Economic Insights on Francophone Africa - Page 4 - SkyscraperCity
 

forums map | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Continental Forums > Africa > General Forums > Business, Economy and Infrastructure

Business, Economy and Infrastructure Our architecture, infrastructure, transport, economy and other related discussions


Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old September 2nd, 2012, 08:13 PM   #61
Matthieu
Administrateur
 
Matthieu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Tarbes, the capital of the world
Posts: 16,197
Likes (Received): 7347

Quote:
Originally Posted by ngantsop View Post
Cardiopad: The First Live-Saving Tablet Made In Africa By A Cameroonian

A 24-year-old Cameroonian engineer has built the first fully touch screen medical tablet that could soon save many African lives. He first has to find the necessary funding to mass-produce the device.

In a country that has only 30 heart surgeons for more than 20 million people, the dream of Arthur Zang, a 24-year-old Cameroonian engineer, is to facilitate the treatment of patients with a heart disease across Cameroon.

Save lives
In 2010, he created a digital tablet known as Cardiopad: “It’s the first fully touch screen medical tablet made in Cameroon and in Africa. It’s an invention that could save numerous human lives”, explains Arthur Zang.

In fact, Cameroon’s thirty heart specialists are all based in either Douala or Yaoundé, the country’s economic and political capitals. Heart patients often have to travel across the country for a consultation.
Appointments sometimes must be made months in advance, leading to death of some patients.

Hassle of travelling
The Cardiopad solves this problem by enabling medical examinations to be performed remotely and the results transmitted electronically, saving patients the hassle of having to travel to the city.

Arthur Zang explains that the Cardiopad is above all a scientific project. He started his research three years ago and carried out several scientific tests that were validated by the Cameroonian scientific community. “The reliability of the Cardiopad is 97.5%”, he says.

Distance consultation
In practice, the Cardiopad is a device that can perform tests such as the electrocardiogram (ECG). The medical tablet also makes it possible to wirelessly send the results of the tests from remote locations to the specialist who will then interpret them.

“The tablet is used as a classical electrocardiograph device: electrodes are placed on the patient and connected to a module that, in turn, connects to the tablet. When a medical examination is performed on a patient in a remote village, for example, the results are transmitted from the nurse’s tablet to that of the doctor who then interprets them.

Digitalised and transmitted
Software built into the device allow the doctor to give computer assisted diagnosis”, explains the young engineer.

Pointing out the differences between the Cardiopad and the classical electrocardiograph, Arthur Zang explains: “The Cardiopad has more functions. With the classical electrocardiograph, the results were usually printed on paper and handed to the cardiologist for interpretation.

It wasn’t possible to send or save the results electronically. With the Cardiopad, the results are digitalised and transmitted. There is no need to print them, the heart surgeon can interpret them, even remotely, from his tablet and then send the diagnosis and prescribed treatment”

Accessibility
“The Cardiopad will cut down the cost of examination. We intend to sell the device for 1500 euros, while the current price for an electrocardiograph device is 3800 euros. If hospitals purchase the device at a low price, they will be able to lower the prices of medical examinations”, Arthur Zang hopes.

However, there is still the issue of energy, as many of the country’s remote regions do not have access to electricity. “The Cardiopad is equipped with a battery that can independently power the machine for more than seven hours”, the engineer assures.

He further explains that a prototype and sample of device is already available. “We are currently producing the first units of the device which will be available for hospitals before July”, says the young engineer who is still looking for funding to mass-produce the Cardiopad. “Besides the funding, I am also looking to start a company to help improve the medical care system in Cameroon”, he concludes.

Source: Radio Netherlands Worldwide
This might be an old thread and this might be bump but I find this very insteresting and it's really cool to see Africa becoming innovative.
__________________
"To erect a tall building is to proclaim one’s faith in the future, the skyline is a seismograph of optimism."
Jean Nouvel
Matthieu no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old October 7th, 2012, 04:23 PM   #62
Hadrami
*Free Agent*
 
Hadrami's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 9,380
Likes (Received): 3424

Quote:
Telecom: Airtel announces new appointments to bolster Francophone operations
07/10/2012

Nairobi- Telecom company, Airtel Africa, on Friday announced the appointments of Louis Lubala and Antoine Pamboro as the new managing directors of its operations in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Gabon respectively.

The new development sees the two Airtel top executives take leadership roles in two African nations with diverse potential in the telecommunications sector, a statement from Airtel said.

Gabon has one of the highest teledensity statistics at over a 100 per cent whilst DRC, the second largest country in Africa by area, has an approximated 25 per cent penetration.

Mr. Tiemoko Coulibaly, CEO (Francophone Africa), Bharti Airtel, was quoted as saying: “These appointments are a clear indication of our commitment to appreciate and tap into the deep reservoir of management skills of the blue chip executive pool in Africa.

'Mr. Luballa and Mr. Pambaro have the requisite experience and leadership skills to successfully steer our top francophone operations.”

Mr. Coulibaly added that both executives would bring different perspectives to two of Africa’s most dynamic telecommunications markets.


source: Pana
...
__________________
"Les faits sont têtus" - Paul Kagame(Apr 7, 2014)

check out:The African Sahel thread
Hadrami no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 8th, 2012, 12:06 AM   #63
SUNS 25
P.E. Aubameyang
 
SUNS 25's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Libreville
Posts: 5,931
Likes (Received): 875

Nkok: Capital Industrial Gabon.

__________________
Quote:
Nothing great is accomplished in the world without passion. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
SUNS 25 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old December 16th, 2012, 03:20 PM   #64
Hadrami
*Free Agent*
 
Hadrami's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 9,380
Likes (Received): 3424

Quote:
Gabon: Une mauritanienne chargée d'établir une stratégie de bonne gouvernance
16-12-2012



Après le Mali, la Côte d’Ivoire, le Sénégal, le Burkina Faso et la Guinée Conakry, l’agence de communication Swahifri Consulting s’implante au Gabon.] La mauritanienne Aissata Kane, qui dirige Swahifri Consulting, a été chargée par la direction générale des contrôleurs, des ressources et des charges publiques (DGCRCP) du Ministère du Budget gabonais d'établir une stratégie de communication et de bonne gouvernance pour l'année 2013.

Cette campagne qui sera lancée au début du mois de janvier rentre dans le cadre du projet " Plan stratégique Gabon émergent (PSGE) 2025 " lancé par le président gabonais Ali Bongo Ondimba. Cette stratégie de développement consiste à mettre en œuvre une stratégie dont le ressort est la valorisation du potentiel en ressources humaines, naturelles et minéralières du Gabon.

La stratégie de communication et de bonne gouvernance sera marquée par l’organisation de projections, de débats, de forums, de sketches, de rencontres avec la chambre de commerce, le patronat et les opérateurs économiques.

Cette campagne de sensibilisation sera soutenue par des commissions qui sillonneront tout le Gabon pour rencontrer également les populations afin de les informer sur les nouvelles orientations des autorités gabonaises en matière de bonne gouvernance.


source: Babacar Baye Ndiaye pour Cridem
...
__________________
"Les faits sont têtus" - Paul Kagame(Apr 7, 2014)

check out:The African Sahel thread
Hadrami no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 10th, 2013, 10:14 PM   #65
Hadrami
*Free Agent*
 
Hadrami's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 9,380
Likes (Received): 3424

Quote:
Bien-vivre: Abidjan et Dakar, les grandes rivales d'Afrique de l'Ouest
Samedi 5 Janvier 2013


Depuis des décennies, les deux plus grandes villes d’Afrique de l’Ouest francophone se livrent une compétition féroce pour la suprématie régionale. Qui va l’emporter?



Le centre d'affaires d'Abidjan, le quartier du Plateau


«Dakar ne peut pas se comparer à vous, même dans ses rêves», s’exclame une jeune Togolaise, alors qu’elle salue des Abidjanais sur la lagune Ebrié (lagune qui traverse Abidjan, en partant du Golfe de Guinée).

Le Plateau, le centre d’Abidjan, la capitale économique de la Côte d’Ivoire, l’impressionne avec ses grands immeubles qui s’élèvent au dessus des eaux paisibles de la lagune.

Ces grandes avenues ombragées de flamboyants, ces vastes ponts qui enjambent la lagune, ces échangeurs et ces autoroutes. A Abidjan, les bétonneurs ont bien travaillé, à commencer par Bouygues qui a fait de très belles affaires, à l’époque du développement accéléré de la Côte d’Ivoire, dans les années 80.

Dakar qui ne pourrait pas se comparer à Abidjan? La jeune Togolaise pense flatter ses hôtes, mais cette remarque ne lui attire que des sourires polis. Désormais, les Abidjanais savent que leur ville est concurrencée par Dakar.

Il y a une décennie à peine, aucune cité d’Afrique francophone n’osait entrer en compétition avec Abidjan, la ville qualifiée par les Ivoiriens de «petit Paris», mais les temps ont changé.


Abidjan, l'ancien eldorado
Dans les années quatre-vingt près de 100.000 Français vivaient à Abidjan. La Côte d’Ivoire faisait alors figure de grande puissance économique de l’Afrique de l’Ouest. Félix Houphouët-Boigny, président de 1960 à 1993, était l’initiateur d’un miracle économique: grâce au café et au cacao, son pays a connu une croissance soutenue, pendant près de trente ans.

Abidjan était devenue une capitale moderne, avec de larges boulevards à l’image de celui qui porte le nom de l’ex-président français, Valéry Giscard d’Estaing.

A l’heure de sa splendeur des années quatre-vingt, l’hôtel Ivoire possédait même une patinoire qui faisait fantasmer l’Afrique de l’Ouest. Mais cette belle image s’est fissurée avec la décennie de guerre.

Pendant près de dix ans, la Côte d’Ivoire a été coupée en deux à partir de la tentative de coup d’Etat de 2002. La plupart des multinationales qui avaient leur siège Afrique de l’Ouest à Abidjan, l’ont déplacé à Dakar. Il en a été de même pour un grand nombre d’ONG ou d’organismes internationaux.

Ces institutions ont déménagé à Dakar au début de la précédente décennie. C’est l’une des explications de l’envolée des loyers à Dakar
; un appartement du Plateau (centre-ville) peut se louer 2.000 euros par mois; des tarifs n’ayant presque rien à envier à ceux pratiqués à Paris, alors même que certaines rues du Plateau sont particulièrement décaties.

Des trottoirs défoncés, des murs lépreux, des gravats dans les rues, le Plateau de Dakar surprend les nouveaux venus au Sénégal, qui s’attendent à découvrir un quartier en meilleur état.


Dakar, la nouvelle coqueluche
Malgré le piètre état du Plateau, bien souvent abandonné par la bourgeoisie sénégalaise au profit de la Corniche, Dakar embellit.

Même l’écrivain ivoirien Venance Konan reconnaît que Dakar a pris un coup d’avance sur Abidjan:
«Qu’ont fait les Sénégalais de leur bord de mer? La corniche de Dakar est tout simplement un ravissement. Bien aménagée, bien propre, bordée de belles maisons, de beaux monuments et de grands hôtels, elle est le lieu de récréation et d’oxygénation le plus prisé des Dakarois. C’est tout simplement un bonheur de se promener sur cette corniche, en voiture ou à pied. Qu’avons-nous fait de notre bord de mer, nous, Ivoiriens? Des cloaques, des toilettes publiques à ciel ouvert, des coupe-gorges.»

Il est vrai que le régime d’Abdoulaye Wade au pouvoir de 2000 à 2012 a réalisé des investissements massifs (des dizaines de millions d’euros) dans l’aménagement des bords de mer.

A elle seule, la statue de la Renaissance, plus haute que la statue de la liberté, a coûté des dizaines de millions d’euros. Des échangeurs ont vu le jour un peu partout à Dakar. La capitale sénégalaise possède désormais une autoroute payante.

Le président Léopold Sedar Senghor (au pouvoir de 1960 à 1980) avait promis qu’en 2000 Dakar serait comme Paris. Le président poète avait sans doute fait preuve d’un excès d’optimisme, mais Dakar se modernise indéniablement.

L’hôtellerie de luxe a connu un développement spectaculaire au cours de la dernière décennie. Dakar est ainsi l’une des villes du continent qui accueille le plus de congrès internationaux. Des hôtels tels que le Radisson de la Corniche ont vu récemment le jour; leur architecture élégante et novatrice attire une clientèle fortunée.

Autre atout de la capitale sénégalaise, elle dispose de bons hôpitaux et d’établissements scolaires de qualité. «Je travaille essentiellement avec le Nigeria, mais j’ai préféré m’installer à Dakar, ainsi ma famille vit en sécurité, avec de bons hôpitaux», explique un expatrié américain qui vit à Dakar, depuis plusieurs années et se félicite de ce choix, même s’il doit prendre l’avion pour Lagos (capitale économique du Nigeria) presque chaque semaine.

La crise ivoirienne a déteint sur la lagune
Mais Abidjan aussi possède de bons hôtels et des établissements scolaires de qualité. La vraie différence, c’est que Dakar apparaît comme un pôle de stabilité. Le pays de la Téranga (tradition d’accueil) n’a jamais subi de coup d’Etat.

Le Sénégal a connu deux alternances pacifiques. Ce pays a toujours été considéré comme un modèle démocratique, peu de nations d’Afrique francophone peuvent en dire autant. «A Dakar, on peut se balader à pied la nuit, sans craindre les violences, même s’il y a davantage d’agression qu’il y a dix ans», explique Alassane, un enseignant sénégalais, qui a perdu des parents en Côte d’Ivoire, en avril 2012, au moment de la chute de Laurent Gbagbo.

A Abidjan, la situation sécuritaire est loin d’être réglée. La nuit, les barrages sont fréquents. Si vous êtes étranger, les policiers et les militaires commencent à vous demander votre passeport, puis votre… carnet de vaccination. Même si vous êtes en règle et si vous possédez l’ensemble de ces documents, cela ne les dissuadera pas, dans bien des cas, de vous demander de l’argent.

«On aime faire la fête à Abidjan, mais on sort de moins en moins ou alors on reste dans notre quartier, on en a marre d’être rackettés», s’exclame Alain, un jeune fonctionnaire ivoirien, croisé dans un maquis de Yopougon, quartier d’Abidjan, longtemps resté fidèle à Laurent Gbagbo. Signe des temps, les maquis de la célèbre rue Princesse, celle où les Abidjanais aimaient venir faire la fête à Yopougon, ont été rasés par le nouveau régime.

«L’ambiance n’est pas encore à la fête à Abidjan. Même si tout le monde fait semblant de s’aimer désormais. Dans les têtes, nous sommes toujours en guerre», confie Christophe, un habitant de Yopougon, qui reste persuadé que Laurent Gbagbo est le vainqueur de la présidentielle de 2011.

Estelle, une autre habitante de Yopougon s’énerve contre les gens du Nord.«Au marché, ils veulent nous forcer à parler leur langue, le dioula. Alors que nous on s’exprime en français. On ne leur impose pas nos langues, pourquoi veulent-ils nous forcer à parler la leur?»

Aux conflits politiques et ethniques s’ajoutent les problèmes d’insécurité.
«De nombreux militaires démobilisés sont devenus des criminels, les cambriolages qui se terminent en tuerie ne sont pas rares», affirme Stéphane, un commerçant de Yopougon.

Pareille psychose ne règne pas à Dakar. Les tensions ethniques n’ont jamais pris cette ampleur et la criminalité reste limitée. Au cours des dernières années, Dakar a accueilli une forte diaspora ivoirienne et malienne.

Les crises qui se multiplient en Afrique de l’Ouest vont sans doute rendre plus essentiel que jamais son rôle de havre de paix. Autre avantage de Dakar, le climat. «Moins chaud et humide qu’à Abidjan, le climat est plus sahélien. Du coup le paludisme reste moins virulent qu’à Abidjan», explique Marie-Claire, une Française installée à Dakar, après avoir longtemps vécu en Côte d’Ivoire.


Dakar cherche encore les atouts économiques de sa voisine

Le développement du port autonome de Dakar marque des points pour la capitale sénégalaise, qui tente ainsi de mettre à mal le monopole friable du port d'Abidjan

Pourtant Dakar reste loin d’avoir le même potentiel économique d’Abidjan. Le Sénégal ne possède ni pétrole ni café ni cacao. Le Sénégal est moins peuplé que la Côte d’Ivoire: 13 millions d’habitants contre 18 millions. La Côte d’Ivoire représente à elle seule 40% du PIB de l’Uemoa (Union économique et monétaire d’Afrique de l’Ouest).

Malgré une décennie de développement accéléré, Dakar possède moins d’infrastructures qu’Abidjan.
Dès que la situation politique sera stabilisée à Abidjan, nombre d’opérateurs économiques installés à Dakar feront sans doute leurs valises et retourneront sur la lagune Ebrié.

Abidjan redeviendra-t-elle la «perle de la lagune»? L’éclat de Dakar sera-t-il moins grand? La mairie de Dakar vient d’organiser, ce 31 décembre, «le plus grand feu d’artifice» que la ville «ait jamais connu» pour marquer le passage du nouvel an. Abidjan voulait aussi profiter du feu d’artifice de la nouvelle année pour prendre un nouveau départ, mais la cérémonie s’est terminée en tragédie, plus de soixante spectateurs sont morts dans des bousculades. Encore et toujours, les deux perles de l’Afrique de l’Ouest francophone sont comparées.

Mais pourquoi les deux grandes villes d’Afrique de l’Ouest francophone seraient-elles d’éternelles rivales? Au fond, elles pourraient très bien devenir complémentaires. Après tout l’Afrique de l’Ouest tourmentée ne dispose pas de suffisamment de havres de paix.

«Plutôt que de se dire que quand ça va mal pour Abidjan, c’est bon pour Dakar, on devrait penser le contraire, analyse Assane, un enseignant sénégalais. Si la Côte d’Ivoire redécolle c’est une bonne chose pour toute l’Afrique de l’ouest, en particulier pour le Sénégal. Qu’on le veuille ou non, nos destins sont liés pour le meilleur et pour le pire.»


source: Slateafrique

Nice article on Abidjan & Dakar. The ''old eldorado'' vs the ''haven of peace''.
__________________
"Les faits sont têtus" - Paul Kagame(Apr 7, 2014)

check out:The African Sahel thread
Hadrami no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 10th, 2013, 10:16 PM   #66
Hadrami
*Free Agent*
 
Hadrami's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 9,380
Likes (Received): 3424

Quote:
Développement: L'envol économique de l'Afrique, un leurre ?
10 Janvier 2013


Des taux de croissance élevés et l’augmentation de l’investissement étranger en Afrique laissent entendre au grand public que le continent serait en passe de devenir le prochain moteur économique mondial. Cette idée d’une «Afrique émergente» a surtout été mise en avant dans de récents articles en couverture des magazines Time et The Economist. Pourtant, ces deux publications font une analyse erronée des perspectives de développement économique de l’Afrique —et les raisons de leur erreur en disent beaucoup sur la manière problématique dont nous appréhendons le développement économique des pays, à l’ère de la mondialisation.





Les deux articles ont recours à des indicateurs inutiles pour évaluer le développement économique de l’Afrique. Ils brandissent la récente croissance élevée du PIB africain, l'augmentation du revenu par habitant et l'explosion des téléphones portables et des services bancaires par téléphone comme preuves que l’Afrique se «développe.»


Critères de développement biaisés
Le Time évoque la croissance dans des secteurs comme le tourisme, le commerce de détail et la banque, et cite des pays qui viennent de découvrir de nouveaux gisements de pétrole et de gaz. The Economist souligne l’augmentation du nombre de milliardaires africains et du commerce entre l'Afrique et le reste du monde.

Mais, ces indicateurs ne donnent qu'une image partielle de la bonne santé du développement —en tout cas, dans le sens qui lui est donné depuis quelques siècles. De l’Angleterre de la fin du XVe siècle jusqu’aux Tigres asiatiques de plus récente renommée, le développement est généralement compris comme un synonyme d'«industrialisation».

Les pays riches ont compris depuis longtemps que si l’économie ne sort pas des activités-impasses qui ne font que perdre en rentabilité avec le temps (principalement l’agriculture et les activités extractives comme l’exploitation minière, du bois et la pêche) pour s’orienter vers des activités de plus en plus rentables (l’industrie de transformation et les services), alors on ne peut pas vraiment parler de développement.

Ce qui est frappant dans les deux articles cités ci-dessus, c’est qu’ils ne mentionnent ni le secteur secondaire, ni même sa troublante absence en Afrique. Ce qui confirme une fois encore à quel point l’idée d’industrialisation comme signe de développement a été totalement abandonnée au cours des dernières décennies.

Les sciences économiques prônant le libre échange en sont venues à conseiller aux pays pauvres de se cantonner à leurs secteurs primaires de l’agriculture et des activités extractives et de «s’intégrer» tels quels dans l’économie mondiale.

Aujourd’hui, pour de nombreux défenseurs du libre échange, la seule augmentation du PIB et une augmentation des volumes des transactions commerciales sont synonymes de bon développement économique. Mais augmentation de la croissance et du commerce et développement, ce n’est pas la même chose.

Par exemple, même si un pays africain comme le Malawi voit augmenter son PIB et ses volumes d’échanges commerciaux, cela ne veut pas dire que la part de l’industrie et des services dans le PIB a augmenté.

Le Malawi a pu voir ses exportations et ses profits augmenter grâce à ses ventes de thé, de tabac et de café sur les marchés mondiaux, il n’en reste pas moins une économie largement primaire qui ne se dirige que très peu vers une intensification de l’industrialisation ou la création d’emplois à forte main-d’œuvre, nécessaires pour que l’Afrique se mette à «émerger».

Ainsi, ne pas mentionner l’industrialisation fausse la plupart des comparaisons entre la croissance de l’Afrique et de l’Est asiatique. Par exemple, l’article du Time, qui suggère que «au cours des quelques décennies qui s’annoncent, des centaines de millions d’Africains vont probablement être tirés de la misère, tout comme des centaines de millions d’Asiatiques l’ont été au cours de ces dernières décennies», cite le fossé qui s’est ouvert entre riches et pauvres en Chine et en Inde pour prévenir que les inégalités pourraient aussi poser un problème à mesure que l’Afrique progresse.

L’article de The Economist évoque, quant à lui, un rapport de la Banque mondiale exposant que «L’Afrique pourrait être au bord d’un décollage économique, tout comme la Chine il y a trente ans,» notant que, dans les deux cas, une population massive de jeunes travailleurs était immédiatement disponible pour dynamiser la croissance.

Il évoque aussi l’importance de l’éducation:

«Sans une meilleure éducation, l’Afrique ne peut espérer imiter le miracle asiatique.»


Une industrailisation poussive
Il existe naturellement plusieurs indicateurs offrant une image plus précise du développement, ou pas, de l’Afrique. On peut regarder si la part du secteur industriel dans le PIB a pris de l’ampleur ou si la valeur ajoutée manufacturière (VAM) des exportations a augmenté.

Dans ces cas-là, la comparaison entre Afrique et Est asiatique est réellement révélatrice—comme le montre un récent rapport de l’ONU qui décrit une image bien moins flatteuse des perspectives de développement de l’Afrique.

Ce rapport révèle que, malgré certaines améliorations dans quelques pays, la majorité des pays africains stagnent ou régressent en termes d’industrialisation.

La part de la VAM dans le PIB africain est tombée de 12,8%, en 2000, à 10,5% en 2008, tandis que dans l’Asie en plein développement, elle est passée de 22% à 35% sur la même période.

On a également assisté au déclin de l’importance des biens manufacturés dans les exportations africaines, dont la part dans les exportations totales de l’Afrique est tombée de 43% en 2000 à 39% en 2008.

En termes de croissance industrielle, si la plupart ont stagné, 23 pays africains ont connu une croissance négative de la VAM par habitant pendant la période 1990-2010, et seulement cinq pays ont réussi à connaître une croissance de la VAM par habitant supérieure à 4%.

Le rapport révèle aussi que la part de l’Afrique reste marginale en termes de commerce mondial des produits manufacturés. Sa part de la VAM mondiale est même passée d’un déjà dérisoire 1,2% en 2000 à 1,1% en 2008, tandis que celle de l’Asie en développement a augmenté de 13% à 25% sur la même période. La part africaine des exportations mondiales de produits manufacturés est passée de 1% en 2000 à seulement 1,3% en 2008.

L’Afrique perd aussi du terrain dans le secteur manufacturier à fort besoin de main d’œuvre: sa part d’activités peu technologiques dans la VAM est tombée de 23% en 2000 à 20% en 2008, et la part des exportations de produits manufacturés peu technologiques dans le nombre total des exportations de bien manufacturés africains a dégringolé de 25% en 2000 à 18% en 2008.

Enfin, l’Afrique reste lourdement dépendante des industries d’exploitation des ressources naturelles, ce qui indique à la fois son faible niveau de diversification économique et le faible niveau de sophistication technologique de sa production.

La part des produits manufacturés basés sur les ressources dans les exportations totales de produits manufacturés africains n’a que faiblement réduit ces dernières années, pour passer de 52% en 2000 à 49% en 2008. Dans l’Est asiatique et le Pacifique, ce chiffre est tombé à 13% en 2008.

De telles statistiques et comparaisons avec l’Est asiatique ne cadrent naturellement pas du tout avec la version admise d’une «Afrique émergente.»

Un récent rapport de la Banque africaine de développement arrive à la même conclusion.

«La croissance de l'Afrique semble se concentrer sur une gamme limitée de matières premières et sur les industries minières, peut-on y lire. Ces secteurs ne génèrent pas les opportunités d’emploi qui permettraient à la majorité de la population d’en partager les bénéfices. Ce phénomène tranche de façon très contrastée avec l’expérience asiatique, où la croissance du secteur industriel à fort besoin de main-d'œuvre a contribué à sortir des millions de personnes de la pauvreté...»

Le rapport continue en soulignant que «promouvoir une croissance globale signifie... élargir la base économique au-delà des industries minières et d’une poignée de matières premières du secteur primaire.»

Cet argument n’a pas échappé au candidat présidentiel ghanéen Nana Akufo-Addo, qui avertit:

«Il y a une trentaine d’années, certaines nations africaines, à commencer par le Ghana et l'Ouganda, ont mis en place des réformes libérales pour contenir leur déclin économique. Mais dans de nombreux cas nous avons ouvert nos marchés à la compétition mondiale alors qu’au-delà des industries minières, nous n’avions rien pour rivaliser. Alors si la part des projets d’investissements directs à l’étranger du continent a constamment augmenté au cours des dix dernières années, une grande partie de cet investissement n’a fait qu’accentuer les déficits structurels de nos économies.»

Aujourd’hui, de nombreux pays africains ont besoin de politiques industrielles, comme des mesures protectionnistes temporaires, des crédits subventionnés dans les domaines technologique et de l’innovation, s’il veulent voir leur secteur secondaire décoller un jour.

C’est vrai pour les mêmes raisons que cela le fut pour le Royaume-Uni et les autres nations qui ont réussi leur industrialisation. Mais, selon, l’idéologie dominante actuelle prônant le libre-échange et le libre-marché, beaucoup de ces politiques cruciales sont condamnées comme étant de «mauvaises interventions de l’Etat».

Les donateurs bilatéraux et multilatéraux y sont opposés (et structurent leurs conditions de prêt en conséquence). Les accords de l'OMC et les nouveaux accords régionaux de libre échange (ALE), tout comme les traités bilatéraux d'investissement (TBI) entre pays riches et pays pauvres les interdisent fréquemment.

Les détracteurs des politiques industrielles citent à raison des cas historiques où celles-ci ont raté leur coup dans des pays en développement. Mais ils ont aussi souvent la critique sélective, choisissant d’ignorer les cas de réussite et omettant d’expliquer pourquoi ces politiques industrielles ont si bien marché aux Etats-Unis, en Europe et dans l’Est asiatique tout en échouant si lamentablement en Afrique et ailleurs.

Des années 1950 aux années 1970, tout particulièrement en Afrique et en Amérique Latine, beaucoup de politiques industrielles ont échoué parce qu’elles étaient utilisées à mauvais escient, mal organisées, et souvent dominées par des intérêts politiques ou la corruption plutôt que par des analyses économiques ou sur une stricte base d’efficacité.

En Amérique latine, très souvent les politiques industrielles sont restées trop longtemps en place et étaient trop concentrées sur de petits marchés internes, négligeant le besoin de développer la compétitivité internationale.

En revanche, les institutions politiques et économiques des pays est-asiatiques avaient tendance à faire appliquer des règles plus strictes pour les subventions aux industries et les mesures protectionnistes, dont elles se voyaient privées quand elles échouaient à atteindre leurs objectifs de performance.

Leurs stratégies d’industrialisation avaient également adopté une approche plus ouverte sur l’extérieur.


Un chômage toujours rampant
Ce qui importe, c’est que cette histoire en dit plus sur la manière dont les politiques industrielles doivent être mises en place qu’elle ne pose la question de savoir si elles doivent l’être.

Mais certains pays se rebellent de plus en plus contre ce genre de contraintes. Des coalitions de pays en développement à l’intérieur de l’OMC, comme le G33 et l'AMNA 11, demandent plus de temps pour mettre en place la libéralisation de leur commerce et d’avantage d’exonérations pour pouvoir augmenter leurs droits de douane quand leur agriculture nationale ou leur industrie manufacturière est menacée par des afflux d’importations meilleur marché.

Ce problème du manque «d'espace politique» nécessaire a été souligné dans un récent rapport de l’Africa Progress Panel, présidé par l’ancien secrétaire général de l’ONU Kofi Annan.

Le Panel fait part de ses inquiétudes au sujet de l’Accord de partenariat économique (APE) proposé par l’Union européenne, qui vise à soumettre l’accès des produits africains aux marchés de l’Union européenne à la condition que l’Afrique élimine ou réduise les droits de douane de 80% des importations issues de l’Union européenne.

Le rapport suggère que cela serait hautement nuisible pour les industries nationales.

Si les pays africains ont désespérément besoin d’espace politique pour pouvoir adopter des politiques industrielles, les pays riches imposent des conditions de prêts et des accords commerciaux et d’investissement qui les en empêchent, tout en glosant joyeusement sur «l’émergence de l’Afrique».

L’idée même d’industrialisation a tout bonnement disparu du programme officiel de développement. Et pourtant, si nous continuons tous à nous référer régulièrement aux pays riches de l’OCDE comme à des pays «industrialisés», il y a une raison.

Malgré des gains importants dans l’industrie des services et le domaine du revenu par habitant, l’Afrique n’est toujours pas en train d’émerger, et les services ne suffiront pas à eux seuls à créer suffisamment d’emplois pour absorber les millions de jeunes chômeurs des zones urbaines en plein développement d’Afrique.

A la place, il faut prendre des mesures pour réviser les accords de l’OMC et les nombreux accords commerciaux et traités d’investissements bilatéraux en cours de négociation pour que l’Afrique ait la liberté d’adopter les politiques industrielles qui lui sont nécessaires pour faire de vrais progrès.


Rick Rowden (Foreign policy)
Traduit par Bérengère Viennot
Pour slateafrique.com

The economic boom of Africa, an illusion?
__________________
"Les faits sont têtus" - Paul Kagame(Apr 7, 2014)

check out:The African Sahel thread
Hadrami no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 10th, 2013, 10:17 PM   #67
HerachioBlo
Registered User
 
HerachioBlo's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 12,148
Likes (Received): 5059

translation nko?
__________________
Invest in You.
HerachioBlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 10th, 2013, 10:24 PM   #68
Hadrami
*Free Agent*
 
Hadrami's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 9,380
Likes (Received): 3424

Quote:
Originally Posted by HerachioBlo View Post
translation nko?
Quote:
Rick Rowden: The myth of Africa's rise
01/07/2013


Recent high growth rates and increased foreign investment in Africa have given rise to the popular idea that the continent may well be on track to become the next global economic powerhouse. This "Africa Rising" narrative has been most prominently presented in recent cover stories by Time Magazine and The Economist. Yet both publications are wrong in their analysis of Africa's developmental prospects -- and the reasons they're wrong speak volumes about the problematic way national economic development has come to be understood in the age of globalization.






Both articles use unhelpful indicators to gauge Africa's development. They looked to Africa's recent high GDP growth rates, rising per capita incomes and the explosive growth of mobile phones and mobile phone banking as evidence that Africa is "developing." Time referred to the growth in sectors such as tourism, retail and banking, and also cited countries with new discoveries of oil and gas reserves. The Economist pointed to the growth in the number of African billionaires and the increase in Africa's trade with the rest of the world.

But these indicators only give a partial picture of how well development is going -- at least as the term has been understood over the last few centuries. From late 15th century England all the way up to the East Asian Tigers of recent renown, development has generally been taken as a synonym for "industrialization." Rich countries figured out long ago, if economies are not
moving out of dead-end activities that only provide diminishing returns over time (primary agriculture and extractive activities such as mining, logging, and fisheries), and into activities that provide increasing returns over time (manufacturing and services), then you can't really say they are developing.

What's striking about the two articles cited above is that they don't mention manufacturing, or its disturbing absence, in Africa. And that, in turn, confirms once again the extent to which the idea of development as industrialization has been completely abandoned in the last few decades. Free market economics has come to advise poor countries to stick with their current primary agriculture and extractives industries and "integrate" into the global economy as they are. Today, for many champions of free markets, the mere presence of GDP growth and an increase in trade volumes are euphemisms for successful economic development. But increased growth and trade are not development.

For example, even if an African country like Malawi achieves higher GDP growth rates and increased trade volumes, this doesn't mean that manufacturing and services as a percent of GDP have increased over time. Malawi may have earned higher export earnings for tea, tobacco and coffee on world markets and increased exports, but it is still largely a primary agricultural economy with little movement towards the increased manufacturing or labor-intensive job creation that are needed for Africa to "rise."

The failure to mention industrialization thus renders most comparisons of growth in Africa and East Asia spurious. For example, the Time article, which suggests that, "during the next few decades hundreds of millions of Africans will likely be lifted out of poverty, just as hundreds of millions of Asians were in the past few decades," cites the divide that has opened up between rich and poor in China and India as a warning that inequality could also become a problem as Africa's progress continues. The Economist article cited a World Bank report that claims that "Africa could be on the brink of an economic take-off, much like China was 30 years ago," noting that, in both cases, a mass population of young workers stood at the ready to boost growth. It also touched on the importance of education: "Without better education, Africa cannot hope to emulate the Asian miracle."

There are, of course, several indicators that offer a more precise picture of how well Africa is developing (or not). We can look at whether manufacturing has been increasing as a percentage of GDP, or whether the manufacturing value added (MVA) of exports has been rising. In these cases the comparison between Africa and East Asia is actually quite revealing -- as demonstrated by a recent U.N. report that paints a far less flattering picture of Africa's development prospects.

It finds that, despite some improvements in a few countries, the bulk of African countries are either stagnating or moving backwards when it comes to industrialization. The share of MVA in Africa's GDP fell from 12.8 percent in 2000 to 10.5 percent in 2008, while in developing Asia it rose from 22 percent to 35 percent over the same period. There has also been a decline in the importance of manufacturing in Africa's exports, with the share of manufactures in Africa's total exports having fallen from 43 percent in 2000 to 39 percent in 2008. In terms of manufacturing growth, while most have stagnated, 23 African countries had negative MVA per capita growth during the period 1990 - 2010, and only five countries achieved an MVA per capita growth above 4 percent.

The report also finds that Africa remains marginal in global manufacturing trade. Its share of global MVA has actually fallen from an already paltry 1.2 percent in 2000 to 1.1 percent in 2008, while developing Asia's share rose from 13 percent to 25 percent over the same period. In terms of exports, Africa's share of global manufacturing exports rose from 1 percent in 2000 to only 1.3 percent in 2008. Africa is also losing ground in labor-intensive manufacturing: Its share of low-technology manufacturing activities in MVA fell from 23 percent in 2000 to 20 percent in 2008, and the share of low-technology manufacturing exports in Africa's total manufacturing exports dropped from 25 percent in 2000 to 18 percent in 2008. Finally, Africa remains heavily dependent on natural resources-based manufacturing, which is an indication of both its low level of economic diversification and low level of technological sophistication in production. The share of resource-based manufactures in Africa's total manufacturing exports declined only slightly in recent years, from 52 percent in 2000 to 49 percent by 2008. In East Asia and the Pacific, the number dropped to as low as 13 percent by 2008.

Such statistics and comparisons with East Asia are, of course, completely at odds with the "Africa rising" narrative.

A recent report by the African Development Bank, makes a similar point. "Africa's growth tends to be concentrated on a limited range of commodities and the extractive industries," the report states. "These sectors are not generating the employment opportunities that would allow the majority of the population to share in the benefits. This is in marked contrast to the Asian experience, where the growth of labor-intensive manufacturing has helped lift millions of people out of poverty ... " The report goes on to note that " 1/8p 3/8romoting inclusive growth means ... broadening the economic base beyond the extractive industries and a handful of primary commodities."

This point was also not lost on recent Ghanaian presidential candidate, Nana Akufo-Addo, who warned: "About 30 years ago, some African nations, beginning with Ghana and Uganda, implemented liberal economic reforms to stop their economic decline. But in many cases we opened our markets to global competition when, beyond the extractive industries, we had nothing to compete with. So while the continent's share of global foreign direct investment projects has improved steadily over the past decade, much of this investment has reinforced the structural deficits of our economies."

Today many African countries need to use industrial policies, such as temporary trade protection, subsidized credit and publically supported R&D with technology and innovation policies, if they are ever to get their manufacturing sectors off the ground. This is true for all the same reasons that it was true for the U.K. and other nations that have industrialized successfully. According to today's ideology of free trade and free markets, however, many of these key policies are condemned as "bad government intervention." Bilateral and multilateral aid donors advise against them (and structure loan conditions accordingly). WTO agreements and new regional free trade agreements (FTAs), as well as bilateral investment treaties (BITs) between rich and poor countries, frequently outlaw them.

Critics of industrial policies are correct to cite some historical cases where industrial policies have misfired in developing countries. But these critics are often selective in their criticisms, ignoring successful cases and neglecting to explain why industrial policies worked so well in the United States, Europe and East Asia while failing so badly in Africa and elsewhere.

From the 1950s to the 1970s, particularly in Africa and Latin America, many industrial policies failed because they were used inappropriately, with poor sequencing, and were often driven by political considerations or corruption rather than economic analyses or strict efficiency grounds. In Latin America, often the industrial policies were kept in place too long, and were too inwardly focused on small domestic markets, neglecting the need to develop international competitiveness. In contrast, the political economies of East Asian countries included institutions that tended to enforce stricter rules for which industries got subsidies and trade protection, and which got cut off from them when they failed to meet performance targets. They also adopted a more outward orientation in their industrialisation strategies. Crucially, this history says more about how industrial policies should be implemented -- not if they should be implemented at all.

But some nations are increasingly rebelling against such constraints. Coalitions of developing countries within the WTO, such as the G33 and NAMA 11 , are asking for more time to implement trade liberalization and for broader exemptions to increase tariffs when their domestic agriculture or manufacturing industries are threatened by floods of cheaper imports. This problem of the lack of necessary "policy space" was noted in a recent report by the Africa Progress Panel, chaired by former UN Secretary General Kofi Annan. The Panel expresses concerns about the European Union's proposed Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs), which seek to make access for African goods into European Union markets conditional on Africa eliminating or lowering tariffs on 80 percent of imports from the European Union. The report suggests that this would be highly damaging to domestic industries.

Though African countries desperately need the policy space to adopt industrial policies, the rich countries are pushing loan conditions and trade and investment agreements that block them from doing so, all the while proffering a happy narrative about "the rise of Africa." The very idea of industrialization has been dropped from the official development agenda. Yet there's a reason why we all regularly refer to the rich, industrialized countries in the OECD as "industrialized."

Despite the important gains in services industries and per capita incomes, Africa is still not rising, and services alone will not create enough jobs to absorb the millions of unemployed youth in Africa's growing urban areas. Instead, steps must be taken to revise WTO agreements and the many trade agreements and bilateral investment treaties currently being negotiated so that Africa has the freedom to adopt the industrial policies it needs in order to make genuine progress.
...
__________________
"Les faits sont têtus" - Paul Kagame(Apr 7, 2014)

check out:The African Sahel thread
Hadrami no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 3rd, 2013, 01:58 PM   #69
Hadrami
*Free Agent*
 
Hadrami's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 9,380
Likes (Received): 3424

Quote:
Plans afoot to build Chad-Cameroon railway line
March 2, 2013


The section between Ngaoundere in Cameroon and Moundou in Chad which is about 400 km long is expected to cost 1160 billion CFA francs.

Officials from both countries are currently engaged in discussions to reconcile their views in line with the commitments made a few months ago by heads of states of the two countries; Paul Biya (Cameroon) and Idriss Deby Itno (Chad).

The technical partner CAMRAIL has already put in place the extension program submitted for the approval of the governments of the two countries.

The Chad-Cameroon railway line will make easier the movement of persons and goods from both countries and be highly beneficial for landlocked Chad.

Besides some 80 percent of Chadian exports and imports pass through Douala port while Chadian crude oil passes through Kribi terminal.


source: APA
...
__________________
"Les faits sont têtus" - Paul Kagame(Apr 7, 2014)

check out:The African Sahel thread

popa1980 liked this post
Hadrami no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 6th, 2013, 09:55 PM   #70
Hadrami
*Free Agent*
 
Hadrami's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 9,380
Likes (Received): 3424

West African Rating Agency, c'est le nom de la nouvelle agence de notation africaine installée en Côte d'Ivoire. Avec Bloomfield Investment Corporation, également basée à Abidjan, et l'agence Agusto, basée au Nigeria, l'Afrique de l'Ouest abrite désormais trois des quatre agences de notations du continent.
__________________
"Les faits sont têtus" - Paul Kagame(Apr 7, 2014)

check out:The African Sahel thread
Hadrami no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 12th, 2013, 09:16 AM   #71
SUNS 25
P.E. Aubameyang
 
SUNS 25's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Libreville
Posts: 5,931
Likes (Received): 875

All updates?
__________________
Quote:
Nothing great is accomplished in the world without passion. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
SUNS 25 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 4th, 2014, 08:42 PM   #72
Hadrami
*Free Agent*
 
Hadrami's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 9,380
Likes (Received): 3424

__________________
"Les faits sont têtus" - Paul Kagame(Apr 7, 2014)

check out:The African Sahel thread
Hadrami no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 21st, 2015, 05:03 PM   #73
Hadrami
*Free Agent*
 
Hadrami's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 9,380
Likes (Received): 3424

__________________
"Les faits sont têtus" - Paul Kagame(Apr 7, 2014)

check out:The African Sahel thread

yassine_fes liked this post
Hadrami no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 24th, 2015, 07:02 PM   #74
Hadrami
*Free Agent*
 
Hadrami's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 9,380
Likes (Received): 3424

Quote:
Algerian companies urged to invest in Senegal Emergence Plan
January 14, 2015

President Macky Sall has said that relations between Senegal and Algeria must surpass traditional bilateral relations and must now encourage economic activities as well as investments and trade between the two countries. He pointed out that the agricultural and energy sector as key areas that could be explored by investors from the two countries. He also paid tribute to President Bouteflika. Sall was speaking at a Senegalese-Algerian meeting in Algiers when he made these remarks.

Sall said Senegal Emergence Plan (PSE) is a platform that encourages foreign investment in socio-economic development projects. He urged Algerian state-owned companies and private companies to fully take part in the plan which began in 2014 and will go on till 2018. He added that energy and agribusiness are “two key industries” for which the two countries can launch partnerships “as soon as possible.” There are also housing, construction, transport, education and health projects in the emergence plan. Cooperation between Algiers and Dakar “should not be limited to the formal political relations but must extend further into the economic partnership, public and private investment, and trade,” Sall stated.

Algeria’s state-owned Sonatratch oversees the exploitation of oil and gas in the country in partnership with other international oil companies. Senegal discovered oil along its offshore at the end of last year in commercial quantity.

During his speech, the Senegalese president hailed the ties with Algiers as he pointed out that they share values of culture and civilization as well as the pan-African ideal. He said these similarities represent “a solid foundation on which the two countries can build closer relationships and forge a mutually beneficial partnership.”
http://medafricatimes.com/4266-alger...ence-plan.html
__________________
"Les faits sont têtus" - Paul Kagame(Apr 7, 2014)

check out:The African Sahel thread
Hadrami no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 7th, 2015, 09:54 PM   #75
Hadrami
*Free Agent*
 
Hadrami's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 9,380
Likes (Received): 3424

Quote:
Ecobank et Attijari devancent largement les banques françaises en Afrique francophone
07 décembre 2015

Une nouvelle étude publiée le 1er décembre par le cabinet Nouvelles Donnes a confirmé que la croissance des principaux groupes bancaires français en Afrique est très en retrait par rapport aux acteurs locaux.

Intitulé «BSEM 2015» (Banking Survey-Emerging Markets), l’étude du cabinet spécialisé dans les problématiques de développement dans les secteurs de la banque et de l’assurance fait cette année un focus sur l’Afrique francophone. Il en ressort que deux groupes locaux dominent actuellement le marché dans cette zone. Il s’agit du groupe panafricain Ecobank qui détient 14% de parts de marché et du groupe marocain Attijariwafa Bank qui approche les 13%.

Parallèlement à la montée en puissance de ces deux groupes panafricains, les banques françaises ont beaucoup perdu du terrain. Des quatre «vieilles» présentes dans les années 80, BNP Paribas, la Société Générale, le Crédit Lyonnais et le Crédit Agricole, il ne reste que les deux premières. Et dans le top dix des banques présentes sur la zone, les françaises sont les seules à avoir perdu des parts de marché depuis 2007. La Société générale et BNP Paribas ont perdu presque trois points de parts de marché, passant respectivement à 8 % et 5 %.

En Afrique du Nord, Nouvelles Donnes constate que BNP Paribas, Société Générale et Crédit Agricole pèsent à peine l’équivalent d’Attijariwafa Bank.

Selon Paul Derreumaux, économiste et président d’honneur du groupe Bank of Africa, la première erreur commise par les banques françaises en Afrique était de s’être concentrées sur la clientèle de grandes entreprises et de particuliers haut de gamme alors que les banques locales multipliaient les agences, même lorsque la clientèle n’était pas très rentable. «Auprès des banques françaises, l’ouverture de comptes se limitait aux expatriés et aux rares nationaux à haut revenu», souligne M. Derreumaux.

L’autre erreur est, selon lui, le départ précipité des banques tricolores du continent durant les années 90 qui furent difficiles économiquement et politiquement pour les pays africains, en vue de se déployer en Europe de l’Est et en Asie. «Vu ce qu’on attendait en Europe de l’Est, les belles années qui commençaient en Chine et en Amérique du Sud, les états-majors des banques françaises ont dit “stop” en Afrique», ajoute M. Derreumaux, qui pense que «le terrain perdu ne sera pas repris» et que «les banques françaises peuvent seulement participer à la poursuite de la conquête».

Ecobank and Attijari ahead largely French banks in Francophone Africa

A new study published on 1st December by the cabinet Nouvelles Donnes confirmed that the growth of French major banking groups in Africa is far behind compared to local actors.
__________________
"Les faits sont têtus" - Paul Kagame(Apr 7, 2014)

check out:The African Sahel thread

marokko, ElOhEl liked this post
Hadrami no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 8th, 2015, 11:30 PM   #76
Hadrami
*Free Agent*
 
Hadrami's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 9,380
Likes (Received): 3424

each country’s contribution to the gdp of the Uemoa(West african economic and monetary union)
__________________
"Les faits sont têtus" - Paul Kagame(Apr 7, 2014)

check out:The African Sahel thread
Hadrami no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 26th, 2015, 08:00 PM   #77
Iazzouzi
BANNED
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 3,056
Likes (Received): 4618

MALI: L’OR REPRÉSENTE 70% DES RECETTES D’EXPORTATION
Quote:


Le secteur des mines est incontournable dans l’économie malienne. L’exploitation de l’or pèse 8% du PIB, 25% des recettes budgétaires et 70% des exportations. Le gouvernement compte mieux valoriser cette richesse naturelle du pays. Un toilettage du Code minier de 2012 est au programme.

Au Mali, le secteur des mines pèse lourd dans l’économie. Lors de la 3è assemblée consulaire de la Chambre des mines du Mali (CMM) qui vient de se tenir à Bamako, le chef de cabinet du département des Mines, Robert Diarra, est revenu sur le poids de ce secteur stratégique.

Selon le responsable de l’administration malienne, l’exploitation de l’or à elle seule, représente «70% des recettes d’exportation, 8% du PIB et 25% des recettes budgétaires», rapporte le quotidien «L’Essor».

Cette importance pousse le gouvernement et les acteurs du secteur à valoriser cette richesse naturelle du Mali. C’est dans ce contexte que la Chambre des mines a initié des «projets d’envergure», note le journal, qui cite, par exemple, «la création d’une raffinerie d’or, la mise en chantier d’une École des mines ou encore la mise à disposition du secteur minier malien de près de 100 MW d’énergie solaire».

Sur le plan législatif, il est question de faire une «relecture du Code minier de 2012» car, selon le président de la CMM, Abdoulaye Pona, «l’existence et la validité toujours en cours de plusieurs codes miniers dans notre pays a crée une certaine complexité du point de vue légal et fiscal».

Il est ainsi question d’organiser un forum sur la fiscalité minière au Mali. «A ce niveau, force est de reconnaître aujourd’hui que la pression fiscale continue sur les entreprises minières d’une part et d’autre part l’absence de procédures et d’institutions efficaces de règlement des contentieux entre l’État et les Mines, constituent des menaces sur la rentabilité et la viabilité même de l’exploitation minière», observe «L’Essor».

Enfin, la Chambre des mines du Mali entend réaliser deux études. L’une porte sur la mise en œuvre de la stratégie de développement des achats locaux dans l’industrie minière au Mali et la seconde sur la stratégie d’appui des nationaux en matière d’acquisition et de valorisation des titres miniers et d’exploitation de petites mines.
http://www.le360.ma/fr/monde/mali-lo...ortation-60350
Iazzouzi no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 26th, 2015, 08:58 PM   #78
bidonv
Registered User
 
bidonv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Skikda-Algeria
Posts: 5,600
Likes (Received): 3593

HDI global rank over 188 countries.................Total failure, those countries should review their economic policies.............
Quote:
162 Togo 0,484
170 Senegal 0,466
172 Côte d'Ivoire 0,462
179 Mali 0,419
188 Niger 0,348
bidonv no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 26th, 2015, 09:28 PM   #79
Iazzouzi
BANNED
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 3,056
Likes (Received): 4618

CÔTE D’IVOIRE: LA PRODUCTION PÉTROLIÈRE EN HAUSSE À 45 MILLE BARILS PAR JOUR GRÂCE AU «CHAMP MARLIN»
Quote:


Réduite à moins de 20 mille barils/jour depuis 2014, la production pétrolière ivoirienne connaît une remontée depuis la mise en production du «champs Marlin» en octobre dernier au large des côtes. Le premier gisement entré en exploitation depuis 2005.

La production ivoirienne d’or noir a bondi à plus de 45 mille barils par jour au dernier trimestre, après être descendue sous la barre de 20 000 barils/jour depuis 2014.

Selon, Daniel Gnangni, le directeur général de Petroci, la compagnie nationale d’opération pétrolière, «la production ivoirienne avait effectivement chuté jusqu’à moins de 20 mille en 2014», avant d’affirmer que celle-ci «a pu remonter à plus de 45 mille barils par jour» après l’entrée en production en octobre du «nouveau champ Marlin», opéré en partenariat avec la firme Foxtrot Internationale.

Une donne qui vient mettre un coup d’arrêt à la déprime du pétrole ivoirien amorcée depuis 2006, période à laquelle le pays avait enregistré un pic record de production à 60 mille barils/jour.

Principales raisons évoquées, la baisse de la production des quatre champs en exploitation dans le bassin sédimentaire ivoirien (Lion, Espoir, Foxtrot et Baobab) et de l’apparition de difficultés techniques «liées à l’environnement géologique» de certains champs qui affectent leur rendement. «Les travaux de développement commencés depuis l’année dernière pour remédier aux difficultés techniques (…) s’étendront jusqu’en 2016 au moins», a t-il expliqué, ce qui devrait permettre d’atteindre «60 mille barils par jours» à terme.

Si aucun nouveau gisement pétrolier n’a été mis en production depuis 2005 dans le pays, ce n’est pas faute de nouvelles découvertes. Des «indices significatifs d’hydrocarbures» ont été décelés sur de nombreux blocs (CI-27, CI-100, CI-103, CI-401 et CI-514) situés en mer. Et «la plus importante est celle réalisée sur le Bloc CI-103 en mer profonde» dont l’évaluation est en cours et devrait s’étendre jusqu’au premier semestre 2016, date à laquelle une mise en production pourrait être envisagée, quelques années après, en cas d’évaluation positive, précise le directeur de l’entreprise publique.

La Côte d’Ivoire qui reste donc un producteur bien modeste doit en outre composer avec la chute des cours de l’or noir qui a entrainé la suspension de «plusieurs projets de développement (…) en attendant des cours favorables à leur développement». Un contexte bien défavorable au pays dont l’essentiel des zones d’exploration se situent en offshore (mer) profond et ultra profond (entre 200 et 4 000 mètres de profondeur) nécessitant des investissements particulièrement lourds.
http://www.le360.ma/fr/monde/cote-di...p-marlin-60000

Reduced to less than 20,000 barrels/day since 2014, the Ivorian oil production experienced a rebound from the "Marlin fields' production commissioning in October off the coast. The first deposit began operating since 2005.
Iazzouzi no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2015, 12:42 AM   #80
Hadrami
*Free Agent*
 
Hadrami's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 9,380
Likes (Received): 3424

Quote:
Originally Posted by bidonv View Post
HDI global rank over 188 countries.................Total failure, those countries should review their economic policies.............
Can’t take that ranking too seriously with countries like Comoros, Mauritania and even South Sudan(wtf!) ranked higher than Senegal and Ivory Coast.
__________________
"Les faits sont têtus" - Paul Kagame(Apr 7, 2014)

check out:The African Sahel thread

Iazzouzi, marokko, Naijaborn liked this post
Hadrami no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:59 PM. • styleid: 14


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us