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Old February 14th, 2019, 10:51 PM   #2481
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View of Potsdam historic centre in 1914, with the Hauptbahnhof's roundhouse in the foreground


(Wikimedia Commons)
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Old February 21st, 2019, 09:09 PM   #2482
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Berlin from above, 1910s

























More can be found here.
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Old February 21st, 2019, 09:15 PM   #2483
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The Reichstag Building during construction, 1888:

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Old February 25th, 2019, 01:30 AM   #2484
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Some more photos of this brilliantly designed and perfectly built masterpiece






East facade




Originally richly decorated corner towers




One of the lion gargoyles


Picturesque roof decorations






Masters at work


Central glass dome




Golden cupola


Incredibly detailed tholobate entablature


Views from the rooftop



http://www.bilderbuch-berlin.net/
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Old February 25th, 2019, 02:50 PM   #2485
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Incredible original structure. It stood only a bit over 50 years before being mostly destroyed in the war and would never have been rebuilt accurately nor would its style be mimicked then or now. Interesting how time has treated architecture; this year marks the 50th anniversary of the start of construction for the Sears Tower in Chicago. Yet today, the Sears (now called Willis to the dismay of many from Chicago I'm told) continues to reflect the architectural tastes of most of the planet.
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Old February 25th, 2019, 04:27 PM   #2486
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Btw, I absolutely love the Sears Tower, as well as the CN Tower, the Hancock Center and other symbols of modern age aesthetics and architecture. But despite this I wanna see more reconstruction projects (including 3d-recos) and new well-crafted stoneworks and other neo-traditional stuff
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Old February 25th, 2019, 05:13 PM   #2487
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Yes, I am a fan of Sears, Hancock, etc, as well. My point was, however, that the wonder of the neoclassical/traditional late 19th and early 20th century was a short-lived, unsustained period of architectural beauty, unlike the period since the 1940s where the continuation and embracing of modernist design aesthetics have remained solidly entrenched for 60+ years.
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Old February 25th, 2019, 10:13 PM   #2488
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I also think that the Historicism, Beaux-Art and Art-Nouveau era was too short. For me this kind of aesthetics remains the highest peak of centuries-old evolution of all types of classic arсhitecture
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Old February 25th, 2019, 11:26 PM   #2489
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Not sure if this has already been discussed, but of all the German big and medium sized cities, what ones do people on this forum feel have been best preserved/restored/reconstructed. I'm thinking about a trip to Germany soon, and while I have an idea about some nice small cities/big town type places, am wondering about bigger cities, in terms of intact or nicely restored neighborhoods etc. I love the Grunderzeit type residential areas, and the beautiful central city areas that alas seem to have been mostly destroyed in every big German city.
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Old February 25th, 2019, 11:47 PM   #2490
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rob in cal View Post
Not sure if this has already been discussed, but of all the German big and medium sized cities, what ones do people on this forum feel have been best preserved/restored/reconstructed. I'm thinking about a trip to Germany soon, and while I have an idea about some nice small cities/big town type places, am wondering about bigger cities, in terms of intact or nicely restored neighborhoods etc. I love the Grunderzeit type residential areas, and the beautiful central city areas that alas seem to have been mostly destroyed in every big German city.
It has been discussed quite a lot and there are some nice lists contributors have put together. So try to look on this thread in the early pages. Here are a few notable cities for you to consider:

Leipzig
Erfurt
Regensburg
Hamburg
Dusseldorf
Lubeck
Dresden
Munich
Berlin
Frankfurt
Wiesbaden
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Old February 26th, 2019, 02:51 AM   #2491
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rob in cal View Post
Not sure if this has already been discussed, but of all the German big and medium sized cities, what ones do people on this forum feel have been best preserved/restored/reconstructed. I'm thinking about a trip to Germany soon, and while I have an idea about some nice small cities/big town type places, am wondering about bigger cities, in terms of intact or nicely restored neighborhoods etc. I love the Grunderzeit type residential areas, and the beautiful central city areas that alas seem to have been mostly destroyed in every big German city.
Leipzig
Dresden (Äußere Neustadt)
Lübeck
Görlitz
Regensburg
Erfurt
Heidelberg
Augsburg
Wiesbaden
Halle
Freiburg (bombed in the war but was rebuilt quite well, with historic architecture and monuments throughout)
Ingolstadt
Stralsund
Schwerin
Göttingen
Tübingen
Esslingen am Neckar

Smaller but also well preserved:

Lüneburg
Wismar
Rothenburg ob der Tauber (beautiful, but very touristy)
Nördlingen
Dinkelsbühl

There are also countless smaller historic towns -- impossible to name them all.
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Old February 26th, 2019, 02:26 PM   #2492
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I recommend you to visit Görlitz if you want to see a farely large city untouched by war and post war developement. Its as far east as one can get, but its worth it.
Right next to it are the small cities of Löbau and Bautzen, which are also untouched beauties. You won't find something like Görliltz anywhere else in Germany.



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Old February 26th, 2019, 07:24 PM   #2493
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rob in cal View Post
Not sure if this has already been discussed, but of all the German big and medium sized cities, what ones do people on this forum feel have been best preserved/restored/reconstructed. I'm thinking about a trip to Germany soon, and while I have an idea about some nice small cities/big town type places, am wondering about bigger cities, in terms of intact or nicely restored neighborhoods etc. I love the Grunderzeit type residential areas, and the beautiful central city areas that alas seem to have been mostly destroyed in every big German city.
If you like something unique (to Germany), consider Bremen as well. It differs from every other German city in its style of Gründerzeit town extension bc it favored row houses instead of the typical Gründerzeit blocks and thus has a rather British or Dutch atmosphere, just a few examples:











And of course the historic centre:







Although heavily bombed in WW2, Bremen could retain some of its charm both of the old town as well as the Gründerzeit areas, although of course there is a lot of post war eyesores.

If it's going to be just a few cities, I would recommend Berlin/Hamburg/Munich, Leipzig and Dresden as big cities (all VERY different, though, but that's part of the fun), Wiesbaden, Freiburg, Regensburg, Potsdam, Erfurt and Lübeck for medium sized cities and Rothenburg, Goslar, Görlitz, Wismar or Bamberg as smaller places. Göttingen indeed is also nice.
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Old February 26th, 2019, 08:32 PM   #2494
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Having had the chance to travel a bit more to Germany and to do some research on the subject, here are a few points worth keeping in mind when planning such a trip/thinking of what to see/avoid there:

1) It can be misleading to look for 'big cities with preserved old towns', partly because the largest German cities of today were not necessarily the largest cities back in the early modern period, when their urban cores were defined. Conversely, some of the most important cities of the period are less important now, but their old towns are not just better preserved, they are often more interesting than the pre-war old towns of some of the bigger cities.

Just to illustrate this point with some approximate demographic statistics from 1600 (a time for which we have some decent figures, and which is right before the 30 years war completely changed the fate of dozens of towns throughout Germany, turning them into 'sleeping beauties'): Augsburg, now a (beautiful) medium-sized city, was then larger than Cologne and Hamburg, and more than twice the size of Munich; Lubeck, relatively well preserved, was slightly larger than Frankfurt; Regensburg was about the same size as Munich and Frankfurt and certainly larger than Leipzig; Stralsund was among the biggest 20 cities in the HRE, and Dresden was perhaps no larger than Bamberg, for instance. Gorlitz was about the same size as Hannover and larger than Stuttgart, and I could keep going. Point is, larger current population does not necessarily equal larger historical center.

2) Many German cities fall somewhere in the middle between the really well-preserved gems (of which there are many) and places like Dortmund, which has preserved almost nothing of its prewar character. There are plenty of medium-sized and larger towns that suffered considerable damage during the war, but either managed to reconstruct some of what was lost or otherwise preserved enough to make them worth visiting, even if for half a day. Nuremberg (which, despite some of the heat taken on this forum, is really beautiful imo and has hundreds of listed buildings within the city walls), Aachen, Bremen, Trier, Ulm, Leipzig, Braunschweig, Dresden, Mainz, Munster, Osnabruck, Ingolstadt or Koblenz all have at least some beautiful areas/buildings in their centers and are worth seeing.

3) Finally, even some of the really large cities that are seldom considered touristic attractions can be quite nice actually. I had this surprise in Dusseldorf, a very large city that doesn't have much of a reputation when it comes to tourism. Dusseldorf actually has a really nice, typically European historical center, made up of narrow streets and cozy squares filled with outdoor bars and cafes. Some of the buildings are pre-war, some were reconstructed and some were rebuilt in a style that fits with the ensemble; in any case, you do get a nice feeling even there, so you shouldn't be discouraged by the constant ravings on this forums about how sad the reconstructions of German cities were. Indeed they could have done better, in some cases a lot better, but given the overall postwar context I'd say there's plenty to see in most German cities. Even in Dortmund, if you're into football!
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Old February 28th, 2019, 07:02 AM   #2495
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Musikzimmer in the Stadtschloß, Potsdam

This room was part of the royal residence in the eastern part of the palace's corps de logis. Apparently there was another concert chamber in the palace, but I haven't found pictures of it.










(source)
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Old March 2nd, 2019, 11:09 PM   #2496
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Potsdam























https://www.blickpunkt-brandenburg.d...artikel/63343/
http://www.maz-online.de/Lokales/Pot...annte-Max-Baur
https://wirtragen.org/eine-seite/
http://www.deutschefotothek.de/
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Old March 9th, 2019, 05:35 PM   #2497
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Berlin. Apartment buildings








Kaiser Friedrich Memorial Church


Mehringdamm (former Belle-Alliance-Strasse)


Lehrter Bahnhof


Schlossplatz


Schlosskapelle




Der Dom


Berliner Tageblatt HQ


Victoria insurance company HQ

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Old March 9th, 2019, 06:39 PM   #2498
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Continuation... Commercial buildings. Kronenstrasse, 10


Ritterstrasse, 78


Bay windows


Berliner Bank


Facade details




Department store


Industriepalast


Insurance company building


Peek and Cloppenburg department store

Full-size pic

Wertheim store

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

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Old March 10th, 2019, 11:20 PM   #2499
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omg
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Old March 11th, 2019, 12:32 AM   #2500
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Berlin had such a distinct style of architecture
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