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Old February 2nd, 2014, 09:16 AM   #1
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Visayas Creative Industry

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Old February 2nd, 2014, 09:32 AM   #2
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The Visayan Film Industry: A Retrospective

by J. Vincent Noriega and Valeriano Avila with Kris Relatado and Junius F. Ranillo

During the 1920's when the Germans and Russians dominated the artistic development of the film and its techiniques (Cabinet of Dr. Caligari-1919;Nosferatu-1922;Potemkin-1925,) Filipino-Visayan filmmakers such as Max Borromeo, Florentino Borromeo and Celestino Rodriguez collaborated in making El Hijo Disobediente (The Disobedient Son) in 1922. This black and white silent picture could have been one of the earliest noted films from the Southern Philippines. The year 1929 marked the advent of talking pictures, but only in 1938 did the Visayan Film Industry have its first "talkie" entitle Bertoldo Ug Balodoy (Bertoldo and Balodoy) written by Piux Kabahar, which was followed by Mini (Fake), 1940, and Gugmang Talagsaon (Rare Love), 1940 by Virgilio Gonzales. In Cebu, the first movie houses were built by the Avila Clan: Ideal Theater (1911), Cine Auditorium (1922) and Cine Oriente (The old Teatro Junquera).

After the second world war, a resurgence of Visayan films cam about through Lapu-Lapu Pictures, which produced Timbu Mata, 1948, starring Eva de Villa and Lino Ramas and Damgo Ni Adan (Adan's Dream), produced by Rudy Robles. Then came Mactan Films which produced Tahas (Mission), 1950, starring Luz Celeste and Dakay; Mat Ranillo was in this film. Then Balud(Wave), 1950 which starred Luz Celeste and Mat Ranillo. Another independent picture, Sa Kabukiran (In The Fields), 1948, was also produced during this time.

By 1951, Azucena Productions was established by the Arong Familiy (owners of Rene and Liberty Theaters). They produced Princesa Tirana (Princess Tirana), 1951 with Mat Ranillo and Gloria Sevilla (her first feature title role after she was discovered through a declamation contest at the University of the Visayas) as lead players. Their first feature together made such a box office success in the Visayas and Mindanao that other features immediately followed: Leonora, 1951;Pailub Lang (Be Forebearing), 1951; Utlanan (Border), 1952; Handumanan (Memoir), 1953; Inahan (Mother), 1952, starring Mat Ranillo and Caridad Sanchez; Antigan, 1952 with Virgie Postigo and Arise Roa; Carmen 1 and 2 (from the famous radio drama in Cebu), 1953; Paabuta Lang Ako (Wait for Me), 1953; Gloria Kong Anak (Gloria My Child), 1953; and Gihigugma Kong Ikaw (I Love You), 1954; Mat and Gloria then became synonymous to Visayan picutures, and since then were called as the King and Queen of Visayan Movies.

In 1953 a film entitled Sangang Nangabali (Broken Branches), produced by Cebu Stars Production broke box-office records in the mid-1950s. Cebu Stars Productions (owned by the Tojong Family) had earlier produced Dimakaling, 1952 and Mga Anak Intawon (Oh, Poor Children), 1953. Other independent Visayan films produced at this time were: Mapait Ang Balaod, 1953 (Arturo Blanco); Bugas Mais (Corn Rice), 1953 (Arturo Blanco); Kapintas Sa Kinabuhi (Hard Life), 1953, (Cebu Stars Productions with Esterlina and Rebecca Torres); Pit Senor (Hail Senor); and San Tilmo, 1953, (Barba Productions); Ang Siloy, 1953 (with Nora Hermosa and Rebecca Torres); Huni sa Gugma (Where is Love), 1953; Dadansoy, 1953 and Inahan (Mother), 1954. Mutya and VM Productions (formed by Natalio Bacalso - former Cebu assemblyman) entered Salingsing sa Kasakit (Partner in Pain) - directed by Bacalso in the 1955 FAMAS derby and won the "Best Child Actor Award" for Undo Juezan. These movie outfits also produced some memorable features such as Ungo Sa Parian (Witch In The Parian); Remember Erlinda;Rosita;Politika (Politics); and Mutya sa Saging Tindok (Muse of Saging Tindok). Garbosa (Proud), 1957 and Matam-is Ang Pagpaubos (Too Sweet To Suffer), 1957 were also released during this time.

Mat ang Gloria finally got married off-screen (in real life) and formed S-R Productions in 1954. The company's initial projects were Paradista, 1955 and May Luhang Nahabilin sa Baybayon (A Tear Fell on the Shore), 1955 and even as they moved on to make Tagalog movies in Manila, they still continued producing Visayan movies like (It is the Palm That Commands) with Flash Elorde and Edita Clomera; Palad Ta Ang NagbuotLungsod Sa Buenavista (Town of Buenavista), 1969 and Hain Ang Langit (Where is Heavean?), 1969 with Gloria Sevilla and Mat Ranillo and Von Serna - this was Mat's last movie. Badlis sa Kinabuhi (The Line of Life), 1969, was entered in the Famas Derby and got 12 nominations out of 14 categories. Gloria Sevilla won best actress, Frankie Navaja, Jr., best child actor, and the late Mat Ranillo got a posthumous award (Mat Ranillo had earlier died in a plane crash in 1969). The film (Badlis) was the Philippine entry to the ASEAN Film Festival in Indonesia, and was showcased under the informative division of the Berlin Film Festival (the film was dubbed in English in Hongkong and retitled "Destined"). In 1970, Badlis Sa Kinabuhi and Palad Ta Ang Nagbuot were released in their original Visayan versions in Metro Manila and made good at the box office. Ang Bayan (The Country), 1970 was also produced at this time.

The 1970s saw the emeregence of more Visayan talents in the Tagalog film industry. Actresses such as Chanda Romero, Caridad Sanches, Alma Moreno, Tessie Sevilla, Rebecca Torres, Aurora Villa, Eva de Villa, Rosita Fernandez, Virgie Postigo, Virgie Solis, Olivia Solis, Cora Real, Diana Arong, Luz Celeste, Annabelle Rama, Suzette Ranillo, Lady Ramos, Pilar Pilapil, and others stepped into the limelight. Male leads (to name a few) were Bert Nombrado, Ber Lopez, Tony Delgado, Riel Ylaya, Lino Ramas, Arturo Blanco, Arturo de Castille, Frankie Navaja Jr, Tony Cruz, Undo Juezan, Felix de Catalina, Arsie Roa, Warfi Engracia, Kadyo Roma and Romy Kintanar (who is now a sports commentator). Directors Leroy Salvador, Fernando Alfon, Talyo Bacalso, Sat Villarino, Gene Labella, Leox Juesan, Cesar B. Cesar and Emmanuel H. Borlaza also originated from the south. Borlaza directed Alma Bonita (with Chanda Romero and Ernie Garcia) and Paypay Placid (Fan of Placid), Diadem Films, (with Pepito Rodriguez, Lilian Lain, Alice Mendez, and Justo C. Justo). Other films that were produced at this time were Medalyon Nga Bulawan (Medalyon Na Ginto), produced by Annabelle Rama, starring Bert Leroy, Gina Pareno, Jerry Pons, Charlie Davao, Johnny Delgado, Raul Aragon, Alice Mendez, and Yoyoy Villame; (with Nobo Bono, Jr. and Tessie Sevilla); Mayor AndalBatul of Mactan (Battle of Mactan), JRJ Productions, starring Chanda Romero, Eddie Peregrina and Alice Mendez; Anino sa Villa Lagrimas (Shadow of Villa Lagrimas), starring Chanda Romero and Ernie Garcia; Bulawan Sa Lapok (Gold in the Mud), starring Alicia Alonzon, Bert Leroy Jr., Tommy Abuel and Dindo Fernando; Antonio Solitaryo and Mga Milagaro sa Santo Niņo (Miracles of Sto. Niņo), Magnolia Films both directed by Sol Gaudite. Other noted films were Aliyana - 1974; Ikaduhang Bathala (Second God), 1974.

Gloria Sevilla remarried in 1971, and together with her husband Amado Cortez (of the Padilla clan) went on to prodce another Visayan film entitled Gimingaw Ako (I Long For You), 1974 (which was shot entirely in Cebu City and directed by Amado Cortez starring Gloria Sevilla, Suzette Ranillo, Bert Nombrado and Inday Nita Cortez). This film won the FAMAS "Best Actress Award" for Gloria Sevilla and "Best Supporting Actress Award" for Suzette Ranillo. Naghilak Ako Sa Kahilum (Crying Silently) also came about within the year. Other independent productions were: Diego Salvador, 1973; Ang Pagbabalik ni Diego Salvador (The Return of Diego Salvador), 1974 with Von Serna; and Sabrin, 1975 with Chanda Romero and Rebecca Torres.

Visayan film producers continued trying to revive the Visayan movies in the mid-seventies by filming in the 16mm format and transfering the material to 35mm for theatrical release. Films such as Ang Manok ni San Pedro (St. Peter's Rooster), 1975 and Itlog Manoy Orange (The Orange Egg Vendor), 1976 were originally shot in 16mm. This less costly process, however, did not prevent the Visayan film industry from finally going into a dormant stage. The Tagalog film industry was just at an upswing at this time, prompting Visayan producers to venture into television production instead.

It was not until 1991 that another Visayan film project was brought to the big screen. Eh Kasi Babae (Because She Is A Woman) starring Pilita Corales, Yoyoy Villame and Manilyn Reynes was produced, then followed by Matud Nila (They Say), 1991 (Bisaya Films, Inc. produced by James R. Cuenco, Jr.). This starred Gloria Sevilla, Mat Ranillo III, Suzette Ranillo, Dandin Ranillo, Juni Ranillo, Pilar Pilapil, Jennifer Sevilla, Mark Gil and Pinky Marquez. Matud Nila also marked the last film directed by the late Leroy Salvador.

It is noteworthy to mention that there is a very large population of Visayan-speaking movie goers in Metro Manila, and that a great percentage of Tagalog movie stars and TV/movie personalities (singers like Pilita Corales, Vina Morales, Manilyn Reynes, Dulce, Verni Varga, and other directors and producers are originally Visayan). It is also interesting to note that most Visayan films revolve around the "love story-drama-comedy" genre which inevitably reflects the lifestyle and culture of the southern Filipinos. This genre, apparently has the most popular appeal to a great majority of the Filipino viewing public today, making "drama-love story-comedy" films sell the most at the box office. It is in this light that the viewing public should not lose hope in seeing more Visayan movies in the future-that is, if all these Visayan talents and producers put their sense together and realize that Visayan Cinema might even be the answer to the long awaited Filipino film revolution- with the way Tagalog films are being made nowadays, who knows - Visayan films might just be the saving grace of the regressing Filipino film industry.

Sources:
http://benjieordonez.multiply.com/jo...pective-Part-I
http://benjieordonez.multiply.com/jo...ective-Part-II
http://benjieordonez.multiply.com/jo...ctive-Part-III
https://www.facebook.com/CebuanoMoviesTVMusic/info
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Old February 2nd, 2014, 09:36 AM   #3
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The Making or Unmaking of Cebu's Local Film Industry

Cebu Cinema: Then and Now

That the Cebu film industry is just not what it used to be is an observation made time and again by the region's film makers. Back in the day as they say, the queen city of the South had a healthy film scene. As early as 1906, movies were shown in public places where large crowds gathered. A cockpit owned by Pedro Royo evolved into a movie house called Cine Royo. Teatro Junquera, Cebu's oldest theater having been established in 1895, was renamed Cine Oriente. And in 1927, another movie house called Cine Magallanes was opened.These early movie houses showed home grown films like Piux Kabahar's Bertoldo ug Baludoy, which is considered as Cebu's first talking film. Many titles soon followed and the years just before the Second World War became known as the first golden era of Cebuano Cinema. It produced movies like Gugmang Talagsaon, Mini, Tanso sa Ginto and Bulak sa Lunangan.


Cebu Cinema in 1947

Cebuano Cinema was understandably idle during the war but in 1947, film making resumed with Manuel Velez' Sa Kabukiran. Subsequently, the years between 1950 and 1957 became known as the 2nd golden era of Cebuano Cinema. More than 50 movies were produced in seven years by around 30 Cebuano film productions. In 1969, a Cebuano film called Badlis sa Kinabuhi won the Best Black and White Film Award in the 16th Asian Film Festival in Jakarta and was entered in the Berlin Film Festival. Salingsing sa Kasakit was also nominated in the annual FAMAS Awards in Manila for Best Picture, Best Cinematography, Best Director and even won the Best Child Actor Award.


Badlis sa Kinabuhi
Directed by: Leroy Salvador
Starring:
Gloria Sevilla
Mat Ranillo Jr.
Frankie Navaja



Golden Years
Soon thereafter, Cebuano movie actresses Gloria Sevilla and Suzette Ranillo won the FAMAS Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress Awards respectively, for the 1974 film Gimingaw Ako. In the same year, the Visayan Movie Producer's association led by then Governor Osmundo Rama held the first Visayan Film Festival. The local industry was churning movies until 1979 and produced films like Bulawan sa Lapok, Ay Takya, ay Takya, Ulan Udtong Tutok and many others.

The Decline
In 1980, the local movie scene petered out. Due to financial difficulties, film makers shifted to television. To make matters worse, Cebuano actors were lured to Manila where the film industry gave hefty salaries and national exposure. This diaspora included other film industry players like Chanda Romero, looking for better opportunities. Without a source of funding, effective marketing and distribution strategy; making films in Cebu became a non-sustainable industry. Local historians would mark this year as the death of the Cebuano film industry.


Cebuano Films Revived?
However, there were people who tried to keep the fire in Cebuano cinema burning. In 1990, a film entitled Matud Nila was produced. Some video films were also produced at this time with titles like Ang Dili Kaniadto, Mahimo na Karon, Mama Maliya and Kalis. Fourteen years later in 2004, the award winning film Panaghoy sa Suba was shown in Philippine movie houses. Although the movie was shot in Bohol, it was recognized by some as a Cebuano film.

At about this time, the International Academy of Films and Television opened in Cebu. The establishment produced a young and dynamic breed of movie makers. It is disappointing to the new breed of film makers that the school does not allow its students to make non English thesis films. Somehow, their English only policy restricts the creativity of local film makers whose mother tongue is not English. The cultural intersections and the abundant hybrid forms produced of Cebu's uneven development coupled with dramatic and rapid changes of recent decades would have provided a Cebuano film maker with a rich mine of material.

Cebuano Film Scene Today
However, once outside the school, some of these new film makers went on to explore their cinematic creativity. A number of short films were produced by the Sinegang Collective, Sine Buano, Oddfield Productions, Dragon Productions and Panumduman Productions. Local universities also started to offer film making subjects. Cebu Normal University, University of the Philippines, University of San Carlos and University of San Jose Recoletos now organize their own film festivals. An inter-school film festival has also become part of the local film scene. The films produced here belong to the animation, documentary and short film genre. USC has just started their Bachelor of Science in Fine Arts major in films in 2011.

The Sinulog Foundation Inc., with its documentary and short film contest, has also encouraged Cebuano film makers to some extent.

Award Winning Cebuano Films
The relatively high cost of film making is still one of the biggest stumbling blocks in the revival of Cebuano cinema. However, in 2007, with funding from Cinema One digital, the Cebuano full length movie Confessional was made. The film won 7 awards in the Cinema One Digital film festival and 5 awards in the PMPC Awards in Manila. It also garnered the Best Feature Film award in the 2008 Cinefan Film Festival in New Delhi, India. Queen Raquela, a film partly made in Cebu by an Icelandic production with a largely Cebuano cast and crew clinched the Teddy Award in Berlin and the Lino Brocka Award in the Cinemalaya Film Festival in 2008.

Today, as the effects of digital technology become increasingly pervasive within contemporary culture, Cebuano cinema is breathing again. A group of young and innovative film makers have emerged. We hope that these artists can be provided with a conducive environment and access to resources. Only then can the cinematic sense of Cebuano film makers be brought to their place in the national and international realm of great films.

In 2010, the film Ang Damgo ni Eleuteria (The Dream of Eleuteria, won a grant from Cinema One Originals. Based on a story writeen by Maria Victoria Beltran, the film was directed by Remton Siega Zuasola. It won the Jury Prize at the CinemaOne Originals Film Festival and at the Junjeu Film Festival in Korea. It also won Best Picture, Director, Cinematography, and Music at the Gawad Urian Awards.

This year, two Cebuano films are under production with grants from the Cinema One Originals. Dili Ingon Nato (Not Like Us), directed by Ivan Zaldarriaga and Brandon Relucio and My Paranormal Romance, directed by Victor Villanueva. Like we say in the film circle: Coming Soon: The Making or Unmaking of the Cebu Film Industry.

http://www.squidoo.com/the-making-of...-film-industry
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Old February 2nd, 2014, 09:39 AM   #4
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A Scene From The Highly-Acclaimed Cebuano Movie in 1969 "Badlis Sa Kinabuhi" That Made Frankie Navaja Jr. A Best Child Actor In The 1969 FAMAS Awards.

The said movie also won international awards and citations. Badlis sa Kinabuhi won the Best Black and White Film Award in the 16th Asian Film Festival in Jakarta and was entered in the Berlin Film Festival.



In this scene, Gloria Sevilla, proved her acting prowess when interrogated by a lawyer. Badlis sa Kinabuhi brought Gloria Sevilla international stardom when it won a string of international awards for the picture and her landmark acting, which also brought her her first FAMAS Best Actress award in 1969. Before Badlis, Gloria Sevilla was already an established name in Philippine cinema, with a FAMAS Best Supporting Actress award and four FAMAS nominations under her belt before her Badlis fame.




Another notable Cebuano movie in 1969 starring Gloria Sevilla, Von Serna and Frankie Navaja Jr.




No more Visayan movies produced after "Itlog Manoy Orange" (The Orange Egg Vendor) in 1976. The Visayan film industry finally went into a dormant stage. The Tagalog film industry was just at an upswing at that time, prompting Visayan producers to venture into television production instead. Then in 1991, there was an attempt to revive the Visayan movie industry through "Matud Nila."




After the movie "Matud Nila" in 1991, no one ever dared create a Visayan movie until in 2004. Cesar Montano, a native of Bohol, was inspired to revive the long-forgotten Cebuano film industry. He produced "Panaghoy Sa Suba," which was a multi-awarded Visayan film, shot entirely in Bohol. Staring Cesar himself and Juliana Palermo. This film grabbed most of the awards from the most respected award-giving bodies of the country (Metro Manila Fim Festival 2004, Film Academy of the Philippines 2005 and Gaward Urian 2005).




In 2010, the film Ang Damgo ni Eleuteria (The Dream of Eleuteria, won a grant from Cinema One Originals. Based on a story written by Maria Victoria Beltran, the film was directed by Remton Siega Zuasola. It won the Jury Prize at the CinemaOne Originals Film Festival and at the Junjeu Film Festival in Korea. It also won Best Picture, Director, Cinematography, and Music at the Gawad Urian Awards.




The relatively high cost of film making is still one of the biggest stumbling blocks in the revival of Cebuano cinema. However, in 2007, with funding from Cinema One digital, the Cebuano full length movie Confessional was made. The film won 7 awards in the Cinema One Digital film festival and 5 awards in the PMPC Awards in Manila. It also garnered the Best Feature Film award in the 2008 Cinefan Film Festival in New Delhi, India. Queen Raquela, a film partly made in Cebu by an Icelandic production with a largely Cebuano cast and crew clinched the Teddy Award in Berlin and the Lino Brocka Award in the Cinemalaya Film Festival in 2008.

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Old February 2nd, 2014, 09:44 AM   #5
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The Cebuano music industry

By Chris Malazarte

I love music and the buff that I am I got from my father whose taste for standards are, I should say, classy. My collection spans across all genres from the pre-war era to the nineties. The oldest (around the thirties) that I have is Al Jolson who, my father recalls, is his father’s “morning ritual.” He gets up at five and plays “April Showers” on his phonograph and mimics Al with coffee in his hand.

Like my father, I also have his old time favorites like Frank Sinatra, Bobby Darin, Johnny Mathis, Frankie Laine, Judy Garland and Doris Day plus a complete set of The Beatles which he doesn’t have. But of course, I am not that old to shun techno stuff like the Black Eyed Peas, Akon and even Justin Bieber and, believe it or not, girl’s stuff like Taylor Swift!

But one of the closest to my heart is Cebuano or Visayan music. Among the collections I have are from Susan Fuentes, Luz Loreto, Dulce Amor, Pilita Corales, and of course, a collection of Visayan music is never complete without Yoyoy Villame and Max Surban’s comical antics or what’s touted as novelty music.

My OPM collection pales in comparison with the foreign labels but dwarfs my Cebuano compilations. I wouldn’t be surprised if music collectors would have more than three-quarters of their songs foreign while the rest are OPM and bits and pieces of Visayan recordings. Even your videoke song book returns the same rundown of songs in their list.

These can only mean one thing. That Filipinos have that musicality running in our veins. We practically enjoy every rhyme and rhythm that goes to our eardrums and do not seem to care if they are native or foreign to us. Our liking for music has stood out that we are known for being the “Videoke Capital” of the world that it has become part of our entertainment menu during special occasions or when we feel like unwinding.

However, we have not maximized our musicality. The music industry in the Philippines is not so lucrative for many of our talented musicians. Filipinos have an insatiable craving for foreign artist and admittedly, I happen to be among those guilty. Because of this, many of our talents either go out as entertainers or fade in oblivion.

We need serious artists who can craft beautiful songs. Those who do not only show up every Cebu Pop Music but those who believe that they got what it takes to show what they got -- the likes of Pilita Corales, Dulce Amor, Sheryn Regis, Susan Fuentes and Luz Loreto.

In my recent chitchat with the King of Visayan novelty, Max Surban, I discovered that he is not only loved by the Cebuanos, he gets invites from people in Mindanao and still holds concerts and private shows here and there and out of the country as well. His secret is the simplicity and the love of poetry inherent of the Bisdaks that he never fails to put in his songs.

Cebuanos are hard to please and for a truly Cebuano music to succeed in the market, which is really a very niche market, artists should give their hearts out in every piece they create – the lines should rhyme and express the love and courtship that happen between couples if its a love song. I also notice that those that succeed are written mostly in the native tongue and I think this something a song artist should possess.

More than anything else, for any Cebuano composition to succeed, the Cebuanos should themselves support the work of a fellow Cebuano.

http://www.philstar.com/cebu-busines...music-industry

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Old February 2nd, 2014, 09:49 AM   #6
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Golden age of Cebuano music


THE tragedy of being popular is that a disconnect between perception and the real eventually surfaces. The image of a famous person that gets stuck in the public mind is often that one associated with his or her peak moments. Life’s continuous motion towards denouement is glossed over, and thus the public is shocked when a famous person resurfaces in a pitiful state years after his or her peak.

Popular Cebuano talent Dulce (Maritess Llamedo) recently cried while singing a song to promote a Tagalog stage play where she is one of its stars. When asked by reporters about it, she mentioned the name Susan Fuentes and the difficulties she is going through (she is confined at the National Kidney Institute for a serious illness).

Before Bisrock, which a new generation of Cebuanos has been lapping up, there was popular Cebuano music, sometimes mistakenly referred to as folk. It featured well-composed songs sung by the best voices that Cebuano-speaking people in the Visayas and Mindanao produced. It became so popular for decades we can refer to it as the main feature of the golden age of the Cebuano music industry.

Propping that age up were composers with good command of the Cebuano language and intense musicality (think Ben Zubiri, Mel Villareal, Vicente Rubi, Nitoy Gonzales, etc.) together with talented singers (think Stax Huguete, Jaime Salazar, Pilita Corrales, Susan Fuentes, Dulce, etc.) and an audience that were intensely loyal to Cebuano culture. Cebuano pop music was so popular even Tagalog singers like Victor Wood sang “Visayan” songs.

Fuentes was born in Butuan City in Mindanao, an accident of nature that contributed to her unique style of singing Cebuano songs. She eventually “owned” classic songs like Gonzales’s “Usahay” with her captivating mellow voice. (Nitoy is Juanito Gonzales Angus of my home place of Tudela). She made good the title attached to her as “Queen of Visayan Songs.”

Incidentally, my favorite Susan Fuentes song isn’t even Cebuano, but her version of the Tagalog classic “Miss Kita Kung Christmas.” Her unique voice transformed it into a haunting song that still captivates me during the yuletide season.

In January 2011, Fuentes, already 56 year old, surfaced during the launching of Sir Jose “Dodong” Gullas’s memoir, “To Never Forget.” In an article written by The Freeman’s Nathalie Tomada, she narrated her tale of woe: from her dominance in the late ‘70s and the ‘80s and her living like a royalty to her getting lost in “abusive lifestyle and self-destructive vices” to her poverty and illnesses (she underwent kidney transplant). And now this.

I remember a few months ago when another pillar of Cebuano pop music, Jaime Salazar, died. I didn’t know Salazar, the person, but could identify with him through his distinctive mellow voice that made memorable such classics as “Matud Nila,” “Ikaduhang Bathala” and the newer “Sa Pangandoy Lang.” Somebody once told me that with the close of the golden age of the Cebuano music industry, Salazar had to survive life by working at the Cebu City Hall.

I didn’t know the story was true but it left me pondering the fate of many great Cebuano talents who died penniless and unrecognized. But there is still something that can be done about it if local government units will just take heed. And we need more people like Sir Dodong Gullas who is valiantly trying to preserve Cebuano music legacy. This is something that we owe to artists who made us appreciate better our own culture.

http://www.sunstar.com.ph/cebu/opini...o-music-237800

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Old February 2nd, 2014, 09:51 AM   #7
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"Badlis sa Kinabuhi (The Line of Life)" (1969) received 12 of 14 Famas nominations. Gloria Sevilla won Best Actress, Frankie Navaja, Jr., Best Child Actor and a posthumous award to Mat Ranillo, Sr.. The movie was the Philippine entry to the Asean Film Festival in Indonesia, and was showcased under the informative division f the Berlin Film Festival (the film was dubbed in English in Hongkong and retitles as "Destined"). In 1970, the movie was released in their original Visayan version in Manila theaters and made good at the box office. (excerpt from the article)

http://video48.blogspot.com/2014/01/...ospective.html

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Old February 2nd, 2014, 09:54 AM   #8
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Pilita Corrales - Visayan Jukebox Queen Vol. 7 (Full Album)


Rosas Pandan - R.I.P* Ms. Susan Fuentes The QUEEN OF VISAYAN SONGS (Butuan City, Philippines)


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Old February 2nd, 2014, 09:55 AM   #9
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Old February 2nd, 2014, 09:57 AM   #10
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Old February 2nd, 2014, 09:59 AM   #11
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Old February 2nd, 2014, 10:03 AM   #12
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Old February 2nd, 2014, 10:07 AM   #13
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It’s complicated: Choices confront creative Cebuanos
By VERA Files


Kenneth Cobonpue at the 2nd Cebu Creative Industries Summit
By Ma. Theresa Angelina Quintana-Tabada, VERA Files


Gregory Fernandez worked for 10 years with a community paper in Cebu City. By the time he led its art department in 2009, the newspaper’s design team “was on its way toward innovation.”

Fernandez also acted in pocket theater plays and independent film productions that had a small but loyal following among Cebuanos.

He left all these when he became a senior designer with the Times of Oman, one of the oldest English dailies in the sultanate.

Fernandez said he is willing to return to Cebu and share what he learns in graphic design.

“Cebu is always home for my art,” he said, adding that, through the Internet, he remains active with Bathalad, a literary group seeking to revive the “balak,” a traditional form of Cebuano poetry.

The decision to return, though, is made complicated by his current earnings in Oman, more than five times his last pay in Cebu.

Between choices
Fernandez illustrates the tug-of-war of choices that confront many overseas workers: stay or leave?

Overseas Filipino workers numbered 1.8 million in 2012, up by 46 percent from the 1.24 million in 2008, according to the Philippine Overseas Employment Administration (POEA).

But while overall overseas employment is on the upswing, the POEA has recorded a decline in the deployment of creative industry workers like Fernandez. This group of professional and technical workers also includes composers, musicians and singers, as well as choreographers and dancers.
From 2008 to 2010, the number of OFWs in the creative industries declined by 16 percent: from 49,649 in 2008, to 47,886 in 2009, and to 41,835 in 2010.

Like other parts of the country, Cebu has “lost” creative industry workers like Fernandez to other countries. Many Cebuanos in the creative field, however, have an option to stay in the community while exploring a global audience and market.

In July 2011, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations Ministers of Culture and Arts Plus Three (AMCA+3) formally launched Cebu City as an ASEAN City of Culture.


Creative Cebu Council

For its association with artists of worldwide renown, Cebu was the British Council’s Creative Choice in 2008.

In 2008, “at least 414 enterprises” were engaged in the creative industries of Cebu, according to an industry mapping project done by the British Council and the Department of Trade and Industry’s (DTI) provincial office in Cebu.

DTI-Cebu itself has been conducting a campaign to get Cebuanos to recognize “the value of creative industries in (contributing to) the (local) economy (trade, tourism and investment),” particularly the “value of creativity as a ‘wealth asset’” present among local creative entrepreneurs and creative professionals, said senior trade and industry development specialist Marivic Aguilar.

Hirota Paint Industries, Monique Lhuillier and Kenneth Cobonpue are among the Cebuanos who have earned worldwide repute for creativity.

With offices on Gorordo Avenue in Barangay Kamputhaw and Long Beach, California, the Hirota Paint Industries (HPI) employs Cebuano artists that created the visual effects of Hollywood blockbuster movies, like “New Moon,” “Watchmen” and “G. I. Joe: Rise of the Cobra”.

Born and raised in Cebu, Lhuillier owns a fashion house in Los Angeles, California. Her gowns are Hollywood red carpet mainstays. She designed the bridal gowns of pop celebrities Pink, Natalie Imbruglia and Britney Spears.

Cobonpue is arguably the most famous Filipino designer. His Lolah Chair won for him the Design for Asia Award of Hong Kong in 2005. Perhaps the most celebrated of his award-winning designs is the Voyage Bed, which Brad Pitt bought for himself, partner Angelina Jolie and daughter Shiloh. His furniture, fusing native materials and organic forms, was featured in “Oceans 13” and other Hollywood productions.

Following the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), DTI-Cebu groups the province’s creative industries into heritage (such as traditional arts and festivals, and cultural sites), arts (visual and performing), media (printed and audiovisual) and functional (design, new media and creative services).

With its creative core of professionals and entrepreneurs, Cebu can vie for a greater share of the copyright-based industries, which contributed 4.82 percent to the gross domestic product, Aguilar said.

The 2008 study by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) also established that copyright-based industries in the Philippines accounted for 11 percent of employment and 13 percent of total exports.

Digital gateway
For sculptor and art professor Raymund Fernandez, the new media exposes Cebuano artists to a global network “where art can be viewed, commented on and sold.”

The Fine Arts professor of the University of the Philippines Cebu said using social networking to present art is cheaper and more effective than holding traditional exhibits.

He cited the seafaring Sugbuanons who, during prehispanic times, traveled afar and returned later to enrich local culture as a foreshadowing of the global village new media opens to artists.

Fernandez said the academe should lead in carving Cebu’s two niches: teaching art and investigating the potential of social network marketing.

“There are other areas to consider, such as animation, digital virtual sculpture, and digital comic books. We have hardly touched the surface of new art for new media,” he said.

His colleague, Palmy Pe-Tudtud, was with other Cebuano artists in Paris from Sept. 8 to Oct. 8 for an Artist in Residency Program, which included a Paris exhibition of the Cebuano artists’ works.

A visual artist and cultural worker who was an officer with the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA) in the Committee on Visual Arts, Tudtud views Cebu as her home and has no plans of working abroad. She has taken part in more than 50 art exhibits in the country and abroad.

“I hope to be able to visit other countries, learn and be inspired by their art, and then share the knowledge with the community,” she said.

Home, good and bad
Digital designer Jethro Estimo had offers to work abroad in 1999. But the UP Cebu Fine Arts graduate and his UP Cebu High School friends decided instead to stay in Cebu and establish a design and printing company that year.

Recently, his company redesigned the websites of the National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA)-7, Regional Development Council (RDC)–7 and UP Cebu.

“We decided we better make what we’re doing work,” said Estimo, who still finds time to teach art part-time and pursue other creative work.

Cebu’s business process outsourcing industry absorbs a lot of creative workers. But Estimo said the “compartmentalized work” in BPOs limits creative workers to repetitive tasks, such as designing only logos or icons for a client. Among his contemporary artists, burnout and hopping from one BPO company to another are common.

Estimo believes artists should be exposed to a basic course on entrepreneurship so they can start their own business instead of working for a company or getting an overseas post.

FILSCAP and PRAC MOA signing in 2012
For Ian Zafra, chairman of the Artists and Musicians Marketing Cooperative (Artist KO), making Cebuano artists understand intellectual property rights lies at the core of the challenge to organize the local music industry.



Zafra leads 18 musician-members and four music production studios in its partnership with the Filipino Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (FILSCAP).

A nonstock, nonprofit association established in 1965 to administer the public performance and reproduction rights of music copyright owners, FILSCAP started operating in Cebu on Nov. 12, 2012. Artist KO is its exclusive licensing agent.

Through agreements with the American Society of Composers Authors and Publishers, Performing Rights Society in London, and the Korean Music Copyright Association, FILSCAP also represents the rights of foreign composers, lyric writers and music publishers, Zafra said.

Artist KO requires companies that use music in their establishments to secure the necessary public performance license from FILSCAP. He said failure to obtain a license for works belonging to FILSCAP’s worldwide repertoire makes a company criminally and civilly liable under the Intellectual Property Code of the Philippines.

Zafra plays the lead guitar and provides the backup vocals for Sheila and the Insects, a band of New Wave revivalists frequently associated with Manila’s alternative rock scene but is actually based in Cebu. The band has toured Southeast Asian countries.

But the proprietor of the ICO Music Publishing and Merchandising and vice president of the Creative Cebu Council Inc. (CCCI) said: “Music licensing is the core of the business. The performance and the bands are just the tip of the iceberg. With the implementation of the law that requires a license for establishments using music, artists can earn from their creations.”

Brain gain
Providing business development services to enhance entrepreneurial capabilities and protecting creators’ intellectual property rights are some of DTI-Cebu’s initiatives to support Cebu’s creative sectors.

By convening the CCCI, a private sector-led, nonstock, nonprofit association of industry stakeholders from the different creative industries, Aguilar said DTI-Cebu hopes to promote “more linkage-building and B2B networking among creative professionals and entrepreneurs, business sectors groups such as the CCCI and the academe,” particularly for the implementation of Republic Act 10557, the Philippine Design Competitive Act of 2013.

Professor Fernandez, Tudtud and Aguilar echo the recommendation of some of Cebu’s creative sector leaders to expose local students and artists to educational and professional stints abroad as a means to learn more, gain experience and contacts, and later share their knowledge and expertise with other Cebuanos.

“In today's knowledge economy where borders are increasingly erased by digital technology and ease of travel, and economies are being integrated (ASEAN Economic Community in 2015, for example), our creative workers are more mobile and receptive to changes, especially toward an environment that offers more financial security, education and professional stimulation,” Aguilar said.

But she acknowledged the possibility that a good number of Filipinos will settle permanently with their families abroad, decide not to share their learning in Cebu, or not take part in any local effort to regain lost talent.

“Then again, the possibility of brain gain is there,” Aguilar said in the same breath.

Professor Fernandez said an exodus of artists is not only inevitable but welcome.


Obanieta's poetry reading at SM Cebu before U.S. departure

“It is not so bad if only a few of our products stay in Cebu. Experience has shown they will always maintain their attachments to home,” he said, citing Cebuano poets Butch Bandillo, Myke Obenieta and Larry Ypil who are now based abroad.

Earning a living as a journalist in Cebu for decades before he left with his children to join his wife in Topeka, Kansas in 2007, Obenieta observed in himself and most of his Cebuano artist-friends a paradoxical “impulse for rootedness and for branching out.”

“This idea can be gleaned from the creative enterprise of Kenneth Cobonpue, probably the most internationally famous Cebuano artist whose work is not only grounded on the ethos/aesthetic of being Bisdak (Cebuano specifically in the use of materials and its context) but also transcendent in pushing the boundaries (beyond parochialism) of what he can do and reach. I think his art can be a template for the opulent possibilities of being a Cebuano artist in any field of creativity,” he said.

Obenieta moderates “Kabisdak,” a blog that publishes Cebuano poets from around the world, as well as emails an English column twice a week to Sun.Star Cebu and a weekly column in Cebuano to Sun.Star Superbalita.

So, will he return to Cebu for his art?
“In the context of the diaspora…the mode of production/creation is less constrained by space and time, especially if you as an artist are aware of where you come from and you bring that awareness wherever you are,” he said. “I may be out of Cebu, but Cebu can never be out of me.”
(VERA Files is put out by veteran journalists taking a deeper look at current issues. Vera is Latin for “true.”)

http://ph.news.yahoo.com/blogs/the-i...031642067.html

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Old February 2nd, 2014, 10:09 AM   #14
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Last edited by storbot; February 16th, 2014 at 02:08 PM.
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Old February 2nd, 2014, 10:12 AM   #15
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Korean movie "Blue Salt / Hindsight" Scenes At Hadsan Beach Resort, Mactan, Cebu.

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Old February 2nd, 2014, 10:15 AM   #16
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Urbanfolio is a television show that aims to become Cebu's handbook when it comes to Cebu's architecture, Interior and product designs. Urbanfolio is available at Amazing Cebu Channel 54. Urbanfolio is a program that explores Cebuano culture and design, allowing people to apply design solutions and think differently as well as encourage Filipinos to support locally-crafted products, furniture and designs.

Urbanfolio will bring the best of Cebu design straight into your home from trendy bars, luxurious private rest houses, established designers and the local scene of music and any forms of talents.

Urbanfolio is hosted by the Filipina-Australian, International Academy of Film and Television, Irena Byriel.

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Old February 2nd, 2014, 10:18 AM   #17
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Wet Slipperz- Bisan Pa (Julie Anne San Jose Cover)

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Old February 2nd, 2014, 10:22 AM   #18
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MYMP - Ginoo Walay Sukod

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Old February 2nd, 2014, 10:25 AM   #19
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"Ang Katapusang Bagting (2010)" By Remton Siega Zuasola
No, no. Not shot in one take, because Remton has already been there, done that many times, and excelled in them. Now what he does is a sweep of generations, the past meeting the present, and the present meeting the future, a tale of romance and chances wrapped in sweet, not to mention terrible, longing.


References:

lilokpelikula. Best Short Films of 2010 . Retrieved from http://lilokpelikula.wordpress.com/2...films-of-2010/

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Old February 2nd, 2014, 10:28 AM   #20
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The world renowned "DANCING INMATES OF CEBU" is included in the international documentary movie Samsara!

Samsara is a documentary film, directed by Ron Fricke and produced by Mark Magidson, who also collaborated on Baraka (1992), a film of a similar vein. Samsara was filmed over a period of five years in twenty-five countries on five continents, and shot on 70mm film, Samsara transports us to the varied worlds of sacred grounds, disaster zones, industrial complexes, and natural wonders.


Reference:

Youtube. (2012, July 26). Samsara Official Trailer #2 (2012) International Movie HD. Retrieved from http://youtu.be/qp967YAAdNk/

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