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Old May 22nd, 2019, 09:09 PM   #141
sefton66
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Birmingham City Council has scooped Gold for the eighth year running at RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2019 for a display recognising the need for action on climate change.



Sponsored by Veolia and working in partnership with Baroness Floella Benjamin, the garden focuses on four key themes: air quality, water conservation, reducing waste and community involvement.

Cllr Sharon Thompson, cabinet member for homes and neighbourhoods at Birmingham City Council said, “I am delighted that we have again achieved Chelsea Gold for Birmingham while simultaneously being able to highlight the importance of our local environment. This is the first year that we’ve been in the ‘Discovery’ area at the show and so it’s fantastic to be recognised for more than just the incredible flora but also the future vision for sustainability in Birmingham.

“However, none of this would have been possible without the support of Baroness Floella Benjamin and our brilliant sponsors, Veolia, who have paid for this year’s display. A big thank you to both who have helped us reach this great achievement.”

Donald Macphail, Veolia’s Midland Director, said: “Veolia are pleased and proud to support Birmingham City Council's commitment to promote resource management, as part of the circular economy. Our on-going partnership with the Council will deliver recycling and composting services to the city, which this wonderful exhibit demonstrates. To win an eighth successive gold is a brilliant achievement - I congratulate everyone involved with this project."

https://www.birmingham.gov.uk/news/a...ower_show_2019
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Old June 17th, 2019, 05:00 PM   #142
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Birmingham has won a place on a new multi-million pound initiative to enhance the future of its parks and green spaces.

Birmingham City Council fought off tough competition to be one of only eight places across the UK selected by the National Trust and The National Lottery Heritage Fund to take part in its ground-breaking Future Parks programme.

It was chosen from more than 80 other projects submitted by councils and communities across the UK to receive a share of more than £6m of funding and £5m worth of advice and support from some of the country’s leading experts in conservation, fundraising, volunteering and green space management.

In the first project of its kind in the UK, Future Parks is designed to help councils find sustainable ways to manage and fund parks and open spaces across entire towns and cities.

Last year, Birmingham City Council submitted its Naturally Birmingham Project plan to the National Lottery Heritage Fund and National Trust. Although covering 4,486 ha of green space in the city, the new funding will focus on will focus on four neighbourhoods within the boundary of the city: Ward End (Population: 93,069), Brandwood (38,964), Perry Common (Population: 75,379) and Ladywood (Population 96,870).

These neighbourhoods are home to a broad cross-section of heritage found in Birmingham and include urban parks, nature reserves, highway verges, green corridors for cycling and walking, canals and water courses, lakes and reservoirs.

Naturally Birmingham will work as a cross-council strategic project, testing new approaches coupled with people’s views and values held at local level through four community pilots.

Each one is to be led by a strategic city council theme, of housing, skills, children and health. They will help create new policy for the city and different ways to work in future. All pilots will link with the Sport England Local delivery Pilot projects, so will engage The Active Wellbeing Society. The four pilots are:-

A Skills-led project at Ward End Park and wider neighbourhood; looking at developing future skills requirement for the sector and how to link to the regional jobs programmes, and the national Parks Advisory Group, reporting to Government;
The Health initiative will focus on Perry Common, which is being re-structured through a recent housing scheme. This will involve the local community through Witton Lodge Community Association and a local health centre to trial social prescribing. This will link locally and nationally with Public Health;
A Housing initiative looking at future sites across Ladywood will look at different ways of integrating urban green space and parks to better serve local communities. Through this the city will be testing the latest Government tools for future development and working closely with the council’s Planning department;
The Children’s Trust are our fourth partner in this project, our fourth community pilot will look to engage with existing projects in south Birmingham around Cotteridge Park, and across Brandwood and Druids Heath. The primary focus is going to be around better engaging children and young people.
Other places which have been successful include: Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole, Bristol, Cambridgeshire, Edinburgh, Islington and Camden, Nottingham and Plymouth.

This latest announcement comes as the UK’s parks face mounting financial pressure. A report from the Institute of Fiscal Studies last month showed that councils were spending less on services because of budget cuts and rising demand for social care, with leisure services such as parks and green spaces falling down the priority list.

This financial squeeze, which in some areas has seen park budgets almost wiped out, comes despite increased numbers of people using open green spaces and more areas being created as part of housing developments, according to the State of UK Parks report from The National Lottery Heritage Fund and the government’s own data.

Cllr John O’Shea, Cabinet Member for Street Scene and Parks at Birmingham City Council, said: “In the early days of Birmingham’s history as a city 130 years ago, the creation of parks and open spaces was a hard-fought battle in the face of rapid transformation, industrialisation and urbanisation - and their importance has remained high ever since.

“As an asset they contribute enormously to the city, from a health, wellbeing and economic perspective.

“We can learn from what parks and open spaces of all shapes and sizes did for us in the past and what they are doing in the present. The funding we have received today will help us unlock the huge potential in the future.”

Alongside the £5m from The National Lottery Heritage Fund, in February the Government announced it was handing the Future Parks project £1.2m from an overall £13m dedicated to green spaces.

Hilary McGrady, the National Trust’s Director General, said: “Today is a landmark moment for the nation’s urban parks. This is not just about new ways to fund and support these much-loved community spaces, but completely re-thinking the role green spaces play in our lives and how we can ensure they thrive for generations to come.

“We need to give parks a reboot and start thinking about them as essential elements of our communities in the same way we think about housing or transport. Future Parks is the beginning of something really exciting. What these eight places achieve will help guide how other councils and communities can really make a difference to securing the future of their parks too.

“Ensuring everyone has the opportunity to enjoy green spaces is nothing new to the National Trust; nearly 125 years ago one of our founders, Octavia Hill, created the National Trust so that green spaces could be ‘kept for the enjoyment, refreshment and rest of those who have no country house’.”

Ros Kerslake, The National Lottery Heritage Fund’s CEO, said: “Our urban parks and green spaces are essential to the health and well-being of the nation and yet in some areas they are facing a very insecure future. Future Parks isn’t simply patching-up a few problem parks. It is enabling local authorities and communities to take a longer-term, strategic approach to managing, funding and maintaining them, so future generations will be able to enjoy their many benefits in hundreds of years from now.

“Developing strategic approaches and championing innovation are key elements of our new five-year funding strategy. Future Parks allows us to maximise our resources and to work with key partners to accelerate progress and share learning.”

The eight selected places will now join Newcastle, a founding city of Future Parks, which has successfully developed a new parks and allotments trust to look after the city’s green spaces. Over the next two years they will work together to develop tools, approaches, skills and finance to create their new way of managing green space as well as sharing their experience with other councils.

https://www.birmingham.gov.uk/news/a...und_parks_fund
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Old Yesterday, 03:25 PM   #143
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A controversial scheme which will see some motorists charged to drive in Birmingham city centre has been delayed.

Problems with implementing the so-called clean air zone means the scheme will not now be introduced until at least next July 2020 - seven months later than planned.

https://www.birminghammail.co.uk/new...y-you-16446851
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Old Yesterday, 03:43 PM   #144
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What a mess this Council is, a flagship project, that has been railroaded through, now delayed for months.

I don't often get political, but they are an absolute joke and are holding this city back so much it's unbelievable.

How will they cope with the CWGs?
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Old Yesterday, 03:50 PM   #145
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It's not the council's fault, it's central government, who were the ones forcing the council to implement it before a specific date in the first place.

Seeing as the government are too busy messing about with Brexit and leadership contests to actually govern.

At least all the people complaining about it will either have:

1) more time to complain about it when they should be grateful for the extra time to prepare
2) more time to prepare for the change
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Old Yesterday, 04:32 PM   #146
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We should just scrap it and use the money to fund improvements to public transport and extra trees/green spaces/co2 benches etc. To help with the current levels
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Old Yesterday, 04:37 PM   #147
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Also

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Mayor of the West Midlands Andy Street is challenging tech innovators, artists, politicians, academics and business leaders to collaborate on innovative solutions to cut pollution.

The ‘Mayor’s Clean Growth Challenge’ will be launched on Clean Air Day (20/06) to find ways to tackle toxic pollution after the Mayor said the West Midlands has a “moral responsibility” to lead on clean growth.

The Mayor has set out four separate Clean Growth Challenges, centred around the creation of more low-carbon buildings, clean transport systems and a new approach to clean energy leadership in the region.
https://www.birminghamupdates.com/ma...ons-emissions/
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Old Yesterday, 04:47 PM   #148
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Couldn't agree more.

We should be promoting the positives - free parking for electric vehicles, clean public transport, more trees, better-designed bus lanes, keeping traffic flowing rather than creating bottlenecks - incentivizing people - not hammering the population for more cash and forcing people out of the city.
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Old Yesterday, 05:56 PM   #149
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Is there not an argument that action on climate change and air pollution, typified by things like a CAZ scheme that can then fund these improvements, is likely to encourage people to move to the city rather than drive them away? people who want to live somewhere with a forward thinking approach, clean air, green priorities etc.

I want to live in a city where people prefer to use trains, buses and bicycles rather than private cars and lots of people feel the same way.

It's a meet in the middle approach, the council and the WMCA are improving bus services, building tram lines, cycling lanes and reopening stations so when people complain there's no other way of getting around it is simply no longer true. At that point they are being quite rightly taxed for unnecessary extra pollution.
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Old Yesterday, 06:36 PM   #150
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CAZs are fine, if there are viable options in terms of transport - but the lack of public transport and what does exist is often totally inconvenient for many people, makes a total mockery of the CAZs.

I 100% agree about living in a city where public transport is the better option, but Birmingham is currently decades away from that. I lived in London for years and happily survived without a car, but this was based on fast, convenient (if very expensive) public transport.

More madness about destroying the massive road structures which are designed to alleviate congestion just sums it up (Five Ways/Perry Barr). The lack of thought into bus lanes is also crackers. Two examples for the buses - bus lane inbound along the Pershore Road - only to merge into one lane of traffic when it meets the ring road!? There is loads of space there - but the buses then get stuck in the traffic.

Harborne - new bus lane - it's now created a mile of stationery traffic that snarls up Harborne high street and traps the very buses that are meant to be using the bus lane...

We need to keep traffic moving, more public transport, more green spaces - but it shouldn't about ripping cash out of the pockets of the majority of the population - which it appears to be doing at the moment.
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Old Yesterday, 07:54 PM   #151
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To be fair the majority aren’t even affected by the CAZ, most vehicles that use the tunnels will be exempt anyway especially in a few more years as people swap out older vehicles - the people who will struggle are the ones who can’t afford to replace their car and those who live around the ring road where traffic will get pushed out to increasing emissions and traffic


Take a look when you go through the tunnels most cars aren’t old enough to pay the charge anyway
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Old Yesterday, 08:18 PM   #152
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My car is 4 years old and will have to pay. The tunnels are include in the zone.
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Old Yesterday, 08:46 PM   #153
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Public transport in and out of the city centre isnít that bad. Itís travelling between the suburbs thatís the main problem.
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Old Yesterday, 10:25 PM   #154
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Originally Posted by markmcd1976 View Post
My car is 4 years old and will have to pay. The tunnels are include in the zone.
Mine too but Iím exempt. I assume you have a diesel?
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Old Yesterday, 11:01 PM   #155
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Mine too but Iím exempt. I assume you have a diesel?
Generally diesels pre 2015 and petrols pre 2008 will be exempt although some models before and after these days will and wonít be exempt
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Old Today, 09:27 AM   #156
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Drove up to Edgbaston reservoir for a walk round on Sunday, and found the barrier down and a notice stating the car park is closed until the end of 2019 due to "antisocial behaviour".
Really saddened me that this fantastic resource is now harder to reach for elderly or disabled people of general visitors, never mind tourists, yes you can park outside, if you can park nearby, but what a disappointment. Thanks yobs whoever you are for messing up one of Birmingham's gems.
I hope if the Edgbaston masterplan goes through some form of security measures will prevent idiots spoiling what is a fantastic resource for the city.

On a separate note, I went up hoping to see the reservoir in or close to flood level with all the rain, but it was at a level you'd expect in mid summer.
Apart from the channel in the corner near the Tower ballroom that drains into the canal system when the level gets high, do they drain the reservoir in other ways too anyone know?
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Old Today, 12:15 PM   #157
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Probably recovering from last summer

https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/www.b...e-14886292.amp
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Old Today, 12:53 PM   #158
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Originally Posted by Kingsheathen View Post
Public transport in and out of the city centre isnít that bad. Itís travelling between the suburbs thatís the main problem.
This is true with all cities because typically transport networks are developed radially.

Interestingly there is a good bit in Caroline Cried Perez book 'Invisible Women' that illustrates how this transport planning negatively affects women far more than men because women are 72% more likely to have care responsibilities (for children, elderly relatives etc). Men typically have an easy commute, to and from work, suburb to city and back again, whereas women's routes are more complication and could be, leave home (suburb) to drop children off at school (suburb), go to work (city), take elderly relative to the doctor (suburb), pick up kids (suburb), after school club (suburb) then home (suburb). Travelling around the outskirts of a city is far more difficult and expensive.

This is sort of also why zoning is a really bad urban planning policy as it separate where people live from where they work and do other things meaning they have to travel and increasing the likelihood of a larger carbon footprint. This is why mixed use developments are the way forwards rather than a typical CBD vs residential/leisure zoning system. A city where the CBD and where people live are spread out over the entire city and everyone can walk to work and walk to take their kids to school etc along tree lined pedestrianised boulevard and take trams or buses to other parts of the city if they need to is basically utopian. Mixed use all the way!

Sorry, not sure where that came from.
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