Half of Humanity to Become Urban - Page 2 - SkyscraperCity
 

forums map | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Forums > Citytalk and Urban Issues

Citytalk and Urban Issues » Guess the City


Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old August 23rd, 2007, 08:23 AM   #21
xXFallenXx
Registered User
 
xXFallenXx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Temecula, CA
Posts: 3,862
Likes (Received): 170

i think its at 19 mil.
xXFallenXx no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old August 24th, 2007, 03:14 AM   #22
ORiHS
BANNED
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 93
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by spongeg View Post
ISN'ty Mexico City over 20 million?
Yeah and Sao Paulo, Jakarta, Mumbai, Shanghai, Delhi, New York and Seoul are all in the 20 million+ club as well (metro wise).
ORiHS no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 25th, 2007, 10:47 AM   #23
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 96,753
Likes (Received): 22773

Will India have cities of the future?
24 September 2007
The Economic Times

Did we hear India lives in the villages? Nah! After sixty years of Independence, policy makers have woken up to a shift in the geographical truth - as high as 40% of the nation's population will live in cities by 2021. Welcome to urbane India!

But that's where the hype ends. The challenges are daunting and action plans have not yet accommodated the sense of urgency - without which India will fail miserably to create global cities and provide good life to 300 million strong urban Indians or in other words, a population five times of UK's total head-count.

Of course, much of the march towards the cities is backed by the desire of urban Indians to live in world class megalopolis and the government's promise to dole out Rs 50,000 cr for select 63 cities around the country. But a few Indian cities have demonstrated their willingness to reform, and align themselves with a vision to create the cities of the future.

Sample this. Ahmedabad has led the way in establishing a sound municipal credit rating and became the first city in India to raise money through municipal bonds. Bangalore, which has already established a brand name for itself globally, wishes to overcome the current infrastructure woes by improving public participation and bringing in more transparency in urban management.

Hyderabad, which is often pitted against Bangalore in the race for being the cyber capital of India, is moving fast on credit ratings, e-procurement and 24x7 water supply. Indore's plans on urban transport have already been appreciated by experts.

A number of states such as Andhra Pradesh, Gujarat, Karnataka, Maharashtra, MP, Chhattisgarh and West Bengal have come forward to grab opportunities extended by the Centre to create modern megalopolis of international standards. Most states have begun to provide more importance to their urban local bodies and city managers at the ground who in turn would translate the vision of future cities into reality.

However, cities have not demonstrated their transition as yet. Bangalore is way behind in doing a Barcelona or Berlin just as Mumbai remains at least 50 notches below Madrid or Melbourne in any global ranking of cities around the world. Jan Sturesson, partner, PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) and leader of its "Cities of the future" network, argues that Bangalore and Hyderabad have the potential to lead the pack of India's future cities. "

A city of the future must take in board new ideas and innovative technologies. Infrastructure is important, but a city should not just get stuck in building infrastructure. The important tools include a grand vision, right branding and proper execution of projects," he elaborates.

Urban specialist David Foster, formerly with USAID, argues that the biggest challenge facing most Indian cities today is not the lack of land, water or money. "It's lack of trust that infects cities in India. In the absence of such a trust, citizens will never be willing to pay sufficient taxes or service charges to provide adequate water, sewerage or transportation. Without such willingness, municipal services in India will forever be trapped in a vicious cycle of inadequate revenues followed by poor operation and maintenance, followed again by poor yet expensive (because of the cost of coping badly operated utilities) service," Foster cautions.

Yes, without greater trust and accountability, private players are unlikely to lend or invest their resources to build world-class infrastructure in Indian cities. According to government's flagship programme of Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission (JNNURM), cities will be given a grant from the Centre out of its Rs 50,000 cr package for seven years, but state governments, local bodies and the private sector need to make significant contributions towards the total kitty for redeveloping cities.

According to the government's financing model, the Centre will provide a grant of 35% for cities with more than four million population. These cities, however, have to generate 50% from urban local bodies which, in turn, can raise debts from financial institutions, whereas 15% contribution will come from the state government. However, for cities in the North-East and J&K, as high as 90% will be in the form of grants.

Former urban development secretary Anil Baijal, who played a lead role in formulating the JNNURM document, argues that the cities should take it as once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. "The Central government used to spend Rs 400-500 cr annually for city development. Now, the promised amount is Rs 50,000 cr for seven years. It's huge, and it should be used for implementing major upgradation of cities to sustain a 10% GDP growth, and not just to cover the existing infrastructure deficits," he says.

However, the challenges are in the front of capacity building. ADB's country director in India, Tadashi Kondo says that capacity building assistance will continue to form a major element of ADB's urban assistance to India. "The mid-and long-term capacity building will be directed at accomplishment of urban reform agendas to ensure long-term sustainability while the short-term capacity building efforts will aim at enhancing urban project implementation performance," he says.

Chris Heymans, senior municipal development specialist from Water & Sanitation Program (WSP), a world bank funded initiative, says that India should heed to the world-wide lessons from Latin America, Europe, South Africa and South-east Asia that migration to cities cannot be reversed. "Let's recognise urban growth, and pursue and plan for its opportunities and challenges in partnership with all those who have a stake in Indian cities' future. Also, cities need to become inclusive.

Large numbers of people remain without tenure and access to services. Current subsidies reinforce inequality by benefiting upper and middle income households rather than extending services to the poor who are often not connected in the first place," he says.

The private sector could be a vital partner in creating ideas, driving change and sharing risks in financing , but opportunities for market financing of infrastructure still remain largely unexplored, and lack of regulatory reforms as well as city-level financial management posed as handicaps in leveraging in private finance into urban development.

R C M Reddy, MD, IL&FS Cluster Development Initiative (CDI), feels that government's policy on special economic zones (SEZs) has the potential to create greenfield cities if a proper planning is executed to achieve that. "The SEZs or other industrial clusters can be converted into an urban centre with a population of three to four lakh. Why can't we identify a zone housing three to four such clusters and convert it into a town," he asks.

Innovations apart, the question that still haunts India's city planning is whether the political masters have been convinced of creating global cities which will eventually house about half of their total constituents?

Experts feel that political bigwigs at the top and city managers at the ground need to work in tandem to develop strategic assets and resources which a report by PwC terms as "capitals". These include intellectual and social capital, meaning knowledge resources and democratic capital which brings in transparency into the system.

What the city managers can't ignore are values, behaviour and public expression. Urban experts point out that the development of a city needs economists, sociologists and psychologists as well. Senior adviser to IDFC O P Agarwal sums up: "The city planning is more of an art than an engineering exercise."

In fact, the government's mega plan of urban planning through JNNURM with an impressive kitty of Rs 50,000 cr may go waste if citizens fail to own up their cities. The city of Amsterdam in the Netherlands is a classic example here. A recent PwC report says: "I AMsterdam is the motto of the city because the citizens are the city there."
__________________
World Photo Gallery recent updates - | Chicago | Los Angeles | Toronto | London | Buffalo | Yellowknife | Silk Road
More galleries - | Hong Kong | Pyongyang | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Queenstown, NZ | Bagan | Angkor Wat
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old September 26th, 2007, 03:50 PM   #24
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 96,753
Likes (Received): 22773

Asia boom creating slum-dwellers: report

SINGAPORE, Sept 25, 2007 (AFP) - The influx of rural workers heading to Asia's booming cities in search of employment is fuelling a rise in the number of slum-dwellers, US-based Habitat for Humanity said Tuesday.

Sixty percent of the world's slum-dwellers are from Asia, where an estimated 554 million people currently live in slums with virtually no basic sanitation and clean water, the international aid group said.

"The situation of housing and water and sanitation in Asia is the most serious," said Rick Hathaway, Habitat for Humanity's vice president for the Asia Pacific.

"Urbanisation is accelerating faster in Asia than anywhere else and if you look at the statistics, as cities are growing in Asia, the number of people living in slums is growing at the same rate," he told AFP.

According to the group, urban growth in the region is set to outpace the rest of the world over the next 25 years, with 2.65 billion people expected to live in cities by 2030.

Most of the new city-dwellers are also likely to be among the poorest, living in slums where houses are constructed out of substandard materials with poor sanitation, it said.

In most cases, these houses are built by the occupants in hazardous locations with a high risk of eviction.

"So it tells you that nearly all of that urbanisation is amongst the poorest of the poor," said Hathaway.

"It's not an easy problem to solve," said Hathaway.

"It requires cooperation amongst the private sector, NGOs and to some extent the political will to design cities and new towns that will not only address housing issues but also address employment issues.

"We need to put people close to where the work could be."

Habitat for Humanity is a non-profit Christian housing group dedicated to bringing decent housing to the world's poor.

It has built more than 200,000 houses worldwide and its most famous volunteer is former US president Jimmy Carter. Among its projects, Habitat has helped replace homes destroyed in the December 2004 Asian tsunami.
__________________
World Photo Gallery recent updates - | Chicago | Los Angeles | Toronto | London | Buffalo | Yellowknife | Silk Road
More galleries - | Hong Kong | Pyongyang | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Queenstown, NZ | Bagan | Angkor Wat
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 27th, 2008, 02:00 AM   #25
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 96,753
Likes (Received): 22773

Half of world to live in cities by end 2008-UN

UNITED NATIONS, Feb 26 (Reuters) - By the end of the year half of the world's population will be living in cities for the first time in history, the United Nations said in a report released on Tuesday.

According to the report, by the year 2050 there will be 6.4 billion people living in cities, up from 3.3 billion now. The world's total population is expected to rise to 9.2 billion in 2050 from the current 6.7 billion.

The world's most developed regions -- Europe, North America and Oceania -- have far more people in cities than in the countryside, as do Latin America and the Caribbean. Africa and Asia are exceptions but have most of the world's people.

As urbanization increases, the world's total rural population is expected to begin declining in around a decade and should fall to 2.8 billion people in 2050 from 3.4 billion in 2007, the report said.

Some countries, like India -- home to two of the world's biggest metropolises, Mumbai and Delhi with 19 million and 18.8 million people respectively in 2007 -- aim to slow down urbanization by encouraging development of rural areas.

Despite the challenges urbanization poses for governments, Hania Zlotnik, head of the U.N. Population Division, told reporters urbanization is often a sign of a lively economy.

"Governments would be well advised that urban growth is a proof of economic dynamism," Zlotnik told reporters.

Still, intense urbanization and the expected addition of eight new "megacities" -- cities with 10 million or more inhabitants -- by the year 2025 will pose new challenges.

Governments need to make sure large urban populations have access to basic services, above all health care, Zlotnik said.

Asia and Africa are still mostly rural but will see booming urban populations over the next few decades. Both have around 40 percent in cities and 60 percent in the countryside now.

But this is steadily changing. Half of Africa's population will be in cities by between 2045 and 2050 while Asia will reach that point between 2020 and 2025, Zlotnik said.

MEGACITIES

Around 40 percent of China's population is in cities now, a figure that is expected to exceed 70 percent by 2050, when over 1 billion people will be living in Chinese cities, she said.

By 2025, China's booming foreign investment center Shenzhen, which borders Hong Kong, will join Beijing and Shanghai as China's third megacity with 10.2 million people, the U.N. report projected.

The world's second-most-populous country, India, has only 29 percent of its population in cities at the moment. By 2050, India will have 55 percent of its people in urban centers.

"India is expected to urbanize much less than China and therefore it's expected to remain the country with the world's largest rural population," Zlotnik said.

But India will get two new megacities to join Mumbai and Delhi by 2025 -- Calcutta, which will have an estimated 20.6 million people, and Madras with 10.1 million.

By 2025 there will be 27 megacities and Europe will add only one more to the list -- Paris. It will have an estimated 10 million people, making it number 27 on the list. Of the 19 megacities today, the only European metropolises are Moscow and Istanbul.

Tokyo is projected to remain the most populous city in the world. With 35.7 million people in its urban agglomeration at last count, this should rise to 36.4 million by 2025, it said.

Africa currently has only one megacity -- Egypt's capital Cairo. Joining the ranks of megacities by 2025 will be Kinshasa in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Lagos, Nigeria.
__________________
World Photo Gallery recent updates - | Chicago | Los Angeles | Toronto | London | Buffalo | Yellowknife | Silk Road
More galleries - | Hong Kong | Pyongyang | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Queenstown, NZ | Bagan | Angkor Wat
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 11th, 2008, 06:42 PM   #26
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 96,753
Likes (Received): 22773

All About: Developing cities and pollution
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/asiapc...on=cnn_latest#

(CNN) -- If you fix the cities, do you fix the problem? With 50 percent of the entire human race currently living in cities and responsible for emitting up to 80 percent of all global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions every year, they certainly don't seem a bad place to start.

The Tyndall Centrex for Climate Change Research says "the fate of the Earth's climate" basically hinges on what we do with our cities from now on. But the fate of the world's cities largely hinge on what the developing world decides to do with their own growing metropolises in the next 20 years.

According to the World Resources Institute (WRI), urban populations in the developing world are growing at 3.5 percent per year, compared to less than 1 percent growth rates in developed world cities.

UN-Habitat says that a staggering 95 percent of the expected global population growth we will see over the next 2 decades will be absorbed by cities in the developing world.

What that means is by 2030 another 2 billion people from the developing world will be living in cities (only 100 million from the developed world meanwhile will be doing the same). Currently 75 percent of world's poorest people -- 1 billion -- live in cities.

Higher density, lower standards

Whether the new wave of migrants will find a better life in cities remains to be seen. More than 70 percent of city dwellers in the developing world (that's around 900 million people) live in slum-like conditions, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

And that number is predicted to more than double to reach 2 billion slum-dwellers by 2020.

The health risks for people living in slum-like conditions will come from every corner and will include increased mortality rates from heat waves; higher risk of exposure to flash floods, mudslides and landfalls; and more frequent exposure to waterborne and infectious diseases (notably dengue fever).

When it comes to poor cities, bigger is by no means always better. According to UN Habitat, the mega-cities of the future, (those with more than 10 million residents) will be "giant potential flood and disaster traps" if insufficient action is taken on behalf of their residents.

Already, 75 percent of the world's 21 mega-cities are based in the developing world, and by some estimates, 27 of the 33 mega-cities expected to exist by 2015 will be in developing countries.

Cities have always traditionally been the centers of the world's wealth, and the World Bank says that as much as 80 percent of the future economic growth of the developing world will come from its cities.

But the United Nations Environmental Program me (UNEP) has also recently said that population growth in the cities of the developing world "has outpaced the ability to provide vital infrastructure and services".

Pollution problems

Rapid economic growth brings substantial problems of its own -- notably increased pollution. Already, 16 of the 20 most polluted cities in the world are in China, which is arguably undergoing the most rapid industrial and economic transformation the world has ever seen.

Today urban air pollution prematurely kills 1 million people a year, the majority disproportionately located in the developing world.

The pollution is not, as some might expect, always transport-related. Some of the most potent and deadly forms of pollution affecting city residents in the developing world are entirely industrial in their nature.

In 2007 the Blacksmith Institute came up with an unranked list of the top 10 most polluted cities in the world. Without exception the sources of that pollution were industrial -- factories pumping out chemicals into the atmosphere and into water supplies.

The pollutants in question amongst the cities in this top 10 were predominantly made up of toxic chemicals, lead, radioactive materials (one of the cities is Chernobyl) and airborne particulates.

Toxic pollution is a particular disease of the developing world's urbanites, affecting more than 1 billion of its citizens. The World Bank says that as much as 20 percent of all the health problems in the developing world can be attributed to environmental factors, particularly pollution.

Mercury levels in the groundwater in Vapi, India, one of Blacksmith's top 10 polluted cities, is a breathtaking 96 times higher than WHO standards. And if you live in Sumgayit in Azerbaijan, also on the list, where "genetic mutations and birth defects are commonplace", you have between a 22 percent to 51 percent higher chance of getting cancer than if you lived anywhere else in the country.

Clean transport takes a backseat to growth

Transportation-related pollution just rubs salt into the wound in these parts of the world. And unless dramatic changes take place in world's cities' transport systems, things will go from bad to worse.

Globally, according to Pew Center on Global Climate Change, emissions from transportation are "rising faster... than any other sector."

In the next 30 years, China alone will have around 752 million urbanites, all needing to get around town. Currently, less than 1 percent of Chinese own a car.

According to World Watch, the Chinese adopting the American "car-centered model in these places would have disastrous consequences".

It gives an example: If each of those 752 million city dwellers copied the transportation habits of your average resident of San Francisco in 1990, the actions of that one country would result in 1 billion additional tons of carbon emissions a year -- the same amount that was released worldwide by all road transport in 1998.

Clean public transport systems then are being increasingly seen as a necessity all over the world, but particularly in the developing world. Pew says that challenges that motorization presents the developing is "unprecedented" and warns that "there is little time or money to build public transportation systems or to expand roads to handle the new traffic."
advertisement

How well these cities will cope with their particular problems could largely be down to the local officials in charge, if the experiences of London, New York and Bangkok are anything to go by.

City officials in Bangkok were ultimately responsible for reducing the city's air pollution levels by 20 percent to 50 percent, even with a 40 percent increase in vehicles, according to The Economist and they managed this by imposing stricter rules on motor-related pollution and introducing unpopular but effective taxes.
__________________
World Photo Gallery recent updates - | Chicago | Los Angeles | Toronto | London | Buffalo | Yellowknife | Silk Road
More galleries - | Hong Kong | Pyongyang | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Queenstown, NZ | Bagan | Angkor Wat
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 11th, 2008, 07:57 PM   #27
Chrissib
Margela Schurkel
 
Chrissib's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,764
Likes (Received): 17559

Quote:
Originally Posted by futureproof View Post
china will have hyper mega cities, overpassing the 40 million, like shaghai, beijing or shenzen.

lagos seems like it will have at leat 30.35 million by then

indian cities will follow the same path china is going now, i guess cities with 30- 40 million are possible in india by then

jakarta, i guess, will pass the 25 million by then.

new york, i guess, will reach 30 by 2100 or before

los angeles will reach the 25 million mark, i guess, then,will decline.

japan is already declining population, but i guess tokyo could reach 40 million somehow

sao paulo will reach 30 or 35, but no idea when

rio de janeiro will reach 25, but no idea when

buenos aires will reach 20, but no idea when, then, decline

johannesburg itīs said that will become a 25 million city by 2050

london could reach 20, but hardly sooner

paris could reach 18, but hardly sooner

moscow will reach 25 i guess by 2050

madrid could reach 12 million, but hardly sooner

sydney, is said to reach only 6-7 million by 2050, if it ever happens

seoul could reach 30, but not sure.

chicago will surely pass the 10 million mark before 2050, but i guess it will only reach 15 at most

just predictions. others i have read about like johannesburg and sydney
LA is growing with ~1,2%, NY only with ~0,3% (CSAs are used). I tjink New York will like in 25 years be surpassed by LA!

Madrid can only double it's population by massive immigration and I doubt that it will continue.

Seoul could reach 30 million, but then it would have over 60% of south korea! But I don't think that seoul will continue to be as big as that, because the population in South Korea is projected to decline very fast. Another possibility is the reunification of Korea. Then it could easily reach the 30 million, maybe even 35 million.
Chrissib no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 11th, 2008, 08:07 PM   #28
Chrissib
Margela Schurkel
 
Chrissib's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,764
Likes (Received): 17559

I'll become urban in roughly two years
Chrissib no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 1st, 2008, 04:51 PM   #29
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 96,753
Likes (Received): 22773

Asian cities struggling against urbanisation woes: ADB
25 June 2008
Agence France Presse

Asian cities need help to cope with an unprecedented period of urbanisation, the Asian Development Bank (ADB) said Wednesday, stressing that their future prosperity is at stake.

Providing adequate water supplies and infrastructure are among the key issues facing urban planners and policymakers, ADB president Haruhiko Kuroda said, adding few Asian cities have successfully dealt with sudden expansion.

"Asia's rapid urbanisation is unprecedented," Kuroda said in a speech to the World Cities Summit in Singapore, explaining that around 1.1 billion Asians are expected to migrate to cities in search of prosperity over the next 20 years.

"Improving the livelihood and quality of life for so many city dwellers is an urban management task of a magnitude never before attempted by humanity.

"Clearly, Asian cities need assistance in coping with the physical impact of past and current urban growth."

The Tokyo-Yokohoma area and Shanghai are rare urban success stories in Asia, Kuroda said.

"Unfortunately such successes are not the norm but the exception," he said.

In most parts of Asia, investment in infrastructure has failed to keep up with economic growth, and where there are new investments, the benefits have not been distributed equally, he said.

Aside from the need to invest in infrastructure, the region needs technical assistance critical to sustain growth, he said.

To this end, the ADB has launched a water financing initiative that aims to provide 200 million Asians with access to safe drinking water, said Kuroda.

A book launched on the sidelines of the summit indicates the region suffers from an "infrastructure deficit" as governments run into difficulty raising the funds needed.

"The revenue sources of local governments are usually insufficient to meet the large, long-term financing needs of infrastructure," the ADB said in the book "Managing Asian Cities."

"Their infrastructure investment has often come through grants or loans from central governments but these governments also face resource limitations.

"The result is an infrastructure deficit."

The ADB estimates the region's infrastructure funding requirements at 60 billion US dollars annually, part of which will need to be financed by Asia's capital markets.

"Inadequate infrastructure is among the most serious threats to sustaining the development of Asian cities in the future," it said.

Governors, mayors and other executives from 16 Asian countries agreed to establish an informal network on how to achieve progress while preserving the environment.

Singapore Minister for National Development Mah Bow Tan, who chaired a session of the city executives, said there was a "sense of urgency" and a "sense of crisis" on the need for sustainable development.

Fauzi Bowo, governor of the Indonesian capital Jakarta, told the session the biggest challenge for the city of almost 10 million people was a "change in mindset" ranging from disposing of waste properly to efficient management of resources.
__________________
World Photo Gallery recent updates - | Chicago | Los Angeles | Toronto | London | Buffalo | Yellowknife | Silk Road
More galleries - | Hong Kong | Pyongyang | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Queenstown, NZ | Bagan | Angkor Wat
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 1st, 2008, 08:37 PM   #30
karim aboussir
cygnus karim
 
karim aboussir's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: casablanca / orlando florida
Posts: 284
Likes (Received): 14

QUESTION what about AGING !!! we are getting OLD !! I mean world population is getting older and older there will a big booming explosive of older people 60 and over in the world what sources what problems what solutions ???? this is a big issue that many countries are ignoring
karim aboussir no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 3rd, 2008, 01:26 AM   #31
resu eman
BANNED
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 84
Likes (Received): 1

A lot of OLD problems are here highlightened but nobody seems to come up with any solutions. How will more people poor get houses when the slums are hughes already? Is land afordable?
What about traficc problems?
resu eman no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 4th, 2008, 06:39 AM   #32
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 96,753
Likes (Received): 22773

Don't think the urbanisation problems and the stress on the infrastructure is attributable to an aging population. It's the young people from the countryside that are flooding into cities looking for jobs, fueling the population rise.
__________________
World Photo Gallery recent updates - | Chicago | Los Angeles | Toronto | London | Buffalo | Yellowknife | Silk Road
More galleries - | Hong Kong | Pyongyang | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Queenstown, NZ | Bagan | Angkor Wat
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 3rd, 2008, 09:52 AM   #33
Azia
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 178
Likes (Received): 1

re

Quote:
Originally Posted by futureproof View Post
china will have hyper mega cities, overpassing the 40 million, like shaghai, beijing or shenzen.

lagos seems like it will have at leat 30.35 million by then

indian cities will follow the same path china is going now, i guess cities with 30- 40 million are possible in india by then

jakarta, i guess, will pass the 25 million by then.

new york, i guess, will reach 30 by 2100 or before

los angeles will reach the 25 million mark, i guess, then,will decline.

japan is already declining population, but i guess tokyo could reach 40 million somehow

sao paulo will reach 30 or 35, but no idea when

rio de janeiro will reach 25, but no idea when

buenos aires will reach 20, but no idea when, then, decline

johannesburg itīs said that will become a 25 million city by 2050

london could reach 20, but hardly sooner

paris could reach 18, but hardly sooner

moscow will reach 25 i guess by 2050

madrid could reach 12 million, but hardly sooner

sydney, is said to reach only 6-7 million by 2050, if it ever happens

seoul could reach 30, but not sure.

chicago will surely pass the 10 million mark before 2050, but i guess it will only reach 15 at most

just predictions. others i have read about like johannesburg and sydney
i think new york can reach 30 million before 2050 because philly and new york are already merged togehter
Azia no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 3rd, 2008, 11:23 AM   #34
Alexriga
BANNED
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 2,089
Likes (Received): 183

This mega cities will be hell. Dirty air, huge mobs of people, everything too expensive, huge traffic jams, overcrowded public transport, epidemics, problems with water/power supply etc. etc. etc.
Alexriga no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 3rd, 2008, 12:47 PM   #35
Chrissib
Margela Schurkel
 
Chrissib's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,764
Likes (Received): 17559

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alexriga View Post
This mega cities will be hell. Dirty air, huge mobs of people, everything too expensive, huge traffic jams, overcrowded public transport, epidemics, problems with water/power supply etc. etc. etc.
I am more optimist. When they do well, they'll look like first world megacities in 50 years.
Chrissib no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 5th, 2008, 07:30 AM   #36
c0kelitr0
Resident *****
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Manila-Canberra
Posts: 2,633
Likes (Received): 21

Manila will definitely be more than 20 million by then.


Last edited by c0kelitr0; August 5th, 2008 at 08:00 AM.
c0kelitr0 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 5th, 2008, 05:27 PM   #37
Chrissib
Margela Schurkel
 
Chrissib's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,764
Likes (Received): 17559

I hope we'll get a new baby boom and Rhein-Ruhr will be at 20 million at the end of the century
Chrissib no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 23rd, 2008, 04:31 AM   #38
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 96,753
Likes (Received): 22773

Income equality of Asian cities under threat: UN report
22 October 2008
Agence France Presse

Asian cities are among the most equal in terms of income, but inequalities are widening as the income gap between rural and urban areas grows, the UN population programme said in a report Wednesday.

Beijing is the most equal city in the world, while Jakarta and Phnom Penh also score highly, UN-Habitat said in its annual report on the state of the world's cities.

Hong Kong is the most inequal city in Asia, while South African cities led by Johannesburg are the most inequal in the world.

However many Asian countries are grappling with expanding income disparities between rural and urban areas, which is fuelling migration to cities and threatening social harmony, the report said.

The United Nations says inequalities in income and in access to adequate shelter can lead to a reduction in economic efficiency and spark social unrest.

UN-Habitat head Anna Tibaijuka told a news conference in London that she was concerned the global financial crisis would aggravate the inequalities and could even lead to rioting as people struggled to pay the rent.

"You cannot have a harmonious society if people are not secure in their homes," she said.

"And if you cannot pay the rent, you are not secure in your home."

The study also found that more than a third of urban dwellers in Asia live in slums.

It said concentrations of slums throughout Asia varied widely, with the highest concentration in southern Asia.

Asian cities are also among the most vulnerable in the world to their surrounding environment.

Eighteen out of 20 of the largest cities in the region are located on the coast or on a river bank or delta, putting them at risk from rising water levels, the report said.
__________________
World Photo Gallery recent updates - | Chicago | Los Angeles | Toronto | London | Buffalo | Yellowknife | Silk Road
More galleries - | Hong Kong | Pyongyang | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Queenstown, NZ | Bagan | Angkor Wat
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 23rd, 2008, 11:55 AM   #39
Republica
BUND
 
Republica's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 4,040
Likes (Received): 3

half of urbanity to become human!
__________________
Rant
Republica no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 11th, 2010, 04:04 PM   #40
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 96,753
Likes (Received): 22773

Rapid city growth threat to Africa's development-UN
8 February 2010

LONDON, Feb 8 (Reuters) - Rapid and chaotic urbanisation is threatening sustainable development in Africa, the head of the U.N. housing agency said on Monday, but taking steps to mitigate climate change could help tackle some of the problems of cities.

The populations of large, fast-expanding cities in Africa, such as Lagos in Nigeria, are set to continue growing at annual rates of around 4 percent according to the United Nations, putting pressure on the provision of housing and basic services.

"We are an urban species now ... but I'm afraid what we have on the ground is rather chaotic and unsustainable," Anna Tibaijuka, executive director of UN-HABITAT, said at a conference on the future of cities at Chatham House in London.

"After HIV and Aids, the biggest threat to sustainable development in Africa is rapid and chaotic urbanisation, because it is a recipe for disaster for increased tensions and pressure."

Tibaijuka said more investment was needed in making urban growth more sustainable, for instance by improving infrastructure and technology.

Decentralising governance from a national to city level would also enable urban problems to be tackled more effectively, she said, acknowledging steps taken by Kenya towards amending its constitution to devolve government to regional counties.

The impact of climate change has exacerbated existing social and economic problems, forcing many farmers away from their villages to become "environmental refugees" in big cities, Tibaijuka said.

But while cities have been part of the problem of climate change, they could also be part of the solution.

"There is a unique opportunity to bridge our global efforts in emissions control with local efforts to improve the quality of life and the productivity of our cities," she said.

"We need to take immediate actions to make our cities more sustainable ... what better measures can we take than to reduce traffic congestion, improve air and water quality, and reduce our ecological footprint."
__________________
World Photo Gallery recent updates - | Chicago | Los Angeles | Toronto | London | Buffalo | Yellowknife | Silk Road
More galleries - | Hong Kong | Pyongyang | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Queenstown, NZ | Bagan | Angkor Wat
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Half of China's Population to be Urban by 2010 hkskyline Citytalk and Urban Issues 250 March 25th, 2019 04:40 PM
State Law Building - Half old, half Gotham Aussie Bhoy Everything else 19 June 30th, 2005 02:21 AM
Valparaiso, Humanity Patrimony vitacura Cityscapes and Skyline Photos 8 April 26th, 2005 01:15 AM


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 07:17 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us