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Old May 23rd, 2014, 05:30 PM   #521
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Bloomberg news article: revised plans for Kidbrooke Village

Quote:
Berkeley Group Holdings Plc (BKG) is weighing the development of 2,000 more homes than originally planned at a site less than 5 miles (8 kilometers) south of London City Airport.

Berkeley now plans to build almost 6,000 homes on a plot of land at Kidbrooke that included the Ferrier Estate, a former government-housing project, the company said in a filing to London Mayor Boris Johnson. The homebuilder, the largest developer of mixed-use buildings in London, will seek approval for the extra homes “in the near future,” according to the filing by planning consultants Barton Willmore LLP on behalf of Berkeley. No one at Berkeley was immediately available for comment.
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-0...don-homes.html
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Old May 26th, 2014, 07:14 PM   #522
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Photos of Meridian Gate (Phase 4) taken yesterday. Looking nice in the flesh:


Meridian Gate - Kidbrooke Village, London by SE9 London, on Flickr


Meridian Gate - Kidbrooke Village, London by SE9 London, on Flickr


Meridian Gate - Kidbrooke Village, London by SE9 London, on Flickr


Meridian Gate - Kidbrooke Village, London by SE9 London, on Flickr


Meridian Gate - Kidbrooke Village, London by SE9 London, on Flickr


Meridian Gate - Kidbrooke Village, London by SE9 London, on Flickr


Meridian Gate - Kidbrooke Village, London by SE9 London, on Flickr


Meridian Gate - Kidbrooke Village, London by SE9 London, on Flickr


Meridian Gate - Kidbrooke Village, London by SE9 London, on Flickr



The apartments of City Point (Phase 1) overlooking Sutcliffe Park:


City Point - Kidbrooke Village, London by SE9 London, on Flickr



Blackheath Quarter (Phase 2) continues construction:


Kidbrooke Village, London by SE9 London, on Flickr
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Old May 26th, 2014, 10:37 PM   #523
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I like how they have thought of the finish here like painting the metal balcony frames. So many developers leave them unpainted resulting in stainless steel. It looks so cheap. Same with railings and fencing. Here it has all been painted black. For such a minimal outlay the final appearance can be altered substantially.
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Old May 27th, 2014, 10:03 PM   #524
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They've done well on that front in Kidbrooke Village. They've also done well to keep street furniture to a minimum.
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Old May 30th, 2014, 11:18 AM   #525
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Kidbrooke Village Phase 1
Europa Concorsi
May 2014

Quote:
This masterplan for an exciting new area of the existing Ferrier Estate which was completed in 1972 and contained 1900 social housing units in concrete blocks.

Due to bad management and poor connectivity to the surrounding suburbs the estate fell into a state of serious physical and social disrepair. The development consists of 109 hectares of land and is located immediately to the east of Blackheath Park with Greenwich Park and the Royal Observatory beyond.

The first phase of housing is located at the south of the site overlooking Sutcliffe Park and the existing community along Eltham Green Road. Four C-shaped apartment blocks front the park, three linear apartment blocks bound the south of the site and the southern portion of the park, and two blocks of 3-storey terraced housing link to the existing suburb.

The C-shaped blocks are arranged around a landscaped podium courtyard that opens out onto the park, creating a visual connection between the private courtyards and the public park.

Phase 1 provides 449 units of mixed-tenure housing, including 80 units of new social housing, designed to sit comfortably between the existing suburban housing of Kidbrooke suburb and the market housing blocks of Phase 1, rehoming many of the families of the Ferrier Estate.

Establishing the masterplan and new homes as an extension to existing neighbourhoods rather than a separate estate renewal programme has been central to the area’s transformation from an isolated estate to a broader, thriving community.

The three-storey terraced houses with traditional pitched roofs are arranged back-to-back, providing secure perimeters to two squares. To provide interest and articulation to the streets houses are paired, with every other pair set back from the street frontage and varied brick.

A break between every fourth house provides a side access to the back gardens. The form presents a recognisable typology, familiar but with modern amenity and comfort. They were immediately popular with residents and neighbours alike.

Phase 1 social housing


Phase 1 apartment block


Phase 1 apartment blocks


Phase 1 social housing


Phase 1 social housing


Phase 1 social housing


Phase 1 apartment blocks

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Old June 20th, 2014, 09:25 PM   #526
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Berkeley Chairman comes out against Berkeley Homes' 31-story Kidbrooke tower.

http://www.architectsjournal.co.uk/n...664353.article

Quote:
Berkeley chairman Tony Pidgley last week appeared at the London Assembly planning committee hearing on tall buildings and told members: ‘Towers should go round transport hubs – that’s where they should be – and they should be in clusters’. However, there is no cluster in Kidbrooke, and the area has been given a public transport accessibility level (PTAL) of only three out of six.
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Old June 20th, 2014, 09:37 PM   #527
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The Chairman hasn't come out against the tower proposal. It's the Blackheath Society that are opposed to it. The quote in context:


Controversy Over Tower in London’s Kidbrooke Village
CTBUH
20 June 2014
Quote:
A leading high-rise housing developer has commissioned Studio Egret West to work up plans for a 31-storey tower in the London suburbs, sparking controversy over its “entirely inappropriate” height.

Berkeley Group, one of the principal sponsors of the London Festival of Architecture 2014, is behind the £1 billion ($1.7 billion) Kidbrooke Village scheme in the Royal Borough of Greenwich, a scheme which replaces the now demolished Ferrier Estate.

The 4,000-unit masterplan for the development by Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands was originally given planning permission five years ago, but Berkeley is now proposing to add more than 1,000 extra homes, including those in Studio Egret West’s planned 31-story residential tower.

Berkeley is also behind plans for the UK’s tallest residential tower by Foster + Partners in London’s South Quay. Berkeley chairman Tony Pidgley last week appeared at the London Assembly planning committee hearing on tall buildings and told members: “Towers should go round transport hubs – that’s where they should be – and they should be in clusters.” However, there is no cluster in Kidbrooke, and the area has been given a public transport accessibility level (PTAL) of only three out of six.

The council’s planning guidance for the area recommends a maximum height of 15 stories, less than half the height of the proposed tower.

Following a recent public consultation on the plans, neighboring action group the Blackheath Society wrote to Berkeley to protest at the densification and particularly the “entirely inappropriate” tower.

The letter complained that the tower would be visible from Blackheath, “in the buffer zone of the Maritime Greenwich World Heritage Site,” and from the grounds of the Art Deco landmark Eltham Palace – one of the council’s designated viewpoints to central London.
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Old June 20th, 2014, 10:30 PM   #528
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SE9 View Post
The Chairman hasn't come out against the tower proposal.
Well, I concur with his remarks that towers needs to be located by transport hubs, and I don't think many people would say that a couple of train platforms and a bus stop or two qualifies (hence the PTAL of 3/6).

It's a nice enough tower, but unless there's a major change in transport infrastructure it's simply in the wrong place.
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Old June 20th, 2014, 11:42 PM   #529
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Kidbrook Village was doing do so well, the tower really is inappropriate.
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Old June 24th, 2014, 01:29 PM   #530
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Hi,

First of all I would like to thank everyone posting in this forum - it is the best site for information about every development in London. Big thank you to SE9, who seems to be one of the main "updaters" - may I ask how you get all of this "inside info" and plans? (no worries if not)

Anyway, my SO and I are looking for a FTB place and out of everything we have seen, Kidbrooke Village seems to be the best place. Last weekend we went to the Merlin Court launch, where we got shown around.

Bakerley have just started building Merlin Court and it will be completed in ~2 years. They shows us plans for it, and the rooms sizes were very big, 1 bed going up to 61sqm. Also we were shown around the place - Blackheath quarter clubhouse was looking very good.

They also showed us the almost finished Maltby House in the Merridian Gate. We saw almost completed interiors, and said that they will be available for occupation in 2 months. Of course, everything in Maltby House was sold already years ago, but little did they know that we are looking for Shared Ownership, which i think will be available in that Maltby House from September via Viridian Housing. Does anyone know more informations about this? All I have is a flyer with Maltby house and another house in Blackheath quarter marked for Shared Ownership.

Sorry for not having any pictures to show as it is custom here. But thanks everyone who keep posting interesting information on this forum!
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Old June 24th, 2014, 06:59 PM   #531
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Cheers phemark.

I don't think any information is yet available regarding shared ownership opportunities in the Meridian Gate phase. I'd keep checking with Viridian Housing so as not to miss out!
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Old June 24th, 2014, 07:08 PM   #532
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Ferrier estate reborn
Inside Housing
19 June 2014


Quote:
Over the past three years, the Ferrier estate in south east London has undergone a major transformation. Emily Rogers investigates

A lot can happen in three years. Few places provide such a demonstration of this potential for change than the newly-created Kidbrooke Village in south east London. Kidbrooke train station is ablaze with banners welcoming visitors to ‘a new village for London’.

Just a few steps down a walkway and you arrive in the village square, complete with a Sainsbury’s Local and a coffee shop with brown leather sofas, displaying a latté list to rival anything in the City. Pristine sunlit flowerbeds and a cluster of inward-facing wooden benches stand in the square, immaculate but vacant, save for a few tea-breaking builders in high-vis jackets.

Change of scene

Overseeing it all are the huge dark windows of Kidbrooke Village information centre, offering a high-tech display of one of the most ambitious regeneration projects in Europe.

‘It’s just such a completely new place altogether,’ says former Ferrier resident Hamida Pyne, who moved out of the estate with her family four years ago and has mixed feelings about the changes. ‘If somebody had been in the Ferrier and had gone away for a few years and been taken back there, they would have definitely said they’d been taken to the wrong place.’

This isn’t hard to imagine. I visited this place three years ago, in the dying days of its previous life as the Ferrier estate, to interview tenants living in the shadow of the wrecking ball.

At the time, repossession orders were starting to fire through the letterboxes of the 190 tenants who still lived there, so work could start on phase two of Kidbrooke Village, a £1 billion, 4,000-home regeneration project led by Berkeley Homes in partnership with Greenwich Council. On the development’s completion, 1,525 of these will be affordable, of which 738 will be let at social rents. There were 1,910 social homes on the original Ferrier estate, although some had been sold under the right to buy.

New beginnings

To the outsider, it wasn’t hard to see why the decaying concrete hulks were chosen as the backdrop for drugs and violence in the gritty 1997 Gary Oldman film, Nil by Mouth. Three years later, the most apt film that springs to mind is The Truman Show, about a man in a pristine town that turns out to be a film set.

Now half of the development’s six phases are either completed or under construction and 195 of the Ferrier’s former 1,900 or so households have set up home here, living in some of the village’s first 832 homes. They are part of an estimated 2,300-strong community with dramatic variations in wealth. Some have shelled out around £1 million for property.

Nick Russell, chair of the former Ferrier Residents’ Action Group, says: ‘The disappointment was that we thought it would be a rolling development of new homes for the Ferrier community. It turned out to be new homes mainly for other people.’

Shop owner Niall O’Brien has run a coffee kiosk at Kidbrooke station for the past four years, giving him the opportunity to observe striking changes in the people coming and going since the bulldozing and building began. He describes the demographic changes as nothing short of a ‘quantum leap’

‘Most of the Prada and Burberry you see now is actually real,’ he says.

The village centre, which also includes a doctor, dentist, village store and medical centre, turns out to be a temporary cluster of portakabins, to create the look and feel of a village before the completion of a permanent centre in five to 10 years.

But on walking away things start to feel more real. The Holy Family Primary school is unchanged, its playground jumping with noisy children, instilling life in its surroundings and providing a fleeting flash of déjà vu to my last Ferrier visit three years ago.

The school gives a sense of continuity to the former Ferrier families, many of whom live opposite it in a row of smart townhouses. They are very happy, according to a Berkeley-commissioned ‘social sustainability’ study carried out last year.

Learning to mingle

Walking around the pristine flowerbeds and acres of green parkland, it’s not surprising that the development scored highly on most indicators used to measure people’s well-being in their neighbourhood. But it scored below average for ‘links with neighbours’.

John Anderson, chair of Berkeley Homes East Thames, is keenly aware of the challenges of building a community from scratch. ‘My experience with the Royal Arsenal [a previous Berkeley development] is that it takes time to get people to talk to each other. It probably takes about 10 years,’ he says.

Tenures are mixed where possible in the village’s streets and apartment blocks, although social tenants are housed together to ‘help the decant’ from the Ferrier. ‘I’m hoping the tenures will blend with time,’ he adds.

Back at the temporary village centre, the huge pile of rubble behind Sainsbury’s leaves a parting reminder of the changes ahead. The Ferrier may have been reduced to dust, but its community wasn’t. Some 195 of its households are now anchored here, amid private renters and those dangling on different rungs of the property ladder. As the number of households multiplies at least five fold over the next 15 to 20 years, making a reality out of Berkeley’s ‘one community’ phrase in its marketing banners surrounding the rubble will prove one of its biggest building challenges.
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Old June 24th, 2014, 07:09 PM   #533
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The shared ownership tenant



Starbucks supervisor Justyna Szczepaniak, 35, moved into her bright, two-bedroom shared ownership flat in September 2012, with her husband Marcin and two children, five-year-old Zofia and Antoni, three months.

The family previously shared a rented three-bedroom house in Hillingdon, north west London, with Justyna’s brother’s family. But as their daughter grew and Marcin started having to leave home at 6.30am for a new job in Southwark, they realised it was time to move. Looking for shared ownership opportunities in south London, the couple found they were eligible for a Southern Housing home in Kidbrooke Village.

The estate was a blank sheet for Ms Szczepaniak, as she hadn’t known about the Ferrier. ‘When I first saw this place, I cried,’ she recalls. ‘I wanted to stay in Hillingdon. My brother and my sister-in-law are my only family in this country. I had friends in Hillingdon and a job there. But I didn’t know anybody here. At the beginning, I was scared and lonely.’

But she has since had her second child, Antoni, here and has built up a small group of friends in her shared ownership block and at the gates of Holy Family Primary School, where her daughter Zofia is ‘very happy’.
‘My neighbours are really nice people; I like them,’ she says.

There are things she’d like improved, such as bus links to the village. And she shares her neighbours’ concerns about Berkeley’s proposal for a controversial 31-storey tower block. ‘I hope they won’t build that, as it’s not much of a villagey thing,’ she says. ‘I hope they’ll keep as many green areas as possible.’

Ms Szczepaniak sees the flat as a temporary stepping stone for her family, as they are likely to outgrow it in several years. But she says it will be hard to move somewhere else again after making friends here.
http://www.insidehousing.co.uk/ferri...004209.article
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Old June 24th, 2014, 07:11 PM   #534
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The homeowner



Industrial engineer and 36-year-old mother of two Sandra Reinholc lives in a three-bedroom townhouse in Boyd Way with her husband Bart, son Lucas, six, and daughter Mila Sophia, 11 months.

The family moved here from their two-bedroom flat in Blackheath Village in September 2012. Her son Lucas is at school in Blackheath, just four minutes away by train.

The couple opted for Kidbrooke Village after scouring the surrounding area for a house within their price range as close as possible to her son’s school in Blackheath and within a quick commute of Mr Reinholc’s workplace in Canary Wharf.

‘I saw the first houses being built and I thought I wouldn’t mind one of those,’ says Ms Reinholc. ‘And as soon as I saw round one, I just loved it right from the beginning.’ She was initially very wary, however, due to the Ferrier estate’s reputation. ‘I knew what was here before,’ she says. ‘We knew perfectly well what the Ferrier looked like.’

But Ms Reinholc was reassured by the fact that the new development was being built from scratch and she says it’s a move they’re very glad they made.

‘I feel so lucky that I live just here,’ she says, as she strolls through Sutcliffe Park, which has been joined to the village’s new parkland with footpaths. ‘In just two minutes, I’m in this beautiful park.’

She has bonded with her neighbours, whose son also attends her son’s school. But she sees the 31-storey tower block proposed by Berkeley as a blot on the horizon of the green environment she has come to love. ‘That’s something I do feel a bit concerned about,’ she says. ‘They’ve done such a great job transforming this area, but they want to make it crowded again. That’s like building a tower block in the middle of Greenwich Park.’
http://www.insidehousing.co.uk/ferri...004209.article
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Old June 24th, 2014, 07:12 PM   #535
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The former Ferrier tenant



Somalian father of seven Mohamed Ajami, 54, has finally fulfilled his dream of keeping his extended family together on the same estate. He, his wife and his then six children, who were squeezed into a four-bedroom house on the Ferrier estate, were among the last to move out of his ‘ghost town’ in March 2012, due to the difficulty of finding a large enough replacement home to accommodate them.

But two months later, his family was rehoused in two of the village’s brand new townhouses. Mr Ajami, a town centre warden in Woolwich, now lives in a four-bedroom house in Gerrard Way with his wife and five youngest children, ranging in age from 12 weeks to 16 years. His two oldest children, aged 21 and 19, live with his sister down the road.

Mr Ajami’s rehousing journey was a painful one. In February 2012, he lost his 82-year-old disabled mother, who lived in a separate block on the estate. She died of a pulmonary illness, which he believes was worsened by the living conditions in her condemned building. Mr Ajami recalls how the council moved swiftly to rehouse his family in the new development as quickly as possible, thanks to the intervention of housing director John Clark.

‘At least we’re not overcrowded now,’ says Mr Ajami. ‘And we’re together. [The council was] saying that [it would] have to disperse us all in Greenwich borough. But I wanted my family in one place and it’s my right to stay in one place.

‘The house was good and it was new. The children got better. Three of them had asthma in the old house. I found my old friends here and my children could stay at their schools and be surrounded by the same places they’re used to. The house is just right; new comforts, new technology, everything.’

But Mr Ajami misses the closeness of the former Ferrier community, who he describes as becoming ‘one family’. And he feels a sense of separation from the new homeowners moving in, some of whom he believes have a ‘bad idea’ of the Ferrier. ‘I’ve lived here for 13 years and now see it as a divided community. There used to be a strong community in the Ferrier and now there isn’t any more. That’s sad.’

Mr Ajami still gets emotional when he passes the place where his mother’s block used to be. ‘Every time I’m there, I say goodbye to her,’ he says.
http://www.insidehousing.co.uk/ferri...004209.article
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Old June 24th, 2014, 10:36 PM   #536
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Without sounding like some reader from the Daily Mail but when he say's ' it’s my right to stay in one place' I seriously have to disagree.
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Old June 24th, 2014, 11:58 PM   #537
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Yep agree. He will have heavily subsidised rent, and with 5 children in that house housing benefit will be paying most if not all of it too, even with him working. Plus all the tax credits and child benefit.

This sense of entitlement is irritating as I know many people renting privately having to move constantly, and often having to move further away from work resulting in more expensive and lengthy commutes. I know there's lots of issues around it such as a lack of social housing and general building but to hear someone (who will be claiming large amounts of welfare) claiming it's 'their right to stay' does not endear him. Those other people have no right to stay anywhere apparently as they don't have 7 children.
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Old June 25th, 2014, 08:53 PM   #538
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What I hate is that it has become taboo to mention anything on this subject, people on housing benefit claiming it to be their right to stay in a specific location, yet if you do mention it out loud you're accused of being right wing, fascist and offensive. There's something very wrong with that. It should be a case of people being made to realise that they sacrifice those very rights they think they have if they are not putting anything back into society like those who do pay their way.

That article above about him and his seven children really got to me as I'm actually going through a very hard slog at the moment trying to secure a private sale property (2-bed flat) in Kidbrooke Village which I have fallen in love with. My partner and I make a pretty good living and we can afford a good home, but anything more than a 2-bed is out of our price range. I would absolutely love to live in a wonderful town house, but that seems like something way in the future, and may not even be possible in London, due to the cost (a million at least). But that bloke above gets given a brand new one on a plate whilst working as a "town centre warden" (traffic warden?); how dare he say it's his right to have a nicer home than hard working people.
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Old June 25th, 2014, 09:50 PM   #539
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I wouldn't say it's taboo, the skybar is full of it.
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Old June 26th, 2014, 12:07 AM   #540
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It's an unusual world. That Somalian man probably came to the UK as a refugee from a war-torn country. He probably lost a lot of family and certainly friends and compatriots. A couple of decades and 7 kids later he has two beautiful townhouses for his family in a relatively idyllic area. At the same time, most people still can't afford 1 kid and a pokey flat in London.
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