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Old July 26th, 2010, 10:05 AM   #141
IchimaruGin1
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hmm more than cars I forsee a lot of highly efficient electric mopeds hitting the roads all round the world in 5 years time. More like city mopeds with a range of 100km and a charging time of 5-6hours. Top speed something like 40-50km per hour cost about $3000-$4000
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Old July 26th, 2010, 07:26 PM   #142
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This is exciting on more than just EV level, future with driverless vehicles is finally within our grasp and here is its first, epic testing journey

Driverless EVs Begin 8,000 Mile Journey From Italy to China



A team of Italian engineers is gearing up for a high-tech road rally that should impress even the outside-the-box dreamers over at DARPA: an 8,000-mile journey from Italy to China, with nobody behind the wheel.

The three-month convoy will be the longest test of driverless vehicles ever conducted, taking the cars through twisting mountain passes, Moscow traffic, and harsh Siberian weather before ending up in the sprawling roadways of Shanghai in October.

Of course, when we say there's nobody behind the wheel, that's not entirely accurate. The project includes two electric-powered "driverless" vans, each of which will carry two technicians. One of them will always be in the driver seat ready to press the red "oh sh*t!" button and take control should the car's laser scanners, cameras, and software get into a situation that might turn dangerous.

Each van will work in tandem with a manned leader van that will drive ahead and give its driverless counterpart cues on where it's going next. But the driverless vehicle will be responsible for negotiating traffic and responding to the environment and obstacles around it. Only one driverless van and leader vehicle will operate at a time; the other pair will be hauled behind on a truck. The vans require an eight-hour charge after every few hours on the road, so even traveling at speeds between 30-37 miles per hour — not very fast but not a crawl either — the going will be very slow.

The transcontinental trek is more of a stress test for driverless technology than a demonstration, and the project leaders concede that the cars will likely need quite a bit of help from humans. But the 100 terabytes of information collected en route will go a long way toward helping the driverless technology maker, VisLab, improve its intelligent systems and artificial vision.

The idea is that someday 100 percent driverless technology could be used to freight cargo across continents autonomously or to reduce troop risk by running driverless military supply convoys, goals more or less congruent with those put forth by DARPA when it created the Urban Challenge several years ago. Of course, there's one more immediate challenge facing the team: Where, exactly, does one charge up a next-gen electric vehicle in the middle of Siberia?

http://gizmodo.com/5593012/two-drive...=Google+Reader
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Old July 27th, 2010, 01:56 PM   #143
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what gets me exited about EVs is that they are much more quiet then regular cars. Imagine how this potentially changes the way we build cities, motorways, etc!
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Old July 27th, 2010, 02:44 PM   #144
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what gets me exited about EVs is that they are much more quiet then regular cars. Imagine how this potentially changes the way we build cities, motorways, etc!
Most of the noise is not from the engine, but from the tires. I've noticed a great difference in the noise level on different types of pavement.
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Old July 27th, 2010, 04:06 PM   #145
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Most of the noise is not from the engine, but from the tires. I've noticed a great difference in the noise level on different types of pavement.
Yeah but since there is no exhaust fumes in EVs you can build large tunnels that where impossible to build due to ventilation issues (such as a tunnel between Europe and Africa at Gibraltar), or park the car indoors.
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Old July 27th, 2010, 04:18 PM   #146
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Yeah but since there is no exhaust fumes in EVs you can build large tunnels that where impossible to build due to ventilation issues (such as a tunnel between Europe and Africa at Gibraltar), or park the car indoors.
Now you're talking. I like the sound of that.

Also note that the Chevy Volt has (will have) a 40-mile range per charge, plus a gasoline engine that is NOT connected to the drivetrain, and is only used to power the battery. I hope there's an option to temporarily disable the gasoline engine, to be used in ridiculously long tunnels like that, or wherever ventilation is a problem.
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Old July 27th, 2010, 05:08 PM   #147
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Mixed engine are probably a very temporary solution, by the time we'll have these tunnels, they won't even be around

I wonder if all the mechanics are going to be out of job with proliferation of electric cars? They won't break nearly as much and when they do, there's little our current mechanics can do.
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Old July 27th, 2010, 05:40 PM   #148
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I was thinking more in the line of



We know better option for hundrets of years:

It can pull more cargo for smaller amounts of energy, and is more eco friendly.
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Old July 27th, 2010, 06:17 PM   #149
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It can pull more cargo for smaller amounts of energy, and is more eco friendly.
...and it's stuck on rails.
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Old July 27th, 2010, 07:04 PM   #150
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Not really an electric car, actually, it's hard to classify it

London's personal rapid transit driverless pods, I don't know much about them, except that they're going to be originally used at the Heathrow airport






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Old July 28th, 2010, 01:40 AM   #151
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Actually the Tesla Roadster is already one of the most muscly cars out there today, doesn't it have the fastest acceleration in the market today or something.
No. It is faster than a lot of supercars when it comes to acceleration, but most Lambos and Ferraris will still outrun it. Its top speed is also much lower than the vast majorityt of cars in its price range(a $48,000 corvette will outrun it).

As for muscle, i think you need to redefine things a little. THIS is muscle:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Vy9LCEwHRY

I'm sure the Tesla has plenty of redeeming qualities, but "muscle" is not one of them. Muscle is about a lot more than just going fast. A lot of fast cars can't be called muscle cars.

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Electric motors get 100% torque at 0 second. No oily transmission, gears, millions of clumsy Victorian-age gasping gaskets and jumping pinions and pistons, electric cars are easy to maintain and more macho to accelerate.

**** the environment I just want to drive a car running on something that wasn't around in Jules Verne's times!
It seems like you just want to be progressive for the sake of being progressive.
That's fine, I guess. I don't think its very convincing reasoning but to each their own.
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Old July 28th, 2010, 01:42 AM   #152
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Mixed engine are probably a very temporary solution, by the time we'll have these tunnels, they won't even be around

I wonder if all the mechanics are going to be out of job with proliferation of electric cars? They won't break nearly as much and when they do, there's little our current mechanics can do.
Fewer parts in electric motors will mean less work, but it is silly to suggest that all mechanics are going to be out of a job. Electric cars, like all cars, still are going to have plenty of systems necessary to drive the car and keep all of the other systems in the vehicle functioning well.
Batteries are going to break and/or need regular disposal/servicing to.

About mixed engines-they are going to be a big deal for a while, and here is why.

Electric cars are not 2 years away from truly worldwide proliferation. They're not even 5 years away. They are decades away. It is going to be a long time before pricing gets to the point where we are going to have legitimate, affordable alternatives to the average Corolla or gas powered Civic capable of operating in any environment, even wintery ones. Will it happen in my lifetime? Probably. I'm 19, and assuming I meet the average life expectancy I will die roughly 60 years froim now. There will be major progress by the year 2070 for sure, likely earlier.

Until then, combustion engines are going to remain the dominant force on the market, and their main challengers will be mixed engines(hybrids and plug in hybrids). Keep in mind that even when electric cars DO begin proliferating, they will do so in a limited way. They'll be sold primarily in western developed countries(Western Europe, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Japan primarily) and even there they are going to be noticeably expensive for a good while. Those are also going to be the only countries for a long time that will be able to create and maintain the infrastructure necessary to keep a large number of electric vehicles going. Nigeria, India, Pakistan and China are not going to be on the same level as Japan will be when it comes to their electric cars.

The vast majority of the world's expanding automotive market will be in developing nations where people are going to be driving little Renault Logans and Tata Nanos or, in the case of China, a whole lot of old VWs. They care about cheap, efficient transport-progressivism means NOTHING to your average joe trying to get by, especially in the developing world. The vast majority of the cars in these rapidly expanding markets are going to be conventionally powered because electric cars are going to be too expensive and the infrastructure to support them will not be available. Only hybrids will remain affordable, and even then only for a few.

That means that combustion engines are going to be a force for much of the rest of this century until battery technology matures and becomes cheaper and more reliable. Environmentally concerned individuals should focus on making combustion engines more efficient and eco-friendly. That will do more for the environment over the next 60 years than limiting one's scope to alternative energies because it is going to effect many more cars in many more places and a lot more people to. If you can focus on making the millions of cheap cars flooding into these developing markets cleaner, you'll have done a lot more for your cause.
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Old July 28th, 2010, 01:46 AM   #153
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I wasn't making a statement, rather posing a question. I can't really say anything about repair of electric cars, other than that everything I've read points to a lot less repairs.
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Old July 28th, 2010, 05:16 AM   #154
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It’s Official: Chevrolet Volt Will Cost $41,000



he big question about the Chevrolet Volt was answered today when General Motors said the car will cost $41,000. Add in the federal electric-vehicle tax credit and you’re looking at $33,500. Yes, that’s a lot. But the General says you’re getting a lot for your money.

GM begins taking orders today and says the first Volts roll into driveways by year’s end. The brass were quick to call this “a historic day” and they rarely miss a chance to call the Volt “a game-changer.” Hyperbole aside, the Chevrolet Volt and the Nissan Leaf we’ll see later this year are the first mass-market highway-legal electric vehicles to hit the market.

“This is a real car,” said Joel Ewanick, VP of North American marketing. “It just happens to be electric. This is not a niche vehicle. This is the future of the automobile.”

That remains to be seen. And with just 10,000 slated for production in 2011, the Volt will be a niche vehicle until GM starts ramping up production in 2012 and beyond. But that doesn’t make it any less of a step forward.


Although electricity is the only thing that drives the Volt’s wheels, it differs from EVs like the Leaf in that it gets an assist from internal combustion. The four-passenger, five-door compact sports a 16-kilowatt-hour lithium-ion battery that’s good for 40 miles. Beyond that, a gasoline engine seamlessly kicks on to drive the 53-kilowatt generator that keeps juice flowing to the wheels.

GM says the Volt combines the environmental benefits of an electric vehicle with the practicality of a conventional car. Although 78 percent of Americans commute less than 40 miles each day, many want or need to go much farther. When the battery dies, the Volt will keep going until the gas tank runs dry. Plug the car into a 240-volt socket and the battery’s good to go in three to four hours.

No one at GM will say exactly how big the tank is, but it is “considerably smaller” than 10 gallons. GM is keeping equally mum on fuel economy — no one’s repeating that 230 mpg nonsense — in part because the feds haven’t decided how they’ll determine such things for cars like the Volt or the forthcoming Toyota Prius plug-in hybrid. GM says the car will go 300 miles with a full tank.

But as Ewanick notes, the biggest challenge with the Volt isn’t the engineering. It’s the marketing.

Any way you look at it, the Volt is expensive. The Volt is by far the priciest Chevrolet model that isn’t a Corvette. Chalk it up to the high cost of batteries. The $33,500 you’d spend on a Volt after the tax credit would put you in a nicely equipped Buick Lacrosse and leave you a few grand shy of an entry-level Cadillac CTS. A lease will cost $2,500 down and $350 a month for 36 months.

It also should be noted that the Leaf, a battery electric vehicle with a claimed range of 100 miles, will run $25,280 after the tax credit. GM says comparing the cars is like comparing apples to oranges, and remains confident consumers will embrace the practicality of an on-board generator to keep them going.

GM, perhaps sensing the price could make the car a tough sell, has packed the Volt with standard features.

It will be the first vehicle to include five years of OnStar’s top-tier “Directions and Connections” service and the OnStar smartphone app in addition to a Volt-specific app to control charging and other functions. There’s a 7-inch LCD navi screen and a Bose entertainment system with a 30-GB hard drive. Safety features include eight airbags, electronic stability control and traction control.

“The base model is heavily, heavily equipped,” said Tony DiSalle, director of marketing and communications for the Volt.

The only options are polished aluminum wheels, leather interior package (seats, steering wheel and door panel inserts), three premium paint colors (red, white and viridian joule) and a back-up camera with parking assist. A fully loaded Volt will cost $44,600 before the federal tax credit.

The General is making a big deal out of the warranty. In addition to eight years and 100,000 miles on the battery, the Volt is covered by a three-year/36,000-mile bumper-to-bumper and five-year/100,000-mile engine warranty.

GM touts gas savings as another incentive. If you drive 15,000 miles a year, you’ll save 500 gallons of gasoline and 4.4 metric tons of CO2 over a comparable car like the Chevrolet Cobalt, said Tony Posawatz, vehicle line director for the Volt. The electricity will run 2 or 3 cents a mile, but the car’s operating cost will depend upon how many miles are driven under battery power and how many are done with the engine driving the generator.

GM will offer the car in seven markets to start — California, Texas, New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Michigan and Washington, D.C., thought it plans to roll the car out nationally beginning in 2012. GM has lined up more than 600 dealers in those first seven markets. You can find your nearest one at getmyvolt.com and call them to place an order.

Many will no doubt howl at the price, but GM expects demand to exceed supply in the first year. That raises the specter of price gouging. Although GM cannot require dealers to sell the Volt at the suggested retail price, Ewanick said it will “strongly suggest” they do so. Gouging is something the company is very much determined to prevent.

Ewanick also said there are so many dealerships lining up to sell the car in each market that “we feel they will maintain integrity.”

General Motors begins full production at the Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly plant early in the fourth quarter and says it will begin delivering cars by the end of the year.



Read More http://www.wired.com/autopia/2010/07...#ixzz0uwXwfor8
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Old July 28th, 2010, 05:50 AM   #155
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It's a very promising car, but I'm disappointed with how few they're going to produce them next year. It seems like they're afraid that noone is going to buy one.
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Old July 28th, 2010, 07:59 AM   #156
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America is not the best place for EV's because people drive long distances...
EU and Japan would be ahead.
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Old July 28th, 2010, 08:40 AM   #157
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...and it's stuck on rails.
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Old July 28th, 2010, 08:43 AM   #158
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Plug and Fly: The Battery-Powered Plane Makes Its Debut
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Old July 28th, 2010, 08:51 AM   #159
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America is not the best place for EV's because people drive long distances...
EU and Japan would be ahead.
The average mileage driven per annum in the US is about the same as Europe. Most US driving is short distance - to shops, work, etc.
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Old July 28th, 2010, 08:59 AM   #160
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It’s Official: Chevrolet Volt Will Cost $41,000
This is a series-hybrid. Electric motors push the car with a generator set providing the power. To make under mass production, this would be cheaper than the current powertrain setup.

Expect many makers to adopt this setup, maybe using the Lotus designed generator engine.

They should sell as the mpg is far superior, without using a large battery bank as a buffer.
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