In, Above, and Around Dundas, Ontario - Page 86 - SkyscraperCity
 

forums map | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Photo Forums > Urban Showcase

Urban Showcase Show your selfmade photos


Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old January 27th, 2020, 09:13 PM   #1701
Why-Why
Registered User
 
Why-Why's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Dundas
Posts: 2,435
Likes (Received): 5541

Dundas Miscellany 2

DM12 by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Dundas Peak.


DM15 by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Swallowtail and coneflowers, Christie Lake.


DM16 by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Hint of fall, Dundas Valley.


DM18 by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Downtown from the Peak, fall.


DM20 by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Pumpkins, Sydenham Road.


DM2 by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Spring, Heritage District.


DM13 by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Cedar waxwing, Crooks Hollow.


DM14(2) by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Red-spotted purple butterfly, Christie Lake.


GH005 by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Monarch Trail, Dundas Valley.
Why-Why no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old January 28th, 2020, 09:53 PM   #1702
yansa
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Vienna
Posts: 9,887
Likes (Received): 31362

Quote:
Originally Posted by Why-Why View Post
Thanks for your comments, too, Paul and Silvia. Wish I was half the photographer that you two are!
Haha, don't hide your light under a bushel, Nick!
We all have different styles, but you are at least at the same level like us,
if not better (you and Paul).

I love every single pic of your update!
One of them stands out for me: I never before saw a butterfly from this nice
angle like the swallowtail in your shot.
__________________
Tulln | Vienna | Krems | Melk

Why-Why liked this post
yansa no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 3rd, 2020, 10:14 PM   #1703
Why-Why
Registered User
 
Why-Why's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Dundas
Posts: 2,435
Likes (Received): 5541

Many thanks, Silvia, though in this case I have to respectfully disagree with you! And thanks to all likers and visitors.

So, with new camera poised, I pay a visit to one of the cultural highlights of our local megacity ...


Art Gallery of Ontario 1: Some Favourites


St. Patrick Subway Station Toronto
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

I've arrived at St. Patrick subway station on my way to the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO).



Art Gallery of Ontario Location
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

The AGO is on Dundas Street West in central downtown Toronto, a short walk from the station.



Art Gallery of Ontario Facade Dundas Street
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

The AGO (founded 1900) is the largest art gallery in Ontario by area.
It is also one of the three largest art collections in Canada.
Its permanent collection is eclectic, and it's also known for hosting major international special exhibitions.
The AGO's facade and interior spaces were redesigned by locally-born celebrity architect Frank Gehry in 2004-08.
Gehry added a 200-metre-long glass-fronted galleria running along the entire Dundas Street frontage.
The interior renovations are, in my view, more successful than the exterior addition.
The facade is difficult to appreciate fully due to the narrowness of Dundas Street.



Art Gallery of Ontario Entrance
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

For a long time the AGO was under-visited as its admission fees were very steep.
But in May 2019 it radically changed its admission policy for a one-year trial period.
Now $35 will get you into the gallery, including special exhibitions, for a whole year.
This is a real bargain and will almost certainly lead to a big increase in visits.
(I have already been twice since I signed up last December.)
Here I'll be showcasing some of my favourite artworks in the AGO.
These images are not for commercial use and are intended solely to encourage wider recognition of the AGO's collection.
I'll also look at the more interesting interior spaces and the urban context of the AGO.



AGO Circle of Hans Holbein the Younger, Portrait of Henry VIII
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Circle of Hans Holbein the Younger (Germany, 1497-1543), "Portrait of Henry VIII" (oil on wood, later 16th century).
This portrait of the much-married Tudor king of England (reigned 1509-47) is one of a number of copies.
It's based on a Holbein mural (1537) commissioned by Henry VIII himself.



AGO Arent Arentsz, Skaters on the Amstel
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Arent Arentsz (Netherlands, 1585-1631), "Skaters on the Amstel" (oil on wood, ca. 1620).
Note the "ice golfers" at lower right.



AGO Balthasar Griessmann, The Judgement of Paris
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Balthasar Griessmann (Germany, ca. 1620-1706), "The Judgement of Paris" (ivory, tortoiseshell, ebony, 1621).



AGO Augustus John, The Marchesa Casati
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Augustus John (Wales, 1878-1961), "The Marchesa Casati" (oil on canvas, 1919).
In her lifetime, Luisa Casati was a famous Italian bohemian and patron of the arts.
This is possibly the most popular oil painting in the AGO's permanent collection.



AGO Marion Long, Portrait of Florence McGillivray
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Marion Long (Canada, 1882-1970), "Portrait of Florence McGillivray" (oil on canvas, ca. 1934).
Toronto-born Long was a member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts.
The sitter, Florence Helena McGillivray (1864–1938), was herself a distinguished modernist landscape painter.



AGO Andy Warhol, Elvis I & II
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Andy Warhol (USA, 1928-87), "Elvis I & II" (silkscreen ink and spray paint, 1963-64).
The image of Elvis Presley is based on a publicity still from the Western film Flaming Star (1960).



AGO Carole Condé and Karl Beveridge, Art as We Are Told...
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Carole Condé (Canada, b. 1940) and Karl Beveridge (Canada, b. 1945), "Art as We Are Told ..." (screenprint and collage, 1975-76).



AGO Sandow Birk, The Horrible and Terrible Deeds and Words of the Very Renowned Trumpagruel
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Sandow Birk (USA, b. 1962), "The Horrible and Terrible Deeds and Words of the Very Renowned Trumpagruel" (lithograph, 2017).
This caricature was in a temporary exhibition, "Crossing the Line: Political Satire from 1800 to Today."
The piece was inspired by a set of illustrations by Gustave Doré to the works of François Rabelais.

[To be continued]
__________________
Why-Why no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 4th, 2020, 12:17 AM   #1704
Romashka01
Registered User
 
Romashka01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lviv, Ukraine
Posts: 7,346
Likes (Received): 23992

I'm impressed.. great set!
__________________

Why-Why liked this post
Romashka01 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 4th, 2020, 10:16 PM   #1705
yansa
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Vienna
Posts: 9,887
Likes (Received): 31362

You and your new camera did a good job, Nick!
A wonderful collection of art - I'm struck by the portrait of Henry VIII (though
he isn't a handsome man ).
The Marchesa Casati (fabulous painting!) has something in her face that
reminds me of actress Mia Farrow in her younger years.

Looking forward to see more!
__________________
Tulln | Vienna | Krems | Melk

Why-Why liked this post
yansa no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2020, 09:02 PM   #1706
openlyJane
Human Being
 
openlyJane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Liverpool
Posts: 38,762
Likes (Received): 57583

Wow! fantastic quality of images - especially the nature images. So clear and sharp.
openlyJane no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 10th, 2020, 09:20 PM   #1707
Why-Why
Registered User
 
Why-Why's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Dundas
Posts: 2,435
Likes (Received): 5541

Many thanks for your replies, Roman, Silvia, and Jane.
And now, another set of favourites from the AGO:

Art Gallery of Ontario 2: More Favourites



AGO Peter Paul Rubens, The Massacre of the Innocents (detail)
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

The main special exhibition during my visit was entitled "Early Rubens."
It covered the earlier career of the Flemish Baroque master Peter Paul Rubens (Belgium, 1577-1640).
The AGO's permanent collection contains Rubens' "The Massacre of the Innocents" (1611; detail above).
It was bought in 2002 by Canadian Kenneth Thomson for $117 million, who then donated it to the AGO.
(Rubens later painted a second version of this canvas, now in Munich.)



AGO Peter Paul Rubens, The Dreaming Silenus (detail)
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Peter Paul Rubens, "The Dreaming Silenus" (detail) (oil on canvas, 1610-12).
Ruben's canvasses are so crowded and dramatic that to view the whole of one at once can overwhelm the eye.



AGO Camille Pissarro, Pont Boieldieu in Rouen, Damp Weather
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Camille Pissarro (Denmark/France, 1831-1904), "Pont Boieldieu in Rouen, Damp Weather" (1896).
An atmospheric urban scene by the oldest of the French Impressionists.



AGO Bamum Peoples (Cameroon, Africa), Throne
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Bamum Peoples (Cameroon, Africa), Throne (wood, glass beads, cowrie shells, ca. 1900).
This remarkable object was carved from a single piece of wood for King Najoya of Bamum (1870-1933).



AGO Lawren S. Harris, Winter Woods
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Lawren S. Harris (Canada, 1885-1970), "Winter Woods" (oil on canvas, 1915).
A fine piece by a member of the Group of Seven, Canada's foremost landscape artists.
The Group of Seven held its first exhibition at the AGO from 7-27 May 1920.



AGO Franklin Carmichael, Festive Autumn
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Franklin Carmichael (Canada, 1890-1945), "Festive Autumn" (oil on canvas, 1921).
A typical Northern Ontario landscape by the youngest member of the Group of Seven.



AGO F.H. Varley, Study of Joan (Fairley)
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

F.H. Varley (Canada, 1881-1969), "Study of Joan (Fairley)" (oil on canvas, 1925-26).
The British-born Varley was another member of the Group of Seven.



AGO Berenice Abbott, Pike and Henry Street
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Berenice Abbott (USA, 1898-1981), "Pike and Henry Street" (gelatin silver print, 1936).
The view is southeast toward Manhattan Bridge, New York City.
Abbott was a pupil of Man Ray and promoted the photography of Eugène Atget.
She is considered one of the greatest photographers of New York scenes.



AGO Henry Moore, Reclining Figure
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Henry Moore (UK, 1898-1986), "Reclining Figure" (plaster cast, 1951).
Moore made a large donation (1967) to the AGO of the original plasters of bronze sculptures placed outdoors.



AGO Norval Morrisseau, Symbols of the Opposite
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Norval Morrisseau (Bingwi Neyaashi Anishinaabek First Nation, Canada, 1932-2007), "Symbols of the Opposite" (acrylic on canvas, 1977).
A self-taught visionary, Morrisseau is Canada's greatest artist of Indigenous heritage.



AGO Judy Chicago, Caroline Herschel Test Plate
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Judy Chicago (USA, b. 1939), "Caroline Herschel Test Plate" (paint on porcelain, 1975-78).
Caroline Herschel (1750-1848) was a German astronomer who discovered several comets.
This is one of a series of ceramics by Chicago commemorating notable women.



AGO Abraham Anghik Ruben, The Hunter and the Seamstress
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Abraham Anghik Ruben (Inuvialuit First Nation, Canada, b. 1951), "The Hunter and the Seamstress" (stone, 2001). Ruben was born in a hamlet in the Northwest Territories and now lives in British Columbia.
This piece is in the AGO's J.S. McLean Centre for Indigenous & Canadian Art.



AGO Kent Monkman, The Academy
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Kent Monkman (Fisher River Cree First Nation, Canada, b. 1965), "The Academy" (2008).
The painting parodies famous artworks as a way of satirizing the misrepresentation of Indigenous people.

[To be concluded]
__________________
Why-Why no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 10th, 2020, 10:11 PM   #1708
yansa
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Vienna
Posts: 9,887
Likes (Received): 31362

What a great selection of different art you show us, Nick!
And very good and sharp images!

I can hardly bear the Rubens massacre.
Of course love the Cameroon chair, as I have a special love for African art.
"Winter Woods" and "Festive Autumn" belong to my favourites as well!
__________________
Tulln | Vienna | Krems | Melk

Why-Why liked this post
yansa no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 11th, 2020, 11:58 AM   #1709
openlyJane
Human Being
 
openlyJane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Liverpool
Posts: 38,762
Likes (Received): 57583

So many treasures....love 'The study of Joan'; the photo of New York; the Henry Moore, especially.
openlyJane no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 14th, 2020, 11:22 AM   #1710
Salazar Rick
Registered User
 
Salazar Rick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: CDMX
Posts: 5,560
Likes (Received): 3850

Dundas Valley is amazing!!
__________________
México

Why-Why liked this post
Salazar Rick no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 18th, 2020, 02:38 AM   #1711
Why-Why
Registered User
 
Why-Why's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Dundas
Posts: 2,435
Likes (Received): 5541

Many thanks for your comments, Silvia, Jane, and Salazar Rick.
Yes, Rick, Dundas Valley really is amazing. Long may it remain so!
And now, one final set from my recent trips to the AGO.
Here we look at the gallery's internal and external context ...

Art Gallery of Ontario 3: In and Around



Dundas Street West Toronto
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

The row of modest lowrise buildings opposite the AGO on Dundas Street West.
Several of the houses have been converted into commercial art galleries.
The tangle of wires overhead indicates that this is a main east-west streetcar route.



AGO AIDS Installation, General Idea
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Part of the "AIDS" installation (acrylic on canvas, 1988) on the 4th floor by the collective General Idea (Canada, 1967-94).



AGO Henry Moore Sculpture Centre
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

View of the Henry Moore Sculpture Centre.



AGO Morrisseau, Man Changing into Thunderbird
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Norval Morrisseau's "Man Changing into Thunderbird" (6 panels, acrylic on canvas, 1977) takes up a whole wall of the AGO.



AGO Life Model Walker Court
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

A male life model poses for amateur artists in the internal Walker Court of the AGO.



AGO Gehry Staircase
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr



AGO Gehry Staircase
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr



AGO Gehry Staircase
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Three views of the sculptural staircase of douglas fir designed by Frank Gehry (Canada, b. 1929).
It ascends from Walker Court to the 5th floor of the AGO.



AGO Galleria Italia
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

The interior of Gehry's Galleria Italia on the 2nd floor of the AGO.



Sharp Centre, OCAD, Toronto
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Will Alsop (UK, 1947-2018) designed the Sharp Centre for Design (2004) on McCaul Street, just behind the AGO.
This building on stilts is an extension to the Ontario College of Art and Design University (OCAD).



Alsop, Sharp Centre, OCAD, Toronto
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

The view of Alsop's Sharp Centre and the downtown skyline from the fifth floor of the AGO.



Art Gallery of Ontario Dundas Street West Toronto
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Goodbye to the AGO, at least until next time ...
Why-Why no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 18th, 2020, 07:02 PM   #1712
yansa
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Vienna
Posts: 9,887
Likes (Received): 31362

Love the "Man Changing into Thunderbird", Nick.
Beautiful pictures of the Gehry Staircase!
Some spectacular architecure shots (with reflection) as well.
__________________
Tulln | Vienna | Krems | Melk

Why-Why liked this post
yansa no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 24th, 2020, 04:10 AM   #1713
Gratteciel
Moderator
 
Gratteciel's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Mexico City
Posts: 8,444
Likes (Received): 31872

Toronto is a great city! Excellent night photos.
The last two photos of the 1685 set are spectacular.
I loved the rail bridge over the Grand River, snowy Hamilton and the Red Chevy.
The Swallowtail on pink coneflowers is a fascinating photo. I loved.
The Art Gallery of Ontario has some invaluable works. Wow!
With old or new camera, your photos have always been great and your comments very interesting. Thank you, Nick!
__________________
Que todo morirá cuando yo muera... ¡Imposible pensar de otra manera! Guadalupe Amor

Mexico City: The Place You thought You Knew

Why-Why liked this post
Gratteciel no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2020, 12:42 AM   #1714
Why-Why
Registered User
 
Why-Why's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Dundas
Posts: 2,435
Likes (Received): 5541

Many thanks for your "reflections," Silvia. And very good to hear from you again, Roberto.
Thanks to likers, too. Feedback, especially the positive kind, is what keeps us contributing to Urban Showcase.

And now, back into the Valley ...


Griffin House, Ancaster


GH05
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

It's midwinter in the Dundas Valley.
When the trees are leafless, the contours of the land stand out in sharp relief.



GH02
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

There's a light dusting of snow in shady areas but it's cold enough that the trail is firm under foot.
No wellies, cleats, icers, or snowshoes needed today.



GH03
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

The colours on this day of low, heatless sun are subdued but appealing.
Mother Nature is always so tasteful!



GH07
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

And even in January she scatters lovely semi-abstract compositions across the Valley.



GH10
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Mineral Springs Road winds through the centre of the Valley.
Just off it, a small building sits on a rise ...



GH15
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

... that on closer inspection reveals itself to be a historic property.



Griffin House
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

(We are in the centre of the forested Dundas Valley, about 7 km southwest of Dundas town centre.
This is an area formerly in the neighbouring village of Ancaster.)



GH16
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Griffin House is a modest 1.5 storey clapboard farmhouse that's almost 200 years old.
It and the 50 surrounding acres were sold in 1834 to Enerals Griffin (1794-1878) and his wife Priscilla.
Enerals, an African American, was probably born into slavery in Virginia and may have later lived in Ohio.
It's not known how he managed to get into Upper Canada in 1829.
It's been speculated that the "underground railroad," that helped slaves escape into British territory, was involved.
Given that social conditions of the time didn't favour visible minorities ...
(American slave-catchers would search Upper Canada for fugitives ...
... and slavery itself was only finally abolished in the British Empire five years after Enerals came to Upper Canada)
... it's hardly surprising that Enerals was not forthcoming about his origin.
Whatever the case, by 1834 he was prosperous enough to buy this property for £125.
He then turned it into a successful farm and bequeathed it to several generations of his descendants.
The Griffin family kept the house until 1988, then sold it to Hamilton Conservation Authority.
It's been restored to how it may have looked pre-1850 and is now a small museum dedicated to Black history.
Griffin House is closed in winter, but you can take of virtual tour of the interior courtesy of Hamilton Civic Museums.



GH24
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Griffin House has a dining-room/kitchen and living room on the main floor and two bedrooms upstairs.
It also has a basement-cum-root cellar for storage.
By 1877 as many as three adult Griffins and eight children lived in this small house together.
They may have been crowded, but at least they were free.
Griffin House is now a National Historic Site of Canada.



GH23
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

This is the view north over the Dundas Valley from the front door of the Griffin House.
What was once Griffin farmland has been returned to nature by the Conservation Authority.
But the modern world encroaches: suburban villas line the crest of the Escarpment on the horizon.



GH27
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

This broken-down outbuilding has almost been reclaimed by the surrounding vegetation.



GH37
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Behind the Griffin House there's a neat little waterfall ... one of the hundred or so in the Hamilton area.
It's never been cold enough this winter for the local creeks to freeze for very long.



GH29
by Nicholas Ruddick, on Flickr

Time to take one of the many Valley trails homewards.
__________________
Why-Why no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 26th, 2020, 12:05 AM   #1715
TM_Germany
Got Fachwerk?
 
TM_Germany's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Berlin
Posts: 913
Likes (Received): 2169

Very nice photos! It seems like such an interesting and diverse place! I also enjoyed the displays of art!
__________________
All pics by me unless otherwise credited.


Germany's small towns
Limburg/ Lahn
Runkel
Weilburg
Amorbach
The cities of Germany
Aachen - Münster - Heidelberg - Erfurt - Frankfurt

Why-Why liked this post

Last edited by TM_Germany; February 26th, 2020 at 12:25 AM.
TM_Germany no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 26th, 2020, 09:09 AM   #1716
yansa
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Vienna
Posts: 9,887
Likes (Received): 31362

We can feel your close connection to and love for nature in every pic you take, Nick.
Some of my favourites are "semi-abstract compositions" and "neat little waterfall"
(with the beautiful moss)!
Interesting story about the Griffin House, an atmospheric place.
__________________
Tulln | Vienna | Krems | Melk

Why-Why liked this post
yansa no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 27th, 2020, 05:36 PM   #1717
openlyJane
Human Being
 
openlyJane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Liverpool
Posts: 38,762
Likes (Received): 57583

Just love that Frank Gehry staircase a couple of sets up......

It must have been wonderful and intriguing coming across that historic wooden house in the woods.....so atmospheric and resonant.
openlyJane no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:54 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us