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Economic and Business Discussion for the Republic of the Congo


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Old September 5th, 2016, 09:36 PM   #461
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I never said we have to close our borders and ourselves to anything coming from outside.although japan did for centuries with the success we all know.Football ball is a technique like computer science,mathematics......we cant afford -even for security reasons-to cut ourselves completely from the outside world.It would be careless and suicidal!
When the portugueses came to the kongo kingdom,they had guns and these guns gave them the upper hand.And what kongo kings did?They sent their kids to Portugal ,not so spy on portugueses and steal the technology,but to become priests.The same thing happens with our ambassadors today:They are just in ngandas in paris or bruxelles eating ntaba na kwanga and entertaining big mamas on top of spying on their kinsmen.What is their inputs to our national well-being?
But when whites go to somewhere,they collect anything possible and take it back home.You see whites going to spend years with pygmees in the deep equatorial forest when we look with contempt on the same pygmees,not knowing these same pygmees have an amazing knowledge of the forest,the plants and their medical values.
That is to say,we have to be proactive in our quest for knowledge and very cunny in our relations with others.But we have to be like jews:Be ourselves with our own culture and spiritualite and conquering the world in the same time.We don't have to lose ourselves to conquer the world!
Well said. ....we see it in how the facebook boss Zuckerberg came visit Kenya in order to learn and copy Kenyan mobile payments technology. ...

No shame in his game. ....
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Old September 5th, 2016, 10:16 PM   #462
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Well said. ....we see it in how the facebook boss Zuckerberg came visit Kenya in order to learn and copy Kenyan mobile payments technology. ...

No shame in his game. ....
100%!
There is a difference between opening ourselves to technology and opening ourselves to islam or whatever.On one hand,we give ourselves the opportunity to master nuclear technology and be really independent,on the other hand we forcefully oblige all the mamas to wear burkhas,men to grow long beards,etc.....Adopting pc technology doesn't have the same cultural impact as adopting islam or any other foreign religion!
What can be done more efficiently with local technology,lets do with local technology.But,if local technology is neither enough nor cost-effective,there is no shame in adopting foreign technology.
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Old September 5th, 2016, 11:23 PM   #463
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L'éducation, l'économie et ses conséquences sont elles plus importantes sur la vie d'un humain que le football?
True, credit is only given to rich people.....But I think only people that really need credit is farmers, small and medium businesses to some extent....the rest is really messed up.

I agree with you people should live according to their means.. The leve of credit in US is ridiculous...they have forced people to get credit just to buy Cars, cloths, houses, even college/unity education you need credit. its mind blowing.
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Old September 6th, 2016, 03:17 AM   #464
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What if those huts were built with conctrete? would you still hate them too? or its just that you really hate Concrete material?


Some school in North Kivu villages. being built locally, by locals and most materials make locally, with exeption of cement and paint, nails imported from another African country across the border.







Africans produce cement, so what is wrong with tha? and Dangote happens to be Africa's largest cement producer.
If the design is really African and pleasing,i wont mind a house in concrete.But there is enough material in our backyards to build comfortable and cost-effective,why bothers with concrete?Since I was child ,I have just seen concrete buildings after concrete buildings,and I have reach a point where I want to see something else.C`est comme les blancs,je les ai vu toute ma vie et je commence a en avoir marreIf I can be in a place where I can spend a day without seeing either a concrete building or a white person,I think I will kill a goat to celebrateThose who grew up in the diaspora can understand what I am saying
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Old September 6th, 2016, 05:08 AM   #465
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If the design is really African and pleasing,i wont mind a house in concrete.But there is enough material in our backyards to build comfortable and cost-effective,why bothers with concrete?Since I was child ,I have just seen concrete buildings after concrete buildings,and I have reach a point where I want to see something else.C`est comme les blancs,je les ai vu toute ma vie et je commence a en avoir marreIf I can be in a place where I can spend a day without seeing either a concrete building or a white person,I think I will kill a goat to celebrateThose who grew up in the diaspora can understand what I am saying
I see..You are so bored and do not sound like you have travelled in Africa, neither Congos....I have to say I was lucky to visit a large part of Congo (Katanga, Grand Kivu, Kisangani, Bunia, Kin and some East Africa.).

Being someone who loves construction since my childhood, also worked in the industry and a passionate of Arhcitecture....I saw a lot and actually most people in Congo where I visited, people build according to their what they have in pocket and available material.

The Choice of concrete/Cement is 1. Durability. it stays for much longer, , it is resistant to that propical rai and humidity which are the environment fund in this country.
In DRC people are free to build how they want sizes, material wise, architectural wise...Can't get any better than that....I like North Kivu's spirit when it comes to both architecture and construction materials etc...1/2 of the city is actually made of Wooden houses and even some nice houses, commercial buildings are mostly built of wood....Wood is loved in this city....the other half is mostly concrete and to some extent Stone...at your choice, at what you can afford.....Up north in Butembo and Beni, mostly concrete and Earth, wood to some extent, but Concrete is greatly appreciated due to durability and longtivity. considering House is #1 investment in people's lives....If you do not have a house, you are not a man yet and will not get respect as one. it is the same mentality in Katanga, and allover Eastern DRC., same allover East Africa.


As for architecture...There is no such thing as African architecture....Those Huts you are passionate about are not unique to Africa..they existed in Europe, Asia....Europeans and Asians started using wood and Concrete due to same ideas, "Durability, longtivity and you can build very big, much taller etc, and design how you want.
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Old September 6th, 2016, 03:38 PM   #466
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Sport is a social-cultural phenomenon just like a language such as french or english....along the line the previous post kuyuman was referring to.....
Judge by yourself this video

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Old September 6th, 2016, 04:11 PM   #467
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I see..You are so bored and do not sound like you have travelled in Africa, neither Congos....I have to say I was lucky to visit a large part of Congo (Katanga, Grand Kivu, Kisangani, Bunia, Kin and some East Africa.).

Being someone who loves construction since my childhood, also worked in the industry and a passionate of Arhcitecture....I saw a lot and actually most people in Congo where I visited, people build according to their what they have in pocket and available material.

The Choice of concrete/Cement is 1. Durability. it stays for much longer, , it is resistant to that propical rai and humidity which are the environment fund in this country.
In DRC people are free to build how they want sizes, material wise, architectural wise...Can't get any better than that....I like North Kivu's spirit when it comes to both architecture and construction materials etc...1/2 of the city is actually made of Wooden houses and even some nice houses, commercial buildings are mostly built of wood....Wood is loved in this city....the other half is mostly concrete and to some extent Stone...at your choice, at what you can afford.....Up north in Butembo and Beni, mostly concrete and Earth, wood to some extent, but Concrete is greatly appreciated due to durability and longtivity. considering House is #1 investment in people's lives....If you do not have a house, you are not a man yet and will not get respect as one. it is the same mentality in Katanga, and allover Eastern DRC., same allover East Africa.


As for architecture...There is no such thing as African architecture....Those Huts you are passionate about are not unique to Africa..they existed in Europe, Asia....Europeans and Asians started using wood and Concrete due to same ideas, "Durability, longtivity and you can build very big, much taller etc, and design how you want.
Butembo j'ai comme l'impression tu ne lis qu'à moitié...

Utiliser les matériaux traditionnels ne veut pas dire que tu dois construire une hutte. Avant le ciment/béton tous les bâtiments qui tiennent jusqu'à plus de 500 ans étaient faits dans des matériaux traditionnels. Ils sont en abondance et surtout on doit utiliser ce qu'on a sous la main. Comme le ciment était imposé comme étant la modernité, les gens avaient perdus les techniques de constructions avec les matériaux traditionnels et surtout c'était devenu péjoratif de construire en terre alors qu'il y'a le ciment/béton qui est moderne.

Alors quand on réfléchit et des spécialistes de la construction on réfléchit à cela, on peut utiliser ces matériaux pour n'importe quel bâtiment, il suffit d'avoir la connaissance et c'est pour qu'il faut vulgariser. J'ai pourtant posté une vidéo sur la construction utilisant la technique du pissé ici en Europe, visuellement je ne vois pas de différence entre ces murs et ceux en béton à part les matériaux utilisés.

Et en ce qui concerne l'architecture africaine comme tous les autres disciplines, le maître mot est le mimétisme de la nature. De l'univers jusqu'au micro organisme, c'est la complémentarité. Les japonais te parleront dans leur culture de Feng Shui. Ces règles là ne sont pas appliqués, on construit une route avec aucun arbre, on construit en verre et béton mais comme on a des problèmes d'électricité on ne centralise pas la climatisation et on a des bâtiments soi disant modernes avec des climatiseurs qui pendent à l'extérieur. Et pourtant ceci peut être évité en utilisant les matériaux adéquats parce qu'ils miment la nature, quand il fait chaud à l'extérieur, il fait froid à l'intérieur et vice versa et se passer des climatiseurs qui sont néfastes pour l'environnement. On a intérêt à étudier, améliorer et investir dans ces techniques et matériaux qui sont à notre porté et qui respectent la nature (écologie sacrée)

Au Cameroun

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Old September 6th, 2016, 06:35 PM   #468
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Main dans la main....Great cultural exchange...Pour copier la tech Africaine, il est pret a tout..

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100%!
There is a difference between opening ourselves to technology and opening ourselves to islam or whatever.On one hand,we give ourselves the opportunity to master nuclear technology and be really independent,on the other hand we forcefully oblige all the mamas to wear burkhas,men to grow long beards,etc.....Adopting pc technology doesn't have the same cultural impact as adopting islam or any other foreign religion!
What can be done more efficiently with local technology,lets do with local technology.But,if local technology is neither enough nor cost-effective,there is no shame in adopting foreign technology.




https://scontent.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0...cb&oe=583948B1


https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...type=3&theater
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Old September 6th, 2016, 06:36 PM   #469
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Old September 6th, 2016, 07:11 PM   #470
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Butembo j'ai comme l'impression tu ne lis qu'à moitié...

Utiliser les matériaux traditionnels ne veut pas dire que tu dois construire une hutte.

At 20.10 wow!

You don't need concrete to build lasting houses:

image hosted on flickr
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Old September 6th, 2016, 07:13 PM   #471
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Bakenyan bazalaka na bilia ya malamu te.Il fallait alia bilia na biso lokola liboke ya soso na mbika+kwanga+pili-pili
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Old September 6th, 2016, 07:22 PM   #472
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I see..You are so bored and do not sound like you have travelled in Africa, neither Congos....I have to say I was lucky to visit a large part of Congo (Katanga, Grand Kivu, Kisangani, Bunia, Kin and some East Africa.).

Being someone who loves construction since my childhood, also worked in the industry and a passionate of Arhcitecture....I saw a lot and actually most people in Congo where I visited, people build according to their what they have in pocket and available material.

The Choice of concrete/Cement is 1. Durability. it stays for much longer, , it is resistant to that propical rai and humidity which are the environment fund in this country.
In DRC people are free to build how they want sizes, material wise, architectural wise...Can't get any better than that....I like North Kivu's spirit when it comes to both architecture and construction materials etc...1/2 of the city is actually made of Wooden houses and even some nice houses, commercial buildings are mostly built of wood....Wood is loved in this city....the other half is mostly concrete and to some extent Stone...at your choice, at what you can afford.....Up north in Butembo and Beni, mostly concrete and Earth, wood to some extent, but Concrete is greatly appreciated due to durability and longtivity. considering House is #1 investment in people's lives....If you do not have a house, you are not a man yet and will not get respect as one. it is the same mentality in Katanga, and allover Eastern DRC., same allover East Africa.


As for architecture...There is no such thing as African architecture....Those Huts you are passionate about are not unique to Africa..they existed in Europe, Asia....Europeans and Asians started using wood and Concrete due to same ideas, "Durability, longtivity and you can build very big, much taller etc, and design how you want.
I left congo when I was about 5,went back for 1month when I was about 15 and that is itIf it was down to me,i would have gone many times,specially to the village.But family didn't want the idea of us going to the village coz of kindokiNever mind!
Last year I wanted to go with a friend of mine who has never been over there,but because of commitments we couldn't agree on when to go.But next year we will be there for few months coz we will have a lot to start up there.
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Old September 6th, 2016, 07:59 PM   #473
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Butembo j'ai comme l'impression tu ne lis qu'à moitié...

Utiliser les matériaux traditionnels ne veut pas dire que tu dois construire une hutte. Avant le ciment/béton tous les bâtiments qui tiennent jusqu'à plus de 500 ans étaient faits dans des matériaux traditionnels. Ils sont en abondance et surtout on doit utiliser ce qu'on a sous la main. Comme le ciment était imposé comme étant la modernité, les gens avaient perdus les techniques de constructions avec les matériaux traditionnels et surtout c'était devenu péjoratif de construire en terre alors qu'il y'a le ciment/béton qui est moderne.

Alors quand on réfléchit et de spécialistes de la construction on réfléchit à cela, on peut utiliser ces matériaux pour n'importe quel bâtiment, il suffit d'avoir la connaissance et c'est pour qu'il faut vulgariser. J'ai pourtant posté une vidéo sur la construction utilisant la technique du pissé ici en Europe, je ne vois pas de différence entre ces murs et ceux en béton à part les matériaux utilisés.

Et en ce qui concerne l'architecture africaine comme tous les autres disciplines, le maître mot est le mimétismes de la nature. De l'univers jusqu'au micro organisme, c'est la complémentarité. Les japonais te parleront dans leur culture de Feng Shui. Ces règles là ne sont pas appliqués. On construit une route avec aucun arbre, on construit en verre et béton comme on des problème d'électricité on ne centralise pas la climatisation et on a des bâtiments soi disant modernes avec des climatiseurs qui pendent à l'extérieur. Et pourtant ceci peut être évité en utilisant les matériaux adéquats parce qu'ils miment la nature, quand il fait chaud à l'extérieur, il fait froid à l'intérieur et vice versa et se passer des climatiseurs qui sont néfastes pour l'environnement. On a intérêt à étudier, améliorer et investir dans des techniques et matériaux qui sont à notre porté et qui respectent la nature (écologie sacrée)

Au Cameroun

KW8tegV4[/youtube]

Yu are correct on most of what you say....except i focus most on a few points related to the topic of the discussions...i do not know how to answer in short answers like you do. i wish i had that skill.


You are very right there are aboundence of construction materials outside Cement. and the loss of pre colonial construction technique is in itself a very big loss.Red bricks, Adobe, wood are some of the easily material avaialble en mass. which can end this cronic deficit of housing in the country.....For some of these reasons , that is why you see me be much advocating for Technical education in the country.....If you ever interested in visiting Goma, Beni, Butembo cities etc, you'll witness the vast viriety of construction types a large mixture of Wooden houses, concrete, and Earth houses, esspecially Butembo, Beni areas in Earth housing materials, wood is mostly Goma..


Anyways, i have to admit that im a passionate suppoter of Cemen/Concr and Steel. for my personal reasons.

Im not against "Traditional naterials"....I think there need to an Architecture and Construction School dedicated to these traditional materials and construction technocs...I personally think that is the best way to solve this problem d'habitation.
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Old September 6th, 2016, 08:37 PM   #474
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At 20.10 wow!

You don't need concrete to build lasting houses:

image hosted on flickr
Come on you guys, this pyramid is more like a landmark rather than a living house....
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Old September 6th, 2016, 08:47 PM   #475
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Ça c'est la réalité...

Mondialisation >> les capitaux peuvent circulaient sans problème mais pas les humains(hummmmm ???)

Les flux de capitaux de l'Afrique vers l'Occident représente 8% de l'aide au développement que l'Europe envoi à l'Afrique ( c'est triste...) donc si l'Afrqiue envoie 100 €, l'Europe lui envoie 8 €

On dit a l'Afrique que son développement passe par l'industrialisation mais les matières premières sont exportés et transformés ailleurs qu'en Afrique (!!!???!)

On ne pleurniche pas mais la vérité doit être rétablie et les dévideurs de demain ne doivent pas ignorer ou se laisser berner et cela ne peut l'archer que si l'Afrique est uni!




On a fait quoi sur les bancs de l'école à part répéter comme des perroquets???
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Old September 6th, 2016, 09:14 PM   #476
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Pauline Mona Kayoko, la self-made woman des stations-services de RDC

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Développé depuis 1986, son réseau de stations-service fait son trou à l'ombre des multinationales, tout particulièrement dans les quartiers populaires. Un reportage de "Réussite", l'émission coproduite par le groupe Jeune Afrique, Canal + et Galaxie presse.

À 40 ans, et avec pour tout bagage scolaire un diplôme de couture, Pauline Mona Kayoko est à la tête de 20 stations-services en République démocratique du Congo. Un réseau qui s’étend de Kinshasa, à Kananga, et de Mbujimayi à Lubumbashi.

Pour s’imposer dans un marché très concurrentiel elle a fait le choix d’aller là ou les autres ne vont pas : dans les quartiers populaires où sa marque de stations-services vertes et jaunes, ML Station Services, trouve sa clientèle.

Son volume d’activité s’établit à l’heure actuelle autour de 30 milliards de F CFA (45,7 millions d’euros). De quoi envisager une diversification des stations-essence : des étals de supermarchés ou des restaurants sont en cours de développement.

[DAILYMOTION]x4s4z1y_pauline-mona-kayoko-la-self-made-woman-des-stations-service-de-rdc_tv[/DAILYMOTION]
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Old September 6th, 2016, 09:29 PM   #477
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On dit a l'Afrique que son développement passe par l'industrialisation mais les matières premières sont exportés et transformés ailleurs qu'en Afrique (!!!???!)



???

Premiere condition prealable pour transformer nos matieres premieres est L'electricitee....en cela meme, notre leadership actuel falls short ...


Meme pour les produits agricole comme café ou the, je pense que le rapport entre toutes parties prenantes est de suivant (si je me trompe pas...)

5%-7% pour le cultivateur
10%-15% pour le gouvernement a travers les impots
5%- 7 % pour le transporteur qui achemine le café au port (pour l'export)
70%- pour celui qui transforme le café en produit fini...example multinationals comme Nestle et autres...


Ce qui fait que la Suisse ou la Belgique gagnent plus dans le secteur cacao etccc... que les pays Africains qui les cultivent.....le systeme capitaliste....
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Old September 6th, 2016, 09:50 PM   #478
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Premiere condition prealable pour transformer nos matieres premieres est L'electricitee....en cela meme, notre leadership actuel falls short ...


Meme pour les produits agricole comme café ou the, je pense que le rapport entre toutes parties prenantes est de suivant (si je me trompe pas...)

5%-7% pour le cultivateur
10%-15% pour le gouvernement a travers les impots
5%- 7 % pour le transporteur qui achemine le café au port (pour l'export)
70%- pour celui qui transforme le café en produit fini...example multinationals comme Nestle et autres...


Ce qui fait que la Suisse ou la Belgique gagnent plus dans le secteur cacao etccc... que les pays Africains qui les cultivent.....le systeme capitaliste....

Il faut éviter de répéter... On a trop répété...

Tu transformes quoi, pour qui?

On ne peut pas être libre quand on ne produit pas ce que l'on consomme

1) Quand tu parles de la culture de cacao, est ce un produit de base dans l'alimentation des Africains? NON

2) Logique simple si les terres qui sont consacrées à cultiver le cacao sont plus importantes que ceux des aliments de base, ça veut dire que sur le marché la nourriture est moindre et donc plus chère > vous êtes contraint à l'exportation, le peu de devise que vous avez eu, repart ( bye, bye) et don vous acceptez les poulets et les poissons congelés à moindre coûts ce qui a pour effet de mettre en péril le peu de production locale car cette dernier est plus chère que la marchandise importée.

Si on a le malheur d'être dans la zone franc (CI, Premièr producteur de cacao) , on subit la loi de la Banque de France parce qu'on ne peut acheter avec des francs CFA à l'extérieur et si on est payé en devise, on a un taux fixe donc on peut être en perte, je m'arrête là.
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Old September 6th, 2016, 10:12 PM   #479
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On ne peut pas être libre quand on ne produit pas ce que l'on consomme

Une evaluation realiste.....Most of the cash crops tea, Coffee, Hevea, Cocoa, tobacco, sugar canes, rice, corn etc... were introduced by the colonizers....faisant partie de l'heritage coloniale......not native to us..


Which brings to the question should Africa continue to grow these crops or stop .

Or better yet should Africans force ourselves to consume these crops since we are already growing them..? In the case of rice, like in Senegal, Africans are still purchasing Asians rice even though rice is already grown locally..
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Old September 6th, 2016, 10:47 PM   #480
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Une evaluation realiste.....Most of the cash crops tea, Coffee, Hevea, Cocoa, tobacco, sugar canes, rice, corn etc... were introduced by the colonizers....faisant partie de l'heritage coloniale......not native to us..


Which brings to the question should Africa continue to grow these crops or stop .

Or better yet should Africans force ourselves to consume these crops since we are already growing them..? In the case of rice, like in Senegal, Africans are still purchasing Asians rice even though rice is already grown locally..
Les prix des MP sont fixés par les acheteurs, c'est comme si dans ton shop les clients fixent les prix pour toi.
Rationalisons, je mange du manioc (feuille, tubercule) tous les jours, est ce que je mange le chocolat tous les jours? Non. Donc au lieu de réserver 70% des champs au cacao et 30 % au manioc, je vais inverser premièrement cette répartition et ensuite je vais transformer moi même mes matières premières sur place non pas dans un but d'exporter le produit finis d'abord mais de fournir le marché local et ensuite s'il y'a sur plus et qu'il ne trouve pas d'acheteurs locaux j'exporte. J'ai pas besoin de vendre en Europe avec un système des regroupements au niveau africain, il y a des cultures qui poussent mieux dans certains coins et pas dans d'autres, donc si la matière première se raréfie en Europe, les prix seront élevés.

Question de priorité et de logique simplement.
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