Singapore's largest mall - VivoCity - Page 7 - SkyscraperCity
 

forums map | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Asian Forums > Asian Skyscraper Forums > South East Asia > Singapore Skyscraper Forum

Singapore Skyscraper Forum » Projects | Heritage | Transport | Skyscrapers & Cityscapes | Skybar


Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old October 24th, 2006, 03:21 PM   #121
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,707
Likes (Received): 2

Business Times - 24 Oct 2006

Harbouring huge changes

JANICE DING offers a vision of a bustling lifestyle enclave for HarbourFront in the next decade

WHAT is the formula for creating a waterfront lifestyle magnet? Colourful retail shops facing a promenade that lines the waterfront, al fresco dining overlooking a marina, abundant leisure activities and discoveries for young and old, and a picturesque haven for doing everything, yet nothing at all. A simple formula it appears, and widely replicated in cities all over the world - from Sydney's Darling Harbour, to San Francisco's Fisherman's Wharf, to London's Canary Wharf, just to name a few. Simple it seems, yet not so simple to make a destination place out of our own HarbourFront precinct that lies across both sides of Telok Blangah Road stretching from Sentosa Gateway to Labrador Park.

Admittedly, much has been done to recreate this former shipyard district. Old buildings were spruced up and reconfigured, while new buildings were added. These included the revamped St James Power Station entertainment hub and the new million square feet mega mall VivoCity.

Infrastructure has been enhanced, starting with the opening of the HarbourFront MRT station in 2003, which is to be followed by the light rail linking Sentosa to the HarbourFront MRT station by the end of this year and the Circle Line by 2010. Major tourist attractions in the area, including Sentosa and Mount Faber, continue to undergo major reconstruction that will culminate in the completion of the Sentosa Integrated Resort in 2010. Two new luxury resort-styled residential enclaves have also sprung up in Keppel Bay and Sentosa Cove. At the Labrador Park end, Singapore Explorer's 55-room hotel and spa Villa Raintree Resort set in two colonial bungalows is due to open soon.

HarbourFront has its strengths, undoubtedly. The area is rich in natural beauty. Not only are there waterfront views, there are also elevated views from the hills and offshore perspectives from the surrounding islands, providing a whole spectrum of exploratory possibilities. HarbourFront is also rich in history and offers corners for discovery such as World War II relics and bunkers in Labrador Park and pre-war bungalows in parks like Mount Faber, Labrador Park and Telok Blangah Hill. It is just a short drive away from the CBD and is the central access node by which visitors can reach major attractions like Mount Faber, Sentosa and Labrador Park. It is also the area's centre of commercial activities.

For now, however, these strengths are shrouded by glaring, inherent weaknesses. The most significant of these is the lack of a continuum of activities between the various attractions. To be a typical successful waterfront development, attractions should ideally be aligned along the waterfront and linked by a continuous promenade, offering visitors a panoramic view of all the attractions and the possibility of stopping by any attraction amid their stroll. The attractions at HarbourFront are, however, aligned vertically to the waterfront stretching from Mount Faber to Sentosa, and separated by Telok Blangah Road. This greatly undermines the enjoyment of a panoramic view and creates a feeling of inaccessibility between the attractions.

At Mount Faber itself, connectivity and activity-based attractions, both major factors in enticing visitors to stay longer, are also lacking. Access to Mount Faber, a critical vantage point, is poor, particularly by foot, as there are few signs or footpaths. Visitors who drive would also be deterred by limited parking and the congestion of cars and tour buses along the only road that leads up to Mount Faber.

Another limitation of the area is the lack of street aesthetics from the main Telok Blangah Road. First impressions always count, and having good street aesthetics, particularly at highly visible junctions such as the Sentosa Gateway, are crucial in projecting a visitor-friendly image. However, two tired-looking buildings - Telok Blangah House and Citiport Centre - stand at this integral junction, giving the area a run-down look. This, coupled with the taxi and private vehicle queues that snake around the front of HarbourFront Centre, particularly during peak hours, project an unwelcoming 'back-door' image to the area.

Strategic planning for the entire Telok Blangah Road is also lacking. Diverse developments including utility buildings, workers' quarters, association buildings and defunct institutional buildings appear at irregular intervals along the stretch. This lends a chaotic and haphazard impression of the area.

Fortunately, most of these shortcomings can be overcome. In fact, the Urban Redevelopment Authority has proposed pedestrian walkways linking Mount Faber to Telok Blangah Hill to Kent Ridge Park to improve connectivity between attractions.

A three-year Master Plan for Mount Faber hinting at the unveiling of spa facilities and fine dining with a view from the hilltop and nature trails, among other improvements, is also in the works. Welcomed options to enhance the accessibility and attractiveness of Mount Faber include improving road access, providing more car park lots, introducing more foot trails and restoring pre-war bungalows into art and history museums, cafes, and even holiday villas. These would increase the number of little nooks for delightful discoveries.

Redevelopment of the strata-titled Telok Blangah House and Citiport Centre is likely to face difficulties due to their small land areas, multiple ownerships as well as their being adjacent to a place of worship, a cemetery, and a flyover. The individual owners could, however, look to sprucing up or upgrading these properties collectively, to capitalise on the growing demand and rising values of properties in the area. This will directly help to enhance the outlook of this integral Sentosa Gateway junction.

The 'back-door' image of this junction could also be improved by reconfiguring the HarbourFront buildings. Otherwise, some landscaping, a colourful boardwalk or a promenade with banners could be added to distract attention from the clutter. The promenade could also serve as a pleasant walkway leading visitors to the waterfront as well as the proposed hotel development in the current SPI building.

Keppel Land and Mapletree Investments, who still jointly hold large undeveloped plots along this stretch, could do much to enhance the attractiveness of the area by providing connectivity and continuity between their existing and future developments.

Besides enhancement works, the HarbourFront precinct has an undeniably strong growth potential, with large tracts of land available for development. The most visible plot is the vacant site directly opposite VivoCity, stretching from Harbour Lights to the open-air carpark beyond Seah Im Food Centre.

Although zoned for part residential and part park use under the Master Plan 2003, the site with its undulating slopes could create more visual impact and excitement as a mixed commercial and residential development, with the street-fronting portion forming a new commercial pocket. This would maximise its advantage of prominence along Telok Blangah Road, visible from street, train and cable car. This pocket of activity could also be an attractive respite from the bustling VivoCity junction and a crowd puller to Mount Faber.

Further up at the Morse and Wishart Roads locality, there are some churches and shophouses that, if redeveloped for mixed commercial use, could form a much longer street worthy of exploration all along the foot of Mount Faber. A commercial pocket at this spot looks all the more viable with the future Labrador Circle Line Station within walking distance.

In fact, in a subject group report on Urban Villages, Southern Ridges and Hillside Villages submitted to the Ministry of National Development in 2002, recommendations were made to increase commercial activity in the area. These included granting full commercial uses to shophouses at Morse Road with the upper floors to be used for budget hotels, using the vacant state land for a new village square with commercial activities, and building car and coach parks.

In a nutshell, if Sentosa could be likened to a house undergoing elaborate renovation, HarbourFront would be its gate and driveway, whose outlook should be just as impressionable on its guests, if not more.

As Singapore awaits the completion of the Sentosa Integrated Resort by 2010, it would be a waste to ignore the potential of its gateway. Increased traffic, vibrancy and real estate values could certainly be realised if the relevant authorities, landowners and even individual property owners could band together with a strategic vision to remake the area to its fullest potential.

HarbourFront waits to emerge from its cocoon.

The writer is senior analyst, research and consultancy, at Colliers International



Copyright © 2005 Singapore Press Holdings Ltd. All rights reserved.
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old October 26th, 2006, 05:28 PM   #122
BODYholic
Singaypore
 
BODYholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,094
Likes (Received): 30

More shops have since opened ...

Terra Cafe


muee - check out their collection of o.d.m watches.


G-Factory by casio


GODIVA
__________________
ถ้าหากมีความรักก็ย่อมมีความหวัง
quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
BODYholic no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 26th, 2006, 05:32 PM   #123
BODYholic
Singaypore
 
BODYholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,094
Likes (Received): 30

Some more shops that were reported last time.

C.E.D.S sportwear - Mainly Oakley and more.


Nautica


37degrees


ESPIRIT
__________________
ถ้าหากมีความรักก็ย่อมมีความหวัง
quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
BODYholic no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old October 26th, 2006, 05:35 PM   #124
BODYholic
Singaypore
 
BODYholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,094
Likes (Received): 30

more shops ...

bebe


Marie Claire


Samsonite


OSIM
__________________
ถ้าหากมีความรักก็ย่อมมีความหวัง
quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
BODYholic no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 26th, 2006, 05:51 PM   #125
BODYholic
Singaypore
 
BODYholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,094
Likes (Received): 30

Look here when u r hungry ...

Coffee Bean & Tea Leaves - The small area is a tad pathetic especially over the weekends when it becomes a picnic area for parents and kids.


Crystal Jade - Interestingly, they look different with every outlet opened.


Gloria Jeans Coffees


Toast Box - I love the decor of this box which stands back-to-back with BreadTalk. Are they related?


BAKERZIN
__________________
ถ้าหากมีความรักก็ย่อมมีความหวัง
quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

Last edited by BODYholic; October 26th, 2006 at 06:00 PM.
BODYholic no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 26th, 2006, 06:04 PM   #126
BODYholic
Singaypore
 
BODYholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,094
Likes (Received): 30

Coming soon ...

Samsung, A|X, River Island (Jan2007) & etc.

Tommy Hilfiger (17nov2006)
__________________
ถ้าหากมีความรักก็ย่อมมีความหวัง
quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
BODYholic no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 26th, 2006, 06:16 PM   #127
BODYholic
Singaypore
 
BODYholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,094
Likes (Received): 30

Things I thought which could be better ...

1. This part of the walkway is too narrow even with the partition removed.


2. Frankly, the MRT flooring of HBF station looks better and more presentatable than this.


Disclaimer: All views are solely personal and subjective. No one is required to agree with whatever that have been posted.
__________________
ถ้าหากมีความรักก็ย่อมมีความหวัง
quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
BODYholic no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 26th, 2006, 06:36 PM   #128
eyetoeye
deceased
 
eyetoeye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 2,222
Likes (Received): 0

Hmmm.. haven;t been there yet but i like what i see in the photos. Generally i don't really like shopping malls, with two exceptions: Ngee Ann City and Millenia Walk. Ngee An City has Kino and lots of Japanese stuff and Millenia just feels so darn good to be in. Not too many teenagers too. I hate teenagers, despite being one myself. Not too sure if i'll end up going to VIvocity a lot, then. It seems like such a hip place. I love the interior design and architecture and everything, but it's just not me.
__________________
http://e2e.sg -- http://e2e.deviantart.com

"All I want is a warm bed, a kind word, and unlimited power." - Ashleigh Brilliant
eyetoeye no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 28th, 2006, 03:32 PM   #129
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,707
Likes (Received): 2

Business Times - 28 Oct 2006

VIVOCITY
More than 2m people have visited VivoCity since Oct 7
Opening of the mall is biggest event for S'poreans this year

TO go by the numbers, the big event in Singapore this year was not the International Monetary Fund meeting or the city-state's first big international art show, but the opening of its largest shopping mall.

Over two million people, equivalent to half the population, have trooped through VivoCity since it opened on Oct 7 - compared with about 20,000 delegates who attended the IMF-World Bank meetings last month and 400,000 visitors for Singapore's first-ever art biennale.

'Singapore needs more shops, more choice, more places to go to,' said Kerry Chan at the $417 million VivoCity, owned by Singapore's investment firm Temasek Holdings.

Ms Chan, 26, and her friend Peisi Tan were among 230,000 people to visit VivoCity last Saturday.

Even at 9.30pm, the mall was packed as hordes of people escaped from the heat and air pollution into an over-airconditioned sanctuary. Mall assistants helped direct shoppers who had lost their way in a space the size of 17 football pitches.

Outside, workers put the finishing touches to the walkways and flowerbeds, while long queues of exhausted shoppers tried to flag down taxis.

Singaporeans, like many affluent Asians, count shopping as something of a national sport.

'Shopping is no trivial pursuit for me. I take it seriously, and am proud to be a mall rat, though there are malls and there are malls,' wrote Sumiko Tan, a Straits Times columnist, on Sunday, adding that she visits her favourite mall at least twice a week.

'You know you've hit the jackpot when you walk into one and you feel your heart quickening and your head going dizzy at the thought of the experience ahead. It's a bit like falling in love, and I got that delicious feeling when I walked into VivoCity.'

Some 84 per cent of people in the Asia-Pacific go shopping once a month or more for 'something to do' or for entertainment, even if they don't need to buy anything, according to an AC Nielsen survey, compared with a global average of 74 per cent.

The survey found that 7 per cent of Singaporeans go shopping twice a week or more just for something to do, ranking third after Hongkongers (17 per cent) and Thais (9 per cent).

Economists say that generous government cash hand-outs before the May 6 general election and a strong jobs market have helped boost spending at malls such as VivoCity, which will ultimately house more than 300 shops.

The VivoCity mall rat 'is a close cousin of the lemming' and 'known for its herd mentality', wrote columnist Jaime Ee in The Business Times yesterday.

Unlike lemmings, though, the VivoCity mall rat looks set to thrive rather than suffer a major population crash. 'A lot of these shopping malls have become entertainment centres in themselves with movies, skating rinks and all kinds of shops and restaurants,' said Khiem Do, head of Baring Asset Management's Asian multi asset group in Hong Kong, whose investments include malls and real estate investment trusts.

'Asian cities are getting more crowded, people lack space at home. These malls have space where people can walk around; they are air-conditioned. It's become an enduring theme in Asia.' - Reuters

Copyright © 2005 Singapore Press Holdings Ltd. All rights reserved.

Business Times - 28 Oct 2006

Viva la food at Vivo

JAIME EE finds out what could draw the foodies in droves to S'pore's latest mall

WHEN it was still in the planning stages, the owners of VivoCity knew they needed to have something unique in order to lure Singapore shoppers from their comfort zone of Orchard Road. So it came up with one million square feet of retail space and close to 300 shops for every whim and fancy. But what is retail without food? Not just any kind of food, either, but something unique that would again draw curious foodies out to the Harbourfront.

With that in mind, the landlords told all prospective F&B tenants that they could not replicate an already existing restaurant formula, which meant that old restaurant hands like Crystal Jade, Tung Lok and the like had to come up with new, or at least, amended, dining concepts.

For a start, all the restaurants have something that none of their city counterparts do - a fantastic wrap around view of the sea and Sentosa island. The mall's design is such that most of the restaurants have a commanding seafront view and all have taken advantage of it, with full length glass panels that provide diners with a view as delicious as their main courses.

VivoCity's brief was also a means of testing F&B operators' ingenuity in coming up with new dining concepts. How well do they fare? Not everything is open yet, but we check out what's already drawing curious foodies to their doors.

IMPERIAL HERBAL SIN CHI
CAFE AND RESTAURANT
#03-08. Tel: 6337-0491


YOU know it in its previous incarnation as the Imperial Herbal restaurant in the former Metropole Hotel on Seah Street, complete with its reputation for fried insects, in-house sinseh and ominous looking bottles of wine stuffed with cobras and other scary reptiles.

You'd hardly guess that this third floor giant eatery/cafe is actually the same place - not when you're accosted by kitschy plush chairs shaped like soccer balls or hands flashing the 'OK' sign.

Apparently, kids love it, says Imperial Herbal's owner Wang-Lee Tee Eng, who adds that the decision to move to VivoCity was almost fated, given the timing of the sale of the Metropole Hotel and the offer of a space at the new mall.

'We were running the restaurant at the Metropole for 19 years,' she says. 'When the hotel was sold we had to look for a new location, and just as the completion of the sale was done, the VivoCity location was ready - I felt it was there just for me!'

The plush chairs are an allusion to the Chinese football team Sin Chi, which Mrs Wang owns, and the football-themed cafe is part of Imperial Herbal's move to be draw more young people to its healthy cuisine. There are still a lot more finishing touches to be done, but come December when the mall officially opens, there will be a snack bar where people can buy pastries or other small bites to munch while touring the mall. There will also be a retail area selling its signature items like hawthorn syrup, herbal lozenges and the like.

Beyond the cafe area is the dining room proper, and this is where the full impact of the restaurant's location can be enjoyed. The restaurant has an enviable view - a full 180 degree expanse of blue sea and ships cruising in the distance.

While not quite the latest in designer chic, the restaurant is practically designed to be able to accommodate big banquets at request. But more important, Mrs Wang's plan is to attract a younger, English-speaking crowd to the restaurant with a menu that is not overtly herbal or medicinal, but following the point of view of using food in a health boosting manner.

While you will still find fried scorpions 'on special request' and the wooden herbal counter is still the main fixture in the dining room (the inhouse sinseh only comes at night) the food at Imperial Herbal emphasises clean simple flavours, with more live seafood items. At first glance, the menu looks almost like something you'd find in a regular Chinese restaurant, but herbal soup aficionados will be glad to find a wide range of health-boosting broths here like lingzhi broth, ladies' tonic soup and cooling soups (even turtle soup and crocodile tonics). It also does a good beggar's chicken - wrapped in lotus leaves and baked in a clay shell, the flesh is moist with intense natural juices and mild herbal flavours.

With such welcoming new surroundings, herbal cuisine may not be quite a bitter pill to swallow after all.

AJI BY HANABI
#01-158. Tel: 6376-9788


WHEN Vera Lim of Hanabi was offered a spot at VivoCity, her first reaction was to replicate the same highly successful buffet formula as Hanabi's other outlets. 'But they said no!' she laughs. 'They said we can't do a buffet concept because there was going to be another Sushi Tei, so they wanted us to do fine dining instead.'

Ms Lim, the original owner of Hanabi who has since sold her business to an Iranian shipping group which hired her to run all the restaurants, decided on a concept that would incorporate fine Japanese dining but with a fusion element. Together with more than $800,000 and the Iranian owners' go-ahead, Aji by Hanabi is a tastefully stylish restaurant with different lighting effects to emulate the changing of seasons.

The interior design is reflected in the menu with its seasonal items, but its general theme is to serve traditional Japanese cuisine while toying with the presentation and incorporating some Western elements. A grilled snapper, for example, featured crispy skinned fish sitting on top of a creamy white sauce surrounded by a moat of brown gravy, topped with deep fried shredded leeks. And for a quirky twist, there's an interesting savoury appetiser in which slippery Japanese yam is blended and mixed with natto (fermented bean curd) wrapped in seaweed and deep fried. It's served with a dipping sauce or your choice of curry or green tea flavoured salt. Otherwise, a straightforward chirashi sushi will do the trick, with a generous amount of mixed raw seafood on top of seasoned rice. Check out its good value mini kaisekis at $38 or $48 for lunch, while dinner costs $60 or $70, where the latter includes a serving of puffer fish.

Has the crowd at VivoCity warmed up to this new fine dining Japanese concept? While the restaurant has attracted a decent corporate crowd from shipping companies in the area, Ms Lim reckons that while the response has been encouraging, it hasn't been as great as they had hoped. So far, the crowd she has seen at VivoCity has been a little downmarket, she says. Which may account for the huge crowds filling up the food court in the basement. But she's hoping that her value-for-money kaisekis will bring in a new group of regulars.

CRYSTAL JADE DINING IN
#01-112. Tel: 6278-5626


SO strong is the Crystal Jade branding that it merely needs to put up a sign with its name and people will instinctively queue up in front of it. From the word 'open', this new outlet dressed in flamboyant red panels and near space-age dining chairs simply cannot keep the crowds away.

Tables fill up as soon as they are vacated and from the looks of it, the focus seems to be on covering the basics while injecting a fusion flourish to its presentation, besides adding a whole new healthy section to its comprehensive menu.

Not all its fusion attempts work. A mixed fruit salad served in a whole fresh red pepper was an ordinary combination of diced melon, sweetcorn and vegetarian ham in mayonnaise. It was pricey for $8. Equally so was the suckling pig layered with a wafer thin slice of goose liver, cucumber and yam crisp for $7 (minimum of two pieces). And you'd probably find better value in other cheaper soups than the $26 double boiled dried seafood soup with chicken and crab claw, because all you get is one miserable claw and a piece of fish maw, dried mushroom and miniscule chicken piece.

You'd best stick to the tried and true like the dim sum, the lovely crispy fatty roast pork belly and other traditional Cantonese fare that it's famous for. But its new healthy menu looks very interesting - cooked in olive and sunflower oil, there's double boiled chicken soup with fresh ginseng and figs, steamed birds nest stuffed and chilled aloe vera. Of course, all this is assuming you can get a table in the first place.

DIAN XIAO ER
Level 2 (beside Ben & Jerry's). Tel: 6376-9786


THIS unpretentious eatery that looks a little like something out of a period Chinese movie set depicting a peasant's home, is a branch of its apparently famous main outlet in Marina Square.

In fact, it's quite an ingenious idea - it looks like a special concept imported from China, but it was actually created by a group of partners who wanted to create an original dish that seemed traditional but isn't. The idea was to combine duck with Chinese herbs - ie, the traditional roasting of duck, and Chinese herbs. Put the two together and you have the unique herbal roast duck that causes long queues at its Marina Square outlet and threatens to do the same at VivoCity. It doesn't take reservations and you're even asked to call ahead for a priority queue number.

Overall, it serves a pretty large selection of Chinese food, and as if in deference to its landlords, concept-wise, many of the dishes in its menu are labelled 'VivoCity', as in, not available in its other outlet.

But the main draw is the duck and it is really quite good - crispy skin, moist flesh and a really delicious herbal dip made from the meat juices. You have a choice of duck roasted with 10 wonder herbs, ginseng or angelica. Elsewhere in the menu, recommended items include Mongolian spare ribs and fried rice with seafood and XO sauce.

CORDUROY CAFE
#01-106. Tel: 6376-9895


THE latest in the Corduroy clan of hip bistro cafes, Corduroy Cafe had a soft opening last night but will soon go full swing in its new premises as a traditional European bakery and milk bar.

You can expect much of the same kind of food that you would find in its flagship eatery in Bukit Timah - fresh salads, sandwiches, pies, pastries and desserts created by chef Henning Wittchen, a member of the Singapore national culinary team.

The highlight will no doubt be its milkbar, where the comforting beverage of your youth is served in every imaginable way, be it milk with flavours like banana, ginger or pineapple, or mixed into smoothies. Soya milk and yoghurt drinks are also available for the lactose intolerant, so you can have your cookies and cream smoothie in either its decadent version or its healthy equivalent.

WHITE DOG CAFE
#02-131 Tel: 6376-9970


IT looks a little stark, but White Dog Cafe hits the spot when you want some quiet downtime away from the teeming masses. Its bright sofas and eclectic decor give it a youthful vibe and to match it you can down a decent Oreo cookie milk shake. It serves Italian-Western food, like pasta, pizza and potato wedges, but try the surprisingly good foie gras burger ($18) - it comprises a deep fried Chinese man tou bun topped with a good sized quivering piece of foie gras and sauteed enoki mushrooms, with a mixed rocket salad on the side. The crispy bun, melting foie gras and raspberry coulis make it a very satisfying snack when you're peckish.

Other outlets to watch out for:

RED, WHITE AND PURE

THE first ever concept eatery by Eu Yan Sang and set to open in December, the impressive two-level premises will incorporate a 70-seater restaurant offering healthy spa cuisine. A nutritionist, Chinese herbalist and chef will join hands to develop a menu aimed at enhancing one's well being through nutrition. As much as possible, there will be organic ingredients and even a raw food section.

There'll also be a bar where health nuts or those aspiring to be one can chill out with vinegar drinks or the more familiar organic wines, juices and artesian water.

TUNG LOK SIGNATURES

AS the name suggests, the Tung Lok group's new baby will bring together the signature dishes of each of its restaurants all into one menu. It opens early November.

BOSSES

IN Chinese characters, the name translates to mean 'triads' but there are no gangsters here, just a new twist to the traditional dimsum restaurant, where show kitchens let you watch the chefs making noodles and xiao long pau.

BROTZEIT BEER BAR & RESTAURANT

SET to soft open in the next few days, one of the partners in this new venture is Roberto Galetti of Garibaldi fame. This trendy beer bar will feature exclusive German beers while serving traditional German and European specialities.

Copyright © 2005 Singapore Press Holdings Ltd. All rights reserved.

Last edited by babystan03; October 28th, 2006 at 03:53 PM.
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 28th, 2006, 03:41 PM   #130
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,707
Likes (Received): 2

Some night pictures of Vivocity

1.


2.


3.


4.

Last edited by babystan03; October 28th, 2006 at 03:49 PM.
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 28th, 2006, 03:44 PM   #131
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,707
Likes (Received): 2

More night pictures....

5.


6.


7.


8.

Last edited by babystan03; October 28th, 2006 at 03:50 PM.
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 28th, 2006, 03:50 PM   #132
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,707
Likes (Received): 2

Last 4 night pictures.....

9.


10.


11.


12.


Hope u like it.....
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 29th, 2006, 02:01 AM   #133
Cliff
Tan
 
Cliff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: London
Posts: 4,325
Likes (Received): 203

wow!!! you make vivocity look good!
Cliff no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 29th, 2006, 11:26 AM   #134
RafflesCity
By Spirit
 
RafflesCity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: S I N G A P O R E
Posts: 25,910
Likes (Received): 111

lovely!

It looks quite exciting at night, with the logo changing colour...it must look quite nice if seen from Sentosa...

The place seems nicer now today...with more plants being introduced on the roofdeck and with people playing in the pools....but the crowds are still thronging it like mad
RafflesCity no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 29th, 2006, 12:05 PM   #135
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,707
Likes (Received): 2

^ hehe....thanks....

I do find it's slightly less crowded than the 2nd week......
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 29th, 2006, 03:00 PM   #136
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,707
Likes (Received): 2

Wide lens at work.....

1.


2.
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 29th, 2006, 03:06 PM   #137
RafflesCity
By Spirit
 
RafflesCity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: S I N G A P O R E
Posts: 25,910
Likes (Received): 111

the widelens does look like its good for large indoor spaces
RafflesCity no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 29th, 2006, 03:14 PM   #138
babystan03
More excitment ahead!!!
 
babystan03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 17,707
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by RafflesCity View Post
the widelens does look like its good for large indoor spaces
Yeah it's a fun lens to use.....in fact some of my night pictures are taken using the wide lens.....
babystan03 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 30th, 2006, 05:26 AM   #139
Sinjin P.
TheLibotero
 
Sinjin P.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: CEBU
Posts: 13,952
Likes (Received): 535

Babystan, thanks for the photos. Vivo City looks very good and promising. There are even TV advertisements for Vivo City on a local travel channel here.

Off-topic: Babystan, I like your shots and photography skills.
__________________
Sinjin P. no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 30th, 2006, 05:49 AM   #140
szehoong
M O D E R A T O R
 
szehoong's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Kuala Lumpur
Posts: 12,924
Likes (Received): 1913

Quote:
Originally Posted by BODYholic View Post
Things I thought which could be better ...

1. This part of the walkway is too narrow even with the partition removed.



Disclaimer: All views are solely personal and subjective. No one is required to agree with whatever that have been posted.

Yea.....My friend (a Malaysian) notices that too. He was telling me on our way back from Singapore because he noticed that Malaysian malls have wider corridors. Myself did not notice that hehehe

Hahaha.....dun need that disclaimer lah. If people have problem with your views that is their problem. No need to entertain em
__________________
The MALAYSIAN Forums
szehoong no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 05:19 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us