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Old September 12th, 2007, 08:22 AM   #121
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LOL NICE; we'll have a platform with doors in 6 years.
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Old September 13th, 2007, 05:50 AM   #122
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That long for a couple of stations!? Incredible.
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Old September 15th, 2007, 05:43 PM   #123
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I remember watching a Discovery Channel documentary about some super-subway system NYC is planning. It was so impressive that when finished, it would be an afront to God himself. It involved super-terminals and much deeper levels than the current subway and would feature high-speed trains etc. Is this going ahead?
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Old September 17th, 2007, 11:54 PM   #124
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Quote:
Originally Posted by koolkid View Post
That long for a couple of stations!? Incredible.
It took four years to build the very first subway line, which is part of the present-day IRT Lexington Line.
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Old September 25th, 2007, 07:38 PM   #125
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E-mail alerts, redesigns planned after New York City subway floods
21 September 2007

NEW YORK (AP) - Subway riders will get e-mails and text messages about delays. Station agents will carry BlackBerrys. Some station entrances will be redesigned to ward off water, and the system's managers would get better weather forecasting equipment.

All are part of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's multimillion-dollar plans to prevent a repeat of a rush-hour washout that followed a rainstorm last month.

The measures were outlined in a report Thursday on the Aug. 8 storm, which dumped as much as 3.5 inches of rain on the region during the morning rush and spawned a rare tornado in Brooklyn. Flooding shut down much of the city subway system and portions of the Metro-North and Long Island Rail Road commuter lines.

MTA Executive Director Elliot Sander said the authority would spend $30 million in the short term -- and possibly hundreds of millions of dollars in the long term -- to lessen the effects of future storms.

Representatives for Gov. Eliot Spitzer, who requested the report, and a riders' advocacy group praised the plans.

Jennifer Givner, a spokeswoman for Spitzer, said his office was "confident that the MTA is taking the appropriate actions." The Straphangers Campaign said the report included "some solid recommendations that should help prevent, or at least mitigate, future rain-soaked catastrophes."

Sander said the MTA would review designs for raising the vents at flood-prone sidewalk gratings to as much as 2 feet above street level, to keep water from flowing into the stations.

Stairwells at some stations will be redesigned to keep water out. Doppler radar will be installed at MTA operations centers to improve weather forecasting.

Communication will also be beefed up. Besides sending e-mails and text messages to passengers, the MTA plans to upgrade its Web site's capacity and expand press office hours for its NYC Transit unit.

Sander said the agency would also work to improve internal communication by issuing personal digital assistants, such as BlackBerrys, to station agents and other subway system and commuter rail employees.

Some 2.5 million transit customers were affected by the Aug. 8 flooding. But information on service shutdowns was scarce because media outlets were not informed promptly and the MTA's Web site was overwhelmed.

NYC Transit President Howard Roberts Jr. said Thursday the agency should have done more to keep riders informed.

"We concentrated on managing trains to the exclusion of managing customers," he said.

In another step to improve communication, the MTA plans to wire the subway system's 277 underground stations for cell phone service.

The plan, announced this week, was under way before the storm. It still needs approval from the MTA board, but Chairman Peter Kalikow has said he supports it and expects other members to join him.

Some riders said Thursday they supported the cell phone plan, which would not include phone service in underground trains.

"I'm always in the subway," said Richard Brazzano, fingering his phone while waiting for a downtown 6 train at Grand Central Terminal. "I miss calls."

The cell phone service would be introduced in a two-year pilot program at six Manhattan stations, Roberts said Thursday. He said he did not know how long it would take to wire the entire system.

A company called Transit Wireless would pay the estimated $150 million to $200 million cost of wiring the stations, plus about $46 million in fees over 10 years to NYC Transit.

Blackberrys are made by Research in Motion Ltd.
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Old September 25th, 2007, 07:42 PM   #126
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Cell phone service planned for NYC subway platforms
21 September 2007

NEW YORK (AP) - Add another sound to the symphony of screeches and clatter in New York City's subway system: cell phone chatter.

All 277 underground subway stations -- but not the tunnels -- would be wired for cell phones and wireless Internet service in the next six years under a plan the Metropolitan Transportation Authority announced Wednesday. It still needs approval from the agency's board, but Chairman Peter Kalikow said he supported it and expected other members would join him.

A company called Transit Wireless would pay the $150 million to $200 million (euro107 million to euro143 million) cost of wiring the stations, plus about $46 million (euro33 million) in fees over 10 years to New York City Transit, a unit of the MTA. Straphangers would be able to use their cell phones only if their carriers signed up for service on the underground network, which Transit Wireless partner Gary Simpson predicted they would.

"There's a need and a demand by riders and customers to use their cell phones down in the stations," Simpson said.

That demand was highlighted when a rainstorm last month caused a subway system meltdown. Some passengers found themselves unable either to get information on the problem or to phone their co-workers and families to explain their whereabouts. Some 2.5 million transit customers were affected by the Aug. 8 flooding.

The MTA also plans to look at possible infrastructure improvements to avoid future flooding problems, such as raising vents at some sidewalk gratings, and redesigning stairwells to keep water out, according to a plan the agency released Thursday.

Almost 5 million passengers ride the subways on an average weekday. The 660-mile (1,062-kilometer) system includes 468 stations under and above city streets.
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Old September 26th, 2007, 01:00 AM   #127
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/25/ny...l?ref=nyregion
Off-Peak Fares Eyed for New York City Transit

By WILLIAM NEUMAN
Published: September 25, 2007

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority yesterday proposed charging people less if they ride subways or buses during off-peak periods, in hopes of easing overcrowding during the commuting rushes.

Under the plan, however, most riders would be hit with steep increases, as the authority seeks to generate $580 million from fare and toll increases during the next two years.

The proposal was one of two possible fare-increase formulas offered by the transit agency. The other called for a more traditional set of increases, raising the base bus and subway fare to $2.25 from $2.

The off-peak discount proposal, which if approved would take effect early next year, also calls for a $2.25 base fare. Under this plan, a discounted fare of $1.50 would be available to some MetroCard users during off-peak hours.

But riders who buy the popular unlimited weekly or monthly passes would pay as much as 8 percent more and would not gain from the off-peak discount. Nearly half of all rides taken on the system are paid for with unlimited-ride passes.

And the authority would eliminate the current 20 percent bonus given to people who put $10 or more on a pay-per-ride MetroCard, which now gives them six rides for every five purchased, making the cost of each ride effectively $1.67.

Under the traditional increase being considered, the pay-per-ride bonus remains intact.

But Elliot G. Sander, the chief executive of the authority, said the alternative structure could help address the system’s rush hour congestion as well as generate more money.

“This is clearly new territory for us,” Mr. Sander said. “It is a very serious, innovative proposal.”

It would be relatively easy to program the turnstiles to charge different rates at different hours, officials said.

The authority has yet to determine which hours would be considered peak travel time, but officials said they would generally coincide with the morning and evening rushes.

Off-peak fares already exist on the region’s commuter rail lines. The transportation authority has experimented with limited weekend or evening subway and bus discounts in the past, but those efforts were eventually abandoned.

Susan Kupferman, the acting chief operating officer for the authority, told a committee of the transportation authority’s board yesterday that officials were not ready to estimate how many people might shift their travel times if they were charged less.

“The policy objective is to spread the peak by getting riders with some flexibility in their schedule to shift,” Ms. Kupferman said. “Even a small percentage shift equates to millions of rides a year.”

A discount would be available to anyone who puts at least $6 on a pay-per-ride MetroCard. During peak hours, passengers with those cards would be charged $2 for each ride, a discount from the new $2.25 base fare. During off-peak hours, $1.50 would be deducted from the card.

The full base fare would still be paid by riders who use cash on buses or who put only one or two rides on a fare card.

Overcrowding is a growing concern for the authority. It is undertaking customer surveys for its subway lines, and initial results show packed subway cars a major complaint among riders. But the century-old system has little capacity to add service.

The authority will flesh out plans for the fare increase next month and then hold public hearings in November. The authority board is expected to vote in December on how to proceed.

The reaction of straphangers to the proposal yesterday was largely driven by the flexibility — or lack of it — in their work schedules.

“I’m always looking for the most economical option, so I probably would try to take advantage of the discount,” said Patricia Gallardo, 48, of the Bronx, who normally puts $20 at a time on a pay-per-ride MetroCard to get to her jobs cleaning apartments. She said her work schedule might allow her to adjust her commute to save more money with an off-peak fare.

But Rhonda Rivera, 25, an accountant who lives on the Upper East Side, said she cannot change the time of day she commutes. She was also unhappy to hear that under the plan, the six rides for $10 bonus would be eliminated.

“The subway fares just keep going up,” Ms. Rivera said. “You feel like you get a little back with that bonus.”

While riders debated the possible off-peak pricing, transit advocates said that the overall increase is too steep.

Gene Russianoff, staff lawyer for the Straphangers Campaign, a rider advocacy group, said the authority has taken “the state and city off the hook and put the burden on the riders.” Mr. Russianoff said that the authority deserved credit for trying to come up with an innovative formula for fares through the off-peak discount, but that the discount raised a host of questions about how it would work and who would use it.

The fare increase is being proposed even though the authority expects to end the year with close to a $1 billion budget surplus. But it has forecast large deficits beginning in 2009 because of rapidly increasing debt and pension costs and an expected decrease in revenues from taxes on real estate transactions. It says it needs to raise fares and tolls now to avoid a financial crisis.

The authority also proposed increases in Long Island Rail Road and Metro-North fares, which would go up in most cases by no more than 8 percent. Tolls on bridges and tunnels controlled by the authority would increase as well. E-ZPass users, who make up about 75 percent of drivers, would see one-way tolls on most crossings rise to $4.75 from $4.50.

Mathew R. Warren contributed reporting.
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Old September 26th, 2007, 05:04 PM   #128
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NYC subways briefly stopped for strange discovery on tracks
21 September 2007

NEW YORK (AP) - A suspicious discovery at a Manhattan subway stop disrupted train traffic during morning rush hour.

Officials first said they had discovered what looked like a suspicious green liquid on the tracks of the 14th Street station on the northbound 6 subway line. Trains ran express between the Brooklyn Bridge and Grand Central station on the 6 line for a half hour between 8 a.m. and 8:30 a.m. while the investigation continued.

Environmental officials were called to the scene, and police removed what they thought was the suspicious substance. Police said later the discovery turned out to be an empty cigar box.
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Old September 28th, 2007, 10:14 PM   #129
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/28/ny...l?ref=nyregion
Manhattan: C Grade for L Line

By WILLIAM NEUMAN
Published: September 28, 2007

New York City Transit has spent millions on a computerized system of speakers and electronic signs on the crosstown L line, which runs from Brooklyn to Manhattan. But according to survey results released yesterday, respondents gave a C grade when asked if announcements in stations on the line were easy to hear, and a C-minus when asked if the announcements were informative. Despite the $17.6 million investment in the line’s “customer information system,” the results were only slightly better than the D-plus grade that riders recently gave the public address system on the No. 7 line. The No. 7 train, however, which runs from Flushing, Queens, to Times Square, has not had a similar upgrade to its public address system. Over all, L train riders said overcrowding was their top priority, and transit officials said they would proceed with plans to add trains to the line by December.
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Old October 7th, 2007, 02:47 AM   #130
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Welcoming the Access, Bracing for Change.


A long-delayed Second Avenue subway may open up what has been a modest enclave of mom-and-pop stores and restaurants in Manhattan.

By ANNE BARNARD
Published: October 7, 2007
nytimes.com

To entice buyers to spend $1 million for one-bedroom apartments on the less glossy eastern edge of the Upper East Side, the builders of a shimmering glass tower going up at 91st Street and First Avenue advertise customized stone countertops, a private fitness center, “expansive sunrise and sunset views” — and the Second Avenue subway.

Now that construction crews have started work on the Second Avenue line after decades of delays, bullish real estate brokers and nervous neighborhood tenants alike expect New York’s first new subway in 50 years to join the market forces that are driving Park Avenue-style prices farther east and replacing quirky Hungarian shops with high-end chain stores.

Ending commuters’ long walk west to the Lexington Avenue subway will bring new cachet to addresses on Second Avenue and eastward — or at least that’s what developers and real estate brokers are betting. Among them are the builders at 91st and First, who point to the subway’s expected opening in 2014 and boldly declare that their tower, christened the Azure, stands at “the heart of the Upper East Side.”

“That’s really been the aversion to that area, that it was so far from transportation,” said Chris Poore, a real estate agent with the Corcoran Group who uses the subway as a favorite talking point when he shows apartment hunters the Cielo, another high-rise of million-dollar condos, at 83rd Street and York Avenue. “People now see the value of moving further east, and what a good investment it is.”

But for many residents and business owners, the neighborhood’s reputation as a bit of a backwater has been one of its attractions: harder to get to, but cheaper and more intimate. Their attitudes veer between the optimistic and the elegiac: They are excited about the subway, but apprehensive about what the neighborhood could lose.

The subway is not the reason that high rents and high-rises have encroached; that has been going on since the 1980s. But some residents suspect the train line’s arrival could be the final step in the transformation of Yorkville and the rest of the eastern Upper East Side from a relatively modest enclave of mom-and-pop stores and restaurants to just another grid of luxury towers and national retailers.

Today, four- and five-story tenements, many rent-regulated, line avenues that show vestiges of Eastern European and German immigration. Many corner lots have sprouted glass towers. But along Second Avenue, old-fashioned businesses like the Heidelberg restaurant, a family-owned hardware store and sellers of Hungarian sausages and pastries jostle with shinier spots like Justin Timberlake’s new barbecue joint.

Next year, some local businesses and lower-income tenants will be forced to move to make way for new subway stations. They fear they will have to leave the neighborhood for good. Construction, which could take years, will strain many more businesses, including sidewalk cafes and restaurants that have given Second Avenue its vibrant streetscape and made it the heart of affordable night life on the Upper East Side.



“There’s going to be more banks and more chain stores and more high-rises with $2 million condos. There’s no more neighborhood,” said Carol Crnobori, who has run Mustang, a Southwestern-style restaurant on 85th and Second, for 14 years.

Sally Ardrey, 69, is one of the tenants the Metropolitan Transportation Authority must relocate because of the subway project. Even though she will be forced to move from her rent-stabilized apartment at 72nd and Second, she supports the subway. But she worries it will kill what little economic diversity remains. When she arrived in 1986, she said, for fancier Upper East Siders west of Third Avenue, “First Avenue might as well have been on Cape Cod.”

Many residents say they will believe in the subway when they see it. City officials first proposed it in the 1920s, to replace the elevated trains on Second and Third Avenues. Twice voters approved it. But funds earmarked in 1951 went instead to improve existing lines; a second bond issue in 1967 led to construction that halted during the city’s financial crisis in the 1970s.

Last year, voters approved a bond issue partly financing the first leg of the line, and the federal government has also committed money. Projected to cost $4 billion and open in 2014, it will run down Second Avenue from 96th Street, stopping at 86th and 72nd Streets and then at 63rd Street and Lexington Avenue, where it will join existing tracks. Someday, the line is to stretch down Second Avenue to the financial district. Transit officials will not venture to guess when.
/
Building crews will mostly tunnel underground, out of view. But to build the stations, they will dig up parts of the street. That means restaurants along swaths of Second Avenue, including from 82nd to 88th Streets and 70th to 74th Streets, will temporarily lose permits for cafes that jut onto the sidewalk. Authority officials do not yet know how long that will last.
/
Earlier, the area was not as prosperous as the rest of the East Side, but that is changing, Ms. Gutoff said. She expects the subway to further raise the value of retail and residential properties, like the four buildings on 71st and Second, a row of modest old tenements, that she is offering to investors in an estate sale.

And the fate of those buildings, with their rent-regulated tenants and shops like the cheap and beloved Afghan Kebab House? Within a decade, Ms. Gutoff said, a buyer could put up an 80,000-square-foot apartment tower, adding to the Upper East Side’s population boom.

That growth, which began long ago, is one reason the area needs a new train line despite the even higher rents it will bring, said State Senator Liz Krueger, who represents the district: “It’s a chicken-and-egg thing.”

(entire article at nytimes.com)
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Old October 7th, 2007, 02:55 AM   #131
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Old October 7th, 2007, 06:33 AM   #132
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All those businesses will be affected to build a line that will only be four stations in seven years!? Can't the bus handle those distances? If it were to reach Houston st. by 2014 then I say it's worth the hassle. This is incredible, you guys can attack me all you want but I think this is a waste of time, not worth it...

It'll probably reach the financial district and the lower east side when I'm 55 years old. (I'm 16, now) If money was the issue then they should've just opted for a trolley.
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Last edited by koolkid; October 7th, 2007 at 09:15 PM.
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Old October 7th, 2007, 06:27 PM   #133
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I wonder if anyone knowns how long it usually takes historically? to complete a subway line in new york.
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Old October 7th, 2007, 07:04 PM   #134
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is the subway safe these days?


London underground is coz all the crack heads cant afford to travel on it lol
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Old October 7th, 2007, 11:04 PM   #135
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The NY Times Tower will have a subway entrance intergrated with it.

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Old October 8th, 2007, 01:05 AM   #136
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie88 View Post
is the subway safe these days?


London underground is coz all the crack heads cant afford to travel on it lol
You will see bums in the subway here and there, which can make one feel a bit insecure. It is quite safe in most parts of the city during the day. I've taken the subway at 3am. to even 5 a.m and nothing has ever happened. If crack heads worry you, then you're in for it because you will find drunkies in the subway, mostly during late hours.
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Old October 8th, 2007, 01:39 AM   #137
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Quote:
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You will see bums in the subway here and there, which can make one feel a bit insecure. It is quite safe in most parts of the city during the day. I've taken the subway at 3am. to even 5 a.m and nothing has ever happened. If crack heads worry you, then you're in for it because you will find drunkies in the subway, mostly during late hours.
how late does the subway stay open


i can look after my self, im a born and bread londoner =]
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Old October 8th, 2007, 01:50 AM   #138
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Quote:
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how late does the subway stay open


i can look after my self, im a born and bread londoner =]
The subway is open 24 hours. (Trains arrive less frequent during late hours, eg: at 2am or 4am trains may take 10- 30 min or more.)


That's the spirit! You'll do fine, fit in real well then...
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Old October 9th, 2007, 12:11 AM   #139
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The subway is open 24 hours. (Trains arrive less frequent during late hours, eg: at 2am or 4am trains may take 10- 30 min or more.)


That's the spirit! You'll do fine, fit in real well then...
omg 24hours! thats soooo good!
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Old October 9th, 2007, 12:55 AM   #140
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yeah but dont forget we have express lines on weekends and late nights as well though less frequent then on weekdays
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