systems.

Construction time

The project development and planning process is generally quicker for BRT than for rail-based MRT systems. The BRT planning process for a 'world class' BRT system takes about one year and costs around Euro 1 to 2 million. Due to the relatively low costs, financing is also generally easier and quicker for BRT than for rail-based systems. City leaders in Jakarta, Indonesia, for example, decided in early 2002 following a visit by the former mayor of Bogota to implement a Bus Rapid Transit system. The government was able to quickly mobilise funds from the routine city development budget. The TransJakarta Busway is currently under construction and is expected to open late in 2003 with an initial line between Blok M and the Kota area and supported by feeder lines and car restrictions.

The simpler physical infrastructure of Bus Rapid Transit means that such systems can also be built in relatively short periods of time, often in less than 18 months. Underground and elevated rail systems can take considerably longer, often well over three years.

This time difference has a political dimension. Mayors who are elected for only three or four years can oversee a BRT project from start to finish.

Flexibility

Unlike rail-based options which are by nature more fixed, BRT allows a great deal of flexibility for future growth. Making new routings and other system changes to match demographic changes or new planning decisions is fairly easily accomplished. Since buses approach and leave busways at intermediate points, many different routes can serve a passenger catchment area, with fewer passenger transfers than would be required in a fixed guided system.

In terms of flexibility to expand and adapt to a changing city, Bus Rapid Transit offers clear advantages over a rail-based system. Expanding and adjusting a rail system is much more costly and complex. Developing cities following rail-based MRT approaches have quickly encountered a need to expand their initial limited systems. Bangkok is a typical example; similar situations apply in Cairo, Shanghai, Buenos Aires, and virtually all developing cities which have developed rail-based MRT systems.

Institutional demands

Institutional challenges are much higher for rail-based MRT compared to BRT. Rail Metros are of a different order of challenge, cost, and risks.

Environment

Rail is the most environmentally friendly type of MRT in terms of energy use per person-kilometre, though only where occupancy is very high. In terms of air quality, however, the crucial factor in developing cities is not so much the emission performance of the different types of mass rapid transit, but rather their potential in getting people out of cars and off motorcycles, and into transit. To the extent that a BRT system can do this better than a rail system (with much more limited coverage), BRT has a greater positive environmental impact.

Private Sector Role

Private sector involvement in forms of mass transit construction and operation can be highly beneficial to all parties, provided the government is able to establish an appropriate regulatory setting. Unfortunately the cost overruns and ridership shortfalls in rail systems have often led to conflicts and financial difficulties for private sector partners. Bus Rapid Transit, on the other hand, is offering a new model of private sector participation. Perhaps the leading current BRT system worldwide is in Bogota, Colombia. In Bogota, the private sector plays the dominant role in all aspects of system operation, including infrastructure construction, fare collection, and bus operation. This BRT system gave rise to 18,000 direct jobs during construction, 3,000 direct jobs during operation, and just 72 jobs from the government.

Conclusion: A way forward

There is no single "right" transit solution. The best system for a city will depend on local conditions and preferences and will involve a combination of technologies. Bus Rapid Transit may not be the solution in every situation. When passenger flows are extremely high and space for busways is limited, other options may be better, such as rail-based public transit; although we have seen that BRT can accommodate passenger volumes to match demand even in very large cities. In reality, it is not always just a choice between bus and rail, as cities such as Taipei, China and Sao Paulo, Brazil, have shown that Metro and BRT systems can work together to form an integrated transport package.

It must however be recalled that city investments in mass transit systems come at a high opportunity cost. Funds used to build and subsidise the operation of a limited rail Metro could be used for a much more extensive BRT system with ample funds left over for schools, hospitals, and parks.

Bus Rapid Transit has shown that high quality public transit that meets the needs of the wider public is neither costly nor extremely difficult to achieve. Many organisations are ready to help municipalities in developing Asian cities make efficient public transport a reality. In Bangkok itself, a major study in 2001 recommended a network of more than 100 kilometres of exclusive busways, but it was not acted upon. In Kunming, Chengdu, Beijing, Shijiazhuang, Jakarta, Taipei, Seoul, Delhi and Hyderabad, city leaders are all moving ahead with Bus Rapid Transit. With political leadership, everything is possible.
Bogota no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 22nd, 2006, 08:26 AM   #43
Thom
Cientifico
 
Thom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Santiago.CL
Posts: 997
Likes (Received): 7

Mmm... veo que todos los puntos que enumeras concuerdan fielmente con el articulo que nos muestras. Bueno yo te puedo hablar desde la perspectiva santiaguina. Aqui el metro afortunadamente es todo lo contrario a lo descrito respecto a la ciudad de Bangkok, que es el ejmplo recurrente en dicha historia. Aqui el metro SI desincentiva el uso del automovil aportando a la disminucion de la congestion y sobre todo a la disminucion de la contaminacion atmosferica. Aqui a diferencia de esos paises, la gente clama por mas metro y toda la gente lo usa; otro aspecto importante es que es un sistema autofinanciable (sin subsidios), por lo que no sufre de los problemas nombrados en el articulo. El problema de la cercania lo solucionas con un buen sistema de acercamiento de buses (de recorridos cortos) y con un sistema de integracion tarifaria (bueno eso es lo que esta implementando Transantiago). Otra cosa que es importante, es que es un sistema seguro (el temor de ser robado o asaltado en el metro es mínimo: tanto la infraestructura misma como el personal de seguridad lo impiden).
De todas formas si la gente esta conforme con Transmilenio y tiene buenas criticas, no veo por que reemplazarlo por un metro. Lo unico que sugeriria es que el sistema en un futuro pueda disponer de buses con cero emision.

Saludos.

PD. Gracias por el articulo, es justo lo que pedia en uno mis de posts de mas arriba (pagina anterior).
Thom no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old August 22nd, 2006, 08:47 PM   #44
Bogota
BANNED
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Bogota
Posts: 3,567
Likes (Received): 6

Thom, estamos de acuerdo, cada ciudad tiene que tomar la mejor alternativa para sus necesidades actuales. Aquí tenemos que buscar la alternativa de buses no contaminantes y creo que la mayoría de las quejas se van desvaneciendo. A medida que mas y mas lineas se construyan en Bogotá mas y mas va bajando la congestión en los buses, ya que hoy en día muchas personas que no son del área de influencia prefieren viajar hasta una estación TM y ahí está el desfase en la planeación, y para eso se necesita incrementar el número de buses acorde lo mas rápidamente posible. TM hoy en día el sistema despacha buses adicionales a las estaciones mas llenas por medio de los sensores de los buses indican que estos están saliendo a capacidad.

Pero lo mas importante es que en nuestro país donde se están construyendo 7 sistemas de transporte masivo tipo TM y me parece que el metro es un lujo que no nos corresponde y creo que en nuestro caso no nos da nigún sirvicio adicional y si cuesta mucho. No se que tan amplia es Santiago en terminos físicos, pero Bogotá se extiende en muchas direcciones y por eso necesitamos sistemas masivos que puedan ser construidos en el menor tiempo posible. Tenemos lo que terminos metro serían 5 lineas y el cubrimiento es solo del 30% de la ciudad. Yo creo que aquí debemos seguir con el plan hasta completar las 15 lineas planeadas y ahí ver como se desenvuelve la ciudad.
Bogota no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 23rd, 2006, 12:37 AM   #45
OscarSCL
Insert Coin
 
OscarSCL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Santiago de Chile
Posts: 11,644
Likes (Received): 8773

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thom
Mmm... veo que todos los puntos que enumeras concuerdan fielmente con el articulo que nos muestras. Bueno yo te puedo hablar desde la perspectiva santiaguina. Aqui el metro afortunadamente es todo lo contrario a lo descrito respecto a la ciudad de Bangkok, que es el ejmplo recurrente en dicha historia. Aqui el metro SI desincentiva el uso del automovil aportando a la disminucion de la congestion y sobre todo a la disminucion de la contaminacion atmosferica. Aqui a diferencia de esos paises, la gente clama por mas metro y toda la gente lo usa; otro aspecto importante es que es un sistema autofinanciable (sin subsidios), por lo que no sufre de los problemas nombrados en el articulo. El problema de la cercania lo solucionas con un buen sistema de acercamiento de buses (de recorridos cortos) y con un sistema de integracion tarifaria (bueno eso es lo que esta implementando Transantiago). Otra cosa que es importante, es que es un sistema seguro (el temor de ser robado o asaltado en el metro es mínimo: tanto la infraestructura misma como el personal de seguridad lo impiden).
De todas formas si la gente esta conforme con Transmilenio y tiene buenas criticas, no veo por que reemplazarlo por un metro. Lo unico que sugeriria es que el sistema en un futuro pueda disponer de buses con cero emision.

Saludos.

PD. Gracias por el articulo, es justo lo que pedia en uno mis de posts de mas arriba (pagina anterior).

Absolutamente, pero creo que tambien hay que entender el contexto histórico-cultural de nuestro sistema.

Obviamente en Bogotá el concebir un Metro no esta dentro de las expectativas ni de la voluntad de las autoridades, porq implementaron otro sistema que les funcionó perfectamente, lo cúal es un tremendo logro que más éncima exportaron.

El Metro de Santiago, tiene la particularidad que es transversal a toda la sociedad santiaguina, aqui no pasa como en otros paises, aqui mismo en America Latina, que usar el Metro es sinonimo de ser de clase baja o que es súmamente peligroso y no recomendable, no recuerdo alguien que me haya dicho que fue asaltado en el Metro, creo que muchos lo prefieren frente a las Micros precisamente por lo mismo, la seguridad que brinda.

Yo la verdad, no entendí mucho el argumento de que al amigo le gusta ir mirando y no estar en un tunel, si bien es respetable, pero el punto es transportarse, de forma rápida y cómoda, no haciendo turismo, súpongo yo.. en todo caso gran parte del Sistema, es elevado o a nivel de calle, así que no es tan claustrofóbico. ;P

Lo positivo del Metro tambien es como dijo Thom, es que desincentiva el uso del Auto, claramente.. y por varias razones, primero porq evita la emisión de gases contaminantes que en una ciudad como Santiago es primordial , porq te ahorras plata, porq no te preocupas del estacionamiento etc.. así que el Metro en Santiago sin duda ayuda a descontaminar a incentivar el uso del mismo dejando al lado del automovil.

Además que a eso le agregamos que pronto estara en funcionamiento en un 100% el TranSantiago, que es un alimentador del Metro, lo cúal ayudara a las personas que no poseen una estación cerca de su casa, en llegar al sistema de fórma rápida, si así lo desean.

Además que se esta constantemente ampliando y construyendo nuevas lineas, y como bien dijo Thom, se autofinancia.

Creo que para lo santiaguinos, el Metro es primordial en esta ciudad, son como las venas de Stgo, no podriamos preferirlos frente a un Transmilenio, complementarlo, de todas maneras.. pero reemplazarlo, jamás.
OscarSCL no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 23rd, 2006, 04:51 AM   #46
ger
Registered User
 
ger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Buenos Aires
Posts: 143
Likes (Received): 1

En buenos aires, el metro(subte), es usado por toda clase de gente (linea a clase media, coches antiguos bien cuidados, linea b clase media y turistas, coches usados japoneses, en buen estado, linea c clases baja (por conectar con ferrocarriles suburbanos al sur), clase media (la gente que vive cerca de la linea), y clase alta (la gente que usa trenes suburbanos al norte), coche de 1930 y usados japoneses en un estado regular la linea d clases media y alta coches nuevos y usados japoneses (lugares con gente de mucho poder adquisitivo, igual es la linea más congestionada), y la linea e gente de clase media cohes de 1940 en buen estado (es la linea menos congestionada).
Igual quieren hacer mas lineas, por que los colectivos no van más, está tan densamente poblada(ninguna de las lineas de metro va a ser en viaducto, por eso lo de subte=subterráneo), se van a inagurar en 2007 10 km mas de trenes subterraneos(extensiones de la linea a y b, y la nueva linea h), Tambien van a electrificar varios ramales suburbanos.
Ahora volviendo al lo de los buses en bs as existen como 400 lineas de colectivo(200 son las que pasan por capital), algunas tienen servicios diferenciales(como primera clase), servicios rapidos, y algunas lineas tienen varios ramales (una tiene 11 ramales+lso semi rapidos+ diferencial), pero si los pusiera en un mapa.... no se quedaria una telaraña, hay muchas lineas que corren iguales, y otras paralelas a una linea de metro. Algunas Lineas tienen los cohes en buen estado y otras un poco deterioradas(especialmente las de provincia, pero hay casos en capital), son operadas por distintas companias, algunas con estilos modernos, otras respetando sus diseños de hace decadas.
__________________

facucaldo123 liked this post
ger no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 23rd, 2006, 05:55 AM   #47
Bogota
BANNED
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Bogota
Posts: 3,567
Likes (Received): 6

Quote:
Originally Posted by OscarSCL

El Metro de Santiago, tiene la particularidad que es transversal a toda la sociedad santiaguina, aqui no pasa como en otros paises, aqui mismo en America Latina, que usar el Metro es sinonimo de ser de clase baja o que es súmamente peligroso y no recomendable, no recuerdo alguien que me haya dicho que fue asaltado en el Metro, creo que muchos lo prefieren frente a las Micros precisamente por lo mismo, la seguridad que brinda.
El TM también lo usa todo el mundo sin distingo de clase social.

¿Que hace que la gente sienta el Metro de Santiago mas seguro? Aquí en Bogotá la gente se queja igual cuando van llenos los buses (corrientes o TM) que le roban el celular o lo que puedan aprovechar en el tumulto. Pero eso es algo que pasa en ciudades como Nueva York o Londres con bastante regularidad. ¿Hay algo que ustedes hayan implementado que haya sido lo que generó esa mayor seguridad en el Metro?

Quote:
Originally Posted by OscarSCL
Yo la verdad, no entendí mucho el argumento de que al amigo le gusta ir mirando y no estar en un tunel, si bien es respetable, pero el punto es transportarse, de forma rápida y cómoda, no haciendo turismo, súpongo yo.. en todo caso gran parte del Sistema, es elevado o a nivel de calle, así que no es tan claustrofóbico.
Yo que después de varios años de moverme en el Metro de Londres le cogí fobia, nada mas horrible que meterse a un hueco y salir al otro lado de la ciudad media o una hora después todos los días. Lo único que uno hace es leer si no va muy lleno, y si va lleno pues empujarse en cada estación para que baje o suba gente. Finalmente un día leí los estudios hechos en el Reino Unido sobre la depresión que causa en la población el Metro y como la ciudad de Londres iba a incentivar el uso de buses cuando no tuvieran que recorrer muchas distancias. Ahora todos los buses nuevos allá son de doble cuerpo como TM o TS y ya no los de dos pisos. Me alegra entonces saber que el Metro de Santiago es aereo o a nivel de piso en su mayoría, ahí yo ya no tengo nada que decir.

Quote:
Originally Posted by OscarSCL
Lo positivo del Metro tambien es como dijo Thom, es que desincentiva el uso del Auto, claramente.. y por varias razones, primero porq evita la emisión de gases contaminantes que en una ciudad como Santiago es primordial , porq te ahorras plata, porq no te preocupas del estacionamiento etc.. así que el Metro en Santiago sin duda ayuda a descontaminar a incentivar el uso del mismo dejando al lado del automovil.
Igual que aquí con TM, la gente deja el carro y usa el TM por muchas razones como el tráfico, las restricciones acorde a la placa, o simplemente porque a razón de 2 dolares la hora en un estacionamiento no hay muchos bolsillos que aguanten.

Finalmente cada ciudad o país tiene que elegir lo que mas le convenga, me alegra que ustedes estén tan contentos con el Metro, aquí mucha gente quiere Metro también y quizás algún día lo hagan, pero en lo que a mi concierne prefiero el 100% de Bogotá cubierta en TM y que alcance el dinero para no solo las 7 ciudades que en este momento están construyendo TM sino para otras 5 o 6 que están en cola para también construir sus sistemas de transporte masivo.

Last edited by Bogota; August 23rd, 2006 at 06:03 AM.
Bogota no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 23rd, 2006, 06:15 AM   #48
OscarSCL
Insert Coin
 
OscarSCL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Santiago de Chile
Posts: 11,644
Likes (Received): 8773

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bogota
El TM también lo usa todo el mundo sin distingo de clase social.

¿Que hace que la gente sienta el Metro de Santiago mas seguro? Aquí en Bogotá la gente se queja igual cuando van llenos los buses (corrientes o TM) que le roban el celular o lo que puedan aprovechar en el tumulto. Pero eso es algo que pasa en ciudades como Nueva York o Londres con bastante regularidad. ¿Hay algo que ustedes hayan implementado que haya sido lo que generó esa mayor seguridad en el Metro?

Sabes, la verdad no sé, no tengo la respuesta precisa de que pasó con el Metro que la gente lo considero y es efectivamente seguro, de hecho yo lo uso por sobre todo los demas medios, porq me da confianza, estando lleno, vacio, a medio llenar.. da igual, será que existe una buena vigilancia, o la ciudad no es tan insegura como otras, o los delincuentes no se suben nomás XD la verdad es que no sé, pero es un sistema muy muy seguro.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Bogota
Yo que después de varios años de moverme en el Metro de Londres le cogí fobia, nada mas horrible que meterse a un hueco y salir al otro lado de la ciudad media o una hora después todos los días. Lo único que uno hace es leer si no va muy lleno, y si va lleno pues empujarse en cada estación para que baje o suba gente. Finalmente un día leí los estudios hechos en el Reino Unido sobre la depresión que causa en la población el Metro y como la ciudad de Londres iba a incentivar el uso de buses cuando no tuvieran que recorrer muchas distancias. Ahora todos los buses nuevos allá son de doble cuerpo como TM o TS y ya no los de dos pisos. Me alegra entonces saber que el Metro de Santiago es aereo o a nivel de piso en su mayoría, ahí yo ya no tengo nada que decir.
Bueno, acá no tampoco tenemos una cantidad de lineas como el Metro de Londres, y además muchos tramos son elevados ( gran parte de la Linea 5 y de la Linea 4) y otros a nivel de calle, lo que hace que no estes mucho tiempo en el tunel, a excepción de la Linea 1 ( y tb gran parte de la Linea 2) que si es casi en su totalidad subterraneo, y ahi puedes cruzar la ciudad totalmente bajo tierra, pero tampoco es un trayecto extremadamente largo.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bogota
Igual que aquí con TM, la gente deja el carro y usa el TM por muchas razones como el tráfico, las restricciones acorde a la placa, o simplemente porque a razón de 2 dolares la hora en un estacionamiento no hay muchos bolsillos que aguanten.

Finalmente cada ciudad o país tiene que elegir lo que mas le convenga, me alegra que ustedes estén tan contentos con el Metro, aquí mucha gente quiere Metro también y quizás algún día lo hagan, pero en lo que a mi concierne prefiero el 100% de Bogotá cubierta en TM y que alcance el dinero para no solo las 7 ciudades que en este momento están construyendo TM sino para otras 5 o 6 que están en cola para también construir sus sistemas de transporte masivo.
Exáctamente lo mismo que pasa acá pero con el Metro, y tambien cuando este implementado en su totalidad el TranSantiago.

se entiende tu posición, el TM ha sido exitoso y no habria porq sustituirlo, y si es más barato, mejor aún, así otras ciudades colombianas podran contar con el servicio.

Aqui, tambien muchas ciudades tienen proyectados sistema de buses al estilo TM, quizás no de la misma magnitud, pero algo se hace, ya se presento el TransValpo, ciudad que ahora tambien cuenta con Metro, o el BioVias de Concepción que posee un buen siste. de buses que alimentan el BioTren, que es un tren urbano.

Saludos.
OscarSCL no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 29th, 2006, 12:51 AM   #49
j.p.f
Registered User
 
j.p.f's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 344
Likes (Received): 23

CONCEPCIÓN, Chile. Buses del Plan Biovias en la Estación Intermodal de Concepción Centro, los que se conectan con el tren metropolitano (Biotren)

j.p.f no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 21st, 2006, 01:22 AM   #50
jErEmIaS
BANNED
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: LiMa - La MoLiNa
Posts: 352
Likes (Received): 0

los buses menos viejos de Lima...





















jErEmIaS no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 21st, 2006, 05:05 PM   #51
Jose Perez
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: ?
Posts: 3,026
Likes (Received): 18

Buses nuevos de Arequipa

Arequipa acaba de recibir sus nuevos buses de transporte publico de su corredor vitrina,consolidandose como la ciudad con el transporte publico mas organizado de Peru.Claro en Lima ya empezaron las obras pero demorara un poco ya que es un ciudad tan grande.

Los buses de Arequipa presentados por el alcalde en la plaza de armas en el centro de la ciudad.......


Jose Perez no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 21st, 2006, 06:20 PM   #52
Caracho
Santiaguista
 
Caracho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Santiago
Posts: 916
Likes (Received): 14

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bogota View Post

¿Que hace que la gente sienta el Metro de Santiago mas seguro? Aquí en Bogotá la gente se queja igual cuando van llenos los buses (corrientes o TM) que le roban el celular o lo que puedan aprovechar en el tumulto. Pero eso es algo que pasa en ciudades como Nueva York o Londres con bastante regularidad. ¿Hay algo que ustedes hayan implementado que haya sido lo que generó esa mayor seguridad en el Metro?

Yo que después de varios años de moverme en el Metro de Londres le cogí fobia, nada mas horrible que meterse a un hueco y salir al otro lado de la ciudad media o una hora después todos los días. Lo único que uno hace es leer si no va muy lleno, y si va lleno pues empujarse en cada estación para que baje o suba gente. Finalmente un día leí los estudios hechos en el Reino Unido sobre la depresión que causa en la población el Metro y como la ciudad de Londres iba a incentivar el uso de buses cuando no tuvieran que recorrer muchas distancias. Ahora todos los buses nuevos allá son de doble cuerpo como TM o TS y ya no los de dos pisos. (...)
El problema con el Metro de Londres es que fue el primero, entonces tiene varios problemas inherentes a su antigüedad:
- El espacio es poco porque para la cantidad de gente que viajaba en sus inicios no se justificaba hacer estaciones tan grandes
- Las técnicas de construcción de la época eran pioneras pero permitían sólo hacer estaciones pequeñas (eso explica los túneles y trenes redondos, que son mucho más pequeños que los de metros de otras partes del mundo)
Ahora, con los tumultos propios de una metrópoli es cuando se sienten de verdad estas dificultades y se hacen muy pequeños los andenes, túneles y pasillos de combinación, y eso es lo que lo hace sentir claustrofóbico. la nueva extensión de la línea Jubilee es con espacios amplios por eso mismo, para combatir esas sensaciones de encierro.

En el Metro de Santiago se evitó esto mediante varias medidas, pues según el primer director del Metro, el Arquitecto Juan Parrochia, que estuvo en todas las etapas del diseño, implementación e inauguración de éste, la sensación de bienestar que se siente dentro del metro santiaguino fue planificada

Los espacios interiores tienen grandes bóvedas, mesaninas amplias y unidad arquitectónica, en el sentido que desde cualquier parte de la estación uno es visible. Es muy difícil encontrar espacios ciegos o peligrosos en ellas (por lo menos en las construidas en las primeras etapas). Incluso en algunas estaciones subterráneas se encuentran espacios más grandes y con mejor calidad de aire que en el exterior, como por ejemplo en Universidad de Chile, que alberga el mural más grande de Latinoamérica y tiene una bóveda de unos 15 metros: afuera puede ser un infierno de bocinazos, humo y aglomeraciones pero dentro de la estación uno respira aire más puro y se está más tranquilo.
Los colores de las primeras estaciones del metro son colores pasteles, los que están pensados para tranquilizar a la gente y evitar con esto el vandalismo. Lo mismo la música ambiental, que en los inicios del metro era musica clásica y orquestada. Parrochia dice (y le encuentro un poco la razón), que los colores chillones podrán ser muy bonitos arquitectónicamente, pero que si lo que se busca es transportar gente eficientemente lo mejor es que sea en un ambiente tranquilo, a lo que los colores fuertes no ayudan.
Otra medida que ayuda a la sensación de bienestar es la limpieza de las estaciones, que se logró con un experimento digno de Pavlov: cuando alguien botaba algo al suelo, pasaba de inmediato un barrendero que con grandes aspavientos y menenado la cabeza dejaba en vergüenza al "cochino". Con eso se logró tener una de las redes más limpias del mundo. Lo mismo que con la retención del boleto, única en el mundo, porque el principal objeto de suciedad en los metros y sistemas de transporte del mundo son los mismos boletos, entonces acá se implementó que en vez de devolverlo éste fuera retenido por los torniquetes, con lo cual se evita tenerlos tapizando el suelo.

Saludos
__________________
"Los problemas sociales del transporte constituyen, ante todo, el precio de la libertad"
Lewis Mumford
"Probablemente seremos juzgados no por los monumentos que construimos, sino que por los que hemos destruido"
Adiós a Penn Station, editorial del New York Times, 30 de octubre de 1963
"Ama a tu ciudad. Ella es de todos, por eso su belleza te enorgullece y su fealdad, te avergüenza"
Gabriela Mistral
Caracho no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 22nd, 2006, 05:17 PM   #53
O'uitte
soy yo.
 
O'uitte's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: BOG - BAQ
Posts: 1,883
Likes (Received): 3168

Afortunadamente en mi ciudad Barranquilla están cambiando todos los buses, para hacerles competencia al futuro "Transmetro" (Transmilenio para Barranquila)... Estos buses son bien nuevos, cuentan a las personas por un sistema de sensores, y por ser mi ciudad caribeña (por lo tanto algo calurosa) ofrece el servicio de aire acondicionado. Otro servicio el es llamado "transfer" que en pocas palabras significa pasarse de un bus de una ruta a otra, esto gracias a alianzas que se han establecido entre las diferentes compañias de buses.

Ésta es una foto de estos buses nuevos... lo siento por el ángulo... más tarde toma más fotos.

O'uitte no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 22nd, 2006, 07:16 PM   #54
Alejo85
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Lima
Posts: 3,677
Likes (Received): 1167

en lima es El metropolitano
__________________
No poder vivir sin ti
Alejo85 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 22nd, 2006, 09:45 PM   #55
Gustavo
Registered User
 
Gustavo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: La Gran Caracas
Posts: 508
Likes (Received): 8

Estos son los autobuses del Metrobus, que son dirigidos por la misma compañia del metro de Caracas y recorren toda la ciudad.








Hay unos proyectos pero n se cuales son exactamente.
__________________
Latin Forums
Gustavo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 22nd, 2006, 10:34 PM   #56
DELCROID
Registered User
 
DELCROID's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 3,024
Likes (Received): 791

Aqui hay mas imagenes de los Metrobuses de Caracas:




































































Nuevos autobuses:






















Ejemplo de rutas del Metrobus:

























Last edited by DELCROID; October 23rd, 2006 at 09:23 PM.
DELCROID no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 23rd, 2006, 07:38 PM   #57
Parlanchín
BANNED
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Montevideo
Posts: 5,634
Likes (Received): 30

Una curiosidad

Un "colectivo" bonaerense y un "omnibus" montevideano, ambos con las misma publicidad.
Parlanchín no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 3rd, 2006, 01:08 AM   #58
jErEmIaS
BANNED
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: LiMa - La MoLiNa
Posts: 352
Likes (Received): 0

ese metrobus se muy bien...=)
jErEmIaS no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 4th, 2006, 05:01 PM   #59
kamilo rxn
♫ Nota Loka ♫
 
kamilo rxn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: medellin colombia,greenville sc
Posts: 4,604
Likes (Received): 3

uy sisas ese metrobus de caracas esta reelegante y k bien por quilla k esta comparando nuevo parque automotor k estan modernizando la flota para hacerle competencia a transmetro k bien gracias o'uitte por la pic
__________________
Colombia

Es Pasion
kamilo rxn no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 17th, 2006, 07:22 PM   #60
Psyklonder
Software developer
 
Psyklonder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Barranquilla
Posts: 1,079
Likes (Received): 484

Quote:
Originally Posted by O'uitte View Post
Afortunadamente en mi ciudad Barranquilla están cambiando todos los buses, para hacerles competencia al futuro "Transmetro" (Transmilenio para Barranquila)... Estos buses son bien nuevos, cuentan a las personas por un sistema de sensores, y por ser mi ciudad caribeña (por lo tanto algo calurosa) ofrece el servicio de aire acondicionado. Otro servicio el es llamado "transfer" que en pocas palabras significa pasarse de un bus de una ruta a otra, esto gracias a alianzas que se han establecido entre las diferentes compañias de buses.

Ésta es una foto de estos buses nuevos... lo siento por el ángulo... más tarde toma más fotos.


O'uitte Esa foto la tomaste tu????????
Psyklonder no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 


Reply

Tags
transmilenio

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 05:21 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us