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Old February 28th, 2009, 02:23 PM   #1
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...Cape Town Discussion

lets start over

last thread
https://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...601927&page=45
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Old February 28th, 2009, 02:44 PM   #2
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Would you mind linking to the old thread in your post? Thanks
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 11:48 PM   #3
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Murray & Roberts Robust Magazine - March 2009 - Page 9

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Old March 4th, 2009, 04:05 PM   #4
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Development land pose risk in Cape Town as city size expected to double by 2030



By Anél Powell

THE City of Cape Town, estimated to be almost 35 000 hectares in size in 2007, will double by 2030.

This means it is expanding by 650ha annually, increasing by what is the equivalent of two rugby fields in size every day.

Kevin Sinclair-Smith, of the city's strategy and planning department, said yesterday that there was not much land left in the metropole for development.

According to a report submitted to the city's planning and environment committee, the areas left for development included valuable agricultural areas, biodiversity areas, environmentally sensitive areas and areas with natural features that needed to be protected from urban development.

The city's "dramatic" urban expansion since 1977 means there is limited suitable land left for future growth.

Using the latest available aerial photography, taken in 2007, the city's urban growth monitoring project has analysed the city's urban development since 1945.

Urban growth has been greatest in the northern areas of the metropole, including Blouberg.

Mitchells Plain and Khayelitsha have grown by 897ha between 1998 and 2007.

Sinclair-Smith noted in the report that, while Cape Town was growing faster than ever before in number of hectares a year, the percentage growth rate had slowed.

The city is seven times larger than it was in 1945.

Since 1977, the city has been growing at a fairly constant 2 percent, with the rate declining to 1.5 percent. City and population growth were similar until 1988, when the population growth outstripped the city's growth.

Sinclair-Smith said formal market housing trends led to more smaller residential units and higher density accommodation such as townhouses.

Many of the city's poorer residents live in high-density settlements, including backyard dwellings and informal settlements, meaning population growth will have relatively little impact on the physical growth of the city.

The report will form the basis of the city's urban planning policy and spatial development framework. As the demand for land increases, the city has been advised to opt for densification rather than spatial growth.

Sinclair-Smith said possible expansion options included the Fisantekraal corridor near Durbanville.

It was reported at a workshop hosted by the provincial government that cultural landscape, such as Durbanville Hills, was under "heavy pressure" for development.

Areas that were deemed provincial cultural landscapes should be put forward for world heritage status to get protection at local government level.

"The protection of large areas of privately-owned land is often contested and complicated, especially when it is undeveloped and where there could be expectations for development," said Clive James, of the city's environmental resource management department, in a report to the planning committee.

He said the city had to declare cultural landscapes as conservation areas so their boundaries could be protected when developments were being considered.

Published on the web by Cape Times on March 3, 2009. © Cape Times 2009. All rights reserved.
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Old March 4th, 2009, 04:14 PM   #5
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New-look Giro del Capo brings 13 international teams

4 March 2009

The Giro del Capo starts on Wednesday, sporting a new format of a series of four individual one-day races instead of being a five-day stage event. The start of the Giro also serves as a reminder that it is again time for the world's largest individually timed cycling event, Cape Argus Pick'n Pay Cycle Tour, which takes place on Sunday, 8 March.

David Bellairs, Co-Director of the Cape Town Cycle Tour Trust, explaining why a decision had been made to change the format of the Giro, said: "We've run the event on the same format for the past 17 years. It would appear we have been in contravention of a UCI regulation of which we were unaware."

He further explained that world cycling's governing body, the UCI, informed the Cape Town Cycle Tour Trust that unless it complied with the clause, the event would be downgraded.
'A tough year'

"Compliance (in the form of a subsistence allowance for cyclists)", said Bellairs, "would have cost about R900 000. It has been a tough year without a Giro sponsor, so there was no way we could also carry this additional cost.

"The challenge we faced was a downgraded event (national tour), where we would only be allowed to enter three international teams.

We had already confirmed the participation of a record 13 international teams, most of who are already in the country for early season training camps,” he added.

It appears the regulations that the Cape Town Cycle Tour Trust had been applying, strictly apply to one-day events and not stage races. "This fact remains unclear in the UCI regulations," reckoned Bellairs.

In an attempt to secure the continuation of the 2009 Giro del Capo, he met with the president of the UCI at their headquarters in Aigle, Switzerland towards the end of February. A compromise was reached.

A relieved Bellairs outlined the format of the event afterwards: "The Giro will now be run as a series of four UCI category ME 1.2 single day events. The event retains the same status, but with a larger prize purse available to participants on a daily basis. All 13 international and 17 local teams will still be accommodated," Bellairs elaborated.
Races

The races comprising, what will now be called, The Pedal Power Association (PPA) Cape Argus Giro del Capo Challenge, are as follows:

# Wed, 4 March: Wellington (110 km)

# Thurs, 5 March: Durbanville (146.7 km)

# Fri, 6 March: Paarl (176 km)

# Sat, 7 March: Rest day

# Sun, 8 March: Cape Argus Pick 'n Pay Cycle Tour (109 km)

Teams will be permitted to field six riders per event but may chose a lesser number if they so desire.

"While not ideal, the new format will see the continuation of the 2009 Giro. We hope to secure a sponsor for the Giro del Capo in 2010 and thereby return the event to its original stage race format which has been so successful for the past 17 years," Bellairs said.

Team Barloworld, with a strong South African flavour, will be one of the strong favourites to excel in both the Giro and the Cycle Tour. The six-man line-up includes South Africans John-Lee Augustyn, Daryl Impey and Robbie Hunter, as well as SA-based Kenyan Chris Froome, Colombian Felix Cardenas, and British rider Steven Cummings. Hunter is the two-time defending champion.

Team Barloworld has produced five of the past six winners of the Giro, so they bear close watching; their line-up for this year's event has been hand-picked for the conditions.
UK number one

The United Kingdom's top ranked team, Rapha Condor, should make matters interesting for Team Barloworld. Rapha Condor's line-up includes Olympic bronze medallist Chris Newton, Tour of Britain star Kristian House, and Namibia's Dan Craven, the reigning African Champion.

Some of the local teams bear watching too. MTN boasts a strong line-up, including David George, a three-time winner of the Giro. Neotel's team includes sprinter Nolan Hoffman. He recently won the 105km The Herald VW Cycle Tour.

Team Medscheme boasts veteran Malcolm Lange, the winner of over 300 races, while Toyota Supercycling Academy has Reinhardt Janse van Rensburg, who outsprinted Barloworld's Daryl Impey to win the Berge and Dale Super Classic at the end of January.

Mannie Heymans of Team Namibia will return to the Giro del Capo for the eighteenth time. He is the only rider to have participated in every single Giro since its inception.
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Old March 4th, 2009, 04:17 PM   #6
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Expats boost CT property
Article By:
Wed, 04 Mar 2009 13:18

Returning expats are not only fuelling rentals across Cape Town, but also sales.

According to Lanice Steward, MD of Anne Porter Knight Frank, the much-discussed return of South African expatriates from overseas countries hit by the world’s economic woes is having a beneficial effect on the Cape property market as a high proportion of these people are heading for Cape Town.

"I am told that 200 000 bankers and financial sector staff have lost, or will lose, their jobs worldwide," said Steward. "The good news is that those returning to SA now comprise nearly three percent of our buyers and, in our experience, are finding jobs here often by setting up in a new business, which is good for the economy.

"Most, too, are capable of paying large deposits or of buying the property with one cheque. This means that they are not held back by the National Credit Act rulings."

UK and EU retirees coming to SA

A steady, though small, stream of retired persons, said Steward, is also still coming to South Africa from the UK and Europe — and she predicts this will increase.

"On the current exchange rate they still get far more for their money and enjoy a far better lifestyle than is possible in their home countries. I am quite certain that if SA published the figures of our houses more widely overseas we could attract far more foreign retirees — particularly with the publicity that the World Cup and the election brings.

"If this election is carried through peacefully the message that we are a reasonably secure society will go out to the world. I, for one, am confident that there will be only minor disturbances and that 2010 will so raise our profile internationally that we will attract more home buyers."

Returning expats fuel rentals across CT

In the face of high interest rates and stricter than ever lending conditions at the country’s banks, many would-be first-time homeowners are finding it difficult to enter the market at present. The result is an upswing in rental activity across Cape Town, says Pam Golding Properties’ Western Cape Rentals Director Dexter Leite. He says there has been a surge in activity across all areas and price ranges — fuelled not only by those who can’t afford to buy, but also by the number of expatriates returning home to South Africa.

"Right now we are seeing high demand in all of the traditionally popular areas such as the Southern Suburbs and Atlantic Seaboard," says Leite, "as well as in the Northern Suburbs and the Blouberg region. The City Bowl has also seen high levels of rental activity as more and more people seek to avoid the cost and frustration of commuting and traffic congestion by living close to their places of work. Historically, these popular areas have always been short of rental properties and this has not changed for those properties which fall within the sought-after parameters such as modern two-bedroom apartments or three-bedroom homes which are appropriately priced. Our Western Cape rentals branches concluded more than 150 lets in December 2008 and in excess of 100 in January 2009 and we have continued to experience very high levels of activity into February."

Among those fuelling the demand for rentals are the returning expatriates who are coming home after spending a few years overseas. For them, says Leite, letting can be a very sensible option, especially upon their immediate return. "Many of these people have been out of the country for an extended period," he says, "and during their time away their specific needs may have changed quite substantially — for example, their financial status, their marital status and their employer. They may also find that the cities they lived in before have changed substantially with new infrastructure affecting commuting options or new business hubs having developed where they might want to work. For these returning expatriates it can be most beneficial to first rent for a short term while they assess what their new needs are, consider different suburbs where they might wish to settle and get a feel for commuting times. Renting provides them with the flexibility to make these decisions without pressure. It also allows them to focus on finding their feet and re-establishing themselves in South Africa without having to worry about homeowners’ responsibilities such as maintenance, a mortgage, insurance, rates and taxes."

Retired visitors from the EU and UK renting whilst considering settling here permanently

A further emerging trend is for retired visitors from Europe and the UK to come and spend an extended period in South Africa — a year or sometimes more. Some of them are renting whilst considering the possibility of settling here permanently, says Leite, while others are simply here for an extended holiday. With exchange rates working in favour of those with foreign currency, there are many opportunities for them to rent high-end properties in prime locations such as on the Atlantic Seaboard.

Leite adds that PGP continues to see particularly high levels of activity at the top end of the rental market, mainly in the more exclusive areas of the Southern Suburbs and Atlantic Seaboard where clients are seeking properties that support and epitomise a secure lifestyle with all the benefits that an up-market property in an exclusive suburb can offer.

Rentals here can range from R30 000 per month to R80 000 per month — or even more in isolated cases. In the period from November 2008 to February 2009, PGP agents have concluded lease agreements of R65 000 and R120 000 per month for houses in Bantry Bay, R25 000 per day for a house in Bishopscourt (on a holiday/short-term let basis) and R70 000 per month for another house in the same suburb. PGP has also recently concluded a R115 000 per month lease in Bishopscourt on a short let basis. The company has further let homes in Camps Bay for R36 000 and R28 000 per month and a Constantia property for R50 000 per month. Also notable were leases in the City Bowl for R35 000 and R32 000 per month and R15 000 and R16 000 in the Northern Suburbs — particularly high for this area. The market for apartments is also strong with PGP agents achieving rentals of R75 000 and R23 000 per month for units in the Waterfront and R20 000 per month for an apartment in Mandela Rhodes Place in the central city.

The CEO of ERA South Africa property group agrees

The global credit crunch may have at least one positive aspect to it, namely encouraging South Africans who have been living abroad to return to the country and in the process provide a degree of stimulus for the property market.

Gerhard Kotzé, CEO of the ERA South Africa property group, says anecdotal evidence suggests this is already beginning to happen — and that many South Africans have postponed their emigration plans.

"There is a new wave of joblessness in the UK, Australia and the US; traditionally regions that have attracted skilled South African emigrants. Even Dubai, where there are an estimated 50&nbsp000 South Africans, has felt the waves of the global recession. Worldwide jobs are scarce and retrenchments are the order of the day, most notably in the UK financial sector, retailing and tourism.

"By contrast South Africa, while by no means having escaped the impact of the global economic problems, is comparatively better off in terms of employment opportunities, a situation created paradoxically by the emigration of the last few years, but also by the fact that the country has a relatively sound business and banking sector."

Nobody is suggesting that we’re about to see a flood of South Africans returning to the country, he says. "Nonetheless there are indications of something of a reversal of the outflow of recent years. Guy Lundie, co-author of 'South Africa, Reasons to Believe' has been quoted as saying the grass on the other side is looking a little less green.

"Also the Homecoming Revolution, a group which tries to persuade South Africans living abroad to return home, was recently quoted as saying that four out of five South Africans who attended a group exhibition in London last year were planning to return to South Africa."

Kotzé says that in addition, personnel agencies are reporting a 'dramatic' increase in the numbers of international professionals and South African expats seeking employment in South Africa.

"And realistically, prodigal South Africans equipped with sterling, euros or dollars could provide something of a fillip for the property market."
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Old March 5th, 2009, 01:35 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mo Rush View Post
Development land pose risk in Cape Town as city size expected to double by 2030



By Anél Powell

THE City of Cape Town, estimated to be almost 35 000 hectares in size in 2007, will double by 2030.

This means it is expanding by 650ha annually, increasing by what is the equivalent of two rugby fields in size every day.

Kevin Sinclair-Smith, of the city's strategy and planning department, said yesterday that there was not much land left in the metropole for development.

According to a report submitted to the city's planning and environment committee, the areas left for development included valuable agricultural areas, biodiversity areas, environmentally sensitive areas and areas with natural features that needed to be protected from urban development.

The city's "dramatic" urban expansion since 1977 means there is limited suitable land left for future growth.

Using the latest available aerial photography, taken in 2007, the city's urban growth monitoring project has analysed the city's urban development since 1945.

Urban growth has been greatest in the northern areas of the metropole, including Blouberg.

Mitchells Plain and Khayelitsha have grown by 897ha between 1998 and 2007.

Sinclair-Smith noted in the report that, while Cape Town was growing faster than ever before in number of hectares a year, the percentage growth rate had slowed.

The city is seven times larger than it was in 1945.

Since 1977, the city has been growing at a fairly constant 2 percent, with the rate declining to 1.5 percent. City and population growth were similar until 1988, when the population growth outstripped the city's growth.

Sinclair-Smith said formal market housing trends led to more smaller residential units and higher density accommodation such as townhouses.

Many of the city's poorer residents live in high-density settlements, including backyard dwellings and informal settlements, meaning population growth will have relatively little impact on the physical growth of the city.

The report will form the basis of the city's urban planning policy and spatial development framework. As the demand for land increases, the city has been advised to opt for densification rather than spatial growth.

Sinclair-Smith said possible expansion options included the Fisantekraal corridor near Durbanville.

It was reported at a workshop hosted by the provincial government that cultural landscape, such as Durbanville Hills, was under "heavy pressure" for development.

Areas that were deemed provincial cultural landscapes should be put forward for world heritage status to get protection at local government level.

"The protection of large areas of privately-owned land is often contested and complicated, especially when it is undeveloped and where there could be expectations for development," said Clive James, of the city's environmental resource management department, in a report to the planning committee.

He said the city had to declare cultural landscapes as conservation areas so their boundaries could be protected when developments were being considered.

Published on the web by Cape Times on March 3, 2009. © Cape Times 2009. All rights reserved.
Looks like it's time to establish a purpose built city elsewhere in the Western Cape to stop CT becomeing too large.
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Old March 5th, 2009, 09:04 AM   #8
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Surfing the wild Cape winds
Jennifer Stern

4 March 2009

When the wind is howling in Cape Town, most people batten down the hatches. But Stefan Gölnitz, Bart de Zwart, Gunther Baade, Jonas Holzhausen, Manuel Vogel and Frank Lewisch are not like most people. These guys come to the Cape because of the wind, not in spite of it.

So the attendant at the gate of the Cape Point section of the Table Mountain National Park had to shake herself out of her inaction-induced reverie to sell them tickets. Not many people were braving the Cape of Storms with a howling southeaster blowing.

Gölnitz is a journalist for a Surf Magazin, the biggest windsurfing magazine in Germany and – strange as it seems – the best-selling windsurfing magazine in the world. Germany has well over 100 000 active windsurfers, which makes it probably the biggest windsurfing market in the world. This is partly because the newer craze of kite surfing, which has seduced so many windsurfers away, has not really caught on in Germany to the same extent it has in, say, South Africa.

After a short session near the Cape of Good Hope, they moved off to Witsand – a popular spot for experienced boardsailors. And they went wild. There were a couple of intrepid kite surfers there when they arrived, but they were just getting out the water as the wind was picking up.

Cool job
Gölnitz has a pretty cool job. He has to do some nice travel articles, and he gets to play on the water more than most people who have regular jobs.

But probably his favourite assignment is his six-week sojourn in Langebaan, where he and his colleagues test the latest, newest and hottest windsurfing equipment. They test light weather equipment in Italy, but they have to leave Europe to get really consistent high winds and big seas, so they come to Langebaan.

This [November 2008] is the 12th consecutive year the Surf Magazin test team has used Langebaan as a location, and it has become an automatic choice.

“In fact,” Gölnitz says, “if the water was warm, this would be maybe the best windsurfing destination in the world.”

Langebaan, he says is the perfect base. The lagoon is calm and protected so they can test relatively light weather gear when the wind is not too strong. When it picks up – as it usually does in the afternoon – they can test racing gear, getting up to tear-blurring speeds across the turquoise lagoon.

“And,” he adds, “Swartriet is a short drive away when we want to do wave jumping.

“And Cape Town is close by, so we can go to Big Bay to surf or to Cape Point and Witsand. There are so many good sites in just an hour’s drive.”

Gölnitz says it’s not only the quality of the wind and sea conditions – fabulous as they are. It’s also the general vibe of Cape Town.

“We’ve done the tests in Egypt and the Caribbean before,” he says. “But it’s boring. There’s nothing to do when you’re not sailing. In Cape Town, if the weather is bad, we can go to a movie or to the Waterfront. Or even play golf.”

A bit of translation may be needed here. Bad weather for Gölnitz means no wind, regardless of how sunny and warm it may be.

They are based for the whole six weeks at the Cape Sports Centre. It’s conveniently right on the beach and it has the facilities to effect repairs if necessary. And it’s the centre of action for windsurfers, kite surfers, paddlers and cyclists with all manner of active happenings going on all the time, so it’s a vibe they can relate to.

They need to test an enormous amount of equipment so it’s fortunate for them they have a sponsorship with a German airline, otherwise the cost of flying about 600kg of gear from Europe to the tip of Africa and back again would be prohibitive. And that’s not even the half of it. The rest is brought over by the manufacturers themselves.

International windsurfing
The first week of their stay is a real who’s who of international windsurfing. The top equipment manufacturers in the world fly in to Cape Town with a selection of gear they’d like tested, and then they spend a few days in Langebaan networking, pushing their products and – of course – sailing.

After that first week, the team gets down to the serious work of testing the gear. It sounds like a cushy job but it really is hard work.

The other five members of the team are not journalists, but are mostly semi-professional or professional windsurfers – either teaching windsurfing or running shops. It’s mid-winter in Germany when any sensible person would be sitting in front of a log fire with a mug of glühwein, or – at most – skiing, so business is slow for the water sports industry.

While their skill is an essential ingredient in their being part of the team, size also does count. The team consists of three pairs of sailors of similar weights – two light, two medium and two heavy.

And they don’t just go out there and have fun. They will perform specific tasks with a range of different boards and sails, and they take copious notes. Then they spend hours in the evening comparing their opinions, and recording their scores.

The result is the most authoritative review of windsurfing equipment in the world. Keen boardsailors from other countries have started to learn German just so they can read it.

While it’s not a holiday, and they are here to work, six weeks is a long time so many of the team are joined by friends and family for a week or two, and they certainly enjoy spending time in Cape Town. They’ve got another couple of weeks, and then it’s back to a European winter – but that’s not too terrible a fate. There’s skiing and glühwein, and Christmas with real trees and homemade stollen.
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Old March 5th, 2009, 06:53 PM   #9
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SAA now run aircraft without seat back entertainment systems to Cape Town from London!! What a joke! Who on earth in their right mind is going to travel with SAA when it costs the same as BA/Virgin and you get service and facilities from the 1990s!!! After this experience I for one will never fly SAA again.
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Old March 5th, 2009, 09:51 PM   #10
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Pretty pathetic.
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Old March 6th, 2009, 09:28 AM   #11
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Berg River Dam to be renamed Autshumato dam



By Anel Powell and sapa

THE R1.5-billion Berg River Dam Project generated 1 430 jobs, contributing to poverty alleviation in the area, says President Kgalema Motlanthe.

Motlanthe, who officially opened the dam yesterday, said the new impoundment would help South Africa reach its target of providing universal access to safe drinking water by 2014.

The dam will contribute 81 million cubic metres to the city's water supply.

Motlanthe also announced that the dam is to be renamed after the 17th century Khoi leader Autshumato, better known as Harry the Strandloper.

"Required legal processes would have to be followed before the dam could be renamed," he said.

But according to a senior department of water affairs official at the ceremony, who declined to be named, the plans are "very advanced".

Motlanthe said the name change would help to correct injustices perpetrated against the Khoi, who had been "written out of history".

Western Cape Premier Lynne Brown said the safety of the province's water, especially the Berg and Eerste rivers, needed to be addressed by the government urgently.

Speaking of Sedgefield, she said it was "mind-boggling" that an area prone to flooding also experienced water shortages. Proper housing and the elimination of informal settlements along rivers would reduce water pollution.

City mayoral committee member for utilities, Clive Justus, said the project, which started in 2004, was a "significant triumph", ending on time and within budget.

The project comprises a dam with a storage capacity of 130 million cubic metres, a supplement scheme, two pump stations and 12km of pipeline.

The concrete-faced, rock-fill dam, in the upper reaches of the Berg River catchment area, is 250 metres above sea level. It has an embankment of rock mined from the river bed and surrounding area, with an impermeable 300mm layer of concrete on the upstream side.

The dam wall is 68 metres high and 929 metres long.

Justus said while the dam would alleviate immediate water shortages, water saving measures were still necessary.

Harry Swart of the Department of Water Affairs said the project costs would be recovered by 2028 through the sale of water from the dam.

The City of Cape Town is the main beneficiary and water tariffs in the province have been increased over the past five years to raise funds for the dam. The Development Bank of South Africa contributed R500m, the European Investment Bank signed a R800m loan and Absa provided R300m.

[email protected]

Published on the web by Cape Times on March 5, 2009.
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Old March 6th, 2009, 09:51 AM   #12
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SAA now run aircraft without seat back entertainment systems to Cape Town from London!! What a joke! Who on earth in their right mind is going to travel with SAA when it costs the same as BA/Virgin and you get service and facilities from the 1990s!!! After this experience I for one will never fly SAA again.
Is it a permanent thing? Is it a general thing? Is it across the board? Because to say you will NEVER fly with them again is a very drastic statement. I thought they were in the process of renewing their fleet?
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Old March 6th, 2009, 09:52 AM   #13
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And I for one have always been very happy with their cabin service, so what is the problem there?
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Old March 6th, 2009, 11:16 AM   #14
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The problem is that it is utterly pathetic to not offer such services on long haul flights nowadays!!!! Why on earth would anyone fly with an airline where you could very easily end up on a substandard aircraft when for the same cost you can fly Virgin or BA where you are guaranteed a certain standard of service.

They have been running this substandard service for over a month now down to Cape Town and it is totally unacceptable.
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Old March 6th, 2009, 11:21 AM   #15
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Somehow you are not answering my question: is it a permanent thing? Is it across the board? No point in reiterating your frustration. Just answer me the goddamn question.
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Old March 6th, 2009, 11:41 AM   #16
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Would he actually know the answer to the question though?
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Old March 6th, 2009, 11:43 AM   #17
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i will also never fly with saa again. when i flew from perth to johannesburg, the entire section of economy class i was sitting in had to share and watch from one crappy little tv. also, we wer only informed once about how far we were from johannesburg and how much time till the destination. and as for the staff, theyre insanley stupid, they couldnt understand anything i said, and i couldnt understand a thing they said. they cant even put an act on, no class at all.
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Old March 6th, 2009, 12:07 PM   #18
Mo Rush
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Construction under way for IRT system

By Yamkela Xhaso
06 March

The implementation phase of the City of Cape Town’s Integrated Rapid Transit system has commenced along the R27.

Kylie Hatton form the City of Cape Town said that this is part of the first phase of the City’s implementation of the IRT, an integrated approach to the provision of public transport in Cape Town that will significantly change how people move around the city.

“What we are doing is that we are constructing tow lanes on the middle of the road”

The lanes will allow buses to move up and down.

The construction is estimated to be finished in March next year
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Old March 6th, 2009, 12:48 PM   #19
mike2005
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How am I meant to know the exact stats of the SAA fleet? All I can tell you is that it has been like that twice in a month and it was the same when my parents flew in January. And judging by the comment from the chap who flew from Perth it happens on other routes.

Sorry but it really is not good enough. No one in their right mind would fly SAA instead of Virgin/BA when you have a very good chnace on being on an aircraft with inflight entertainment that would have been out of date in the 1990s!!!
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Old March 6th, 2009, 02:25 PM   #20
Mo Rush
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Cape Town ready for 35,000 cyclists

March 06, 2009 Edition 1

Leila Samodien

A staggering 40 000 visitors are expected to arrive in Cape Town from today, with the city's hospitality, transport and cycling industries in overdrive to cope with the Cape Argus Pick n Pay Cycle Tour.

Only about 15 000 of the 35 000 Cycle Tour cyclists are actually from the Western Cape, and even fewer are from Cape Town.

Event organisers said 18 000 entrants were coming from upcountry to race, with most - about 11 500 - from Gauteng.

Just more than 2 000 were from other countries, including 900 from other African nations.

Most international riders, about 600, were from the UK.

The majority of participants are men; for every three men there is only one woman riding.

The city has meanwhile transformed into a cycling hub amid all the Cycle Tour excitement.

Deidre Hendricks, Airports Company South Africa (Acsa) spokeswoman at Cape Town International Airport, said she expected about 10 000 bicycles to be moved through the airport today and tomorrow.

Airlines were co-operating to ensure everything ran smoothly.

"We have a dedicated area where bikes can be collected."

Cycling shops have also reported a sharp increase in business, especially in the past few days.

Shane Jansen van Vuuren, of Bowman Cycles in the city centre, said the workshop had been booked up in advance for weeks. There had been far more sales than usual as well, he said.

"Today and tomorrow will be the craziest, though."

Lance Stephenson, co-owner of The Epic Bike Shop, said he single-handedly repaired and maintained 16 bicycles a day - more than double what he did in quieter months.

"We're inundated. We really can't even cope with any more walk-ins."

Business has also picked up at Cape Town hotels, especially those close to the race start at the Green Point Stadium.

"We're running at very high occupancies," said Protea Hotels brand communications manager Sandra Boome.

Cycle Tour Trust co-director David Bellairs anticipated the event would pump R400 million into the local economy.

Bellairs has also assured cyclists that Tour organisers were on full alert considering the blistering heat-wave here, with extra drinks stations planned.
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