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Old August 2nd, 2012, 02:36 PM   #161
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Looks like our ancestors have done great job safeguarding our cultural relics from torrential storms.

Rain damages Beijing's cultural heritage
Updated: 2012-07-26 17:20
China Daily

The Beijing Municipal Administration of Cultural Heritage announced on Wednesday the results of a damage assessment conducted on Beijing cultural heritage sites after Saturday's torrential rain.

More than 160 immobile cultural heritage sites were damaged by floodwaters and collapsing parapets. The economic loss at those sites is estimated to be 800 million yuan ($125.3 million).

The damaged sites were mostly in rural places, especially in Beijing's Fangshan, Fengtai and Shijingshan districts.

Beijing's six World Cultural Heritage sites remained intact during the rain, as did the main architectural structures of sites maintained at the city-level or above.

Since 2000, the local government has invested 1.5 billion yuan on maintaining cultural heritage sites, made social investments of more than 5 billion yuan and kept more than 140 city-level cultural heritage sites in good condition.

On June 19, the Beijing Municipal Administration of Cultural Heritage sent a notice to cultural heritage sites, asking them to be vigilant for intense rainfalls.

A work team has been formed to eliminate potential risks and repair the damaged sites.
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Old August 9th, 2012, 03:27 PM   #162
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A civil worker warns the traffic of a drainage outlet on a waterlogged road in Nanjing, capital of east China's Jiangsu Province, Aug. 9, 2012. A rainstorm hit Nanjing on Thursday as a result of Typhoon Haikui, waterlogging many of the city's roads. (Xinhua/Wang Xin)



Vehicle's run on a waterlogged road in Nanjing, capital of east China's Jiangsu Province, Aug. 9, 2012. A rainstorm hit Nanjing on Thursday as a result of Typhoon Haikui, waterlogging many of the city's roads. (Xinhua/Wang Xin)
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Old August 10th, 2012, 03:00 PM   #163
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Drainage systems struggle to cope
Shanghai Daily
Aug 9, 2012

THE heavy rainfall brought by Haikui became a major challenge for Shanghai's drainage system as hundreds of roads were flooded yesterday afternoon leaving vehicles broken down in the middle of the road.

From 8am to 5pm yesterday, most parts of the city, apart from the islands of Chongming County, suffered a downpour of more than 100 millimeters.

The Zhennanbei area of Putuo District had the most at 194 millimeters. Precipitation in suburban districts of Jinshan, Songjiang, Fengxian and Jiading all exceeded 125 millimeters, the Shanghai Flood Control Headquarters said last night.

More than 400 roads were flooded by yesterday's rain with water levels from 10 to 30 centimeters, and at least 18 of them had to be closed to traffic.

Flooding over 20 centimeters deep was spotted at the Middle Ring Road exit of Tongchuan Road in Putuo District, Fuxing Road M. in Xuhui District and Kunshan Road, Wusong Road and Sichuan Road N. in Hongkou District.

"The Jingling Church is now like a waterpark," a pastor surnamed Ding said on his microblog. The church is on the flooded Kunshan Road in Hongkou, where the drainage system could barely cope as it is still under renovation.

More than 8,900 traffic police officers were sent to flooded roads across the city.

The maximum water level at the Hongkou Port reached 4.3 meters.

The water levels of Pengyuepu Creek and Taopu Creek were also over the alert level.

The water level of Suzhou Creek almost reached the top of its dyke as the drainage system reached its peak capacity.

The turning off of the pumps because of the rising of the creeks worsened the flood situation in Hongkou, Zhabei and Putuo districts, flood headquarters officials said.

Nearly 1,000 households were flooded in the rain with water accumulating to depths of five to 20 centimeters.

Residents in a neighborhood on Gonghexin Road near Guangzhong Road were asked to leave yesterday afternoon when flooding in the area reached 50 centimeters and there was a danger of electric shocks.
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Old August 13th, 2012, 12:28 PM   #164
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Philippine Offices Reopen as Fifth of Manila Still Submerged
By Clarissa Batino and Joel Guinto
Aug 8, 2012 1:25 PM GMT+0800
Bloomberg

Philippine financial markets and offices reopened today even as a fifth of the Manila region remained under water after the worst flood in three years.

The weather bureau dropped its rainfall warning to yellow, the lowest in its three-step color-coded system that moves up to green and red. The capital may see rainfall of up to 15 millimeters (0.6 inches) in an hour, it said on its website. That compares with as much as 40 millimeters yesterday.

Residents wade through a flooded street, after torrential rains inundated most of the capital, as they evacuate to a safer area in Marikina town, in suburban Manila on August 7, 2012.

Residents wade through a flooded street, after torrential rains inundated most of the capital, as they evacuate to a safer area in Marikina town, in suburban Manila on August 7, 2012. Photographer: Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images

Yesterday’s deluge killed at least 15 people on the main Philippine island of Luzon and forced 130,000 to flee their homes, according to police and disaster officials. Flooding crippled transport links in the capital, forcing the closure of schools and offices. The downpour was enhanced by the effect of Tropical Storm Haikui lashing China, the weather bureau said.

About 20 percent of Metro Manila, an area half the size of Los Angeles, remains submerged, down from about 50 percent yesterday, Civil Defense chief Benito Ramos told reporters. “Every time there are floods, we evacuate people then we bring them back,” Ramos said.“They should be relocated to higher ground to solve this problem once and for all.”

The latest flood comes after Storm Saola earlier this month killed 53 people in the Philippines and damaged more than 400 million pesos ($9.6 million) worth of farm output and infrastructure, the nation’s disaster risk reduction agency reported on its website. While the Philippines is regularly battered by cyclones that form over the Pacific Ocean, rain in the past few days was due to the annual monsoon and not a storm, Ramos said.
Shanghai Storm

As the Philippine capital mopped up, Haikui made landfall south of China’s Shanghai, lashing the region with heavy rainstorms and canceling flights of the nation’s three largest airlines.

The China Meteorological Administration said today that Haikui, the third typhoon to hit China in a week, had poured 350 millimeters to 434 millimeters of rain in Xiangshan, Ninghai and Taizhou of Zhejiang province since this morning. Average rainfall in the eastern portion of Zhejiang has been more than 100 millimeters, it said.

Yesterday’s flooding brought renewed criticism of the Philippines’ efforts to prepare for natural disasters.

“They shouldn’t just respond to crises, they should prepare for them,” Ramon Casiple, executive director of the Institute for Political and Electoral Reform in Manila said by phone. While President Benigno Aquino’s administration bought Doppler radar and enhanced forecasting, little improvement has been made to infrastructure, Casiple said.
Stores Open

“People shouldn’t wait for floods to rise up to their necks before they evacuate,” Ramos told reporters. “They should heed warnings from local government officials. They should understand that rescuers are also at risk especially at night.”

Typhoon Ketsana flooded Manila and parts of Luzon in September 2009, killing more than 400 people, and causing crop and other losses of 11 billion pesos. The damage caused by typhoons and other disasters in 2011 reached 59.2 billion pesos, Economic Planning Secretary Arsenio Balisacan told lawmakers this week.

SM Prime Holdings Inc. (SMPH), the Philippines’ biggest shopping mall operator, said all its 44 outlets will open today and none were flooded, Cora Guidote, senior vice president at SM Investments Corp. (SM), the parent company, said by phone.

After a delay of a day due to the flooding, the National Statistics Office said inflation accelerated to 3.2 percent in July from a year earlier, up from 2.8 percent in June and a faster pace than economists surveyed by Bloomberg predicted.

The peso rose 0.1 percent to 41.792 per dollar at the noon break, according to Tullett Prebon Plc. (TLPR) The Philippine Stock Exchange (PSE) Index gained 0.6 percent to 5,315.38. The yield on the 4.625 percent July 2017 bond fell five basis points to 4.55 percent, data from Tradition Financial Services showed.

Aboitiz Equity Ventures (AEV) and unit Aboitiz Power Corp. (AP) scrapped their analyst briefing on second-quarter results today.
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Old July 9th, 2013, 05:40 AM   #165
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Rain pounds Toronto, leaves stranded train in need of rescue
Environment Canada says 90 millimetres of rain has hit some parts of the GTA
CBC News
Posted: Jul 8, 2013 5:49 PM ET
Last Updated: Jul 8, 2013 11:23 PM ET

image hosted on flickr

Don Valley Flood VI by ~EvidencE~, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Don Valley Flood ll by ~EvidencE~, on Flickr

A Toronto police marine unit was sent in on Monday evening to rescue people on a commuter train that had become stranded on tracks with water up to its windows, as a result of record rainfall that pounded the city.

A month's worth of rain fell on Toronto in just a few hours, creating flash flooding and leaving some tracks that GO Trains use covered in water.

A rush-hour train that was bound for Richmond Hill saw water seep onto its lower level and passengers take refuge on its upper deck.

Mike Li, a commuter, told The Canadian Press that the train became stuck after trying to back away from the water pooling on a section of track.

"People take it for what it's worth, but some are frustrated too," he said.

The stranded commuters were on the train for more than three hours before the marine unit was sent in. The rescue was still ongoing at 11 p.m. ET.

Rain hit in late afternoon

The rain started arriving ahead of the supper hour, which caused severe flooding, major public transit delays and power outages across the city.

Pedestrians sought shelter where they could as they waited out the weather.

For drivers and commuters, the voyage home was just as problematic. The rain made it hard to see, while the pools of water made it hard to drive and in some cases drivers were unable to move.

Environment Canada said that some parts of the Greater Toronto Area were hit with more than 90 millimetres of rain on Monday. In some cases, the weather agency said the total would exceed 100 millimetres. The monthly average for Toronto is 74.4 millimetres.

On Monday evening, Mayor Rob Ford told CBC Radio that "it's all hands on deck" to deal with the fallout from the storm and the damage it has caused to the city.

"We've brought in crews, we’ve brought in everybody to deal with the storm," Ford said in a brief telephone interview.

Transit delays, power outages

Initial reports from Toronto Hydro initially advised that the rain could lead to local outages. But within hours, the utility would report that some 300,000 customers were without power. By 11 p.m., the number was down to about 250,000 without power.

Hydro spokeswoman Tanya Bruckmueller said the approach of nightfall would be an additional challenge for people trying to turn the lights back on for affected customers.

"There's not a lot that will change once it starts getting dark. It'll be harder for the crews... they need to be able to identify where the damage is so it'll take longer in the night,” she told The Canadian Press.

Power outages were just as much of a concern in Mississauga, Ont., the sixth largest city in Canada, which lies to the west of Toronto. Eighty per cent of customers were said to be without power after the rain on Monday.

In Toronto, power and signal issues brought the subway system to a halt and in some cases, subway stations had flooding.

Some parts of the subway were operating again by 8 p.m. The Scarborough Rapid Transit Line is operating as are most streetcars.

For people standing on the street waiting for buses, a number of passengers were left watching as fully packed buses drove by without any room to take them aboard.

The rain was also causing problems for GO Transit passengers, including delays and a few cancellations on the Milton, Kitchener, Barrie, Richmond Hill and Lakeshore East lines. Many GO buses were delayed by half an hour or longer as a result of the weather.

For people hoping to fly in or out of Toronto, the rain was causing problems as well. On Monday evening, Porter Airlines tweeted that all of its Toronto flights had been cancelled for the rest of the day. Air Canada said flights to or from Pearson airport could be delayed or cancelled as a result of the weather.

Ontario NDP Leader Andrea Horwath was among those unable to fly into Toronto as a result of the weather:

Flight from #Windsor back to #Toronto cancelled tonight because of the storms. Pics of the flooding. Stay safe
— Andrea Horwath (@andreahorwath) July 9, 2013
From Toronto police headquarters, the duty desk tweeted a long list of areas where flooding and other rain-related issues were being reported. They included:
Underpasses, including those near Wilson Avenue and Highway 401, where large puddles were accumulating
The southbound lanes of the Don Valley Parkway, where flooding had been occurring south of Pottery Road
A tree fell on a car near Mount Pleasant Road and St. Leonard's Avenue, bringing down power lines with it
The Don Valley Parkway and Dundas Avenue area were seeing some flooding
The ferry running to Toronto's island airport was down as a result of a power outage
A section of Trethewey Drive flooded, just east of Black Creek Drive
Selected road closures along the Humber River, including Cordella Avenue, Alliance Avenue, Trethewey Drive and Black Creek Drive
Traffic lights going out in Etobicoke

The powerful rains also caused flooding at Toronto's Union train station and the parking lot outside Toronto City Hall.
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Old July 10th, 2013, 08:01 AM   #166
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Wuhan











Cars move on a flooded road in Wuhan, capital of central China's Hubei Province, July 7, 2013. Wuhan was hit by the heaviest rainstorm in five years from Saturday to Sunday. The local meteorologic center has issued red alerts for rainstorm for many times in sequence. (Xinhua)
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Old July 26th, 2013, 06:01 PM   #167
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Beijing marks one year since devastating floods
22 July 2013
South China Morning Post

Beijing yesterday marked the first anniversary of devastating floods that claimed 79 lives in a day by mourning victims and holding a large-scale disaster relief drill in the hardest-hit Fangshan district.

It was the capital's worst deluge in decades and caused about 11.6 billion yuan (HK$14.5 billion) in economic losses. But what has changed in the past year? And is Beijing better prepared for another such onslaught of rain and flooding?

There has been an ongoing effort over the past year to upgrade the city's notoriously bad drainage system. But experts and residents near "rainstorm- vulnerable" parts of the city are still voicing concerns about the adequacy of the capital's flood-control mechanisms, particularly as Beijing saw an average rainfall of 247.3mm between June 1 and July 15 this year. It was the largest average since 1999 and 79.6 per cent more than the average during that time period in the past decade, according to the official People's Daily.

And the major flood season didn't even start until Saturday. So, to help cope with whatever Mother Nature dishes out, the municipal government has been busy since May upgrading drainage systems in 21 low-lying areas, such as under flyovers, the Beijing Morning Post reports. Other upgrades reportedly included increasing the capacities of pump stations, in an effort to minimise street flooding.

Fangshan authorities have also spent 34 million yuan on flood-control facilities over the past year, and 43 rescue teams have been created to help deal with any flood emergencies that may arise, China News Service reported.

An air siren sounded in the district at 3pm to commemorate those who lost their lives in the mountainous area, and the flood drill was carried out with an emphasis on evacuations.

Measures have also been taken in other parts of the city to prevent flooding. In Chaoyang district, much of the water has been drained from the south moat near the Guangqumen flyover, where an editor at a publishing house drowned last year in his car after it became submerged in three metres of water.

The water level in the moat is now about a metre lower than its usual level, according to a group of students at the University of Science and Technology Beijing, who have been conducting research about the city's flood- control capacity, as well as trying to raise awareness about flood preparedness among residents in areas that are susceptible to floods.

Zhang An , one of the students, said other flood-prevention measures taken by authorities included clearing rocks near moat drains that could disrupt water flow.

The State Council in April ordered all mainland cities to draw up plans and upgrade drainage systems in the coming decade, after several major cities such as Beijing, Wuhan and Chengdu flooded as a result of inadequate infrastructure.

It stipulated that no major casualties should be caused by floods in urban areas.

However, Professor Zhou Yuwen from the Beijing University of Technology's College of Architecture and Civil Engineering said that all existing engineering efforts in the capital were just "painkillers" that could only partially relieve Beijing's flooding problems that have worsened over the past decade as the population has boomed.
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Old August 27th, 2013, 04:15 AM   #168
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Seeking a Cure - Cities are upgrading drainage systems to battle chronic flooding
22 August 2013
Beijing Review

People in many cities across China have experienced disruptions due to urban drainage failures since the beginning of summer.

Kunming, capital of southwest China's Yunnan Province, was forced to grapple with urban flooding after the heaviest rainfall of the year hit the city on July 18. During the next three days, flooding of local roads submerged cars and taxis and rendered more than 200 inundated buses unusable.

In the wake of a tropical storm that swept southeast China's Fujian Province, the coastal city of Xiamen, was severely flooded on July 19. In some areas of the city, water reached waist-high levels, while pedestrians caught fish that had escaped from ponds and aqua farms.

While reading such reports, citizens in Beijing may be reminded of the city's most deadly rainstorm from one year ago. The heaviest rain in six decades struck the capital on July 21, 2012. The 16 hours of nearly constant downpour wreaked havoc on Beijing's infrastructure and left 79 people killed in rain-triggered disasters and accidents.

The primary reason for urban flooding is that drainage systems often lag behind overall urban development, said Xu Ke, a senior engineer with the Beijing Tsinghua Tongheng Urban Planning and Design Institute.

He said that another major cause is that some roads are built higher following maintenance projects, leaving lower-lying roads more vulnerable to flooding in heavy rainfall.

Mounting risks

In recent years, frequent urban drainage failures have forced governments of many cities to establish emergency plans.

Rainstorms brought by typhoon Krosa slammed Hangzhou, capital of east China's Zhejiang Province, in 2007. Streets were flooded to such an extent that many residents resorted to using canoes for transportation.

Starting in 2008, the local government began raising standards for drainage pipelines used in new projects and applying these in old city areas. Meanwhile, for identified vulnerable areas, municipal authorities have established an emergency plan to designate personnel and pumps to key spots during downpours to prevent waterlogging.

But this method has shown only limited effectiveness. During a rainstorm on June 24, Hangzhou was still paralyzed by floods in spite of drainage workers being assigned at 18 key stretches of roads and 14 residential communities beforehand.

The failure of Hangzhou's emergency drainage plan during this year's flood season highlights the need for a national effort to solve this problem once and for all. In April, the State Council issued a notice on upgrading urban drainage facilities. Accordingly, China will achieve a drainage network upgrade to separate rainwater from wastewater within the next five years and build sound urban drainage systems within the next 10 years.

On June 18, the Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development (MOHURD) issued a guideline for local urban governments to formulate plans on improving their drainage systems. It says that by 2017 drainage facilities in downtown areas across the 36 largest cities would be upgraded to handle torrential rain occurring once every 50 years; drainage facilities in downtown areas of all other prefecture-level cities would be able to withstand heavy rain occurring once every 30 years, and drainage facilities of all other downtown areas would be able to cope with heavy rain occurring once every 20 years.

According to a survey conducted by the MOHURD in 2010, between 2008 and 2010, 62 percent of cities in China experienced severe flooding at least once; 137 cities reported this problem three times or more and real estate or other facilities were submerged more than 12 hours in 57 cities.

Data from the Office of State Flood Control and Drought Relief Headquarters show 258 cities in China suffered from heavy inundation during 2010, mostly caused by urban flooding in the wake of torrential rains.

Cheng Xiaotao, Executive Deputy Director of the Water Hazard Research Center under the Ministry of Water Resources, told newspaper China Business News that urban flooding has posed a more prominent threat to cities in China than externally sourced floods while laws, regulations and emergency plans on flood control have yet to differentiate responses to both types of disaster. "A clear understanding of the different causes for such water hazards is the key to reducing urban flooding," he said.

A crumbling system

Cheng said that the most direct cause for worsening urban flooding in China is its relatively poor drainage infrastructure.

Experts with the MOHURD identified more specific problems such as the low coverage rate of drainage networks and inadequate drainage capacity. According to the ministry, although Beijing's built-up urban area has doubled over the past decade, the construction of an underground network has not kept pace.

The revised Code for Design of Outdoor Wastewater Engineering, issued by the MOHURD in 2011, stipulates that a drainage system for general areas in cities should withstand high-intensity rainfall once every one to three years, while design for important areas should withstand rainfall once every three to five years.

Cheng said that most cities have taken advantage of the flexible description of precipitation in the regulation and built the weakest drainage systems possible.

Along with his team, Cheng has spent the last three years conducting field surveys in cities across the country, compiling a report entitled Flood Control in Chinese Cities: Current situations, Problems and Solutions. According to their findings, more than 70 percent of cities in China, including Beijing and Wuhan in central China's Hubei Province, have designed their drainage systems based on handling high-intensity rainfall occurring once a year, while old areas in 90 percent of cities have poor drainage facilities.

The report also identified the less-than-satisfactory coverage of drainage networks across cities, even in Shanghai.

Cheng attributes this handicap in drainage development to rapid urbanization. "Suburban areas have been turned into urban areas on an unprecedented scale over the past two decades," he said.

Cheng said that in other countries, where urbanization progressed at a much slower pace, the government had enough time to finish constructing infrastructure before selling land to real estate developers. But this is not the case in China, and the situation is worsened by the fact that the country is yet to establish a sound legal framework to avoid such infrastructure loopholes.

Another important reason is that during the development of large cities in China, open soil, wetland and lakes, which could store water during rapid precipitation, have shrunk enormously. Take Beijing for example. Cheng's research team discovered that the number of lakes across the capital had plummeted from more than 200 to around 50 over the past six decades.

Many experts have suggested that cities must fully tap storage potential among existing water bodies to alleviate urban flooding. However, widening rivers has become almost impossible in Beijing because of high-density construction on their banks.

Another typical city suffering from the consequences of land reclamation from lakes and ponds is Wuhan.

Wuhan has been hit by severe urban flooding at least once every summer since 2008. After torrential rains on June 18, 2011, 82 stretches of roads were severely flooded and traffic paralyzed, forcing the highest level of response to deal with the problem.

Nicknamed "city of 100 lakes," Wuhan used to have more than 100 lakes in its city center during the 1950s and was famed for its lakeside scenery. By 2012, the total number of lakes had dropped to 40 following waves of land reclamation over the past three decades.

Although the local legislature adopted a regulation on protecting lakes and ponds from random land fill and pollution, shrinkage has not be effectively checked until recently. According to official statistics, Wuhan's built-up urban area grew from 455.06 square km in 2006 to 507.54 square km in 2011, up 11.53 percent during five years.

"To prevent 'urban flooding' from devastating Wuhan as a manmade disaster, related laws and regulations must be perfected and more strictly enforced," Liao Hua, an associate professor at the Law School of South-Central University for Nationalities in Wuhan, told newspaper Legal Weekly.
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Old March 31st, 2014, 01:54 PM   #169
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Hong Kong : Hailstone havoc
31 March 2014
The Standard


















Rainfall map from the Hong Kong Observatory

Hailstones the size of golf balls battered several areas of Hong Kong last night causing extensive damage and forcing the Hong Kong Observatory to hoist the first black storm warning of the year.

Though this was lowered after two hours, the damage was heavy with torrents of rain cascading through shattered window panes at the glitzy Festival Walk in Kowloon Tong.

Elsewhere, more than 20 containers collapsed at Kwai Chung terminal, scores of trees were uprooted and there was extensive flooding in several areas, especially the northwest New Territories where farmers said crops were ruined.

The amber rainstorm warning was raised at 7.45pm before intensifying to red at 8.15pm. Shortly after 8.30pm the black signal was raised together with a warning that rainfall in excess of 100mm an hour was expected in several areas.

By 8pm, Yuen Long, Tuen Mun and Wong Tai Sin all reported heavy rain and flooding. Hail hit Wong Tai Sin, Yuen Long, Tsing Yi, Tsuen Wan, Tuen Mun, Kowloon Tong and North District.

At Tsz Wan Shan the hailstorm lasted for more than five minutes. At Sham Tseng, Lok Fu and San Po Kong the hailstones measured about 3cm across.

Flooding was also reported in Wong Tai Sin and Kowloon Tong MTR stations forcing commuters to roll up their trousers or pick up their skirts.

Train service was also temporarily disrupted due to heavy rains affecting services at Kowloon Tong MTR station. Trains ran at 12-minute intervals between Hung Hom and Tai Wai at one point, and at eight-minute intervals between Tai Wai and Lo Wu.

Curtains of rain poured through the glass ceiling of the seven-story Festival Walk as staff fought to block the water from entering their shops and restaurants.

Workers were later kept busy mopping up with shoppers taking pictures.

More than 130 flights were either diverted or postponed at Hong Kong International Airport. The Education Bureau asked schools and tuition centers not to release students until it was safe.

Though the black signal was lowered at 10.30pm the observatory said the thunderstorm warning would remain in force for several hours. The downpour was blamed on a trough of low pressure that brought thunderstorms, hail and heavy rain to the coastal areas of Guangdong. In addition, a fresh to strong easterly airstream is affecting the coast of southeastern China.

The observatory said the skies will remain cloudy today with rain which will be heavy at times with squally thunderstorms. Temperatures will range between 20 and 24 degrees Celsius with the weather remaining unsettled for a few days.

Feng shui consultant Mak Ling-ling said hail in large areas generally means a warning of an upcoming bad economic or unstable political environment.

"Hong Kong has seen hail many times in history. But hailstorms in large areas, including Guangzhou, Shenzhen and Hong Kong are rare,'' she said. "It could be a case of people's complaints not being heard."
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Old March 31st, 2014, 10:45 PM   #170
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post



The little boy is like: "Have they realised what is going on or im hallucinating?."
Besides this im sorry for the damage in the city hope everyone is fine.
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Old August 23rd, 2014, 09:55 AM   #171
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We usually don't get floodings here. Rotterdam has built underground storage areas for excess rainwater.

This massive storm rolled through 1 hr ago:

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Old August 14th, 2018, 07:45 AM   #172
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More flooding, more questions for Toronto politicians
After streets and streetcars flooded this week, what can city hall do before the next storm hits?
CBC News Excerpt
Aug 12, 2018

Hard rain returned to Toronto this past week, and with the floodwaters came serious questions about how to handle the city's increasingly weird and wild weather.

Tuesday's storm was definitely intense, but hardly unique. Basements were again drenched. Power went out. Beaches were covered in super-gross trash from sewer overflows. Some drivers, bizarrely, insisted they could successfully drive through deep water, only to watch their cars float away.

We've seen this all before, and we'll see it again.

The city's own resiliency office — tasked with preparing Toronto for the "shocks" of a changing climate — projects the future will get a lot wetter, with fewer but far more intense storms.

Politicians can't control these weather patterns, but they are expected to mitigate their effects.

However, Toronto's recent history with this kind of thing suggests finding political support for new measures designed to address extreme weather won't be easy.

Last year, Mayor John Tory pushed council to reject further consideration of a new stormwater charge designed to fund infrastructure to better handle floodwaters.

The stormwater charge was a response to both increased flooding, and a funding problem.

Traditionally, the city pays for infrastructure improvements to water-related stuff through the revenue it takes in from the water bills paid by residents and businesses. But over the last decade, per-capita water use in the city has declined — thanks in part to those PSAs reminding you to turn off the tap while brushing your teeth.

More : http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toront...ians-1.4781412
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Old March 7th, 2019, 10:29 PM   #173
Eric Offereins
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Well defined rain core in a storm over Rotterdam of last summer.
Unfortunately the downburst in this storm claimed the life of 1 woman when a tree was blown on top of her car.

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Old July 2nd, 2019, 02:58 PM   #174
hkskyline
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Heavy rains in India kill 30, cripple financial capital
July 2, 2019
Excerpt

MUMBAI (Reuters) - Wall collapses in Mumbai and nearby towns, caused by the worst monsoon rains in a single day in 14 years, killed 30 people on Tuesday and disrupted rail and air traffic, prompting officials to shut schools and offices.

Financial markets were open in the city of 18 million touted as a potential rival to the Chinese city of Shanghai, but hampered by poor infrastructure like many other Indian cities.

During every monsoon season, which runs from June to September, India experiences fatal incidents of building and wall collapses as rainfall weakens the foundations of poorly-built structures.

Heavy rain brought a wall crashing down on shanties built on a hill slope in Malad, a western suburb of Mumbai, a fire brigade official said, killing 21 people.

More : https://www.reuters.com/article/us-i...-idUSKCN1TX07F
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