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Old March 11th, 2012, 01:13 PM   #41
sarahwassmann
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Hey Parchie,

I do understand. My question was more or less to find out what the current market rate of 1 m3 of ethanol is. But thanks for your reply, much appreciated.

Thing is that I am just trying to gather some information regarding biofuel.

Thanks again
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Old March 16th, 2012, 01:05 PM   #42
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Why oil prices and power rates keep on rising

By Cecilio T. Arillo

To answer this question, let us first look at the country’s energy situation for 12 years, a specific period covered by President Marcos’s total energy plan for the country that succeeded on the right combination of regulated policies, resulting to the steady, low-cost supply of oil and cheap electricity to consumers.

In that period, the Marcos government, based on indisputable government records, had also succeeded in reducing the country’s dependence on Middle East oil from 92 percent in 1973 to 71 percent in 1980 and more to 57 percent in 1984. By 1985, the Philippines stood as the world’s second largest user of geothermal power, next to California, resulting further to a 44 percent reduction of the country’s dependence on imported oil worth billions of pesos in savings.

On June 19, 1986, four months after the Edsa Revolution, President Corazon Cojuangco Aquino, deliberately abolished the Ministry of Energy and placed the successful multibillion-peso National Power Corporation (NPC), Petron and the Philippine National Oil Corporation (PNOC) under the supervision of the Office of the President.

The NPC had incomes in sales revenue from P0.4 billion to P18 billion and had total assets of P107.2 billion between 1977 and 1985, almost 10 times of what it had in 1977. Mrs. Aquino’s government broke it up, dissipated some of its assets and privatized majority of its operations, including generations, transmissions and distribution under the guise of doing away government monopoly over the energy sector.

Also at that time, PNOC was featured annually in Fortune’s 500 Best Corporations with incomes running into billions of dollars while Petron served as a buffer against foreign oil production and distribution monopoly. Petron, with multibillion-peso assets, controlled 40 percent of the fuel distribution network in the country.

To justify the abolition of the energy department and to cover the paper trail, President Aquino through the Presidential Commission on Good Government (PCGG) subsequently charged the late Energy Secretary Geronimo Zamora Velasco with having allegedly committed corruption, only to be declared later innocent by the Supreme Court.

Velasco died sometime ago but left behind a solid reputation of honesty and certitude as well as his own personal files made into a book that exposed the unforgivable sins of the Aquino regime in the energy sector.

Here’s an extract of Mr. Velasco’s 209-page book Trailblazing, published in 2006:

“…it appears that Mrs. Aquino abolished the ministry upon the advice of Cesar Buenaventura, who had claimed that the Ministry of Energy was ‘the most corrupt’ among the Marcos-era agencies.

“…Cesar Buenaventura was one of Mrs. Aquino’s closest advisers, but he also happened to be the president of Pilipinas Shell at the time. I have no idea as to Buenaventura’s basis for claiming that the ministry was the ‘most corrupt,’ but I also have no doubt that he had Shell’s interest in mind when he recommended the ministry’s abolition. I could sense that the foreign oil companies were never happy with PNOC, not only because Petron led the pricing structure in the oil market, but also because PNOC’s energy development program, with its emphasis on tapping non-oil sources, threatened to erode the oil companies’ position in the energy market.

“Riding on the wave of anti-Marcos sentiment was a good way to eliminate a rival. In my opinion, the abolition of the ministry showed Mrs. Aquino’s inexperience in proper governance. Buenaventura may have been a close friend of hers, but how could she, in conscience, consult someone like him whose interest was to protect his employer, a foreign oil company operating in the Philippines? On the mere say-so of Buenaventura, Mrs. Aquino dismantled the whole energy complex that took twelve years to build and which, in government annals, was unique for the successes it achieved considering the constraints that faced by the country.

...
“Joker revealed that other advisers had already been eyeing Petron’s privatization early on in Mrs. Aquino’s term; they were lobbying for British Petroleum and for a Kuwaiti oil company. Other groups close to Mrs. Aquino’s advisers were interested in PNOC’s privatization because this would enable them to get their hands on Petron.

“From a policy perspective, there was no reason to privatize PNOC/Petron even at the time. Why would a government in dire need of cash be willing to let go of a good source of income? PNOC was the biggest government corporation in terms of revenue.

“Much of it was due to Petron, which commanded about 40 percent of the local oil market and occupied the top spot in the industry. More important, as Joker himself acknowledged, PNOC’s involvement in oil importation, refining, and marketing took away the foreign oil companies’ advantage of being the only ones who knew how to play the game. It is not surprising then that Petron threatened the interest of multinational oil companies.

“Joker’s point about PNOC’s impact on the oil companies is significant, if only because it affirms the fact that foreign oil companies have always invited suspicion that they act as a cartel and dictate the local price of oil regardless of international prices. This issue has hounded the local oil industry since the Ramos Administration deregulated the sector, and has intensified in times of unabated oil price increases, such as what we are experiencing now.

“To my mind, however, there is one important question that we should confront–a question that has so far evaded a real answer: As a matter of policy, what should we expect from the foreign oil companies in the Philippines?

To answer Mr. Velasco’s question, when the Aquino regime deregulated the energy industry, foreign oil companies formed their own cartel and dictated their own prices, leaving consumers helpless from the harsh effects of rising prices of oil, electricity, water and other commodities.

...

To read the complete article ...
http://www.manilastandardtoday.com/i.../2012/March/16
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Old March 16th, 2012, 02:14 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by watcher09 View Post
Why oil prices and power rates keep on rising

By Cecilio T. Arillo

To answer this question, let us first look at the country’s energy situation for 12 years, a specific period covered by President Marcos’s total energy plan for the country that succeeded on the right combination of regulated policies, resulting to the steady, low-cost supply of oil and cheap electricity to consumers.

In that period, the Marcos government, based on indisputable government records, had also succeeded in reducing the country’s dependence on Middle East oil from 92 percent in 1973 to 71 percent in 1980 and more to 57 percent in 1984. By 1985, the Philippines stood as the world’s second largest user of geothermal power, next to California, resulting further to a 44 percent reduction of the country’s dependence on imported oil worth billions of pesos in savings.

On June 19, 1986, four months after the Edsa Revolution, President Corazon Cojuangco Aquino, deliberately abolished the Ministry of Energy and placed the successful multibillion-peso National Power Corporation (NPC), Petron and the Philippine National Oil Corporation (PNOC) under the supervision of the Office of the President.

The NPC had incomes in sales revenue from P0.4 billion to P18 billion and had total assets of P107.2 billion between 1977 and 1985, almost 10 times of what it had in 1977. Mrs. Aquino’s government broke it up, dissipated some of its assets and privatized majority of its operations, including generations, transmissions and distribution under the guise of doing away government monopoly over the energy sector.

Also at that time, PNOC was featured annually in Fortune’s 500 Best Corporations with incomes running into billions of dollars while Petron served as a buffer against foreign oil production and distribution monopoly. Petron, with multibillion-peso assets, controlled 40 percent of the fuel distribution network in the country.

To justify the abolition of the energy department and to cover the paper trail, President Aquino through the Presidential Commission on Good Government (PCGG) subsequently charged the late Energy Secretary Geronimo Zamora Velasco with having allegedly committed corruption, only to be declared later innocent by the Supreme Court.

Velasco died sometime ago but left behind a solid reputation of honesty and certitude as well as his own personal files made into a book that exposed the unforgivable sins of the Aquino regime in the energy sector.

Here’s an extract of Mr. Velasco’s 209-page book Trailblazing, published in 2006:

“…it appears that Mrs. Aquino abolished the ministry upon the advice of Cesar Buenaventura, who had claimed that the Ministry of Energy was ‘the most corrupt’ among the Marcos-era agencies.

“…Cesar Buenaventura was one of Mrs. Aquino’s closest advisers, but he also happened to be the president of Pilipinas Shell at the time. I have no idea as to Buenaventura’s basis for claiming that the ministry was the ‘most corrupt,’ but I also have no doubt that he had Shell’s interest in mind when he recommended the ministry’s abolition. I could sense that the foreign oil companies were never happy with PNOC, not only because Petron led the pricing structure in the oil market, but also because PNOC’s energy development program, with its emphasis on tapping non-oil sources, threatened to erode the oil companies’ position in the energy market.

“Riding on the wave of anti-Marcos sentiment was a good way to eliminate a rival. In my opinion, the abolition of the ministry showed Mrs. Aquino’s inexperience in proper governance. Buenaventura may have been a close friend of hers, but how could she, in conscience, consult someone like him whose interest was to protect his employer, a foreign oil company operating in the Philippines? On the mere say-so of Buenaventura, Mrs. Aquino dismantled the whole energy complex that took twelve years to build and which, in government annals, was unique for the successes it achieved considering the constraints that faced by the country.

...
“Joker revealed that other advisers had already been eyeing Petron’s privatization early on in Mrs. Aquino’s term; they were lobbying for British Petroleum and for a Kuwaiti oil company. Other groups close to Mrs. Aquino’s advisers were interested in PNOC’s privatization because this would enable them to get their hands on Petron.

“From a policy perspective, there was no reason to privatize PNOC/Petron even at the time. Why would a government in dire need of cash be willing to let go of a good source of income? PNOC was the biggest government corporation in terms of revenue.

“Much of it was due to Petron, which commanded about 40 percent of the local oil market and occupied the top spot in the industry. More important, as Joker himself acknowledged, PNOC’s involvement in oil importation, refining, and marketing took away the foreign oil companies’ advantage of being the only ones who knew how to play the game. It is not surprising then that Petron threatened the interest of multinational oil companies.

“Joker’s point about PNOC’s impact on the oil companies is significant, if only because it affirms the fact that foreign oil companies have always invited suspicion that they act as a cartel and dictate the local price of oil regardless of international prices. This issue has hounded the local oil industry since the Ramos Administration deregulated the sector, and has intensified in times of unabated oil price increases, such as what we are experiencing now.

“To my mind, however, there is one important question that we should confront–a question that has so far evaded a real answer: As a matter of policy, what should we expect from the foreign oil companies in the Philippines?

To answer Mr. Velasco’s question, when the Aquino regime deregulated the energy industry, foreign oil companies formed their own cartel and dictated their own prices, leaving consumers helpless from the harsh effects of rising prices of oil, electricity, water and other commodities.

...

To read the complete article ...
http://www.manilastandardtoday.com/i.../2012/March/16
Thanks for posting this article. At least truth gets printed now.
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Old March 16th, 2012, 02:52 PM   #44
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You're welcome!
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Old April 22nd, 2012, 11:39 AM   #45
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Mineral development policy deviation between the Philippines and Indonesia.


Raw Commodity Export Ban Sparks Smelter Building Boom in Indonesia
http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/busin...donesia/499567

Indonesia's Neighbor Stands to Benefit From Ore Ban
http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/busin...ore-ban/508769
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Old April 23rd, 2012, 02:17 PM   #46
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'World-class discovery' in Recto Bank, Philippine oil exploration company announces

23-Apr-12, 8:22 AM | Likha Cuevas-Miel, InterAksyon.com

Quote:
ANILA, Philippines - Amid rising tensions between the Philippines and China over a section of the West Philippine Sea, a member of the private consortium exploring oil in the area said it may have made a "world-class discovery."

Officials of Atok-Big Wedge Co. told shareholders during its annual meeting that a report from experts commissioned to assess Service Contract (SC) 72 in Reed Bank has yielded a “world-class discovery.”

Walter Brown, Atok vice chairman, said the board met last week to assess the results of the seismic test at SC 72, also known as the Recto Bank, and they were “encouraged” by what they have seen from the report.

“The results were extremely favorable and we’re very optimistic about it,” Brown said, adding that based on their assessment, Atok has to defer other exploration projects, especially in Laos.

“We’re focusing now on oil and gas. It’s not difficult but you have to decide. But at this point we are much more interested in this prospect,” Brown said, referring to SC 72.

Atok is allotting P350 million for oil exploration and only a minuscule amount would go to mining, the official said.

The executive was not at liberty to disclose what the report contained only to say that it is a "world-class discovery.” Atok management has to wait until Forum Energy Plc discloses the information at the London Stock Exchange in the coming days.

“The results very much exceeded our expectations. We are very happy.” Roberto V. Ongpin, Atok chairman, told shareholders.

Brown said that there are several public companies involved in exploration activities in SC 72 and that Atok management does not want to preempt the others who have bigger stakes in the field that covers the Sampaguita prospect.

Atok has a 25.6-percent stake in Forum Energy, which owns 70 percent of the consortium that holds SC 72, with the rest owned by Monte Oro Resources & Energy Inc.

Forum Energy is majority owned by Philex Petroleum Corp, a unit of Philex Mining Corp. chaired by Manuel V. Pangilinan, who is also the chairman of TV5 and its online news portal InterAksyon.com.

Pangilinan had said the reserves in SC 72 could rival that of the Malampaya field.

Given signs that the prospect is economically viable, the consortium will start drilling by the end of the year. The question of whether to drill one well or a back-to-back well however remains on the table.

According to Atok officials and shareholders, the Swedes had drilled the area around Reed Bank in the late 1970s until the early 1980s, yielding some gas discoveries. This prospect was later abandoned for failing the test of economic viability.

However, the oil and gas exploration landscape has changed since, especially with the Malampaya field now producing the gas requirements of the Philippines, which is scrambling to build more power plants that use fuel other than coal and crude to stave off a power crisis, Brown said.

When asked if SC 72 contained oil, Brown said that as a geologist by profession, "there is probably a condensate. Geologically, there is a possibility of oil but not in the upper zone.”

According to a source at the Department of Energy, the “condensate” in a gas field is the liquid component, “or in layman’s terms, crude oil.”

To date, only the Galoc field within the vicinity of the Calamian Group of Islands in Northern Palawan produces oil in the Philippines.
.
http://www.interaksyon.com/article/3...pany-announces


Recto Bank natural gas reserves bigger than those in Malampaya -- DoE


23-Apr-12, 1:45 PM | Michelle Orosa, TV5

Quote:
MANILA, Philippines - (UPDATE 7:02 PM) The Department of Energy on Monday confirmed that the natural gas reserves in Recto Bank are bigger than those in Malampaya.

The energy department's revelation came on the heels of remarks by a member of the private consortium exploring oil in the area that it may have made a "world-class discovery."

Officials of Atok-Big Wedge Co. had told shareholders during its annual meeting that a report from experts commissioned to assess Service Contract (SC) 72 in Reed Bank has yielded a “world-class discovery.”

According to Energy Undersecretary Jay Layug, it is very likely that the natural gas at Recto Bank exceeds the 2.7-trillion cubic feet in the Malampaya Natural Gas Field that has for years provided the country billions in revenue.

"We are hoping for equal, if not at least a bit higher natural gas from Sampaguita Field," Layug said Monday, referring to the area in Recto Bank where a consortium of three firms--- Forum Energy, Monte de Oro and Walter Brown---have been exploring.

The DoE said a new, substantial find in natural gas is important to the Philippines because the supply coming from Malampaya is estimated to run out by 2024.

Malampaya now supplies 40 percent of power to provide electricity to Luzon. Of the 2.7-trillion cubic feet of reserves in the field off Palawan, an estimated 1.2-trillion cubic feet of natgas has been used.

Recto Bank is ours, period

Meanwhile, Layug stressed that Philippine ownership of Recto Bank is beyond dispute, considering it is only 70 nautical miles west of Palawan, nearly twice as close to the mainland than Scarborough (Panatag) Shoal off Zambales province, and parts of the Spratly island chain. China insists on claiming both Recto Bank and Panatag Shoal, even though both are within the Philippines’s 200-mile exclusive economic zone. A stand-off over fishing rights that began April 10 is still ongoing at Panatag.

As for Recto Bank, Layug said Monday, "Hindi na dapat issue yan. As far as the Philippines is concerned, Recto Bank is ours," sabi ni Layug.

The government started exploring for natural gas at Recto Bank since the 1980's but since there was no market yet for natgas, it gave to the Forum Energy-led consortium the service contract for SC 72. The bidding for the rights to explore was part of a series of contracting rounds set by the Aquino administration in order to encourage energy investments, diversify the country’s energy supply base and maximize economic benefits from the natural resources.
http://www.interaksyon.com/article/3...lampaya----doe
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Old April 23rd, 2012, 09:55 PM   #47
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Kaya pala hinaras ng Chinese yung survey ship na kinontrata natin...
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Old May 21st, 2012, 09:34 AM   #48
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The country needs more investments in crude oil refinery, mineral smelter plants and petrochem plants.

Reforestation is needed also to replenish our timber/wood resources.
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Old May 22nd, 2012, 12:41 AM   #49
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Quote:
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The country needs more investments in crude oil refinery, mineral smelter plants and petrochem plants.

Reforestation is needed also to replenish our timber/wood resources.
Agree sir. Our ASEAN neighbors have lots of these thats why their economies are strong and vibrant.
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Old June 16th, 2012, 03:19 PM   #50
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Shell to invest P6.5B for refinery

Quote:
MANILA, Philippines—Pilipinas Shell Petroleum Corp. is investing about $150 million (roughly P6.45 billion) to upgrade its refinery in Tabangao, Batangas, which will not only result in more efficient operations for the oil firm, but will also help shield Filipinos from the volatility of global oil prices.

The company has decided on this action despite facing numerous lawsuits filed by the government over Pilipinas Shell’s alleged tax evasion and misdeclaration of imported raw materials.

Pilipinas Shell was already close to completing a technical study that would evaluate possible modifications in the design and refining processes of Pilipinas Shells’ 110,000-barrels-a-day refinery.

The actual upgrading activities are set to begin next year and the modernized facility hopes to start commercial operations by 2015.

By upgrading the facility, Pilipinas Shell will be able to produce more “white products” such as liquefied petroleum gas, gasoline and diesel in its refinery out of the “black yields,” thus helping meet rising fuel demand of the local market.
http://business.inquirer.net/65469/s...b-for-refinery
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Old June 17th, 2012, 04:20 AM   #51
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Shell to spend $150 M for refinery upgrade



By Neil Jerome C. Morales (The Philippine Star) Updated June 17, 2012 12:00 AM Comments (0)

MANILA, Philippines - Oil industry giant Pilipinas Shell Petroleum Corp. is spending as much as $150 million to upgrade its refinery in Batangas.

Shell’s investment forms part of the investment commitments generated by President Aquino’s recent trade mission to the United Kingdom.

“The modernized and upgraded refinery will be in commercial operation by 2015. Investment is estimated at $100-150 million,” Energy Secretary Jose Rene Almendras said in an e-mail yesterday.

Almendras said Shell would start the upgrade early next year. To date, the local unit of Royal Dutch Shell Plc. operates a refinery in Tabangao, Batangas with a capacity of 110,000 barrels per day.

“One of the things that came out of the business meetings in the UK and US is the renewed confidence in the Philippine economy,” Almendras said.

The country’s gross domestic product surged 6.4 percent in the first quarter, faster than the revised growth of 4.9 percent in the same period last year, driven by government spending and private consumption.

It is faster than the five to six percent full year target of the government.

Last week, Shell said it is close to completing a technical study to evaluate possible modifications in the design and refining processes of Shells’ refinery.

The study aims to determine the necessary changes in the facility that would allow Shell to meet the new Philippine National Standards for ‘Euro IV’ grade diesel and gasoline set to take effect in 2016.

Almendras said the upgrade, which would result in value-added products, would be for the Philippine market.

Last week, Shell said it signed a deal with the Philippine government for a joint technical feasibility study for a liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminal in Batangas. The proposed site of the LNG import and regasification terminal is located adjacent to Shell’s refinery.

The government has a $2.1-billion natural gas master plan, which includes the construction of an integrated Bataan LNG terminal and several LNG-fired power plants.

http://www.philstar.com/Article.aspx...bCategoryId=66
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Old June 21st, 2012, 02:38 PM   #52
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Colmenares on Malampaya as a milking cow
Details Published on Wednesday, 20 June 2012 00:00 Written by DUCKY PAREDES

...Colmenares calls SC 38 an anomaly. He says that, while most countries would have negotiated for at least a 30-40 percent share in consortiums exploiting their resources, Shell and Chevron took 90 percent of the consortium shares and allowed the Philippine government only a pittance --10 percent. And we get to pay their expenses, too!

http://www.malaya.com.ph/index.php/o...-a-milking-cow
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Old June 22nd, 2012, 06:56 AM   #53
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wow, that's crazy.

you get peanuts.
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Old July 6th, 2012, 04:04 PM   #54
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Hey, is there any news about further explorations of our newest territory, The Benham Rise? It's supposed to be rich in raw materials for steel production and of course, the holiest of holy grails, oil & gas.
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Old July 9th, 2012, 06:03 AM   #55
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Palace: Mining EO can withstand judicial scrutiny
By Delon Porcalla (The Philippine Star) Updated July 09, 2012 12:00 AM

MANILA, Philippines - Malacañang gave assurances yesterday that President Aquino’s new executive order on mining, described as a comprehensive policy regulating the industry, will be able to withstand judicial scrutiny.

“We are prepared to defend it. That is usually the case whenever the executive comes out with an executive order or even an AO (administrative order), an MC (memorandum circular), an MO (memorandum order). We’re ready if this is challenged (in court),” deputy presidential spokesperson Abigail Valte said.

Valte told state-run radio dzRB that critics should wait for the government to release the EO, which she described as a product of multi-level consultations with stakeholders.

She said the new mining EO is a “more comprehensive policy” that will do away with recurring concerns over small-scale miners, where government “took into consideration the voices of the stakeholders” concerned.

Valte’s boss, Edwin Lacierda, confirmed Saturday last week that Aquino signed the EO, which aims to generate more revenues for the government and address mining industry and environmental concerns.

Executive Secretary Paquito Ochoa Jr. will release the new mining policy this week.

Lacierda said Environment Secretary Ramon Paje will also hold a press briefing to explain the executive order.

The spokesman stressed that the administration conducted extensive consultations with mining stakeholders before it finalized the new mining policy.

The government crafted the new mining policy that would be beneficial for both the government and mining investors.

With the crafting of the new policy, the Aquino administration hopes to generate more revenues in the face of high demand for metallic resources.

The new EO also aims to balance out concerns on environment protection and economic gains.

Lion’s share

Aquino earlier promised to reduce significantly the 98 percent profit of miners and cut this by as much as 30 points, to as low as 68 percent, and increase the government’s take – by means of taxes – from the measly two percent to 32 percent.

“I think the division of profit is not fair,” Aquino said, adding that the EO will address the issues of all concerned, especially after the series of consultations.

The EO is also expected to list down tourism areas where mining will be banned, or the 78 ecotourism sites. The mining policy guideline also includes provisions on environmental degradation, safety issues, and dislocation of indigenous peoples.

Ochoa said the EO will strike a balance between the interests of the mining industry and the environment because it seeks to harmonize the conflicting national and local laws on mining, especially in terms of approving and handling mining applications.

‘Not the proper solution’

However, Father Edu Gariguez, executive secretary of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines’ (CBCP) National Secretariat for Social Action (NASSA), said the various issues on mining operations in the country could not be totally addressed by a mere executive order.

Gariguez said the passage of Alternative Minerals Management Bill (AMMB) in Congress has become more urgent with President Aquino’s recent signing of the executive order on mining.

“There is a need to push for this AMMB because that EO is not the solution to our problem. The Chamber of Mines rejoicing is already an indicator that this EO actually favors mining companies,” he said in a recent interview.
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Old July 11th, 2012, 12:18 PM   #56
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Noy to certify new mining laws
By Aurea Calica and Paolo Romero (The Philippine Star) Updated July 11, 2012 12:00 AM

MANILA, Philippines - President Aquino is ready to certify as urgent any legislation that will effectively amend the Mining Act of 1995 as investors now have a clearer industry roadmap with the signing of Executive Order 79, Malacañang said yesterday.

Environment Secretary Ramon Paje said the Mining Industry Coordinating Council, whose creation was stipulated in the EO, would draft the legislation.

The council will include the Cabinet clusters on climate change adaptation and mitigation as well as economic development. It will be headed by the chairs of the two clusters and shall have the following additional members: secretary of the Department of Justice (DOJ), chairperson of the National Commission on Indigenous Peoples (NCIP) and president of the Union of Local Authorities of the Philippines (ULAP).

“I think we are also considering asking, recommending to the President certifying it as urgent bill,” Paje said. Through EO 79, the government bans mining in protected areas and in tourism sites and holds off issuance of new mining permits until Congress approves an improved revenue sharing scheme.

Paje said he cannot tell how soon Congress can legislate a revenue sharing arrangement between the government and mining companies but “of course, we would (want it) as soon as possible.”

Paje said the EO, which expanded the mining ban to include 78 ecotourism sites and other areas, would allow existing mining explorations to continue.

“Except the fact that we cannot sign new mineral contracts for mining agreements,” he said.

Paje said the Department of Environment and Natural Resources also stopped exploration and issuance of environment compliance certificate.

“We also have stopped the processing of mining feasibility. But now, the EO says all of those can continue except the signing of new agreements,” he said.

“I think what we intend to do is that the MICC will draft already the (bill)… In fact, there is already an ongoing study and draft the provisions then submit it to Congress for their review and approval,” he said.

Presidential Communications Development and Strategic Planning Office Secretary Ricky Carandang said there was positive reception to the mining EO by various stakeholders—environmentalists, the mining industry and local governments.

“With the exception of a few hard line elements, the administration’s reforms in the mining sector have been accepted as a clear direction for mining in the country,” Carandang said.



“As a result of EO 79, mining will be prohibited in certain environmentally sensitive areas, agricultural lands, and areas that have been designated for ecotourism. There will also be areas reserved for small-scale mining. Just as importantly, the government will get a larger share from mining activities and investors now have a clearer roadmap,” he said.

“More work needs to be done by local governments, the national government, Congress, civil society and the industry itself. But with this new directive from President Aquino, the path has been cleared for environmentally responsible and economically equitable mining activities in the country,” Carandang said.

House support

At the House of Representatives, Speaker Feliciano Belmonte Jr. said a legislation on higher mining revenues for the government would certainly be approved by lawmakers.

“We will certainly be supportive of whatever is needed,” Belmonte said when asked about Malacañang’s call for a law that will increase from two percent the excise tax imposed on mining companies.

The Speaker said the House may either pass a new revenue bill or incorporate the increased tax in pending mining bills already being discussed at the committee level.

“If Malacañang wants five to seven percent, then we can discuss this in the committee deliberations, but in our proposal, the royalty for the IP (indigenous people) communities is separate,” Ifugao Rep. Teddy Baguilat Jr., for his part, said.

He said the Alternative Minerals Management Bill (AMMB) pending in the House proposes a 10-percent excise tax and another 10-percent royalty for indigenous people who will be affected by mining operations.

Baguilat said giving indigenous people reasonable share in the mining revenues is also in compliance with the provisions of Republic Act 8371 or the Indigenous People’s Rights Act, which seeks to give just and fair compensation to the communities affected by any development project.

Eastern Samar Rep. Ben Evardone and Zambales Rep. Milagros Magsaysay, in separate statements, warned that the EO would be useless if not strictly implemented.

Magsaysay said the EO “looks good on paper but the true challenge will be in its implementation.”

“EO 79 basically seeks to increase government revenue from mining as well as protect agricultural lands and ecotourism areas from irresponsible mining operations. This also includes a review on existing mining agreements entered into by the government, large scale and small scale,” she said.

“There is really no problem with the EO, and the bigger issue would be in its implementation. The government must be firm in its crackdown on illegal mining operations, and set standards especially for small-scale mining which has caused countless accidents in the past couple of years because of unsafe practices,” she added.

Magsaysay said Malacañang should not expect the issuance of the EO “to be like a magic wand which will make all existing problems go away.”

“This will not happen overnight. This needs long-term commitment or else this endeavor will not bear any fruit. There is nothing wrong with mining as an industry so long as it is done in moderation and in accordance to the needs of development,” she said.

Evardone said the EO will transform the Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG) “into a ‘super department’ because of its awesome powers to enforce not only the Local Government Code, and laws on peace and order, but also environment laws.”

“Interior Secretary Jesse Robredo should form task forces in every province whose members are not beholden to any governor or mayor to ensure the success of EO 79,” Evardone said.

He said the drive to stop illegal mining is like the campaign against illegal gambling.

“The EO is meaningless if the DILG fails to implement this sound policy on mining. This is a radical move to preserve the environment,” Evardone said.

Laguna Rep. Danilo Fernandez, chairman of the House committee on ecology, lauded the EO as “the right approach to address the problem of climate change as well as the deteriorating environment.”

He said a five percent charge is not enough especially if pitted against the rates in other countries like Australia, Brazil, Canada, and Chile where royalties can reach as high as 18 percent.

“The government should have charged higher fees, we can fight it out in the committee hearings. I think the taxes are a small price to pay for the destruction these mining firms do to our environment,” Fernandez said.

Oriental Mindoro Gov. Alfonso Umali, president of the League of Provinces of the Philippines, said the EO is “good for all stakeholders” since it proposes to develop the Philippines’ mineral resources with strong safeguards on environmental protection and social acceptability.

“We can develop the mining industry hand in hand with environmental protection and preservation,” Umali said.

“All stakeholders stand to benefit from this policy direction,” he said, stressing the importance of social responsibility and acceptability in localities where mining activities are permitted.

Umali cited “highly commendable” provisions in the EO, including Section 11 or measures aimed at improving and regulating small-scale mining activities, and Section 12 that seeks consistency of local ordinances with the Constitution and national laws.

He also hailed two other provisions, namely Section 13 creating a one-stop shop for mining applications and procedures, and Section 14 improving transparency in the mineral industry.

“The creation of the MICC is most welcome,” Umali said, adding that the council should include individuals with technical expertise and in-depth understanding of mining operations.

Bigger role

In Albay, Gov. Joey Salceda said the new EO recognizes the role of local government units in ensuring responsible mining.

“Admittedly, the final shape and complexion of the mining EO has taken a very constructive approach towards LGU role and a weighty bias towards environmental protection and inter-generational responsibility in resource management,” Salceda said in an e-mail to The STAR Monday.

“We must concede the mighty exertion of Presidential Adviser for Environmental Concerns Neric Acosta, Climate Change Commission Bebeth Gozon and Environment Secretary Ramon Paje to take into account the concerns of local chief executives in drafting the EO but short of amending mining laws,” he said.

“But the structural limits imposed by legislation especially on RA 7492, otherwise known as the Mining Law of the Philippines preempt the kind of reforms that could justify in changing our fundamental opposition to mining in the current socio-political context,” Salceda added.

Meanwhile in Bacolod City, Negros Occidental Gov. Alfredo Marañon Jr. said he is in favor of the operations of large-scale mining companies in this province, but not of small-scale “fly-by-night” firms.

Marañon said he welcomes the activities of large mining firms like Maricalum Mining Corp. and Philex Mining Corp. in Sipalay City, because they are a boost to the local economy.
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Old July 11th, 2012, 12:18 PM   #57
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Noy to certify new mining laws
By Aurea Calica and Paolo Romero (The Philippine Star) Updated July 11, 2012 12:00 AM

MANILA, Philippines - President Aquino is ready to certify as urgent any legislation that will effectively amend the Mining Act of 1995 as investors now have a clearer industry roadmap with the signing of Executive Order 79, Malacañang said yesterday.

Environment Secretary Ramon Paje said the Mining Industry Coordinating Council, whose creation was stipulated in the EO, would draft the legislation.

The council will include the Cabinet clusters on climate change adaptation and mitigation as well as economic development. It will be headed by the chairs of the two clusters and shall have the following additional members: secretary of the Department of Justice (DOJ), chairperson of the National Commission on Indigenous Peoples (NCIP) and president of the Union of Local Authorities of the Philippines (ULAP).

“I think we are also considering asking, recommending to the President certifying it as urgent bill,” Paje said. Through EO 79, the government bans mining in protected areas and in tourism sites and holds off issuance of new mining permits until Congress approves an improved revenue sharing scheme.

Paje said he cannot tell how soon Congress can legislate a revenue sharing arrangement between the government and mining companies but “of course, we would (want it) as soon as possible.”

Paje said the EO, which expanded the mining ban to include 78 ecotourism sites and other areas, would allow existing mining explorations to continue.

“Except the fact that we cannot sign new mineral contracts for mining agreements,” he said.

Paje said the Department of Environment and Natural Resources also stopped exploration and issuance of environment compliance certificate.

“We also have stopped the processing of mining feasibility. But now, the EO says all of those can continue except the signing of new agreements,” he said.

“I think what we intend to do is that the MICC will draft already the (bill)… In fact, there is already an ongoing study and draft the provisions then submit it to Congress for their review and approval,” he said.

Presidential Communications Development and Strategic Planning Office Secretary Ricky Carandang said there was positive reception to the mining EO by various stakeholders—environmentalists, the mining industry and local governments.

“With the exception of a few hard line elements, the administration’s reforms in the mining sector have been accepted as a clear direction for mining in the country,” Carandang said.



“As a result of EO 79, mining will be prohibited in certain environmentally sensitive areas, agricultural lands, and areas that have been designated for ecotourism. There will also be areas reserved for small-scale mining. Just as importantly, the government will get a larger share from mining activities and investors now have a clearer roadmap,” he said.

“More work needs to be done by local governments, the national government, Congress, civil society and the industry itself. But with this new directive from President Aquino, the path has been cleared for environmentally responsible and economically equitable mining activities in the country,” Carandang said.

House support

At the House of Representatives, Speaker Feliciano Belmonte Jr. said a legislation on higher mining revenues for the government would certainly be approved by lawmakers.

“We will certainly be supportive of whatever is needed,” Belmonte said when asked about Malacañang’s call for a law that will increase from two percent the excise tax imposed on mining companies.

The Speaker said the House may either pass a new revenue bill or incorporate the increased tax in pending mining bills already being discussed at the committee level.

“If Malacañang wants five to seven percent, then we can discuss this in the committee deliberations, but in our proposal, the royalty for the IP (indigenous people) communities is separate,” Ifugao Rep. Teddy Baguilat Jr., for his part, said.

He said the Alternative Minerals Management Bill (AMMB) pending in the House proposes a 10-percent excise tax and another 10-percent royalty for indigenous people who will be affected by mining operations.

Baguilat said giving indigenous people reasonable share in the mining revenues is also in compliance with the provisions of Republic Act 8371 or the Indigenous People’s Rights Act, which seeks to give just and fair compensation to the communities affected by any development project.

Eastern Samar Rep. Ben Evardone and Zambales Rep. Milagros Magsaysay, in separate statements, warned that the EO would be useless if not strictly implemented.

Magsaysay said the EO “looks good on paper but the true challenge will be in its implementation.”

“EO 79 basically seeks to increase government revenue from mining as well as protect agricultural lands and ecotourism areas from irresponsible mining operations. This also includes a review on existing mining agreements entered into by the government, large scale and small scale,” she said.

“There is really no problem with the EO, and the bigger issue would be in its implementation. The government must be firm in its crackdown on illegal mining operations, and set standards especially for small-scale mining which has caused countless accidents in the past couple of years because of unsafe practices,” she added.

Magsaysay said Malacañang should not expect the issuance of the EO “to be like a magic wand which will make all existing problems go away.”

“This will not happen overnight. This needs long-term commitment or else this endeavor will not bear any fruit. There is nothing wrong with mining as an industry so long as it is done in moderation and in accordance to the needs of development,” she said.

Evardone said the EO will transform the Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG) “into a ‘super department’ because of its awesome powers to enforce not only the Local Government Code, and laws on peace and order, but also environment laws.”

“Interior Secretary Jesse Robredo should form task forces in every province whose members are not beholden to any governor or mayor to ensure the success of EO 79,” Evardone said.

He said the drive to stop illegal mining is like the campaign against illegal gambling.

“The EO is meaningless if the DILG fails to implement this sound policy on mining. This is a radical move to preserve the environment,” Evardone said.

Laguna Rep. Danilo Fernandez, chairman of the House committee on ecology, lauded the EO as “the right approach to address the problem of climate change as well as the deteriorating environment.”

He said a five percent charge is not enough especially if pitted against the rates in other countries like Australia, Brazil, Canada, and Chile where royalties can reach as high as 18 percent.

“The government should have charged higher fees, we can fight it out in the committee hearings. I think the taxes are a small price to pay for the destruction these mining firms do to our environment,” Fernandez said.

Oriental Mindoro Gov. Alfonso Umali, president of the League of Provinces of the Philippines, said the EO is “good for all stakeholders” since it proposes to develop the Philippines’ mineral resources with strong safeguards on environmental protection and social acceptability.

“We can develop the mining industry hand in hand with environmental protection and preservation,” Umali said.

“All stakeholders stand to benefit from this policy direction,” he said, stressing the importance of social responsibility and acceptability in localities where mining activities are permitted.

Umali cited “highly commendable” provisions in the EO, including Section 11 or measures aimed at improving and regulating small-scale mining activities, and Section 12 that seeks consistency of local ordinances with the Constitution and national laws.

He also hailed two other provisions, namely Section 13 creating a one-stop shop for mining applications and procedures, and Section 14 improving transparency in the mineral industry.

“The creation of the MICC is most welcome,” Umali said, adding that the council should include individuals with technical expertise and in-depth understanding of mining operations.

Bigger role

In Albay, Gov. Joey Salceda said the new EO recognizes the role of local government units in ensuring responsible mining.

“Admittedly, the final shape and complexion of the mining EO has taken a very constructive approach towards LGU role and a weighty bias towards environmental protection and inter-generational responsibility in resource management,” Salceda said in an e-mail to The STAR Monday.

“We must concede the mighty exertion of Presidential Adviser for Environmental Concerns Neric Acosta, Climate Change Commission Bebeth Gozon and Environment Secretary Ramon Paje to take into account the concerns of local chief executives in drafting the EO but short of amending mining laws,” he said.

“But the structural limits imposed by legislation especially on RA 7492, otherwise known as the Mining Law of the Philippines preempt the kind of reforms that could justify in changing our fundamental opposition to mining in the current socio-political context,” Salceda added.

Meanwhile in Bacolod City, Negros Occidental Gov. Alfredo Marañon Jr. said he is in favor of the operations of large-scale mining companies in this province, but not of small-scale “fly-by-night” firms.

Marañon said he welcomes the activities of large mining firms like Maricalum Mining Corp. and Philex Mining Corp. in Sipalay City, because they are a boost to the local economy.
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Old July 18th, 2012, 08:04 AM   #58
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Philippines urged to stop killings of mining foes
Agence France-Presse
12:27 pm | Wednesday, July 18th, 2012

MANILA – President Benigno Aquino should move to stop the killings of anti-mining activists as the Philippines pushes to revitalize the mining sector, a global rights body has said.

The New York-based Human Rights Watch (HRW) said it had documented three cases since October last year of three anti-mining and environmental activists allegedly killed by paramilitary forces who may have links to the military.

The victims had opposed mining activities that could displace tribal communities as well as destroy their communities, it said in a statement Tuesday.

“President (Benigno) Aquino has enacted decrees to encourage mining investment in the
Philippines but has done little to stop attacks on environmental advocates,” said HRW deputy director for Asia, Elaine Pearson.

“He should recognize that respecting human rights is crucial for economic development,” she said in the statement.

Aquino issued a new mining policy early this month aimed at boosting revenues from mining and increasing environmental safeguards.

But Pearson said the policy was silent on the issue of alleged rights abuses by paramilitary forces deployed by the military to protect mining companies from attacks mostly by communist guerrillas.

Aquino spokesman Ricky Carandang said the government did not tolerate attacks against environmentalists or other advocacy groups.

He acknowledged previous cases of activists killed, but stressed investigations were being carried out to get those behind the attacks.

“We are doing what we can, and we do recognize the need for these cases to be resolved much more quickly than they are being resolved,” he told AFP.

He said linking the deaths to the military was “a sweeping allegation” that could further incite tensions.

In October, Italian activist priest Fausto Tentorio was shot and killed by a gunman while inside his parish compound in the town of Arakan in the southern island of Mindanao.

Four suspects had been identified from a local paramilitary group, though no one has been arrested.

Two other activists were killed in March and May, while in January last year, an environmentalist broadcaster was gunned down in the western island of Palawan for his advocacy.

A former governor who is alleged to have planned the journalist’s murder is in hiding after a court ordered his arrest.
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Old July 18th, 2012, 07:36 PM   #59
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http://www.businessweek.com/news/201...theast-asia#p1
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Old July 19th, 2012, 07:50 AM   #60
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this is so sad, greedy people! not good for our country.

i dont get it, you mine the gold process it turn it into gold bars the put in it the bank, lock it in the dungeon. so stupid! 90% percent of the gold bars in the world just stocks in the bank.

Last edited by pogiboi; July 19th, 2012 at 08:22 AM.
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