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Old February 14th, 2012, 12:16 AM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sky_Is_The_Limit View Post
Where is Menya?

One in Chinatown, and one near Town hall on Market St. You can find their address here:
http://menya.com.au/


I found Spice I Am too spicy for me! Much more spicier than the average Thai in Australia.
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Old February 14th, 2012, 09:33 AM   #42
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Cheers!

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Originally Posted by surryhills View Post
The vacant space under the Recital Hall (facing the back of the Armani building) is being taken over by the China Doll/China Beach operators - they had a DA in for fitout and outdoor seating recently.

That precinct tends to be pretty quiet on weekend days, but during the week, there is lots of activity centred around Felix and Ash St Cellar. If the George St/Martin Pl retail area develops further, we might see greater activation there during the weekends...
I walked through Angel Place/Ash Street/Palings Lane today to check out a few of the spaces. I was wondering whether the space at the Recital Hall facing out onto Angel Place was left empty for the crowds to move around before or after an event? But it's good to hear something is going to happen with the space! Looks like China Doll is a suitable tenant for the site (in terms of price and look).

Felix looked very nice! Wouldn't mind heading back and having dinner there one night.

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Originally Posted by mw123 View Post
Thanon Khao San - They even have a tuk tuk and a street sign from Khao San Road in there and its open until 3am on Thurs-Sat
http://www.thanonkhaosan.com.au/home.htm

Also Sky, if you are somewhat of a foodie and are interested in discovering Sydney's food offerings, I highly suggest you read a food blog called Grab Your Fork.
I saw the tuk tuk!

I got the menu too and the meals look well priced.

I have seen Grab Your Fork but I haven't read it in great depth. Thanks for the tip I'm more of an eatie than an all round foodie (don't like cooking )

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Originally Posted by LanceDriver View Post
Hey Sky, if you're in Pyrmont then go to Cherry Bean cafe because they do a mean bacon and egg roll !! It's in a classic art deco building across from Pyrmont bridge. Tops bacon!

http://cherrybeans.com.au/
Must be good if you're recommending it Lance
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Old March 6th, 2012, 10:21 AM   #43
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For those who are interested in the food truck happenings you can follow some of them on twitter..

http://www.au.timeout.com/sydney/res...98/food-trucks

We're definitely not gonna get cheap eats a la LA food trucks .. friends keep raving about them whenever they come back from a visit to LA... but here's hoping we won't be paying Westfield 'food precinct' prices for the cool factor!

Also Miss Chu's is going to open in the basement level in Regent place (Lumiere building) in the not too distant future (http://www.misschu.com.au/Locations/SydneyCBDTuckshop).. It will be located right next to Assembly, a newish small bar (http://www.assemblybar.com.au/)..
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Old March 6th, 2012, 11:16 AM   #44
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Old March 6th, 2012, 11:28 AM   #45
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Old March 10th, 2012, 02:23 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hyperkube View Post
For those who are interested in the food truck happenings you can follow some of them on twitter..

http://www.au.timeout.com/sydney/res...98/food-trucks

We're definitely not gonna get cheap eats a la LA food trucks .. friends keep raving about them whenever they come back from a visit to LA... but here's hoping we won't be paying Westfield 'food precinct' prices for the cool factor!

Also Miss Chu's is going to open in the basement level in Regent place (Lumiere building) in the not too distant future (http://www.misschu.com.au/Locations/SydneyCBDTuckshop).. It will be located right next to Assembly, a newish small bar (http://www.assemblybar.com.au/)..
I think Miss Chu has been 'opening soon' for ages in that location at Regent Place?? Didn't seem to be any sign of said opening when I was down there last week.
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Old March 12th, 2012, 03:57 AM   #47
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Complaints leave a bitter taste in alfresco feud
Kelly Burke
March 12, 2012


Unhappy … Daniel Blackman, left, co-owner of Room 10 in Potts Point, says he has been forced to halve the number of outdoor tables and chairs at the cafe. Photo: Dean Sewell


THE metamorphosis of Potts Point from a clutch of sleazy, drug-riddled back streets to a cosmopolitan food hub over the past 20 years has benefited the suburb's well-heeled residents and its businesses.
But now, competing interests are threatening the area's harmony, with some restaurant owners threatening to close up shop if alfresco dining regulations are not relaxed.


Daniel Blackman, co-owner of the cafe Room 10 in Llankelly Place, is locked in a bitter dispute with his neighbour, Jo Holder, proprietor of the Cross Art Projects gallery. Mr Blackman said he had been forced to halve the number of outdoor tables and chairs he used because of Ms Holder's complaints - an allegation she strongly disputes

''My only objection is that I don't want his people in front of my gallery - out of respect, because it's a quiet, contemplative space,'' she said. ''But I have made no complaints [to the council] and [Mr Blackman's accusations] are mischievous and way out of line.''

However, Mr Blackman has secured the support of the celebrity chef Neil Perry to argue the case for unfettered alfresco activity in Potts Point.
''Compared to New York or Paris, we are so far behind the eight ball and the sad sacks are winning the race,'' he said. ''The council talks a lot about a living city, so why can't they let it live? If it wasn't for the harbour, I'd probably move to Melbourne.''

Cohabitation has been sorely tested in Challis Avenue, where a growing number of cafes and restaurants are squeezed among the grand Victorian houses and upmarket apartment blocks.

The City of Sydney council has mandated outdoor furniture be cleared from footpaths by 11pm, effectively ensuring restaurants have their patrons out the door and doors closed by then.

The owner of the Sardine Room, Angela Heracleous, said it was getting to the point where it wasn't profitable to operate.

''It angers me because we are having to say 'no' to people wanting to eat at 9.30 at night and telling people who want to linger over their wine after eating that they have to leave,'' she said. ''These people who moved into area over the last two years, they don't like the noise. Why don't they go and live in Sylvania?''

Fellow Challis Avenue tenant Peter Lew, from Fei Jai, said his restaurant had received up to 15 visits from council rangers in recent months, acting on residents' complaints.

''It's frustrating because this local action group is faceless, so there's no one to discuss things with,'' Mr Lew said. ''They just complain to council and send out anonymous letters.''


A spokeswoman for the City of Sydney said the council had to respond to complaints from businesses and residents.

''The lord mayor and staff have met with residents and businesses on Challis Avenue to discuss their concerns and are working hard to balance the needs of both groups,'' the spokeswoman said.

The council had not received any complaints about outdoor dining at Room 10, she said.


Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/...#ixzz1orLWwWLy
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Old March 12th, 2012, 04:31 AM   #48
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Originally Posted by sbx View Post
Complaints leave a bitter taste in alfresco feud
Kelly Burke
March 12, 2012


Unhappy … Daniel Blackman, left, co-owner of Room 10 in Potts Point, says he has been forced to halve the number of outdoor tables and chairs at the cafe. Photo: Dean Sewell


THE metamorphosis of Potts Point from a clutch of sleazy, drug-riddled back streets to a cosmopolitan food hub over the past 20 years has benefited the suburb's well-heeled residents and its businesses.
But now, competing interests are threatening the area's harmony, with some restaurant owners threatening to close up shop if alfresco dining regulations are not relaxed.


Daniel Blackman, co-owner of the cafe Room 10 in Llankelly Place, is locked in a bitter dispute with his neighbour, Jo Holder, proprietor of the Cross Art Projects gallery. Mr Blackman said he had been forced to halve the number of outdoor tables and chairs he used because of Ms Holder's complaints - an allegation she strongly disputes

''My only objection is that I don't want his people in front of my gallery - out of respect, because it's a quiet, contemplative space,'' she said. ''But I have made no complaints [to the council] and [Mr Blackman's accusations] are mischievous and way out of line.''

However, Mr Blackman has secured the support of the celebrity chef Neil Perry to argue the case for unfettered alfresco activity in Potts Point.
''Compared to New York or Paris, we are so far behind the eight ball and the sad sacks are winning the race,'' he said. ''The council talks a lot about a living city, so why can't they let it live? If it wasn't for the harbour, I'd probably move to Melbourne.''

Cohabitation has been sorely tested in Challis Avenue, where a growing number of cafes and restaurants are squeezed among the grand Victorian houses and upmarket apartment blocks.

The City of Sydney council has mandated outdoor furniture be cleared from footpaths by 11pm, effectively ensuring restaurants have their patrons out the door and doors closed by then.

The owner of the Sardine Room, Angela Heracleous, said it was getting to the point where it wasn't profitable to operate.

''It angers me because we are having to say 'no' to people wanting to eat at 9.30 at night and telling people who want to linger over their wine after eating that they have to leave,'' she said. ''These people who moved into area over the last two years, they don't like the noise. Why don't they go and live in Sylvania?''

Fellow Challis Avenue tenant Peter Lew, from Fei Jai, said his restaurant had received up to 15 visits from council rangers in recent months, acting on residents' complaints.

''It's frustrating because this local action group is faceless, so there's no one to discuss things with,'' Mr Lew said. ''They just complain to council and send out anonymous letters.''


A spokeswoman for the City of Sydney said the council had to respond to complaints from businesses and residents.

''The lord mayor and staff have met with residents and businesses on Challis Avenue to discuss their concerns and are working hard to balance the needs of both groups,'' the spokeswoman said.

The council had not received any complaints about outdoor dining at Room 10, she said.


Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/...#ixzz1orLWwWLy
Interesting in that poor old Daniel feels he should be allowed to have his tables and chairs in front of his neighbour's premises and that his neighbour is being rather nasty about this in complaining to the local council; the council, however, has not received any complaints about his encroachments (from anyone, let alone the neighbour).

This strikes me as a near perfect example of a person who feels entitled to walk over anyone and feels persecuted even when the person he is walking over does nothing about it.

If Daniel was my neighbour and treated me like he apparently treats everyone else he might find his precious coffee shop having the odd problem in the future.

What a wanker!
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Old March 12th, 2012, 11:01 AM   #49
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Separate the personal dispute from the Nimby issue. Per Lenin,what then must be done? How can we hold Nimbys to account for the destruction of wealth they have wrought.
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Old March 12th, 2012, 02:17 PM   #50
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Originally Posted by S.Zampatti View Post
Interesting in that poor old Daniel feels he should be allowed to have his tables and chairs in front of his neighbour's premises and that his neighbour is being rather nasty about this in complaining to the local council; the council, however, has not received any complaints about his encroachments (from anyone, let alone the neighbour).

This strikes me as a near perfect example of a person who feels entitled to walk over anyone and feels persecuted even when the person he is walking over does nothing about it.

If Daniel was my neighbour and treated me like he apparently treats everyone else he might find his precious coffee shop having the odd problem in the future.

What a wanker!
Not sure that I am qualified to speak on the situation between business but in regards to residents...who seriously would move in around the corner from Kings Cross and expect everything to be quiet by 11pm to enable some beauty sleep? If people don't want late night activity, move. Even worse if people move into a new neighbourhood with late night activity and complain about it

I live 2 doors down from the pub where you can here patrons more often than not. However I'm not going to march down to the council chambers and demand action for the following reasons;
1. The pub was there first
2. It's a part of the social fabric of the neighbourhood
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Old March 21st, 2012, 01:48 PM   #51
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Old March 29th, 2012, 12:43 PM   #52
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So Movida will be opening in Surry Hills, not Potts Point.

A little disappointing, was hoping they'd open in Potts Point but good that progress is being made!!

Short black
Scott Bolles
March 27, 2012

Wheels in motion for Lowy's garage overhaul
Frank Lowy's old garage in Woolloomooloo is an unlikely setting for the birth of Sydney's latest restaurant empire. But with restaurants taking residence everywhere from former toilet blocks to decommissioned banks, Fraser Short's choice of the Lesseys Garage site on Riley Street is right on trend. ''That's the one, Frank Lowy's old car park,'' says Short, who describes the deal as ''imminent''. The transformation of the garage into a restaurant is in advanced stages, with plans before the City of Sydney to rebirth it as a 190-seat venue and $950,000 to be spent polishing it up. Short is cashed up after being bought out of Keystone - the hospitality group with Cargo Bar and The Winery in its portfolio. While Keystone has its own launch plans, Short is also on a spending spree. He has snapped up the Brooklyn Hotel site on George Street in the city centre, which he will reopen in August with a strong food theme. Former Astral chef Sean Connolly will oversee an oyster room and a restaurant menu Short describes as ''girl-friendly''. Short quashed the rumour that My Kitchen Rules host Pete Evans, reportedly on the way out of the Hugos empire, was about to team up with him. ''Pete is a friend, and I've had enough experience to be cautious about working with friends or family,'' Short says.

Bayswater Road's taste of Broadway
Grasshopper head chef Richard Duff has teamed up with Chris Matters, a former manager at the equally hot Bodega in Surry Hills, to front a new venture opening at 33 Bayswater Road, Kings Cross. Reno Sweeney's opens in six weeks, sliding into the complex where Concrete Blonde and Hugos Bar Pizza are in residence. Duff has experience on the strip - he was chef at the short-lived The Lincoln, a multimillion-dollar fizzer that received some good reviews for his food. The chef says that in spite of a few notable closures the strip has changed for the better since Lincoln opened in 2007. "Two small boutique hotels have opened," he says. The food will be tratt-style Italian. Reno Sweeney was the name of character in the Broadway musical Anything Goes and used as a name by some post-World War II restaurant-clubs in the US.

New feel for an old Newtown favourite
Fijian-style ''freaky tiki'' and Greek food will be inspirations for the Newtown Hotel, which has been snapped up by Keystone Group. The King Street pub will reopen later this year after a major makeover. Keystone, owner of a string of venues, including Cargo Bar and the Gazebo Wine Garden, is developing the 1886 pub, building a giant verandah overlooking King Street to replace the one taken down in the 1920s. The first floor will feature Fijian resort touches and the ''freaky tiki'' theme, while Keystone Group director, Paul Schulte, says the upstairs eatery will focus on Greek street food from the spit.

Trautner gets in behind La Grillade
Pendolino senior sous chef Luukas Trautner has joined La Grillade at 118 Alexander Street, Crows Nest, as head chef. Operator of Manta at Woolloomooloo, Rob Rubis, who recently bought and renovated La Grillade, says Trautner will work under executive chef Patrick Dang. Rubis hints that another new project is on the cards. ''We have plans for something else for Patrick down the track,'' he tells Short Black.

East End owners head off in a new direction
With former Pier and Le Kiosk chef Richard Latham in the kitchen and the floor patrolled by Leisa Latham - described as ''impossible not to be charmed by'' in the 2012 Sydney Morning Herald Good Food Guide - Newcastle's East End Enoteca has a lot to recommend it. Sadly, they serve their last meal on Friday. The couple plan to devote more time to ''lifestyle and travel''. A move to Melbourne is also on the cards.

Ladies enjoy the Village atmosphere
A ladies' lunch menu is something you may expect to find girls clutching in one hand, a ciggie in the other, during an episode of Mad Men. But the Ladies' Lunch menu is a signature of the Village, which has just swung open its doors at 1 Kellett Way, Potts Point. It is more of a rebirth than a start-from-scratch venue. Formerly Favela nightclub, the venue has undergone a renovation and name change to become more food and wine focused.

Too cool kids get in line for Assembly
San Francisco has a Skool restaurant. Sydney now has a small bar named Assembly. The venue, at 488 Kent Street, Sydney, may conjure images of education for some of us, but the inspiration takes its lead from the assembled parts in its construction. Assembly's bar top is made from a recycled bridge, room dividers are from forklift pallets, and its lamps are from a bomb-making factory in France.

Melbourne restaurant comes to a Holt
Melbourne's MoVida restaurant is set to open in the Holt Street, Surry Hills site of Cotton Duck restaurant. Movida chef and co-owner owner Frank Camorra couldn't be reached for comment, but is believed to have moved quickly to secure the site after Cotton Duck chef-owner Jared Ingersoll announced last week that he will close the restaurant on Saturday. Camorra has long harboured plans to open in Sydney, confirming to Short Black in January that he had been looking at two sites in Potts Point after a Surry Hills location fell through.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/...#ixzz1qUsdWtcH

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Also anyone know anything of Gaston Acurio/La Mer's progress/if they're still opening in Sydney
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Old March 29th, 2012, 05:31 PM   #53
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New feel for an old Newtown favourite
Fijian-style ''freaky tiki'' and Greek food will be inspirations for the Newtown Hotel, which has been snapped up by Keystone Group. The King Street pub will reopen later this year after a major makeover. Keystone, owner of a string of venues, including Cargo Bar and the Gazebo Wine Garden, is developing the 1886 pub, building a giant verandah overlooking King Street to replace the one taken down in the 1920s. The first floor will feature Fijian resort touches and the ''freaky tiki'' theme, while Keystone Group director, Paul Schulte, says the upstairs eatery will focus on Greek street food from the spit.
I was wondering what was happening to the Newtown Hotel - there have been hoardings of some sort up for a while now and it was an iconic pub.

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Old March 30th, 2012, 03:26 AM   #54
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The Newtown Hotel has been painted Green, terrible colour but apart from that the first floor came crashing down on Wednesday and the whole area has been cordoned off closing the top of Watkin Street and redirecting traffic through the back lanes. I'd say this will push back the opening time. I am looking forward to the balcony being reinstated, even if it is for the smokers.
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Old April 3rd, 2012, 04:58 AM   #55
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A diners' favourite stripped of its past
Scott Bolles
April 3, 2012

For lease signs are now a regular feature of Oxford Street's once bustling landscape. Photo: Edwina Pickles

Oxford Street's once-bustling restaurant scene is on the verge of extinction.

Sixty-one real estate signs dot the length of Oxford Street, a rolling advertisement for a retail sector under fire and a reminder of a once great Sydney eat street turned sour. Among the jumble of lease and sale signs fighting for attention, it is the lower slopes of Oxford Street, in Darlinghurst, where the food operators' battle for survival is at its most combative.
The closure of venues including Rambutan, Chianti and Betty's Soup Kitchen has put a serious dent in the reputation of this once golden slice of Oxford Street, a section the Sydney Mardi Gras parade passes each year before swinging right into Flinders Street. Stalwart Betty's Soup Kitchen pulled up stumps late last year. ''If a soup kitchen can't make it, what can?'' asks a veteran of the strip.
When chef Andrew Prasad took a job last year as head chef at a new restaurant on Oxford Street, near Taylor Square, he was more than qualified. He'd worked at Bennelong and Lucio's, and had experience in the kitchen of a pub on Oxford Street. His new home, Chianti restaurant, lasted just nine months.

Oxford Street circa 1980 was quite a different proposition. Photo: Fairfax Photos

''Our windows got smashed twice,'' he says. ''I remember one time the coppers had some guy pushed up against the window in the middle of service. I think it's just going to get worse and worse.''
The lord mayor of the City of Sydney, Clover Moore, doesn't disagree. This part of Oxford Street is her turf and she cites violence on the strip as one of her chief concerns.
''On Friday and Saturday nights, it's really out there and dangerous,'' Moore says. ''You've only got to look at the number of incidents the police deal with … People come from all over Sydney, get drunk and spaced out.''

Scathing ... Joe Natale, former owner of Rambutan. Photo: Danielle Smith

Is it fair to say serious food can no longer survive in that environment? ''Yes. The battle is lost until we can turn that [the violence] around,'' she says.
Moore supports the liquor freeze introduced by the state government that extends from Whitlam Square to Taylor Square, seriously restricting liquor licences, venue capacity and operating hours.
Some operators want to see exemptions made for small bars, which they argue don't create unsociable behaviour and would bring new life to Oxford. Moore's answer is a retreat from the main drag. She's taking back some basement spaces of council-owned properties fronting Foley Street that she'd like to see activated as an easily patrolled and contained small-bar precinct.


Chui Lee Luk, owner/chef at Claude's. Photo: Marco Del Grande

The hurdles for Oxford Street are many and complex. The opening of new Westfield shopping centres at Bondi Junction and the city have bookended the strip with new competition and drained it of many operators who joined the Westfield party. Veterans at the Darlinghurst end of the strip say efforts to clean up Kings Cross have only pushed more trouble their way.
Jeremy McNamara, who joined the exodus of the Darlinghurst end of Oxford Street last year when he closed the well-reviewed Snakebean restaurant, maintains things started to unravel several years ago when the Oxford Street upgrade took place.
''They seemed to close it to do the electricity, then the water and the gas,'' he says. ''Constant disruptions. There has been a slow migration of the gay community out of the area and then the bus lanes came in a few years ago. That's made a big difference. It made it more difficult to park your car, take a walk and choose somewhere to eat.''
Mention the bus lanes on Oxford Street and operators on the strip often roll their eyes. The creator of website saveoxfordstreet.com, Stephen Gyory, is passionate about the subject of traffic. ''They took out both right turns. They've turned it into a six-lane highway: do they want it to be a main road or a main street?'' he says.
Moore says: ''I don't want Oxford Street treated as a thoroughfare for people to get to their houses in Vaucluse.''

She wants Oxford Street ''calmed'' with new speed limits. And depending on the upcoming decision about whether light rail will run up the street, Moore would like the bus lanes moved to the middle of the thoroughfare.
Perhaps the biggest blow to food credibility on Oxford Street in recent times was the closure of Rambutan restaurant. Owner Joe Natale has come out swinging.
''We won an award as best Thai for the last three years,'' he says. ''If we'd been somewhere else, it would've been a completely different story.''
Natale has lashed out at everything from parking to the bus lanes, the demographics nightclubs attract to the area and the continual approval of what he sees as ''more and more convenience stores and kebab shops''.
Gyory says local businesses have lots of ideas for refreshing the strip - his own proposals include a major design competition for a new fountain at Taylor Square and opening the gates to the forecourt of the law courts for public use.
Everyone seems to have a piece of Oxford Street: state and local government, the police and various interest groups. Gyory is typical of many in wanting more leadership on its future direction. ''We just want to see a plan,'' he says.
Fond memories of the cradle of mod-Oz cuisine
It hasn't always been this way for Oxford Street. The strip was Sydney's original new-wave eat street; a prototype others tried and usually failed to duplicate.
If it wasn't the birthplace of mod-Oz restaurant food, it was certainly its most productive nursery.
The owner-chef of Pier restaurant, Greg Doyle earned his stripes on Oxford Street as the operator of the restaurant attached to Rogues nightclub between 1979 and 1982.
The strip was home to some of the biggest names in Australian culinary history. During its golden era, the Paddington end boasted the likes of Phillip Searle at the ground-breaking Oasis Seros and an up-and-coming young chef named Neil Perry at Perry's, paving the way for later arrivals such as chefs Matt Moran, Paul Merrony and Luke Mangan. All have since left.
Doyle says the Darlinghurst end was "hip and happening".
"At Rogues, we were packed every night,'' he says. ''There was a queue 200 metres up the road.''
The lower slopes of Darlinghurst were fertile, so many top restaurateurs ploughed in. Anders Ousback set up camp at Taylor Square restaurant, across from Kinselas, where Tony Bilson gave Tetsuya Wakuda his start.
"John Pegrum ran the dining room at The Albury and Tony Barlow had the restaurant at the Burdekin hotel," Doyle says. "The area had a really good, relaxed vibe. There was none of the aggressiveness that has made the public reluctant to go there."
Much of the action has since moved to the surrounding streets.
"You'd never have thought 20 years ago that [restaurateurs] would say 'I want Crown or Bourke streets rather than Oxford'," says Conrad Vass from CV Property Group, a veteran of the area who has witnessed the change.
Operators seeking a new home have migrated to even more niche precincts in recent years, including the laneways of Darlinghurst that have been put on the map by Love, Tilly Devine and The Owl House.
At the Paddington end, there's been plenty of action in the side streets, where Fratelli Paradiso launched 10 William Street and Cipri Italian opened. But it has been the spread of high-profile eat streets across Sydney that has marked the beginning of the 21st century. From Neutral Bay to Marrickville and Kirribilli, eating strips have flourished. And in the once food-barren suburbs to the south, another shift is under way. Redfern, Alexandria and Waterloo have taken off, and Rosebery is the next star on the rise.
Old haunts, new tricks
While the 1980s and 1990s represented Oxford Street at its peak, the one constant has been Claude's, which opened in 1976 and remains a twin-toqued restaurant under current owner-chef Chui Lee Luk.
She has watched with interest the changing face of Oxford Street. She's observed the period of duplicate retail stores, the relocation of boutiques to Westfield and the current fad for pop-up stores.
"Initially, this area was arty with a bohemian buzz,'' she says. ''But rents went higher and higher and a lot of the interesting boutiques had to move out. Fortunately, a lot of the greedy landlords have seen the light and offered discounts on rents."
Lee Luk is optimistic the Paddington strip of Oxford Street will morph into something new and attract "some of the more interesting places that can't afford the rents elsewhere".
Indeed, her tiny strip of Oxford is in many ways the poster child for the street. Buzo spinoff The Wine Library has been an instant hit, and Claude's is building on its success, closing soon for a major redesign that will see it re-emerge as part fine diner, part neighbourhood eatery-speakeasy.
Four in Hand chef Colin Fassnidge is one of the new wave trying to reinvent Oxford Street. Fassnidge, who recently stepped in to produce the pub grub at the Paddington Arms Hotel, admits the strip is a challenge: "In one place there are five shops in a row for lease".
Fassnidge believes more realistic rents will attract enthusiastic new players. He says pubs have banded together to work on a unified approach to making Oxford hum again. He says part of the solution is refreshing what used to make Oxford Street a great place to visit.
"They've got the markets but they've dropped off the radar a bit. I'd like to see more fresh food there. You've got the blueprint at Eveleigh market. I've been talking to some of the chefs in the area about it and we'd really like to make it happen. We need to make the area better."


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Old April 4th, 2012, 01:43 PM   #56
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So Matt Moran's Chiswick debuts in Good Living with a score of 15/20 (1 hat territory) and is dubbed Sydney's hottest restaurant. This is despite the fact that Terry Durack awarded 16/20 (2 hat territory) to Sixpenny in Stanmore (see second article) just last week. I guess hype + celebrity chef = hot in his books...

Sydney's hottest restaurant
Terry Durack
April 3, 2012

RATING 15/20

For a cook, it changes everything when you have a garden. Suddenly every herb, vegetable or tomato is precious, and you want to keep that specialness alive in the cooking and not waste, overcook or otherwise diminish them.

For a chef, it changes everything, too. It's as if your vegetable supplier suddenly dumps four boxes of radishes on your doorstep instead of the asparagus, beans and wild mushrooms you ordered. So you design your menu around radishes. You put them into salads, you use them to garnish fish, you pickle them. People try them, they appreciate the reality behind your fresh, seasonal cooking, and they come back. No more radish surplus.

Therein lies the most beguiling feature of Chiswick, the newie from Aria's Matt Moran and Peter Sullivan. No, not the contemporary glasshouse-inspired space from Humphrey + Edwards, not the white bentwood chairs, not the open kitchen nor the long communal-tabled bar area, but the 150-square-metre vegetable garden to the side of the former Pruniers restaurant in the immaculately groomed Chiswick Gardens. Right now, it's jumping out of its skin with cherry tomatoes, rosa radishes, purple basil, lemon balm, mint, lavender, rosemary and French tarragon.

So ordering is easy. There are pickled garden vegetables as a nibble ($10) and a small but dazzling salad of rosa radish, marinated cucumber, mint and goat's curd ($22) that's all brightness and lightness. The garden gets raided again for a gentle gathering of plump, well-made veal ravioli ($22) that in the past would probably be heavily sauced and doused with cheese. Instead, it is strewn with broad beans, baby nasturtium leaves, shiso leaves, diced boiled egg and a lovely dressing.

That's what having a garden does for you. It lightens things. Instead of dreaming up wacky flavour combos in front of a computer, you simply work with what already exists and is already compatible.

A sense of self-sufficiency flows through to the big share main courses of lamb and grass-fed beef, from the Moran family farm at Rockley, near Bathurst.

The shoulder of lamb ($65) has been brined first, then roasted in the wood-fired oven for about four hours until it shreds off the bone. No carving is necessary and there's no taint of mutton fat; just the long, almost herbal, flavour of lamb.

As one of Moran's greatest early mentors, the late Joan Campbell, would have said, it's ''bloody delicious''. The only problem is it's too big to share between two.

I suggest you share between three or even four; the restaurant's profit margins be damned.

The rest of the menu is a bit all over the place but it's only the things that depart from Chiswick's core values that tend to be unconvincing. Using the American term ''sliders'' doesn't sit easily with the herbal, botanical and local philosophy. And deep-fried chicken, really?

Aria's chief sommelier, Matthew Dunne, has put together a stunner of a drinks list, with pitchers of pink, fruity things, Bloody Mary cocktails and home-made sodas (a bit wishy-washy). There's no big-dick tome of museum wines; just a good, balanced list of desirable labels helpfully assembled under headings such as ''textural, bold whites'' and ''elegant, perfumed reds'', including a savoury, supple 2010 Lark Hill pinot noir from Canberra.

Desserts might be missing a trick by not making more of the produce from garden and orchard.

A puffy, oversized ''eclair'' made with Valrhona Caramelia (chocolate caramel) and topped with almond sable ($17) is overly sweet for me, but the neighbouring plums are a treat.

Chiswick is an instant hit with the mix of A-listers and the older, lunchier, eastern suburbs crowd, and you'll be hard-put to get a table for a while yet.

While Moran can't stay away, he's more focused on Aria and his media commitments; leaving the kitchen here with Simon Sandall and Tim Bryant. Floor staff are generally cluey, and reservations are not only taken (thank the Lord) but well-governed by Marta Presciutti. Thanks are due for returning this iconic dining room to Sydney. It's a gift; a genuinely pleasant, lovely, graceful place to be.

It's also much more together than I anticipated, with a real sense of integrity coming through the produce and a kitchen clever enough to keep it simple and interesting. But why stop there? There should be some Moran family lambs grazing on the rolling lawns, a couple of wagyu calves, and a pond full of trout as well as radishes and purple basil. Woollahra Council, we live in hope.

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We use the same ratings in our reviews as The Sydney Morning Herald Good Food Guide.

Best bit The vegetable garden.

Worst bit Sharing huge plates between just two.

Go-to dish Salad of rosa radish, marinated cucumber, mint, and goat's curd, $22.

Chiswick
Address 65 Ocean Street, Woollahra, 8388 8688, chiswickrestaurant.com.au.

Open Lunch and dinner Tues-Sun.

Licensed Yes.

Cost About $135 for two, plus wine.

Score indicates

Very good.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/...#ixzz1r4DH4Ds7

Small change, big ambitions
Terry Durack
March 27, 2012

RATING: 16/20

Why Sixpenny? Because there was a time when Australian restaurants fed the working classes filling meals of soup, meat and pudding accompanied by cups of tea and bread and butter, all for the princely sum of sixpence. Sixpenny restaurants were hugely popular in the 1850s but, according to one visitor, ''they never change throughout the 365 days of the year. Invariably beef, mutton and poultry, boiled and roasted, roasted and boiled; the everlasting dish of potatoes, and sometimes some soggy boiled vegetables''.

It's sufficiently intriguing, nevertheless, that two former Josephine Pignolet Best Young Chefs have chosen to pay tribute to the past rather than doing the Gen-Y thing of assuming everything old is bad and everything new is good. Nor have they chosen to go the dude-food route and for that we bless them.

James Parry, 33, and Daniel Puskas, 30, have worked in some of the world's finest kitchens -

Parry at Mugaritz in Spain and Copenhagen's Noma, and Puskas at New York's WD-50 and Alinea in Chicago. Puskas relinquished his prime co-chef position at the current Restaurant of the Year, Sepia, to once again team up with his former Oscillate Wildly colleague. Together, with former Codfather partner Chris Sharp, the pair has taken over a sweet little 1907 corner site, transforming it into a quietly mature, Nordically inspired dining space of bare-but-beautiful dark tables and chairs surrounding a central wooden serving station.

In a nod to modern dining's no-barriers philosophy, the chefs bring the food to the tables. Parry is first, bearing a pat of creamy ''mascarpone'' butter and a loaf of good, house-made crusty sourdough.

In a flurry of starters reminiscent of Copenhagen's Noma, out comes a pale and pretty pickle of baby veg from the chefs' garden plot in Bowral and some super-fine, super-crunchy malt and vinegar crisps that cling together like atomic clusters. Next comes a knuckle sandwich (Cutest Title Award), a tiny brioche toastie of soft ham hock with apple and mustard seed jelly. Next to it - I'm not sure why - is a single duck's tongue, free of cartilage, cushioned on a baby cos leaf.

And so it goes; the food is freshly put together as if just picked and plated. No heavy sauces, no huge protein hits, and definitely no ''soggy boiled vegetables''; just beautifully balanced, gently textural, lightly savoury small courses. Key notes are herbal, botanical, floral, earthy. There are roots, shoots, leaves, nuts, seeds and grasses as lead accompaniments instead of potatoes, grains and pulses. A gentle, giving fillet of snapper is dressed with pumpkin seed cream, buttery leeks and slightly mealy, crushed roasted pumpkin seeds. A white-on-white puddle of mudcrab in a silky macadamia nut cream is one of those sneak-up-on-you dishes; the flavours rooted in Australia, yet heaven-sent.

Only one dish goes awry for me and that's a daylily bud, coated in caramel. Thrilled about the daylily (Hemerocallis fulva), unconvinced by the caramel.

Then along comes ''peas, beans and cheese'', a thoroughly grounded dish highlighting more bounty from Bowral, teamed with pillow-soft curd. Next, a plug of roasted and relaxed Suffolk lamb with sweet onion broth is charmingly topped with sweet onions.

Desserts are not as immediately engaging; perhaps because they play in a narrower field of ice-cream, sour lemon and caramel. Or perhaps because they come as the final three courses in the flow of things, when hunger, appetite and the need for entertainment have peaked. The latter theory then gets blown out of the water by the unseemly scrambling at our table to get our hands in the ''cookie jar'' of petits fours; a glass preserving jar filled with micro-lamingtons, butternut snaps, kingstons and monte carlos.

You can choose to have dinner served with matching wines for an extra $55, or the well-mannered wait staff will introduce you to a few highlights from the wide-ranging, sweetly put-together list, most of which is sourced from NSW and the ACT. I scored a clean yet complex NV Centennial Blanc de Blanc ($13 a glass) from the Southern Highlands; a fresh, savoury Mount Majura Chardonnay from Canberra ($13) and a cracker of a 2009 Tertini Pinot Noir, again from the Southern Highlands ($90).

Sixpenny may be small but it's a significant opening for Sydney, the first of what could be a whole new breed of small, personal, young-chef, post-Noma restaurants with an emphasis on garden produce and sustainability. The cooking is accomplished, the flavours clean and seasonally matched, the effort, intent and ambition palpable. It will steal your heart away.

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We use the same ratings in our reviews as The Sydney Morning Herald Good Food Guide.

The Low-down

Best bit The cookie-jar petits fours.

Worst bit Maybe a little too reminiscent of Noma.

Go-to dish Peas, beans and cheese.


Sixpenny
Address 83 Percival Road, Stanmore, 9572 6666, sixpenny.com.au.

Open Lunch Sat-Sun;dinner Wed-Sat.

Licensed Yes.

Cost Six-course menu $105pp, plus wine; eight courses $125, plus wine.

Score indicates Capable of greatness.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/...#ixzz1r4E0QP4a
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Old April 4th, 2012, 01:46 PM   #57
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Also...

Is the North Shore going to shake off the shackles of being known purely as a damn good place to live (and not much else), with a small bar revolution that could make it the hub of Sydney's bar culture? Is it going to overtake the inner eastern trio of Darlinghurst/Potts Point/Surry Hills? The SMH would like to think so...

Bar hop: Vinobravo Wine Bar
Rachel Olding
April 3, 2012

RATING 3.5/5

It won't be long before Neutral Bay and Cremorne take the small bar crown from Surry Hills and Darlinghurst, such is the rate of great bars opening that side of the bridge. But unlike their inner-city counterparts, these newbies are a little less grunge and a little more refined.

MUCH LIKE ITS NEIGHBOURS Honey Rider and Local Bar, Vinobravo is a mature kind of bar, with slick, minimalist decor making clever use of a small, narrow space. Metal stools line a long bar covered in pressed silver, and white walls are punctuated by bright New York-style photographs, black tiles and dark timber tables. The furniture is simple and not quite as inviting as a cosy couch in a dimly lit corner but it's very Italiano chic. All it needs is a naff, slicked-up man on a Vespa and the picture is complete.

THIS IS A WINE BAR at heart so we begin with just that. The list was put together by owner David Brown with the help of suppliers and friends and it's predominantly Italian with some French, Australian and Kiwi wines thrown in. ''I had a big taste test at my house with 30 people and we culled it down to 70 wines,'' says Brown, a former lawyer who threw it all in last year to open the bar. ''It was lots of fun.'' There are 26 wines and champagnes by the glass and about twice that by the bottle. The Ercole Velenosi Offida DOC pecorino from Marche ($10.50) is an interesting entry into the Italian list - an intense, straw-yellow wine that is both crisp and sweet - and the 2009 Bonacchi Chianti Gentilesco from Tuscany ($11) is a fitting exit - it's a medium-bodied, tangy digestive that goes down well after a meal on a quiet weeknight.

WITH NO KITCHEN, the food is limited to easy share plates made using the bare basics behind the bar. Haloumi comes in thick slices with simple lemon (6.50); and Sicilian olives ($5), while advertised as chilli and lemon flavoured, taste bland. Simple crostini with toppings such as roast pepper puree, spicy Italian cacciatore sausage and fetta ($12), and pizzettes with marinated grilled zucchini, fontina, pine nuts and fresh mint ($10) are filling but not amazingly tasty. This food should be treated as the support act, not the main attraction. Cheese and salumi are a good bet and Monday nights are tasting nights with three cheese-wine pairings for $18.

COCKTAILS GET THE ITALIAN TOUCH, too. Classics such as Sidecars, Negronis and Martinis are jazzed up with Italian liqueurs and flavours such as prosecco, blood orange and limoncello. A Limoncello Martini (limoncello, citron vodka, lemon juice, $15) with a sugar-crusted rim, and a Negroni Sbagliato (Campari, prosecco, sweet vermouth, $15) both find a great balance of sugar and tart, although they could pack more of a punch considering they're showcasing two of Italy's gutsiest spirits. Best go for the original Negroni (Negroni gin, campari, sweet vermouth, $15). Or better still, a Menabrea beer ($9), which is so fresh and easy to drink we buy a six-pack on our way home. Stick to the wines and beers and it'll be a worthwhile trip to little Italy.

YOU’LL LOVE IT IF you want a couple of wines on the northside.

YOU’LL HATE IT IF you’re looking for a substantial dinner, too.

GO FOR Menabrea beer, Ercole Velenosi pecorino, haloumi.

IT’LL COST YOU wine by the glass $8.50-$15, cocktails $15, bottled beers $7.50-$9, pizzettes $10.

Vinobravo Wine Bar

Address 350 Military Road, Cremorne, 9904 4668

Open Mon-Fri, 4pm-midnight; Sat, noon-midnight; Sun, noon-10pm

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/...#ixzz1r4EzZ2k6
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Old April 17th, 2012, 04:23 PM   #58
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Short black
SCOTT BOLLES
April 17, 2012

Coffee makes an exhibition of itself

''The cafe has taken over from the pub. We supply the social lubricant pubs used to,'' Ben Sweeten, owner of Joe Black in Surry Hills, says. Sydney is in the grip of a Melbourne invasion of our caffeine scene as witnessed by Seven Seeds's rumoured move (see item below) to Surry Hills. But has the humble cuppa got ahead of itself with a Melbourne barista the centre of a four-day art exhibition kicking off on Thursday at the Outre Gallery at 285A Crown Street in Surry Hills? The exhibition - where the barista is the exhibit - shirks cafe art of pretty pictures in your cappuccino froth, focusing on black coffee with the catchcry ''no milk, no sugar, no espresso and no bullshit''. Barista Mark Free, who says a milky coffee hasn't touched his lips for six months, has the lingo of the art world. ''It's good to take things out of context,'' he says of the gallery setting. ''It's about transparency, demystifying. Showing that it is, and isn't, an art form.'' Got that? Free will use various brewing methods, including siphon and pour over, as Sydney comes to grips with the coffee boom. Sweeten says the recently opened The Grounds, 2 Huntley Street, Alexandria - a combined cafe, bakery, garden and coffee ''research facility'' - is a sign of how quickly the revolution is proceeding: ''It is the ultimate of ultimate. The area where they talk about coffee is bigger than my cafe,'' he says. Sweeten, who sells about 500 takeaway coffees from his cafe daily, maintains there has been a cultural shift in attitude to coffee. ''These days it's as much about the social side as caffeine.''

Turnbull to switch across the ditch

In a worrisome sign for a potential Sydney restaurant brain drain, Warren Turnbull is selling his toqued Surry Hills restaurant, Assiette, and will relocate to Auckland. ''Business owners do extremely well in New Zealand, particularly with wages and rents,'' the talented chef says. Veteran restaurateur Neil Perry has long complained about the competitive disadvantage of operating a restaurant in Australia. ''The red tape and labour costs [here] are crazy,'' Perry says. ''We're just waiting to see with electricity costs and carbon taxes how high energy costs will go.'' Turnbull (pictured) has noted a customer shift away from the upper-end dining he championed at Assiette. ''I'm not sure people want to spend money on a degustation menu any more,'' he says. ''I love doing it, but I'm not sure I love it so much I don't want money in my pocket.'' Turnbull was lucky to spot the trend early, opening the more casual District Dining 18 months ago in Surry Hills, a restaurant he will retain. An opportunity to launch an Auckland branch of District Dining opened his eyes to opportunities across the Tasman. A pop-up eatery, Mexico, he opened during the Rugby World Cup was such a success it became permanent. He'll open a second branch on Auckland's north shore in July. Turnbull will also open a casual restaurant in the Auckland city centre in August. ''When you look at the bottom line, District Dining does better than Assiette, and Mexico does even better again,'' he says.

Right for Wong

Tetsuya's general manager, Jerry Jones, is headed to Justin Hemmes's soon-to-open Mr Wong restaurant in the city. A Merivale spokeswoman confirmed Jones (pictured) will ''look after Mr Wong''. It is a key signing for Hemmes. Jones is a high-profile recruit with some prized sommelier awards in his kit.

Seven Seeds in the Sydney picture?

Melbourne coffee roaster and cafe operator Seven Seeds is believed to be headed to Sydney. Short Black hears the crew from SS has teamed up with the owner of Sydney cafe outfit Reuben Hills and will open in the Paramount Pictures building, opposite Longrain, in Surry Hills. It's the same building where Bo Hanna's Lo Studio briefly traded and a rooftop cinema business tried to open before running into problems with residents. A spokesman for Reuben Hills declined to comment on the rumour.

Manfield comes up trumps in taste test

Tasting India by Christine Manfield (pictured) won the best cookbook and culinary travel categories at the International Association of Culinary Professionals Awards in New York City. Restaurateur Lucio Galletto's tome, The Art of Pasta, took out the food photography and styling award. It was also named the people's choice.

More action destined for the High Street

The food news for Willoughby just keeps getting better, with the 191-197 High Street precinct where Jeff Turnbull'sHigh St Bistro and Dose Espresso gathered good reviews about to get a new set of restaurant operators. Former Sushi-Ya chef Sang Lee'sGochiso Japanese Restaurant joins the action on the strip in June. Owners of Sydney's Firefly restaurants open The Italian the following month.

Brothers at arm's length over Toko restaurants

The Bird Cow Fish site at 500 Crown Street, Surry Hills, will reopen in June as a ''traditional'' bistro. Speculation the restaurant is backed by Toko'sMatt Yazbek (pictured) is on the money, the restaurateur telling Short Black he has other ventures in the pipeline, with a new ''Japanese influenced'' project hopefully opening in another suburb by summer. Matt, who is locked in a legal battle with his brother and former business partner Al Yazbek, says the separation of their business interests ''took place some time ago'' and he is the owner of Toko Surry Hills, while Al has Toko Paddington. However, Al disagrees, saying, ''Matt would like to think the impasse in regards to the restaurants has been resolved but nothing could be further from the truth. That's why lawyers are involved.''

Open wharf fare in Nowra

The Nowra waterfront site where The Boatshed traded will reopen in late June as Wharf Road, a new restaurant from former Book Kitchen chef David Campbell and his wife, Nicole. The couple are expanding their interests on the south coast after opening Hungry Duck in Berry three years ago. The one-time harbour master's residence at 10 Wharf Road, Nowra, is receiving a complete overhaul from local interior designer Rebecca Riles. "We're putting in a big wood-fired barbecue where we'll use lots of local produce, wagyu from Gerringong and alpaca," Campbell (pictured) says.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/cuis...#ixzz1sIsiZI7b
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Old April 23rd, 2012, 05:44 PM   #59
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Mark 2012 as the year Angel Place/Ash Street truly take off. There are still a number of spaces available for lease in the little laneway set up. Let's hope they are taken up soon too

Short black
Scott Bolles
April 24, 2012

Four Seasons in one deal for Bar H partners
Hamish Ingham and Rebecca Lines from Surry Hills hottie Bar H are set to ink a massive deal with Sydney's Four Seasons hotel to operate a new restaurant and oversee room service and a bar. The deal has similarities to the one Luke Mangan struck with Hilton Sydney. The Four Seasons, at the Circular Quay end of George Street, is undergoing a major revamp of its food venues. Its signature restaurant, Kable's, is being scrapped for a Michael McCann-designed restaurant on the ground floor, plus a new bar, with a feature glass wall that will retract into the ceiling creating an opening window on to George Street. ''We've agreed to basic terms, but we're still nutting out the detail," Ingham says. The restaurant would include a wood-fire grill and rustic-style cooking. The chef is clearly confident of getting the deal over the line, recruiting Est pan rattler Joshua Niland as head chef of the new restaurant, set to open in October.

Jones set to say goodbye Sailor
Businessman Greg Jones pocketed a reported $45 million from the controversial float of Rams Home Loans, now he's hoping to add another quick million to his fortune by offloading Sailors Thai restaurant at The Rocks. The restaurant and its canteen popped up as a listing, without a name, at broker Michael Fischer & Associates. Bill Sweeney, who oversees the Sailors Thai investment for Jones, confirms the photographs are the famed Thai restaurant, and rumours of a $1.4 million price tag are "around the mark". While best known for its connection with chef David Thompson, the now Bangkok-based chef sold out of Sailors Thai several years ago. Thompson's business partner at Sailor's, the late Peter Bowyer, drafted Jones in as an investor. "Greg was just trying to help Peter out,'' Sweeney says. ''Greg now lives in Hong Kong so it doesn't figure in his plans.'' Sailors still has cache: the team from MasterChef was camped in the restaurant last week. Michael Fischer continues to try to sell toqued Surry Hills restaurant Assiette. It has a $285,000 price tag.

Milsons near point of no return
Things don't look good for Milsons in Kirribilli, where unopened mail is littered inside the door, the shelves have been stripped of wine, and tables and chairs are stacked around the room. A spokesman for the restaurant told Short Black: ''It is closed and will remain closed.'' He refused to comment further. Milsons was one of the ridgy-didge pioneers of the Sydney dining scene, so fingers crossed it reopens its doors down the track.


David Allison hopes to open new bistro/fine diner Gramercy at 350 George Street in September.
The network of city lanes around Felix and Ash Street Cellar is about to get another food boost, with David Allison opening Gramercy restaurant in the one-time site of a Dymocks outlet at the back of 350 George Street. Allison, owner of Stix Catering, lodged a development application last week and hopes to open the restaurant's doors in September. He has taken leave from his catering work to brush up on trends in the kitchens of internationally famed restaurants including The Fat Duck and Per Se in New York City. Despite the pedigree of those restaurants, he says Gramercy won't be a fine diner. "It'll be in between a bistro and fine dining," he says. Another new project - from the crew at China Doll - is finally taking shape at Angel Place, which is only an Adam Goodes hand-pass away from the Gramercy site. After numerous delays, co-owner Steve Anastasiou says building work should finally start at the modern-Asian restaurant this week. They've also settled on a name: China Lane.


Tweet and sour in Surry Hills
When Bar H began serving quick Asian lunch items last week under the label Little H, it didn't anticipate setting off a war of words in Surry Hills. ''Boring H is my clue to the bland person doing similar if not the same lunch offerings within 100 meters [sic] of Shortgrain,'' tweeted Longrain and Shortgrain co-owner Martin Boetz. Bar H chef and co-owner Hamish Ingham has pedigree with Asian cooking, as a former head chef at Billy Kwong. Ingham's partner Rebecca Lines returned Twitter fire for her beau: ''Seriously? Enough's enough. You did not invent chicken wings, tofu salad or takeaway.''

You just can't keep a good man down
Is Tony Bilson about to launch himself back into the restaurant game? The veteran chef has been touting his food products across Sydney since his restaurant empire imploded earlier this year. But his Facebook page has been active, sharing a link to author Michel Houellebecq, a writer the chef calls "a contemporary Camus". In between his Houllebecq observations, Bilson puts out a call for a manager for a waterside restaurant. "Great pay, big job … you will need a car or speedboat," Bilson touts. He was unavailable for comment, but Short Black hears he is headed to a gig in the kitchen of Danny's seafood restaurant at La Perouse. It may not be Provence, but La Perouse is as close as Sydney gets for the Francophile.

Bill continues his Asian adventure
After opening his first Bills in Tokyo's answer to Palm Beach, Shichirigahama, in 2008, Bill Granger has built a small chain of Bills in Japan. Last week he added his first in central Tokyo to the collection. ''None were affected by the tsunami except from blackouts and being very careful with food sources,'' a Bills spokeswoman told Short Black. ''No staff, thankfully, had any family members directly affected.''

Labbozzetta strikes out on his own
After stints working at Il Piave in Rozelle and Paddington's Cipri Italian, Attilio Labbozzetta has opened his own venue, Gigino, at 338 Hamilton Road, Fairfield West. Labbozzetta will offer a different ''home-cooked meal'' each night.



Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/...#ixzz1ssHpAn00
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Old April 23rd, 2012, 05:48 PM   #60
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Set the meals in motion
Linda Morris
April 24, 2012

From their new food truck, Cantina Mobil, Rode Vella and Stephanie Raco will peddle a menu of slow-cooked Mexican treats, non-alcoholic sangria and chilli-chocolate ice-cream. They are revving the engines and expect to open for business in the next few days. Their competition is not far behind, with Sydney's fleet of food trucks expected to roll out by July.

Veggie Patch, a colourful food truck selling quality vegetarian fare and built to resemble a barn, is close to completion, as is Peter Saad's pastizzi-filled van.

The Asian-inspired Tsuru is attending pop-up events before its launch. The Eat Art Truck says it is eager to start. Stephene Chevassus a L'Antoine of Urban Pasta says he will be on the road in late June. His truck is still being built. ''I hope it's earlier but I prefer to plan large,'' he says.

The arrival of mobile food trucks will inject excitement into the city food scene, and vendors are promising fresh and honest food, sometimes with added extras. Four truck locations have been approved while others are waiting for confirmation. The proposed sites are shown.

Rowan Bates of Lets Do Yum Cha says his truck will have daily specials, as well as special offers for social media followers. Al Carbon's chef, Attila Yilmaz, promises ''music, seating depending on location and the occasional mariachi. We want to encourage people to hang around and party with us.''

''There's definitely a gap in the market between the food court and the local restaurant,'' Saad, of the Bite Size Delights truck, says. ''There's a demand for food at odd times of the day and night, and before and after work, and [at] trading centres not well served by retail food outlets.''

Council plans to operate 12 food truck stops in the city, rotating vans every three hours through prominent, high-traffic sites including the Customs House forecourt, Martin Place and Pitt Street Mall, as well as parks on the edge of the central business district.

Food trucks will also be free to park along designated roads in fringe CBD suburbs such as Glebe and Surry Hills under a schedule to be finalised by council soon. Vendors will be required to keep to parking limits and not park within 200 metres of existing food venues.

Scheduled stop-offs will be booked by Sydney City Council and customers can track truck locations via a smartphone app. After a year-long trial, the council will decide if the vans will become a permanent fixture. Initially, there will be no seating, but some vendors hope this will change once security, lighting and public liability issues are resolved.

As to which truck goes where, and when, Saad hopes the vendors can, over time, work co-operatively to share sites based on demand. Some operators expect steady all-day demand whereas others are gearing up for mealtime rushes. Given public support, Saad thinks the food truck idea could expand to other council areas, as well as corporate events and public holiday festivals.

THE FIRST FLEET

Eat Art Truck

Food style Progressive food with a barbecue theme influenced by Japanese and Korean cuisine and the US's deep south.
Signature dishes Southern-style smoky barbecue; Korean ssam-style wraps; kingfish ceviche; Japanese-influenced seafood dishes with salads and homemade pickles.
Chef/creator Stuart McGill has been at Tetsuya's for five years - three as sous chef - and has worked at Longrain and Galileo.
Mission To make great food, using techniques from some of the city's top restaurants, accessible to Sydneysiders at different times throughout the day.
Extras The menu will be divided into Small Eats, Green Eats, Main Eats and Sweet Eats. One side of the van will display work by some of Sydney's best street artists. The art will change regularly and be auctioned at an annual charity event.
Prices From $6.

Lets Do Yum Cha

Food style Chinese favourites such as barbecue pork buns, prawn and chive dumplings, chicken dim sims, prawn gow gee, vegetarian gow gee and mushroom gow gee.
Signature dishes Twice-cooked pork belly with plum sauce served on a Chinese spoon; seasonally available dessert of mango pancake.
Chef/creator A variety of chefs with a combined 50 years' experience making authentic yum cha.
Mission To bring Sydney authentic yum cha, made fresh from locally sourced ingredients.
Extras Trailer folds out into an Asian-style dining cart. There will be offers for the truck's social media followers and daily specials.
Prices Yum cha, $2-$2.50/piece; $10/pack of six.

Cantina Mobil

Food style Slow-cooked Mexican treats, with non-alcoholic sangria and chilli-chocolate ice-cream.
Signature dishes Chipotle beef, slow-roasted for six hours and served with soft-flour tortilla teamed with a chilli con queso; slow-cooked pinto beans.
Chef/creator Simon Livingstone, former sous chef for Kensington Place in London and founding head chef at InSitu in Manly.
Mission To create accessible, gourmet fast food using Australian raw produce and imported Mexican chillies, seeds and pulses.
Extras Customers can perch on Mexican blankets placed around the truck.
Prices Chilli corn, $3.50/tub; tacos, $4.50; burritos, $9.50.

Veggie Patch

Cantina Mobil's Rode Vella. Photo: James Brickwood
Food style Quality vegetarian fare and fresh juices.
Signature dishes Burger with a zucchini and chickpea fritter, caramelised onions, beetroot relish and roasted baby tomatoes; fresh seasonal juices and smoothies; bircher muesli for breakfast.
Chef/creator Danya Bilinsky and a roster of chefs.
Mission To connect growers with diners, using seasonal produce from local sources.
Extras Trailer resembles a wooden barn. An information chart maps and explains the origin of each ingredient. All waste is compostable. Vegetable oil and solar panels power the cooking and van.
Prices About $10.

Tsuru

Food style Asian street fare, from steamed half-moon Chinese buns filled with a variety of ingredients (braised pork belly and pickles, roasted duck and lychee, crispy fried chicken, barbecue beef with kimchi, and fried tofu) to chicken/lamb satay skewers, and onigiri (Japanese rice balls).
Signature dishes The Pig, a piece of pork belly roasted, then slow-braised for hours according to an old family recipe, then sandwiched between steamed buns with cucumber pickles.
Chef/creator Ellyn Tse, proprietor and head chef of the catering business Little Nyonya, and volunteer chef for the non-profit organisation, Eat. Drink. Give.
Mission To interpret Asian street food culture for Sydney appetites.
Extras From time to time, customers will be invited to help with the charity. Each dish comes with a paper crane to spread a message of peace.
Prices: $2.50-$4.50.

Bite Size Delights

Food style Traditional Maltese pastry pockets served with about 15 different fillings, and fruit drinks featuring Australian native fruits and berries.
Signature dishes Fillings include spinach and ricotta, salmon and dill, and beef and vegetable curry.
Chef/creator Peter Saad, catering manager for five years.
Mission To offer high quality snacks, baked fresh on site.
Extras Aims to promote community and culture and schedule entertainment where possible.
Prices $3 each

Taco Truck

Food style Gourmet spin on traditional Mexican treats.
Signature dishes Chicken taco with corn-and-orange salsa and mayonnaise; vegetarian taco with potato, jalapeno peppers, ricotta, coleslaw and salsa verde; fish taco with coleslaw, poppyseed mayonnaise and lime squeeze; fresh guacamole and corn chips and lime.
Chef/creator Rafael Rashid, Melbourne's food truck pioneer.
Mission To introduce captivating Mexican fare to streets of Sydney.
Extras Fresh salsa roja free with guacamole and corn chips.
Prices Taco, $6; taco plate, $12 with choice of two tacos, a handful of corn chips and lime juice squeeze; guacamole and chips, $5.

Al Carbon

Food style Soft tacos freshly cooked to order over mesquite (mangrove charcoal) with homemade salsas.
Signature dishes Carne asada (marinated beef steak); al pastor (spicy marinated pork, spit-roasted with charred pineapple); el turco (spit roasted lamb); vampiro (crisp chargrilled dried tortilla with carne asada, melted Oaxacan queso, salsa roja and garlic crema). The truck will also sell raspados - sweet and spicy fruit flavours frozen into blocks and finely shaved, then topped with fruit syrups, agave syrup and dulce de leche.
Chef/creator Attila Yilmaz - former police officer, catering business owner and ''passionate foodie''.
Mission To introduce uncomplicated and authentic north Mexican street-style tacos to Sydney.
Extras Trailer lowers to ground level and opens out as a pop-up Mexican-style street stall.
Prices $10.50-$12.50/three tacos and traditional trimmings on the side.

Agape Organic

Food style Certified organic spelt pizzas and tapas, mini burgers and chocolate spelt brownies.
Signature dishes Gundooee wagyu beef meatball pizza; chocolate spelt brownie.
Chef/creator Simon Lawson, owner and executive chef of Agape, a certified organic restaurant in Botany.
Mission To bring certified organic food that is tasty and nutritious to the streets of Sydney.
Extras For every pizza sold, a meal will be donated to aid organisation Feed the Hungry. Menu will be seasonal and changing.
Prices Pizzas, about $9.

Urban Pasta

Food style Italian pasta favourites with sauces made to original recipes.
Signature dishes Slow-cooked duck ragu.
Chef/creator Stephane Chevassus a L'Antoine, a self-taught chef and food enthusiast, who trained for six months at Lanzafame Trattoria in Woolloomooloo.
Mission To produce fresh, convenient and quality food, add vibrancy to city life and foster a sense of community.
Extras Pasta cooked to order in front of customers, with gluten-free options. Daily selection of classic French desserts, including macarons, creme caramel, creme brulee and petits pots de creme.
Prices $7 to $11, depending on portion sizes.

Food trucks with council approval
1. Queen's Square, near St James station, Sydney. 5pm-2am Mon-Fri; 7am-2am Sat-Sun. 2. Hyde Park North. 9pm-2am daily. 3. Victoria Park (car park), Camperdown. 7am-2am daily. 4. Victoria Park (City Road), Camperdown. 6pm-2am daily.

Awaiting confirmation or proposed food trucks
1 Belmore Park. 7am-3am daily. 2 Macquarie Place Park, Bridge Street, Sydney. 9pm-3am daily. 3 Customs House forecourt, Circular Quay. 9pm-2am daily. 4 Pitt Street Mall, 9pm-2am daily. 5 Pirrama Park, Pyrmont. 7pm-2am daily. 6 Minogue Reserve, Glebe. 12pm-12am Mon-Fri; 7am-12am Sat-Sun. 7 Bicentennial Park, Glebe, 6am-12am daily. 8 Sydney Park, Alexandria. Two locations: Sydney Park Road car park; Princess Hwy car park. 7am-12am daily.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/...#ixzz1ssJh3RWY
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