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Old May 5th, 2006, 06:18 PM   #81
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bubach_hlubach
Ehh one more thing, i've been searching for photos of Croatian made boats, yachts and cruisers in order to open a thread about them. So i have also come across these Elan boats - Power E35 and E42. Both models are manufactued in Obrovac (Croatia), by Elan PBO which is owned by Slovenian Elan.

Now, i want to know; are these Elan boats from the Croatian factory above only for Cro's market or wider?

Elan Power E35


Elan Power E42


awesome looking boats!

I believe they are for wider market, although I don't know how many factories has Elan. I know the biggest part of their products are made in Slovenia and I know they export majority of them. I'll investigate a little
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Old May 5th, 2006, 06:31 PM   #82
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Elan is establishing itself very well recently...

It's Elan 344 Impression got a title Yacht of the Year at Duesseldorf Boat Show.

"A jury of 10 European boating magazines from 10 countries at Dusseldorf Boat Show 2006 elected the Elan Impression 344 the European Yacht of the Year in the category up to 10 metres.
Extensive sea trials were conducted in Barcelona and the judges have highlighted the Impression's spacious interior and distinctive design. The yacht is described as perfectly balanced with remarkable high stability and excellent response.
Elan Impression 344 The Impression 344 is another example of Rob Humphreys' masterful configuration of keel, rudder, rig and hull design producing quality and excellence overall."

"The Impression 344 is a great choice for cruising families and charterers. She offers a lot of space outside and inside, plenty of natural daylight and makes a great impression with her extravagant look. The Impression concept is all about creating an onboard environment that is easy to live with over a long period, and in this respect the Impression 344 will invite long stay-aboard periods. And with a fine turn of speed under sail and power, she will offer her owner considerable cruising scope."






Slovenian Seaway Shipman 63 also got the title in it's class... With its cost of 1.5 million € it is a bit different than Elan's Impression. Seaway is the world's biggest producer of carbon fibre sailing boats.
Seaway, Bled-based company and their in-house J&J design office is the world's biggest nautical development company. In 22 years of existence it has been responsible for more than 200 projects, which have led to the production of more than 41,000 boats in a total of 20 countries.
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Old May 5th, 2006, 06:36 PM   #83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SinCity
Nice boats. I thought that Slovenian Elan was actually owned by Croats. Can anyone confirm who owns Elan?
No, it is purely a Slovenian company. Although, for a moment Zagrebacka bank owned it, but that was back in late 80's, and didn't last too long.

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Old May 5th, 2006, 06:36 PM   #84
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bubach_hlubach
In this photo, there are quite a few of outer airoconditiong units attached on balconies and facades. How much it costs in Slovenia to install these?
Hmmm, I have no idea... But I am sure you can get average ones below 400 €.
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Old May 5th, 2006, 06:39 PM   #85
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@LJubljana city is this new passanger center going to be constructed on the place of the old railways station? Or is this some whole new location in the city?
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Old May 5th, 2006, 06:42 PM   #86
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Originally Posted by djurob
@LJubljana city is this new passanger center going to be constructed on the place of the old railways station? Or is this some whole new location in the city?
It's the same location. Many buildings (most of them) will be demolished, but the old train station remains as it's considered as architectural heritage.
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Old May 5th, 2006, 09:15 PM   #87
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ljubljana City
Hmmm, I have no idea... But I am sure you can get average ones below 400 €.
Oh i meant just "bare hands", how much it would cost just to put them up.

Anyway, i hate to see those boxes sticking on facades, i think no one should be allowed to put them up. Not just they make buildins ugly and messy, but they damage facades as well when they leak and stuff.
There are many of these on Zagreb's buildings, but thank God there ain't any in historical parts of the city.

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Old May 5th, 2006, 09:20 PM   #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bubach_hlubach
Oh i meant just "bare hands", how much it would cost just to put them up.

Anyway, i hate to see those boxes sticking on facades, i think no one should be allowed to put them up. Not just they make buildins ugly and messy, but they damage facades as well when they leak and stuff.
There are many of these on Zagreb's buildings, but thank God there ain't any in historical parts of the city.

Oh, I really don't have an idea how much would you cost you...

Same in Ljubljana. You can't see any of them on old-style buildings.
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Old May 9th, 2006, 06:22 PM   #89
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European Commission Upgrades Growth Forecasts for Slovenia

Brussels, 08 May

The European Commission has upgraded its 2006 economic growth forecast for Slovenia by 0.3 percentage points to 4.3% in its spring report on economic outlook in the EU.

The Commission also lowered the anticipated inflation rate in Slovenia for this year to 2.4% from 2.5% in its autumn report, backing its decision by saying that inflation-busting measures are progressing well in Slovenia.
The report leaves the outlook in Slovenia for 2007 almost unchanged compared to the autumn report: economic growth is expected to stand at 4.1%, while inflation is anticipated at 2.5%.
Slovenian growth is a fair way above the 2.3% average growth rate anticipated for the EU this year. Meanwhile, Slovenia's inflation forecast is only a touch above the 2.1% expected in the EU this year.
According to the Commission, the double pricing mechanisms in place in Slovenia should ensure a limited impact on prices of the planned euro changeover.
The report, released just over a week before the Commission releases a report on Slovenia's readiness for the euro, adds that the current government policies and exchange rate stability are thwarting inflationary pressures.
Slovenia is well on the way to meeting other eurozone membership criteria as well: the budget deficit is set to stand at 1.9% this year and 1.6% next year (limit is 3%), while the general government debt is to remain below 30% in both years (limit is 60%), according to the report.
Among the risks that could threaten Slovenia's steady inflation rate, the Commissions points to the price of energy, foremost fuel and electricity.
According to the report, economic growth in Slovenia will be fuelled by domestic spending, while exports are slated to have a smaller positive impact than in 2005.
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Old May 10th, 2006, 04:36 PM   #90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SinCity
Nice boats. I thought that Slovenian Elan was actually owned by Croats. Can anyone confirm who owns Elan?
I was owned by Croats. It's one of the many ecomomy affairs in Ex-YU. I can't find anything about it on the net, but i was told that Ostoja and partners bought Elan's debt in exchange for major share in Elan. They got more than they actually paid for by taking over the debt. Standard privatization affair.

Quote:
Darko ostoja - član Nadzornog odbora
....Osmislio je i vodio jedan od najvećih hrvatskih pothvata u inozemstvu – preuzimanje tvrtke Elan u Sloveniji.....
http://www.podravka.hr/o_podravki/darko_ostoja.php

Darko Ostoja and his partners took over Elan, then sold it to Privredna Banka Zagreb wich sold it further. I don't know the details.

Quote:
Elan prodan za 14 milijuna DEM
ZAGREB, 17. ožujka 2000. - Elan je prešao u stopostotno slovensko vlasništvo ugovorom koji su u petak potpisali Privredna banka Zagreb, Državna agencija za osiguranje štednih uloga i sanaciju banaka i Slovenska razvojna družba. Riječ je o prodaji 77,3-postotnog udjela u Elanu i 85,7-postotnoga u Elanu Commerc te svih potraživanja PBZ-a prema Grupi Elan. Vrijednost je kupoprodajnog paketa 14 milijuna njemačkih maraka, priopćili su iz PBZ-a.
http://www.vjesnik.hr/Html/2000/03/18/

Last edited by gwinczlav; May 10th, 2006 at 05:00 PM.
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Old May 15th, 2006, 06:34 PM   #91
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Municipality Wants to Buy Airport, Plans Massive Logistics Hub


A municipality in NE Slovenia is putting together a consortium that has offered to buy the company operating the international airport in Slovenia's second-largest city, Maribor. The Hoce-Slivnica municipality says the offer is part of a project to build a EUR 100m logistics hub at the airport.

According to Hoce-Slivnica mayor Anton Obreht, the municipality sent a bid to Prevent, the company which owns Aerodrom Maribor, offering SIT 800m (EUR 3.34m) for the airport operator.

The aim of the municipality is to buy the airport operator and then establish a consortium that would build a logistics hub on the premises of the airport, Obreht told STA.

According to him, the municipality, which is trying to revive business in the area, expects Prevent to respond to the bid by next week.

"I believe we have offered a fair price," said Obreht, who added that the airport has lain more or less idle since Prevent bought it four years ago.

The mayor believes the future of the airport lies in cargo transport and logistics services. He added that the municipality was willing to make Prevent a partner in the project.

Meanwhile, Prevent spokesperson Monika Zvikart told STA that the company would study the offer and take a decision on it by the end of May."

According to her, Prevent, which bought the airport for SIT 240m (EUR 1m) four years ago, examines every bid received for the airport and weighs it up in view of the anticipated consequences for the entire region.

Obreht stressed that the municipality has already launched talks with potential investors, both domestic and foreign.

"We have established contacts with 14 potential investors...among others, we held talks with representatives for Israel today and intend to meet Irish representative next week," said Jurij Pinter, the coordinator of the project.

According to him, a public call for bids is to be published in the Slovenian Official Gazette and the Official Journal of the EU as well as Slovenian business daily Finance and the Financial Times.

Among foreign investors interested in the project, which is expected to completed by December 2008, are Siemens, Raiffeisen, Vienna Airport, Bonn-Cologne Airport, UBM and Porr.

Meanwhile, postal company Posta Slovenije, the Slovenian Railways, port operator Luka Koper and logistics group Intereuropa are among the domestic investors said to be interested in the project.

According to Obreht, the project also enjoys the support of the economics and environment ministries.
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Old May 15th, 2006, 09:20 PM   #92
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Slovenia Awaiting Decisive Euro-Readiness Reports


The European Commission and European Central Bank (ECB) are scheduled to release on Tuesday, 16 May separate assessments of Slovenia's readiness to join the eurozone as of 1 January 2007. Both institutions are expected to give Slovenia the thumbs up thereby paving the way for it to become the first among the countries that joined the EU in May 2004 to adopt the euro.

Slovenia asked for an individual convergence report - instead of the usual group report that would be issued in October - on 2 March in a bid to make sure that it would have enough time to carry out all the preparations for eurozone entry.

The country has been meeting all the criteria for eurozone membership since late last year, when it brought down its inflation to the euro-compatible level. The fact that Slovenia is compliant with all Maastricht criteria has been confirmed by European Commissioner for Economic and Monetary Affairs Joaquin Almunia on several occasions in recent weeks.

Slovenian officials are not hiding their high-hopes for the decisive reports: "I'm expecting a positive assessment. There are no signs that our expectations are not justified," Finance Minister Andrej Bajuk said during a recent visit to Brussels.

Despite the overall positive assessment, well-placed sources suggest that Slovenia will also be given a number of warnings, the main concerning public finance sustainability. The Commission is likely to underscore the need to ensure the sustainability of its pension system.

The reports are to be first steps leading to the confirmation of Slovenia's bid to join the eurozone. Following the reports, EU leaders are expected to vote on admitting Slovenia to the eurozone at their summit on 15 and 16 June. Moreover, EU finance ministers are expected to take a final vote on the legal basis for Slovenia's membership on 11 July.

The convergence criteria define that a candidate country's inflation must be within 1.5 percentage points of the average inflation rate of the three euro-zone countries with the lowest rates. Slovenia's inflation rate in March (the basis for the reports) was 2.3%, which is 0.3 percentage points under the ceiling.

The country's deficit must moreover not exceed 3% of its GDP (Slovenia anticipates a deficit of 1.8% this year), the public debt must stay below 60% of GDP (Slovenia's is below 30%) and the member state must spend at least two years in the ERM II waiting room. Slovenia entered the mechanism on 28 June 2004 as the first of the newcomers to do so.

The quick entry into the ERM II, the waiting room for the euro, was a result of the government's decision to seek rapid eurozone entry because of the anticipated benefits this would have for an economy that is heavily reliant on that of the EU.

Since joining the waiting room for the euro, Slovenia has not faced any great instability in its economy and Slovenia's currency, the tolar, has fluctuated only slightly around the parity rate of SIT 239.64 for one euro. It is therefore expected that the changeover rate is to stand at around the parity rate.

Besides meeting the convergence criteria, Slovenia must bring its national legislation in line with the EU's. The parliament recently passed amendments to the act on the country's central bank, while a draft version of the euro changeover bill has been sent to the ECB for scrutiny before it is adopted by the government and sent to parliament.

Slovenia has opted for the big-bang euro adoption, with the changeover period, when both euros and tolars are in circulation, lasting through 14 January 2007. Banks will accept tolar bills until February 2007, while the central bank will impose no limitations.

The country introduced double pricing as of 1 March of this year in a bid to prevent unjustified price hikes at the time of the switch. The system has been working well so far, with only a few violations noted.
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Old May 16th, 2006, 05:33 PM   #93
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It's done, the European Commission gave us the green light!
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Old May 16th, 2006, 06:54 PM   #94
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edolen1
It's done, the European Commission gave us the green light!
Right



REUTERS

Slovenia gets euro entry go-ahead, Lithuania fails

By Jan Strupczewski

BRUSSELS, May 16 (Reuters) - The European Commission and the European Central Bank (ECB) gave Slovenia the green light on Tuesday to become the 13th member of the euro zone in 2007 but said Lithuania's inflation was too high to join.

Slovenia will become the first of the 10 new European Union members to adopt the single currency which is now used in Portugal, Spain, Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany, France, Luxembourg, Italy, Austria, Ireland, Finland and Greece.

"Slovenia has achieved a high degree of sustainable economic convergence with the other member states and ... it fulfils the necessary conditions to adopt the euro," the Commission said.

Lithuania, on the other hand, is the first EU country to have its application turned down after its inflation rate was just too high to qualify and was expected to rise further.

The ECB, the guardian of the euro, also said Slovenia was well placed to adopt the currency but Lithuania was not.

Economic and Monetary Affairs Commissioner Joaquin Almunia hoped EU finance ministers would back Slovenia's entry on July 11 after talks among EU leaders and in the European Parliamnet.

He also said he had offered Lithuania advice on bringing its inflation down without damaging its strong economic growth in order to be able to join as soon as possible.

Vilnius should focus on tighter fiscal and wage policy and a better functioning market. "If nothing is done in the future, inflation will increase in Lithuania," Almunia said.

EU officials say the criterion may be outdated but is still part of existing law and candidates must meet it.

EU officials also fear leniency towards Lithuania could make it harder for them to make bigger Eastern Europe member states like Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic abide by the rules.

JOY AND FRUSTRATION

"This is one of the most important projects of Slovenia in the last decade, it is a historic event, which is unique and cannot be repeated," Prime Minister Janez Jansa told a news conference in Ljubljana.

"But we realise the euro will mean new responsibility, we will have to keep healthy public finances in the future, therefore Slovenia will not delay with reforms that are needed," he said.

Lithuanian EU Budget Commissioner Dalia Grybauskaite criticised the decision as interpreting too rigidly the Maastricht Treaty of 1992 which sets the euro entry criteria.

"The Maastricht criteria were set down in order to support economic stability and economic development," she was quoted by an EU official as saying.

"That is the purpose of this instrument. When it is applied in a dogmatic fashion, the instrument does not serve its purpose," Grybauskaite said.

The decision on Lithuania had been expected and officials from the country have said they will now take their fight for a 2007 entry into the euro zone to an EU heads of state summit in June in the hope of changing the inflation criterion.

"The government still considers that based on economic arguments Lithuania could be admitted to join the euro zone," the Lithuanian government said in a statement, adding interpretation of the inflation criterion should be wider.

To become a member of the euro zone, an EU candidate has to meet criteria on debt and budget deficit levels, price and currency stability and long-term interest rate levels.

To pass the price stability test a candidate country has to have average annual inflation no higher than the average of the three best performers in the EU plus 1.5 percentage points.

The inflation rates of the three -- Poland, Sweden and Finland -- plus the margin set the ceiling at 2.6 percent for the 12-month reference period ending in March.

Lithuania's inflation was 2.7 percent. While the difference is small, Lithuania, the Commission and the ECB expect inflation in the Baltic state to rise further this year.

The Maastricht Treaty says the inflation criterion must be met in a sustainable way.

Lithuania argues, as Greece did in 1999 when it struggled to bring down its inflation to adopt the euro, that the reference group for the comparison should be the best performers from just the euro zone, not from the whole EU.

If that were the criterion, Lithuania would fulfil it.


EU OBSERVER

Slovenia to join eurozone in January 2007

16.05.2006 - 18:21 CET | By Lucia Kubosova

EUOBSERVER / STRASBOURG – Slovenia is set to become the 13th member of the eurozone following a positive assessment of its economic situation by the European Commission on Monday (16 May).

The commission proposed that Slovenia kicks off the "long period of eurozone enlargement" as the first of the ten EU newcomers to join the single currency in January 2007.

However, as widely expected, Lithuania's bid to join the eurozone next year, was rejected by Brussels.

Only the Czech and Lithuanian commissioners reportedly argued in favour of Vilnius during the commission's weekly policy meeting on Tuesday.

Speaking to journalists following the debate among the commissioners, monetary affairs commissioner Joaquin Almunia said both countries were legally prepared to join the euro but Lithuania did not meet one of the five economic criteria, concerning inflation.

He argued the country was not only "slightly above" the reference rate calculated as 2.6 per cent in March by Eurostat, it also failed to prove the sustainability of its current inflation rate.

According to the commission's estimates, Lithuania will record an average inflation of 3.5 per cent in 2006.

"We have taken into account the criteria as they are spelled out in the treaty - nothing else but them," said the commissioner, adding Brussels may still give a positive answer to Vilnius next year if the country's government takes measures to curb inflation.

The rule, which states that euro newcomers should be judged by the average inflation rates in the whole of the EU - not just the eurozone - has been criticised by several economists, including the eurozone's chief Jean-Claude Juncker.

But Mr Almunia commented that a similar thing happened when Greece was joining in 2000, adding that the commission "simply cannot invent a new treaty."

He said EU policy makers did have a possibility to challenge the Maastricht rules during the debate on the new EU constitution, but although "not everybody thought this particular rule was rational, nobody proposed to change it."

Slovenia to make crucial preparation

The commission's recommendation on Slovenia is to be debated by EU leaders at a summit next month and officially endorsed by the bloc's finance ministers on 11 July.

The ministers will also agree on the exchange rate between the country's tolar and the euro.

Mr Almunia urged the Slovenian authorities to use the remaining time to prepare the citizens and business community for the euro and avoid problems that other member states have encountered.

"We have seen cases of price abuses at the time of the switch to the euro, but also good examples of how to prevent them," he noted.

The commissioner also said that Ljubljana should prepare the information campaigns for the impact of the single currency, as the public image of its impact "is usually much worse than reality."


BBC

Slovenia to enter eurozone club

The first new entrant since 2003 to the twelve-member eurozone has been agreed by the European Commission.

Slovenia's application to join the single currency on 1 January 2007 was accepted by the Commission.

The application by the former communist state must now be approved by the European Parliament and EU member states, who will set the exchange rate.

However, Lithuania's application for euro membership was rejected because its inflation rate was too high.

If all goes to plan, EU finance ministers will fix the exchange rate between the euro and the tolar, the Slovenian currency, on 11 July.

The euro could be legal tender in the new year, with just a two-week transition period during which it circulates alongside the Slovene tolar.

The Slovenian central bank would have the task of distributing 155 million euro coins and 42 million bank notes by 1 January.

The news was generally welcomed in the small Alpine nation of two million people, which borders Italy and Austria but was formerly part of communist Yugoslavia.

"This is a matter of prestige. I'm boasting to visitors that Slovenia will be the first [of the new EU members] to adopt the euro," said Franjo Bobinac, chief executive of Slovenia's largest household appliances maker Gorenje.

The government hopes that euro membership will boost tourism and foreign investment.

Sticking to the rules

Countries wanting to join the eurozone are supposed to meet economic performance criteria, set out in the Maastricht Treaty which is the legal basis for the euro.

The criteria cover government debt, currency stability and interest rates.

But for Lithuania, it was the inflation target which proved the sticking point.

Prices there are rising very slightly faster than the maximum allowed under the EU's rules.

There was bitterness that despite a strong economy, the country's inflation rate was 0.1% outside the target.

"We can proudly say that we did our best in our attempt to join the eurozone at the start of 2007," Lithuanian Finance Minister Zigmantas Balcyti told the AFP news agency.

"Our economy is one of the best performing in the EU and if there is some problem in our joining the eurozone, the problem is that the EU cannot make a decision on expanding the eurozone," he added.

Hazy timetable

All the countries that joined the EU is 2004 are supposed to be preparing to adopt the euro, but in practice, the timetable for the other countries is unclear.

Estonia, for instance, was at one stage due to be considered alongside Slovenia and Lithuania, but has asked for a year's delay.

Some of the bigger new entrants - such as Hungary and Poland - have large budget deficits that they would have to reduce before qualifying for entry.

The idea behind having strict criteria for adopting the euro was to ensure that economies converged with each other before joining a zone with a single interest rate policy - set by the European Central Bank.

But critics of the euro project say these difficulties are already painfully apparent in the weak economic performance of some of the large economies using the euro, notably Germany and Italy.

-----

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Old May 16th, 2006, 07:29 PM   #95
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Slovenian euro coins:







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Old May 16th, 2006, 09:37 PM   #96
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Originally Posted by Ljubljana City
Slovenian euro coins:







meni fali taj klopotec
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Old May 17th, 2006, 12:41 AM   #97
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great news my camarades!
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Old May 17th, 2006, 07:35 PM   #98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by number1
meni fali taj klopotec
Is that some weird Styrian dialect or something?

But still, I don't see any klopotec on the coins..

On a less side note, news about Brnik coming soon, maybe already tomorrow..
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Old May 17th, 2006, 07:57 PM   #99
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edolen1

On a less side note, news about Brnik coming soon, maybe already tomorrow..
Yp... Interesting ones
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Old May 19th, 2006, 06:57 PM   #100
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edolen1
Is that some weird Styrian dialect or something?

But still, I don't see any klopotec on the coins..

On a less side note, news about Brnik coming soon, maybe already tomorrow..

thats something from prlekija in the east of slovenia, insider know what i mean
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