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Old May 11th, 2009, 06:37 AM   #81
NZ1
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For those that are interested, I've created a new thread here to discuss Ports & Shipping related infrastructure.
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Old May 12th, 2009, 11:11 PM   #82
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From this morning's herald

Consultants say new railcar link to Hamilton will be a winner
4:00AM Wednesday May 13, 2009
By Mathew Dearnaley

Leading rail industry consultants have added weight to a campaign to run a commuter train between Hamilton and Auckland, saying economic benefits would "comfortably" exceed operating losses.

They predict $15.5 million over 15 years in economic benefits including reduced road congestion from a single daily return service, against an operating loss of $6.6 million.

That would give the service a benefit-cost ratio of 1.9, or an economic return of $1.90 for each $1 invested by the Government and ratepayers.

The analysis is in a preliminary business case prepared for the Environment Waikato regional council, which is being urged by campaigners including Hamilton City leaders to lease Silver Fern rail-cars being taken off the Pukekohe-Auckland commuter run at the end of next month.

Although the council omitted a Hamilton-Auckland service from its draft three-year regional land transport programme of projects for which it will seek Government subsidies, it has received 40 submissions urging it not to lose the chance to obtain the rail-cars.

Those submissions were among 92 received for the entire programme, which is worth about $1.2 billion.

Environment Waikato said last month that it was waiting to receive the business case before the Waikato regional transport committee could consider whether to add the rail proposal.

A team from three transport consultancies, led by Dr Murray King, has since provided a report to the regional council, citing indicative prices from KiwiRail of $1.84 million a year for one daily round trip, $2.2 million for two, and $2.65m for three.

The report suggests a modest start with one return trip from Hamilton's Frankton station, ensuring competitiveness with car journey times by limiting stops to Huntly, Papatoetoe and Newmarket before reaching Britomart.

Average one-way fares of $24 from Hamilton and $17.60 from Huntly are assumed, and the consultants predict a 75 per cent occupancy rate from 96 seats available on a single rail-car, starting at 72 passengers a day.

Fares income would initially cover 40 per cent of costs, leaving an operating loss of $1.14 million in the first year, but would improve with patronage to about 68 per cent in 2023 - reducing the deficit to $610,000.

A 60 per cent subsidy of $648,000 would be sought from the Transport Agency for the first year, which the consultants say is less than 0.3 per cent of the total amount being requested through the regional transport programme.

That would leave $456,000 to be raised from Waikato sources.

The consultants point to potential access problem through Newmarket to Britomart, saying the Auckland Regional Transport Authority does not think planned additions to its own suburban services next month and early next year will leave room for a Hamilton train at peak hours.

But they say KiwiRail's Ontrack division believes enhancements to trackwork and signals will create enough room, once they are commissioned by the middle of next year.

That may mean having to run the new service through Auckland's eastern and waterfront line into Britomart, bypassing Newmarket, until Ontrack completes the work.

The report's economic findings have been welcomed by the Campaign for Better Transport in Auckland and Hamilton City transport chairman Dave Macpherson, who said the only question now was when - not if - the service would start.

He hoped trains could also stop at a site at Te Rapa, where his council had allocated funds for a station, and believed two daily return trips could prove feasible.

KiwiRail needs an early decision on the use of its three Silver Fern rail-cars, and has indicated a preference for three daily return trips if a Waikato service is to run, a frequency which even Mr Macpherson believes might be too ambitious.
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Old May 13th, 2009, 01:32 AM   #83
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Good news, but $24 each way sounds a bit too much for me. I could catch a two hour bus to Hamilton for $9.

Still cheaper than driving solo though, especially if you factor in costs other than petrol.
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Old May 13th, 2009, 03:48 AM   #84
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That's not much more than Palmy - Wellington on the Capital Connection ($22).

I'm just wondering, with $9 bus fares, is that a standard price or the cheapest (ie only for limited seats on limited services). $9 sounds like a bargin ...
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Old May 13th, 2009, 06:02 AM   #85
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You can normally get a $9 fare. If unlucky, you will end up paying $14. If lucky, you will end up paying $1. You can check it out yourself here.

I once got to Tauranga and back for $3.70 ($2 return fare, $0.70 booking fee, and $1 SMS reminder, which is optional)
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Old May 13th, 2009, 09:34 AM   #86
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$24 does seem to be quite high. I have to wonder whether it'd just be easier, more cost effective and more environmentally friendly for people who work to live closer to the place of work?
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Old May 13th, 2009, 11:58 AM   #87
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Good news though - you'd hope a city the size of Hamilton could support a train service if Palmerston North and the Wairarapa can, it just needs to beomce engrained in the local psyche that the train actually is an option - easier said than done though!

I suppose it will need some good headline fares and specials (season ticket deals or weekend shopping day returns), a good marketing campaign, and maybe some promotion in terms of leisure travel/backpacker stuff too? Aren't those glow-worms near there?

Also can someone help illuminate me (as a Brit but NZ visitor and fan) as to the rather odd hierarchy of stations along that line?

The Wellington train stops at Middlemore, but this one suggest Papatoetoe and the suburban expresses often stop there too. Why are either important?

And why does this omit Papakura (too busy?) and that last station which is further out with less trains (another P). Surely a stop there would help this service?
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Old May 14th, 2009, 12:53 AM   #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cle View Post

And why does this omit Papakura (too busy?) and that last station which is further out with less trains (another P). Surely a stop there would help this service?
Because Papakura will be the southern terminus of the electrified line, and ARTA will want as many ppl as possible using its services to ensure it can justify the expenditure. The last thing they will want is a natioanally subsidised service paoching passengers, (In any case, I suspect that the Transport funding agency will not actually allow two competing services to both receive a public subsidy)

The further south stop you mention will be Pukekohe, which again is on the Auckland suburban network ( but not in line to be electrified), so the same rational would likely apply in terms of dual subsidisation.
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Old May 16th, 2009, 02:33 AM   #89
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Originally Posted by greenwelly View Post
Because Papakura will be the southern terminus of the electrified line, and ARTA will want as many ppl as possible using its services to ensure it can justify the expenditure. The last thing they will want is a natioanally subsidised service paoching passengers, (In any case, I suspect that the Transport funding agency will not actually allow two competing services to both receive a public subsidy)

The further south stop you mention will be Pukekohe, which again is on the Auckland suburban network ( but not in line to be electrified), so the same rational would likely apply in terms of dual subsidisation.
Great news that someone is actually thinking about a rail service from Auckland to Hamilton...

I can't see why it should matter about one rail service poaching customers potentially from another - Ultimately a bum on seat in a train is better than a bum on a seat in a private car. So it would make sense to me to have trains stop at places to ensure best catchment of people with maximum possible frequency while at the same time ensuring that you are running the service as quickly as practical.

I would think that it would be viable for a Hamilton train to make the following stops:
1) Hamilton Frankton
2) Maybe a second Hamilton stop with park'n'ride since frankton station has little space for parking. (eg: Te Rapa?)
3) Ngaruawahia
4) Taupiri
5) Huntly
6) Te Kauwhata
7) Pokeno
8) Tuakau
9) Pukekohe
10) Papakura
11) Newmarket
12) Auckland

If there is concern about the extra stops slowing the service too much, some minor upgrades to route geometry would help alleviate this by allowing the trains to run at a higher line speed.

Who cares if a passenger who normally catches a regular Auckland suburban train from Pukekohe or Papakura to Auckland accidentally catches the Hamilton to Auckland service? I see that having an extra service available is an advantage in case I miss my regular train.

This whole rationale that it would be to stop one service poaching customers from another is just typical politicking bollocks that proves that trains should be owned and operated on a not for profit basis by the government. Having dumb limitations like this will do nothing to make using PT attractive (dont our governments remember that us NZ'ers are sticklers for not getting out of our cars - so come on... make it EASY for us)

Since the cost per return service seems rather low once you get above the first return service, then it would seem to me to have the first train stop where possible to make it initially available to the greatest catchment of people, then, add additional services, some with more limited stops if required.

Any service that is introduced, the govt needs to back it and support it, even if at a loss initially. People will be willing to use a service if there is commitment from operators that they are in it for the long haul, not just a quick and dirty trial basis using old rolling stock etc.

Last edited by KaneD; May 16th, 2009 at 02:42 AM.
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Old June 9th, 2009, 09:05 AM   #90
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Freight | Wiri Inland Port

Works start to connect Ports of Auckland's Wiri site to the rail network.
Quote:
Construction begins on Inland Port rail exchange
Tuesday, 9 June 2009, 11:30 am
Press Release: KiwiRail

Work officially started today on construction of a rail exchange at Ports of Auckland’s Wiri Inland Port in South Auckland.

Jointly funded by KiwiRail and Ports of Auckland, the exchange will connect the 15 hectare Wiri Inland Port with the national rail network and provide a direct link to the Waitemata seaport.

Once fully operational, the rail link is forecast to eventually save up to 2.5 million truck kilometres per year – the equivalent of 100,000 truck trips.
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What is involved:
Quote:
The works involve construction of three rail sidings, each capable of taking 22 wagons, a 450m long hardstand (heavy duty pavement) and around 2,000m of track. Construction is due to be completed by the end of the year.
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Old July 5th, 2009, 08:46 AM   #91
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Freight | Christchurch - Lyttelton container shuttle

Container shuttle for Lyttelton Port Company's City Depot inland port in Woolston.

Quote:
Rail Shuttle Reduces Lyttelton Tunnel Truck Volumes

3 JULY 2009 - An initiative between KiwiRail and the Lyttelton Port of Christchurch, to move containers by rail between the port and its CityDepot site in Woolston is already reducing heavy truck movements through the Lyttelton road tunnel.

The short haul container rail shuttle service has the potential to replace up to 45,000 truck journeys a year along the busy six kilometre journey through the road tunnel to the port.
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Old July 7th, 2009, 03:45 PM   #92
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Work starts converting F&P site to dairy store

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Dunedin contractor Naylor Love has started initial preparatory work on a new 45,000-tonne capacity dry store for Fonterra at the former North Taieri site of the Fisher and Paykel manufacturing plant.

A Fonterra spokeswoman said that later this year the dairy company planned to add a cool store to handle a further 17,000 tonnes of product.

Most of the dairy product would come from Fonterra's Edendale and Stirling dairy factories.

A fourth dryer was under construction at Edendale with the ability to produce 150,000 tonnes of milk powder a season.

It was on track to accept milk on September 1.

Finished dairy product would be trucked or railed to North Taieri where it would be stored and prepared for export through Port Otago.

Fonterra's group supply chain manager Joe Coote said the North Taieri storage project was designed to increase the efficiency of the company's supply chain.

It was modelled on the company's Hamilton dry store hub and would allow an increased use of transporting by rail, which he said would reduce heavy truck movements.

The Hamilton operation had reduced the number of truck movements by 45,000 a year, he said.


While securing construction industry work, Mr Coote said the development would result in about 30 new jobs on site and in related industries.
A pity our government goes on and on about economic effieciency yet ignores rails potential. Fonterra alone keeps some sections of rail line viable, imagine if other industries followed in Fonterras footsteps.
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Old July 12th, 2009, 04:00 PM   #93
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http://www.hawkesbaytoday.co.nz/loca...-life/3901218/

Quote:
On Tuesday the concept of a cycle/walkway between Napier and Gisborne, based on the Central Otago Rail Trail model was floated.

While the line currently accommodates only one train per week, the Bay2Bay idea was immediately given cold water treatment by KiwiRail, which said the line was "sacrosanct". The Hawke's Bay Regional Transport Committee were equally dismissive. Not even the possibility of a similar result to that likely to be achieved in Central Otago this year - 11,000 users and a boost to the economy of $3.85 million - impressed them.
It's a bit amusing to see a rail line described using that word, but this is exactly the kind of thinking we need. The former Tranz Rail was doing pretty much everything to make sure it would close.
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Old September 8th, 2009, 12:06 AM   #94
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Looks like the Hamilton/Auckland commuter rail service is dead in the water:

http://www.aucklandtrains.co.nz/2009...ding-diverted/
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Old September 8th, 2009, 02:15 AM   #95
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Old September 8th, 2009, 11:44 AM   #96
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Short sighted move. I guess spending money on the Waikato Expressway is more worthwhile than on the Puhoi-Warkworth motorway. Nevertheless, this is missed opportunity.
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Old September 8th, 2009, 11:47 AM   #97
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Yep short sighted and sadly predictable.
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Old September 8th, 2009, 01:16 PM   #98
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Yep short sighted and sadly predictable.
True.

I think we should expect nothing from this government in the way of public transport, and take PT developments only as a pleasant surprise.

Less disappointments that way.
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Old September 8th, 2009, 02:58 PM   #99
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Wellington's rail overhaul over the next few years may change that. If the $550 million spent on modernising the Wellington commuter rail system is successful and when an election is near it maybe a little different. I think Key is having a bit of a wait and see approach.
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Old September 9th, 2009, 12:07 AM   #100
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I think Key is having a bit of a wait and see approach.
I don't think so. Key and his government has no interest in public transport whatsoever. It does not even figure in their thinking. All they are doing is finishing off projects started by the last government then that will be it.

They couldn't care less about Public Transport it's not and never will be a priority for them.
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