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Old November 11th, 2013, 10:31 AM   #1001
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BenM16 View Post
This thread will share ideas for a new adelaide to be built in north Adelaide. Would love to hear people's opinions for this idea and any building visions anyone has for the site.

(This is a vision and I would like to hear what people have to say about this idea. Whether the people of Adelaide are happy for a new height skyline which will stand next to our current one)


I feel north Adelaide is a wonderful site for a new city and the skyline will be viewable from the current site of adelaide. This idea of a second city centre allows work to be built at one without disturbing the other city.


Attractions of this site would be a new market place, Little Italy and Mini Middle East, an observation wheel along the river (the oval side), a few rides and restaurants also along the river, 4 towers rising between 150-180m with one having an observation deck which will overlook the new and current cities of Adelaide. It will also have a clear view of Mt Lofty, adelaide oval, Glenelg and Port adelaide.
Tina Arena. good.
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Old February 14th, 2014, 12:26 AM   #1002
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It's Fringe/Festival time

Few interesting venues, large rooftop garden bar/event space/outdoor cinema on roof of bus station carpark - Tiki Tai

Victoria Square a large fringe event/bar space - Royal Croquet Club

Garden of Unearthly delights - same as usual but currently underwater

The more down to earth "gluttony" - over the road in Rymill Park

The festival will be having their big thing on the banks of the Torrens (near Elder Park)
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Old October 15th, 2014, 04:51 AM   #1003
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The former Adelaide Bank building is being converted into Channel Nine's new Adelaide studios, with a glass fronted studio on the ground floor.

[IMG]http://i62.************/zu1e08.png[/IMG]

Their current site in North Adelaide is on market and will no doubt attract many investors thanks to it's location... next to Wellington Square, walking distance to O'Connell St, Adelaide Oval and the south facing views would be stunning.
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Old November 3rd, 2014, 02:43 PM   #1004
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what's with the Sens-Adl site lately, Its either soooo slow or not responding/loading at all
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Old November 9th, 2014, 01:52 AM   #1005
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at least it wasn't as bad as it could have been, but a rather concerning day for the future of our city centre
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Old November 9th, 2014, 01:43 PM   #1006
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wot?
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Old November 9th, 2014, 02:48 PM   #1007
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wot?
we have gone back to another conservative lord mayor, how great. After a bit of light over the past 3 years, we can now go back to our staid, dull, boring car infested city. The old Adelaide establishment will be happy.

Good riddance to all the food trucks, new bars, pedestrian only streets, bike lanes etc. Who on earth wants to make cities more vibrant, other than tree hugging communists
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Old November 10th, 2014, 09:57 AM   #1008
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a great article on Indaily

Quote:
Old Adelaide strikes back at Yarwood

David Washington | 10 November 2014


Stephen Yarwood


Comment | Old Adelaide was shocked when unknown young planner Stephen Yarwood came from nowhere to win the Lord Mayoral race in 2010.

Then, it was dismayed as he went about actually changing things – and being so damned enthusiastic as he did so.

On Saturday, a business-backed candidate ousted him, thanks mostly to the preferences of a cashed-up member of the North Adelaide establishment whose policy platform was so reactionary it read like parody.

Yarwood was far from perfect, and InDaily has held him to account as rigorously as any. We questioned his trip to Texas to present the “key to the city” to Lance Armstrong; we revealed his embarrassingly large Telstra bill; we provided sceptical scrutiny of a range of council programs including free city wifi, moves against the homeless in the parklands and plenty more.

We reported on his administration’s many mistakes, with the Central Market management debacle and problems with the Adelaide Oval parking regime high on the list.

What we haven’t done is participate in unsophisticated campaigns against change: we attempted to provide balance and facts to the mind-numbing “cars versus bikes” debate; we questioned the petty reactions against the colour of the Mall pavers; we rolled our eyes at empty cynicism about pop-ups.

Yarwood could be naive in his relationships with the media and as a politician, and his many enemies on the council were happy to hang him out to dry on unpopular issues, such as changes to the city’s roads and parking regimes.

He became the sole figure of blame for anyone stuck in traffic – as if one small section of bike lane had caused the city to gridlock (rather than the increasing numbers of people actually driving cars – a balance he attempted to address).

Attempts to paint him as a creature of Labor show no understanding of either Yarwood or the ALP.

He was fiercely independent to the point of political isolation, and this flaw might have led to his downfall.

He wanted to be re-elected in his own right, and his campaign involved a simple but taxing door-knocking campaign. He had no posters and, despite his reputation as a tech-head, his social media presence wasn’t particularly large. He refused to do preference deals, perhaps figuring that all of the other candidates aligned against him wouldn’t play ball anyway.

On Saturday he became a rare one-term mayor – but this electoral failure shouldn’t mask the fact that, unlike so many mayors before him, he left the post with the city a changed place; a place in better shape than when he arrived.

His legacy won’t be easily erased, because its impact went beyond the borders of the city centre, and his replacement Martin Haese is not quite of the staid ilk of former mayors (although much of his policy agenda is yet to be revealed).

Here are Yarwood’s three most important contributions.

He made us think differently about transport

In the absence of leadership on transport policy at the State Government level, Yarwood was a visionary – at least for a time.

As a self-confessed urban design policy wonk, he recognised what the planners of every major city in the world had seen before him – that successful cities are primarily places for people.

The council joined with Integrated Design Commissioner Tim Horton (who left SA earlier this year), to commission a major report by Gehl Architects on the city’s public spaces and public life.

While the State Government was steadfastly refusing to develop a transport strategy, Yarwood championed the Gehl report, which envisioned a more people-friendly city, with new tram routes, revitalised laneways, and a streetscape less hostile to cyclists and pedestrians.

The ensuing debate was one of several factors that caused the State Government to do an abrupt about-face and produce an integrated transport plan of its own.

The much-criticised Frome Street bikeway was Yarwood’s High Noon moment. As councillors went to jelly around him in response to public and media criticism, Yarwood was left as a lone voice defending an infrastructure concept which is commonplace elsewhere.

Yarwood changed his public rhetoric in the face of constant sniping, moving away from defending the need for multiple integrated forms of transport to take pressure off the roads system, to simply pushing the health benefits of cycling.

As the CEO of Cycle SA, Christian Haag, noted last week, Adelaide is one of the last Australian cities left to build decent cycling infrastructure. In every other city where this has occurred, conservative forces have initially fought tooth and nail against it.

Nevertheless, at least we now have some understanding of the issues and tensions – there’s no going back to square one now.

He helped re-energise the city

In 2010 when Yarwood entered Town Hall, Adelaide’s city was stuck in a rut, famously recruited as a film stand-in for 1970s Perth.

He had the advantage of coming to power just before a changing of the guard at State level.

New Premier Jay Weatherill also wanted to re-energise the city and, with a like mind (at least on this point) in Town Hall, the two administrations entered a rare period of cooperation.

Yarwood’s championing of food trucks and the Splash Adelaide program, which filled unloved corners of the city with interesting happenings, worked seamlessly with the Government’s licensing reforms, which freed young entrepreneurs from red tape to spark an explosion in small bars and restaurants across the city.

The Government’s massive investment around the Riverbank gave the council the confidence to begin decades-overdue transformations of Victoria Square and Rundle Mall.

Yarwood found the dysfunctional wasteland of Victoria Square to be particularly galling. Whatever you think about the design solution in Vic Square, Yarwood’s administration finally crashed through years of inaction and handwringing to create a new and usable place.

People actually go there now and do things – in Adelaide, that’s a big win.

The nerdy Lord Mayor pushed the idea that technology was crucial to a modern city: a free wifi network was negotiated and installed across the CBD; a smart, tech-heavy, new library was built in a lane off Rundle Mall.

People could see and feel that the city was changing. Young people, in particular, imagined a new kind of city living and working that hadn’t occurred to them before.

Adelaide seemed almost cool, for the first time since Dunstan.

He showed us we could change

We didn’t even talk about “Old Adelaide” and “New Adelaide” until Yarwood came to power.

A whole generation of Adelaideans had lost any faith that the city could change for the better or, for that matter, in any way at all.

Yet Yarwood managed to enthuse people from across Adelaide, not just those who live in the CBD, with his imagination about the city’s possibilities and his willingness to be the public voice of reform (a sort of bravery that probably cost him the Lord Mayorship).

And this leads me to his greatest contribution to the city.

While his civic opponents talk in dull and earnest tones about the council’s budget lines, debt to revenue proportions, the removal of a slip lane in this street or that, and the hue and slip rates of various pavers, a large swathe of the population will remember Yarwood as a Lord Mayor who helped them to believe again in Adelaide and its future.

For this, at least, New Adelaide will thank him.

Old Adelaide may be celebrating today, but their world has been changed for good.

David Washington is editor of InDaily.
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Old November 11th, 2014, 12:54 PM   #1009
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What's going on with Sensational-Adelaide lately?.... it's been incredibly slow and for the past 24 hours it comes with a 404 error.
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Old November 18th, 2014, 02:15 PM   #1010
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What's going on with Sensational-Adelaide lately?.... it's been incredibly slow and for the past 24 hours it comes with a 404 error.
it's still doing it. Has Howie had enough and moved on?
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Old November 19th, 2014, 11:48 AM   #1011
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Unfortunately there's still problems on Sensational Adelaide.

How about we get some discussion going on here until they fix the problems.

External demolition has started on the Central Adelaide site on Grote Street and also the Palladium on Light site has fencing around it so demolition should start soon there as well.

I drove through the city today and also noticed that the Krispy Kreme store on Gouger Street has opened, apparently one girl lined up for about 75 hours for the store opening and was first in and won a years worth of free donuts !!!
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Old April 4th, 2015, 05:14 PM   #1012
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from http://www.news.com.au/finance/real-...-1227291391200

Quote:
More than $400 million in city apartments under construction or in pipeline — even as new home market slumps

This story was published: 5 hours ago April 04, 2015 7:57PM


ADELAIDE’S CBD is experiencing an apartment boom, defying industry claims of a slump in the state’s housing sector.

More than $400 million of new apartment projects are under construction or in the pipeline as people take advantage of low interest rates, generous concessions and the appeal of city living.

In a sign of the strength of the market, buyers snapped up almost a third of the 220 apartments in the $110m Bohem development on Whitmore Square when it went on sale last Saturday.

Deputy Lord Mayor Houssam Abiad, who sits on the Development Assessment Panel, said recent planning changes and incentives were helping to boost demand.

“The State Government has had a big focus on getting more population in the city through things like planning reforms and the stamp duty concessions,” he said.

“A block (of land) that you could only build two storeys on, you can now go to 12 or 13.

“That is all starting to make an impact right now.”

Mr Abiad said the city’s cultural resurgence was making it a more popular place to live.

“The city is a much more vibrant place now than it was five years ago and people want to live here because of the lifestyle it provides,” he said.


Purchasers of off-the-plan apartments in the city are entitled to a partial stamp duty concession until June 30, 2016.

Jade Dickie, 20, of Findon has taken advantage of first-home-owners grants and stamp duty concessions to buy a unit in Bohem because she is attracted to the city lifestyle.


“I always meet up with my friends in the city, whether it is having dinner on Gouger St or shopping in Rundle Mall,” said Ms Dickie, who lives with her parents at Findon. “There was a lot of savings to buying off the plan.”



But the Housing Industry Association says Adelaide is in a residential building crisis and has blamed the State Government’s decision to cut a housing construction grant for traditional houses as creating a “housing recession”.

According to Australia Bureau of Statistics figures compiled for the HIA, councils approved 589 detached dwellings in February, down from 795 at the same time last year.


HIA SA executive director Robert Harding said the approvals data “highlights the dire state of SA’s new housing activity” since the government cancelled the $8500 construction grant in December 2013.


“Importantly, while residential building activity is carrying state economic activity and productivity in other states, South Australia is missing the boat,” he said.


The Master Builders Association policy director Ian Markos said unless changes were made “quite quickly” the housing market will get worse.


But Property Council SA CEO Daniel Gannon said approvals were increasing over a 12-month period when including apartments and units.


Business SA CEO Nigel McBride said “we had reason to be optimistic after strong rises in building approvals across December and January, but unfortunately that trend has lost momentum into February.”

Although the government abandoned the housing construction grant in December 2013, it has provided a stamp duty concession of up to $15,500 for people who buy an apartment off-the-plan in the Adelaide CBD. That concession ends in June 2016.

Professionals SA real estate chief executive officer Ted Piteo said the boost in high-rise development in the city would provide a boost for the construction sector.

“You need a lot of people to build these high-rise developments and they take a long time to finish,” he said.

Mr Piteo said he believed many of the high-rise developments in the pipeline would sell and commence construction in the next 18 months.

“I think it is a great thing we are getting more apartment developments in the city,” he said.

“Adelaide has always lagged beyond the other capital cities when it comes to the high-rise apartments in the CBD.

“It’s almost as if Adelaide is growing up a bit because so many more people are embracing city living.”



GOING UP


— $110 million Bohem development on Whitmore Square. On sale.

— $100 million Eclipse project on Austin St. Approved subject to conditions.

— $100 million Vue development on King William St. Under construction.

— $70 million U2 on Waymouth St. Expressions of interest.

— $40 million Palladium on Light project. On sale.

— $35 million Parkview Apartments. On sale.

— $9 million 60 South development on South Tce. Approved.
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Old May 15th, 2015, 06:09 AM   #1013
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Fantastic job on the updates wilkie!
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Old January 23rd, 2016, 05:17 AM   #1014
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After the zombie apocalypse

Don't worry, if you,re reading this.

The South Australians, who got resentful at the rest of the country, abandoned the SSC forums and went to

http://www.sensational-adelaide.com

The name obviously is there to make up for various insecurities.

I know posting a competitor to SSC is not in the spirit, but we can't have people thinking Adelaide is now a barren wasteland.
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Old January 24th, 2016, 02:51 AM   #1015
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Sensational Adelaide was the marketing slogan back in the Grand Prix days. Like "Marvellous Melbourne"
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Old January 24th, 2016, 04:46 AM   #1016
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eco-rat View Post
Don't worry, if you,re reading this.

The South Australians, who got resentful at the rest of the country, abandoned the SSC forums and went to

http://www.sensational-adelaide.com

The name obviously is there to make up for various insecurities.

I know posting a competitor to SSC is not in the spirit, but we can't have people thinking Adelaide is now a barren wasteland.
cool story bro, you seeking some attention are you?
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Old February 17th, 2016, 03:34 AM   #1017
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so what's anyones thoughts of our outback being the dumping ground of radioactive waste? It may mean we might have some money to spend on our city infrastructure, which would be a first
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Old February 17th, 2016, 04:05 AM   #1018
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so what's anyones thoughts of our outback being the dumping ground of radioactive waste? It may mean we might have some money to spend on our city infrastructure, which would be a first
I think the South Australian community really does need to give serious thought about using already contaminated areas of the outback (Maralinga) as a nuclear dump site.

It may not be the most "pleasant" industry to have but the economic benefits are there to be taken.

The latest proposal I have seen, has nuclear waste being shipped to a new deep water port south of Wh*****, and then trucked to Maralinga, therefore avoiding any populated area.

I am not sure how long Maralinga is off limits to the general human population...10,000 years (?) Obviously the dump site would not be exactly the same spot as the nuclear tests... a site in the eastern half of the exclusion zone is probably the most likely candidate (and geologically very stable...i.e no earthquakes)

Time will tell but the latest economic news out of Wh***** is not good , there is a chance that Arrium will close its steel making operations in the city.....that's 1000 jobs gone with the flow on effect 4 times that amount.
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Old March 4th, 2016, 03:22 PM   #1019
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from http://www.theguardian.com/culture/2...own-on-culture


Quote:
How Adelaide could become Australia's most exciting city – simply by doubling down on culture

South Australia is on track to having Australia’s worst economy but, as anyone who’s been to Adelaide in March knows, there’s one thing the city excels at


Brigid Delaney

Friday 4 March 2016 16.04 AEDT Last modified on Friday 4 March 2016 16.12 AEDT

Is there any place in the world as magnificent as Adelaide during festival season?

Some animating spirit takes over and the city is packed with thousands of people getting their minds turned inside out by art.

Usually on a Sunday night in the Rundle Street mall, you can hear the tumbleweeds rolling past (my colleague Adam Brereton wrote of his frustration about not being able to buy cigarettes on a Sunday night) but in February and March you have to push through the crowds.

Around every corner is something weird and exciting: what looks like a naked human pyramid; a sword-swallower who is also juggling fire; a doorway that leads to a crowd participating in a Jacobean immersive theatre production.

Enter a pop-up croquet club or the botanic gardens to find kilometers of fairy lights, and live music, and roving performers, and an old fashioned circus freak show. The weather is warm and someone in a bow-tie in a little stand under a tree is mixing a delicious cocktail. Going to bed before midnight feels like a dereliction of duty.

There’s a cluster of festivals during late February and into March – the Adelaide festival, the Adelaide Fringe, Womadelaide, the Biennial and Adelaide Writers Week – which has nothing less than a transformative effect on the city.

The festivals also have a transformative effect on the state’s economy. In a report released last month by Festivals Adelaide, the festivals delivered $210m to the state’s economy in 2014/15 – an increase of 16% on the previous year.

There’s the money from ticket sales – more than a million tickets were sold, according to the report – but there’s also the rest of it: the hotel rooms, restaurants and taxis, plus the couple of days many tourists tack on at the end to explore the Clare Valley or McLaren Vale regions, shipping crates of wine back home.

Last year 52,000 interstate and international visitors came to Adelaide in “Mad March”. In the same year, 800,000 people came through the Garden of Unearthly Delights, according to the founder and creative director, Scott Maidment. Many of the garden’s visitors were locals, and everyone has a lovely time.

But what happens to Adelaide when the party’s over?

After the curtains close, so does the economy

Outside of Mad March, South Australia threatens to top the league table no one wants to be on: that of worst-performing state.

The latest State of the States report, released quarterly by CommSec, shows that South Australia is on track to having Australia’s worst economy thanks to an increasing jobless rate.

The report revealed that Tasmania – currently the worst-performing state – was showing “better momentum” and its jobless rate had fallen to near four-year lows; meanwhile, South Australia had good population growth but its jobless rate stood at a 15-year high.

Once the bedrock of the state, the manufacturing industry is evaporating. In 1985 about 100,000 people were working in manufacturing in South Australia. In 2013 that figure had fallen to 74,000 and is still dropping; as Malcolm King wrote in an opinion piece in the In Daily, this has a run-on effect for the transport and warehousing sectors, too.

The Commsec report said South Australia lacked “a growth driver”. As CommSec’s chief economist, Craig James, told the ABC: “Most states get their momentum from somewhere, might be Western Australia [from] the mining sector, NSW and Victoria at the moment are getting it from their house sector, but South Australia is really finding it hard to find that X factor.”

As manufacturing and construction wind down, could that “X factor” be the creative industries?


The Garden of Unearthly Delights in Adelaide attracted 800,000 visitors last year, many of whom were locals. Photograph: Steph Harmon for the Guardian

Could the city’s fortunes be found not in emulating Sydney or Melbourne – which are surging ahead in terms of population growth – but in taking inspiration from cities like Austin or Portland in the United States, which have carved ouWEIt their own niche based mostly on supporting local creatives and celebrating the “weirdness” of the city?

Send in the small bars

Jane Howard, 27, grew up in Adelaide and – at least for now – it remains home.

The writer, who contributes to Guardian Australia, Kill Your Darlings and the Lifted Brow, says Adelaide is the perfect place for baby boomers that came of age in the 1970s, when a progressive government led by Don Dunstan made it the most exciting city in Australia. For a time.

“My dad likes to say that Adelaide was built for his generation,” she says. “If you’re a baby boomer, there’s so much for you here. A lot of the rhetoric used is from the Don Dunstan era, without acknowledging that the state has lost a lot of its progressive tendencies since then. People are resting on the laurels of the past. Most of the cultural institutions are from that time – they are all 42 years old.”

Meanwhile, thousands of aspiring young people leave for bigger opportunities in Melbourne or Sydney each year. Census data, collated by the Adelaide University demographer Prof Graeme Hugo, showed 59,222 people left the state between 2006 and 2011 – 9,000 more than those who came to South Australia over the same period.

But it’s not all decline and fall.

Howard reckons Adelaide has become a more interesting city to live in since the city’s liquor licensing laws were loosened. It’s pocket change to get a small bar licence compared with what it once cost.

In a depressed Melbourne during the 1990s, the emergence of a small bar scene was seen as a return of vital signs. A thriving night-time economy and revitalised CBD followed. Could the same pattern of recovery happen in Adelaide?



South Australia is really finding it hard to find that X factor.
Craig James, CommSec



Fifty-three small bars opened in Adelaide last year, with Restaurant and Catering SA saying local growth is “unprecedented”. Another 17 are expected to open this year.

“It’s changed the feel of the whole city,” Howard says. “People are out more. It’s more vibrant than it’s been for years.”

Farrin Foster, the 29-year-old editor of Adelaide’s CityMag, also praises the bar-led recovery: “There’s a very slow change happening. I became an adult at the right time in Adelaide. A wave of people around my age are staying and starting their own thing.”

That “thing” has entrepreneurship in its DNA. It may include a jewellery design business, or Pedi cabs made from steam pressed bamboo and aluminium.

One needn’t look far for evidence of Adelaide’s creative boom; this year’s Adelaide Fringe featured a record-breaking 1100 events. Photograph: Steph Harmon for the Guardian

“The vast majority of people my age who have started a business have opened a small bar,” says Foster. “It makes sense because we are a wine region – though everyone seems to be launching a gin label at the moment.”

Lockout laws in other states have a knock-on effect, even if it’s just a matter of perception. As Sydney and now Brisbane restrict night-time entertainment, other cities that are less regulated, like Melbourne and Adelaide, get a reputation for being more fun, and more open to people going out late without an externally imposed and premature ending to the night.

But in order to get the buzz when you bar hop, and to get the jobs that give you the money to buy the drinks, there needs to be enough people in town.

If only that festival magic could stretch beyond March.

Rob Brookman, Adelaide born and bred, has worked for four decades in the arts, including as the artistic director of the Adelaide festival and as founder of WOMADelaide. He’s currently the chief executive of the South Australia Theatre company. He thinks it’s impossible to extend the energy produced by the festivals year-round.

“People find it hard to remain in love 12 months of the year – you can only be ecstatic for a short period,” he says. “The phenomenon of the audience coming out at unprecedented levels in February and March – you cannot sustain that for 12 months. And one should not want to or hope to; there is something glorious about a month where culture takes centre stage. You want people to feel like it’s something special.”

Instead, he says, festival season “acts as a great calling card for the city”.

Brookman believes Adelaide should make urban areas more dense, as a way of replicating that festival season buzz that creates more opportunities for businesses.

So what should city planners do?

Scott Maidment founded the hugely popular Garden of Unearthly Delights, a carnival space that runs during festival season. He says the low density, layout and geography of Adelaide would allow for some elements of festival season – including pedestrian zones, central hubs like the Garden and pop-up venues – to run outside of February and March. “The government could support this by not having too many hoops to jump through,” he says.


The Garden of Unearthly Delights’ founder, Scott Maidment, says some elements of festival season could run all year through. Photograph: Andre Castellucci/The Garden of Unearthly Delights

Maidment says Adelaide is equal to the great festival cities, like Avignon in France and Edinburgh in Scotland. “Adelaide is much more of a festival city than, say, Hobart,” he says. “It’s very easy to navigate because it’s on a grid and the festival is part of the culture here. People save up their money all year and a taxi driver can tell you what shows to see. In Sydney you can’t take over a city with a festival.”

While festivals drive tourism (and create jobs – Festivals Adelaide claim they generated 790 full-time or 7800 casual equivalent jobs last year), the state government needs to address how the city will attract a more stable, permanent population of bright young things.

Says Brookman: “The state and its population [seem to] have worked out that heavy industry will not have a big future in South Australia. There is a lot of thinking about the way a creative capital city could be [achieved by] a multifaceted approach, including cheap housing, a good place to live, good wine and fresh food.”

Howard says rents in Adelaide are “significantly cheaper” than Melbourne and Sydney, “about half for the equivalent place”. It costs about $110 a week for a room in a share house in central Adelaide, she says, compared with about $300 a week in Sydney. Good cycle paths means “a lot of commuter cyclists, which also cuts down on transport costs”.

Lower costs are attractive to artists, and other members of the creative classes – particularly those working to establish themselves.

Brookman agrees: “What we are seeing is a greater retention of good artists, rather than the automatic route of heading to Melbourne or Sydney. There are a lot of young people making a go of it here – the live contemporary music scene has really picked up over last five or six years. There’s a lot of encouragement by the government … We’ve built the alleyway culture and the live music culture is really strong.”

The Australian premiere of Pina Bausch’s Belken (Carnations) opens at Adelaide festival on 9 March. Photograph: Oliver Look

Christie Anthoney, CEO of Festivals Adelaide, says the festivals provide a networking opportunity for emerging Adelaide artists that are not necessarily available to their bigger city counterparts. The scale, serendipity and discovery elements of the festivals means relationships spring up unexpectedly between performers and their audience.


Adelaide is more vibrant than it’s been for years.
Jane Howard, arts writer



“Creative culture drives the scene here,” she says. “It’s an affordable place to live and there’s a connectivity among the arts community. But there are restrictions – you have to make your own way quite significantly. We are not seeing federally or at a state level a significant increase in arts funding – but there is more of a start-up culture in Adelaide.”

Keep Adelaide weird

So the rents are cheap, the artists are staying and the night-life is booming. Does that mean Adelaide just has a marketing problem for 10 months of the year?

Stuart Gregor, a Sydney marketing executive, wrote a 2013 piece published in Adelaide Now that begged Adelaide to embrace its freak side: “Adelaide should give Melbourne the finger and get on with its own thing. And get weird.”


A performer from Circus Trick Tease embraces the weird, spruiking Adelaide Fringe show Straya. Photograph: Steph Harmon for the Guardian

Could the weirdness, and the darkness – Salman Rushdie once nominated Adelaide as “the perfect setting for a Stephen King novel or horror film”, and Australia’s worst serial killer operated just down the road, in Snowtown – be gathered into the central narrative and identity of the city?

Portland, Oregon has done as much, creating an identity based on good coffee, microbreweries, cycle paths, theatre, creativity and weirdness.

In Australia, the “awesome small city” vibe has worked for Hobart, whose arts and tourism sector have been revitalised in a relatively short space of time by the Mona museum.

Foster agrees: “We do have an interesting culture of intellectual property excellence in weird niche fields. There are … little advanced manufacturing businesses that lead the world in making or designing very specific things. Our editorial line at CityMag is that we are not Sydney or Melbourne or anything else – there’s no point in trying to compete in a realm that you don’t belong in.”

Foster visited Portland last year. “It’s great,” he says, “but how does anyone make any money? There’s not really an industry there.” She believes specialised industry will develop over time in Adelaide, as huge growth already takes place in the tourism industry.

Rather than thinking big, Howard says, Adelaide should think small – and do that really well.

“Adelaide has essentially had flat population growth for the past 30 years and I can’t see anything that will change that trajectory in the future. Perhaps the best thing that could happen is [if] Adelaide truly embraces its smallness and difference, and becomes a viable city for being a completely alternative proposition, rather than simply trying to play catch up with Melbourne and Sydney.”
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Old April 21st, 2016, 12:25 PM   #1020
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from http://www.theguardian.com/commentis...-on-renewables

Quote:

'Innovation is in our blood': how South Australia leads the way on renewables

Kathy Marks

South Australia is expected to generate more than half its electricity from wind and solar power this year. Who says you can’t run a modern economy on renewables?

‘South Australia has 16 wind farms, which generated just over a third of the state’s electricity in 2014–15.’ Photograph: Morne de Klerk/Getty Images


The sunbaked streets of Snowtown were deserted when I drove up from Adelaide in late 2000, 18 months after the dismembered remains of eight people were found in barrels of acid in a disused bank vault. The gruesome discovery brought the glare of publicity to the little country town in South Australia’s mid north, and – although no one from Snowtown was among the murderers or victims – the unwelcome attention persisted for years, as the protracted trials were followed by a film and four books.

Talk to any local, though, and they will tell you that even before those tragic events, the place, like many rural communities, was in decline. And they will also tell you that Snowtown, if not exactly booming, is nowadays much rejuvenated, in large part due to the gales that howl across the nearby Barunga and Hummock Ranges.

Power plan maps out route to follow for 100% renewable energy future


In a state that leads the country – in fact, much of the world – in producing electricity from renewable sources, Snowtown is wind central. The first stage of a $660m, 270-megawatt farm, with 47 turbines, opened in 2008, 5km west of the town; the second, adding another 90 turbines, came on stream in 2014.

Developed by New Zealand’s Trustpower, South Australia’s biggest wind facility – and Australia’s second biggest – created hundreds of construction jobs and 21 permanent positions.

“They’ve taken people off the farms and out of the unemployment queues. They’re investing in Snowtown’s schools and sporting clubs,” says Ian Hunter, the state’s ebullient climate change minister. “They’re underpinning the economy of a place that was really doing it tough.”

Altogether, South Australia has 16 wind farms, which generated just over a third of the state’s electricity in 2014–15; solar provided another 7%. The combined figure is set to climb past half this year, well ahead of the government’s 2025 target date. “If South Australia was a nation,” observes Alicia Webb, policy manager for the Clean Energy Council, the industry’s peak body, “it would be second only to Denmark.”

Progressive policies have placed the state in the vanguard of change for much of its history, notes Hunter. “We don’t have the natural environmental advantages of the eastern states, the big water catchments and all the arable land,” he says. “So we’ve always had to be incredibly innovative. Innovation is in our blood.”

Holden’s Elizabeth plant will close next year, and South Australia’s two remaining coal-fired power stations, at Port Augusta, are also due to shut imminently, with the Leigh Creek mine which supplies them already shuttered since November. The withering of these traditional industries, in a state with Australia’s highest unemployment rate (7.2%), has given extra impetus to the move to a modern, low-carbon economy.

Political leaders, though, recognised the opportunities, as well as the challenges, long ago. In 2007, Mike Rann’s SA Labor government was the first in Australia to legislate emissions reduction and renewable energy targets. It was also the first to establish a feed-in tariff for rooftop solar (now installed on 28% of homes), and dedicated planning guidelines for wind farms: part of a policy and regulatory framework which has helped the state attract $6.6bn of clean-energy investment, 40% of it into regional areas.

The government of Jay Weatherill, Rann’s equally zealous successor, has two new goals: $10bn of clean-tech investment by 2025 and zero net emissions by 2050. Such explicit objectives appeal to investors, “sending a strong signal that that’s the direction we’re heading in”, says Frank Jotzo, director of the Centre for Climate Economics and Policy at the Australian National University, and one of three experts who advised the state on its new climate change strategy.

As a pioneer, South Australia is being closely observed, and not always with benevolent intent. An incident last year in which the state was cut off from the grid, causing widespread blackouts and sky-high electricity spot prices, was seized on by critics of renewable energy as evidence of its unreliability. Although a piece of hardware linking the state’s grid with Victoria’s was to blame, the episode underlined South Australia’s dependence, on windless days, on “dirty” electricity from its eastern neighbour.

“If Victoria then got rid of all its coal-fired power stations, you start looking a bit shaky,” suggests Tony Wood, director of the Grattan Institute’s energy program.

Technical problems, such as voltage and frequency fluctuations, can occur when high levels of “intermittent” wind and solar enter the grid. Research and experience have demonstrated, however, that Australia’s network can accommodate far more variability than was previously thought, and grid stability will be vastly improved by battery storage, which enables energy to be stockpiled, then dispatched when needed. Multiple studies have also refuted the claim that renewables are incapable of supplying baseload power, the minimum required around the clock.

South Australia’s achievements owe much to political continuity, with Labor in government since 2002. Nonetheless, says Richard Denniss, the Australia Institute’s chief economist, “they are hugely significant, because so much of the political influence of the polluter lobby stems from the argument that you can’t run a modern economy on renewable energy. Sub-national governments like South Australia are showing us that you obviously can.”

This is an extract from Kathy Marks’s report New Power, New Realities published in Griffith Review 52: Imagining the Future edited by Julianne Schultz and Brendan Gleeson of the Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute. Available from 27 April.
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