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Old March 21st, 2019, 01:20 PM   #421
RokasLT
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PAC PALACE

LITHUANIA

KAUNAS




Quote:
The late baroque (rococo) mansion was rebuilt in 1742 by Kaunas city court foreman Simonas Sirutis, that he bought from Christopher Pac. The gothic 15th and 16th centuries’ vaults are one of the oldest in the whole city, besides they remained in perfect condition. The building used to be two-storey with driveway in the centre, curb roof and luxurious interior. The walls in the second floor rooms S. Sirutis covered in silk textiles, draperies, the mansion was furnished with luxurious furniture, pieces of art, mirrors and clocks. There still remained gothic and rococo niches, baroque closets and spruce historicistic stoves.
In 1779 the mansion was bought by the court foreman count of Starodub Juozapas Chrapovickis. He reconstructed the mansion: he built four column classicism portico with a balcony, that replaced the former arch of the driveway, he also made some changes in the façade.
After the war in 1812 the mansion was turned into a hospital and there was established court–martial, During the suppression of the rebellion of the 1863rd years, the vaults were turned into prison and one of the rebellion leaders Antanas Mackevicius was condemned to death. After the rebellion, the mansion was withdrawn from the counts’ disposal. In 1903 the mansion became the establishment of the headquarters of Kaunas fortress, and then it became the Russian barracks – in front of the mansion marched soldiers – the mansion became stables and was left derelict.
Now it is a rear baroque house of a wealthy citizen, which is titled by the status of supreme cultural monument.
In 1909, Maironis after had returned from Petersburg to Kaunas, he purchased the mansion, repaired it in a year, slightly changed the decoration of the pediment and inscribed 1910. J. Maironis in it. He settled in eight rooms of the second floor and the remained part of the mansion reserved for the Lithuanian cultural organizations. In this part of the mansion there was established the first Lithuanian library-athenaeum in Kaunas, Catholic Women Association, Craft School, the edit of the magazine Garnys, publishing office Sakalas. Marcele Maciulyte lived in that mansion together with her brother poet; they together provided education for their sister’s Kotryna Lipciene children.




PALACE OF POCIEJAI

LITHUANIA

VILNIUS





Quote:
Dominikonų Street is one of the oldest and most flamboyant streets of Vilnius where famous noble families of the GDL. Pociejai Palace was expanded after the 1748 fire. The façade of the palace demonstrates elements of early Baroque: the knights’ bas-reliefs, the two-storey arch gallery and the colour configuration are characteristic of the early Baroque period. Zavišos (Zawisza) Palace was built at the end of the 18th century. It is predominated by early Classicism with a stringent symmetrical façade and its renaissance cellars have been preserved. Gureckiai Palace. A Gothic two-storey building that was situated here from the 15–16th centuries was reconstructed at the end of the 18th century according to the early Classical style.







Łopacińskich PALACE

LITHUANIA

VILNIUS




http://www.autc.lt/lt/architekturos-objektai/1434





VERKIAI PALACE-MANOR

LITHUANIA

VILNIUS REG.



Quote:
Verkiai Manor Estate was established in a beautiful corner of nature in the outskirts of Vilnius City. The estate borders the Neris River and the forested districts of Jeruzalė, Naujieji Verkiai and Verkiai Forest. The Verkiai Manor Estate consists of a number of well-preserved buildings and remnants of fine architecture stored at the Verkiai Architectural Reserve.

Back in the 14th century, the manor of the Grand Duke of Lithuania gifted by the King of Poland Jogaila to bishops stood in Verkiai. The manor used to be a summer house but later gradually became a permanent residence of the bishops of Vilnius City.

The first Verkiai bishop manor was a wooden building with masonry cellar and stood in place of the present-time Trinapolis Monastery.

Since 1780, the Verkiai Manor had belonged to the Bishop Ignacy Jakub Massalski. He hired a famous architect Marcin Knackfus to choose the location of the new manor and to design its spatial layout. Marcin Knackfus started the construction of the central and eastern parts of the manor. The latter was designed to house servants. The work of Marcin Knackfus was continued by his former student Laurynas Stuoka-Gucevičius after he completed his studies in Paris. Laurynas Stuoka-Gucevičius redesigned the central manor partially changing its layout. Based on the designs of this young architect, a masterpiece of Classicism was built. The manor of Ignacy Jakub Massalski was shaped like a luck bringing horseshoe: two-story-high central manor house with servants’ quarters from both sides to the east and to the west. The central manor house was the most luxurious and ornate. It had several halls, 30 rooms, a chapel, a treasury, a large library, a museum and a domed theatre hall which is known for its rendition of the Marriage of Figaro of 1788. The manor house had waterworks and gas lighting. Laurynas Stuoka-Gucevičius also designed other estate buildings: the greenhouses, pavilion, inn and stables, a school for the children of peasants, watermill, villa, etc. The construction of the entire manor estate and its buildings supposedly lasted until the end of the 18th century. Sadly, Ignacy Jakub Massalski was unable to bring his dream manor to completion as he died during the Uprising of 1794. That was when the manor was passed on several times and largely deteriorated, especially in terms of its architecture.

The heaviest damage to the manor was caused at the time when it was occupied by the army of Napoleon. The French soldiers burnt down the wooden floor and the roof rafters of the central manor and used the walls of the manor house for target practice. A year later, the manor was used as a prison for French captives. By the middle of the century, the abandoned manor house and other estate buildings started falling apart and lost the shine and splendor they had under the rule of bishops.

New life was breathed into the Verkiai Manor and Park in 1839, when the entire estate was bought by the German Count Ludwig Adolf Wittgenstein who served as Colonel in the Russian Army. Stefanija Radvilaitė was the first wife of the Count. After her death, Count Ludwig Adolf Wittgenstein moved to Verkiai together with his second wife. It was Count Ludwig Adolf Wittgenstein who attempted to preserve and restore the Verkiai Manor Estate and Park to its former glory. Sadly, the central manor house was too deteriorated for a successful reconstruction and had to be demolished all the way to its cellars. The eastern servants quarters with an added tower at the west became the main house. Count Ludwig Adolf Wittgenstein built an additional hall and established a gallery there, keeping a variety of paintings by European artists, busts of famous people, ivory carvings and ancient military armor brought in from the collection of the Radziwiłł family of Nesvyžius. A two-story high winter garden was built next to the south end of the eastern servants’ quarters. The winter garden had many tropic plants, such as bananas, pineapples and fig trees. The garden had pathways winding among the flower bushes and fruit trees, a fountain, birds kept in cages and a working organ. Even at times of the coldest winter, the greenhouse maintained a temperature of +16–18°C.

The Verkiai Manor Park was also redesigned by decreasing its upper part, building a new fence and a guardhouse and reconstructing the central court and its fountain and pool. The new golden age of the manor lasted until 1864. Later, the reconstruction works started by the Count were taken over by his son Peter who mostly focused on ponds, waterways and aquiculture. Since 1881, the estate has been once again abandoned and unmaintained.

During the 20th century, misfortune once again befell the Verkiai Manor. In 1910, the owners changed numerous times, the land was sold and the forests were cut down. The Verkiai Manor Estate was heavily damaged during the First World War as well. The greenhouse next to the eastern servants’ quarters fell into decline, highly valued trees in the estate park were cut down, the lower part of the park and other buildings fell apart and pieces of art were stolen from the manor. During the interwar period, the manor house was used for a variety of purposes: a boarding school and summer house, a school of husbandry, a technical vocational school of husbandry and a school for leaders of collective farms in the Soviet times. The deterioration of the manor stabilized gradually only in the second half of the 20th century.

Presently, the manor house belongs to the Lithuanian Science Academy and Nature Research Center that use the building for their own needs. Visitations to the manor are restricted. The eastern servants’ quarters have the original hall and wall décor but the halls are empty.

















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Old March 24th, 2019, 01:15 PM   #422
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not exactly palaces but still from the era :

Wisloujscie Fortress (Gdansk)

Wisłoujście Fortress (German: Festung Weichselmünde) is an historic fortress located in Gdańsk by the Martwa Wisła river, by an old estuary of the river Vistula, flowing into the Bay of Gdańsk. The fortress is located close to the Wisłoujście borough, Westerplatte and the Port Północny (Northern Port).

During the times of the Teutonic Order, in the fourteenth century, a wooden fortress stood by the mouth of the river Vistula, flowing into the Baltic Sea; which was burnt down by a Hussite Sirotci raid, in September, 1433.

In 1482, a brick lighthouse tower was built in place of the former fortress. The tower was assigned to control the passage of ships, traveling to and fro from the Bay of Gdańsk's main port cities of Gdańsk and Gdynia.

The Wisłoujście Fortress was target for military campaigns. In 1577 the fortress was besieged several times by Stefan Batory, inconclusively, during the Battle of Oliwa (1627), when the fortress was cannonaded by a Swedish fleet; in 1734 by Russian-Saxon, in 1793 by Prussian, in 1807 by Napoleonic, and once again in 1814 by Prussian fleets.

Between 1622-1629 the fortress was known as Latarnia (Lighthouse, Polish), under the name of a fortress - while actually being a naval base of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.





















On the night of July 5–6, 1628, the fortress was attacked with artillery fire, from a Swedish fleet traveling from Wisłoujście, into the fortress, sinking the vessel Złoty Lew (Golden Lion, Polish), and a galleon Sankt Georg (Święty Jerzy).

The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth flagship Sankt Georg - Rycerz Święty Jerzy / Ritter Sankt Georg / Knight St George – galleon, 31 guns, 400t







The Great Armoury (Gdansk)

The Great Armoury building - one of the most spectacular examples of Dutch Renaissance in Poland - constitutes a truly masterful finishing touch in the landscape of Piwna street and an important architectural landmark of the Coal Market area.

The Great Armoury building was erected in years 1600-1605 in the western section of the medieval defensive walls of the Main Town in Gdańsk.

The design is attributed to both Anton van Obberghen, a municipal architect, and to Hans Vredeman de Vries.

The construction process was overseen by Hans Strakowski, while the sculptural decorations were executed by Willem van der Meer the Younger and Abraham van den Block.

Until the late 18th century, the building was used as an arsenal, which meant that it remained under the management of the army until the end of World War I.

During the Free City of Danzig era, the ground floor was converted into a shopping arcade, with the upstairs rooms being used for storage purposes. Crucial renovation works - mostly pertaining to stonework - were performed in 1699, 1768, 1887 and 1911.

During the spring of 1945, the interiors of the building were destroyed and gutted by fire so that only the peripheral walls were left standing; the domes crowning the towers as well as some of the decorative gables have also been destroyed. The roofs and interiors were rebuilt in years 1947-1951, while the gable masonry was reconstructed in years 1957-1966; the staircases inside the towers as well as their crowning domes were also rebuilt during that period.

In May 1954, the building became the property of the Academy of Fine Arts in Gdańsk. Many important restoration works were performed in years 1997-2005, encompassing both the facades and the interiors; the most readily apparent ones are the reconstruction of the stone attic crowning the southern facade and the comprehensive restoration of both facades, including the reconstruction of wall paintings and gilded decorations visible from Piwna street.

For many years, the ground floor performed commercial functions; today - within the framework of the “Armoury of Art” project, it serves to facilitate the implementation of an “open academy of arts” concept, according to the “exhibition, education, promotion and archiving” slogan.















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Old March 29th, 2019, 12:32 PM   #423
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Poland :

Zator castle

The first traces of the Palace in Zator date back to the fifteenth century. This is when it was first built as a fortified castle. The castle in Zator was then used as the seat of the dukes of Zator.

In the second half of the eighteenth century, it was purchased by the family Duniów and partially rebuilt. The next owners of the castle in Zator were the families: Poniatowski, Tyszkiewiczowie, Wąsowiczowie and Potocki. They later rebuilt the palace, giving it a romantic neo-Gothic style.

In the times of the last war, it was unlawfully taken from the rightful owners. Later, it became the seat of the Institute of Animal Production and Fisheries Department of Experiments, and the castle has been used as their head office. The castle was completely restored in the years 1964 to 1973. The ground floor has beautifully renovated rooms that are called: Hunting, Gold, Fern and Ivy.

The Duchy of Zator was one of many Duchies of Silesia.

It was split off the Duchy of Oświęcim, when after eleven years of joint rule the sons of Duke Casimir I in 1445 finally divided the lands among themselves, whereby his eldest son Wenceslaus received the territory around the town of Zator. The fragmentation of the duchy continued after Wenceslaus' death in 1468, when in 1474 his sons Casimir II and Wenceslaus II as well as Jan V and Władysław again divided the Zator territory in two along the Skawa river.

After the death of Casimir II in 1490 however both parts of the duchy were reunited, and in 1494 Jan V as the last surviving brother became its sole ruler. As Jan himself had no heirs, he decided in the same year to sell the duchy to King John I Albert of Poland, under a guarantee that he would remain duke until his death.

Jan was killed in 1513 and Zator was united with Poland.

At the General sejm of 1564, King Sigismund II Augustus issued privileges of incorporation recognizing both Duchies of Oświęcim and Zator as part of the Polish Crown into the Silesian County of the Kraków Voivodeship, although the Polish kings retained both ducal titles and the name of the Duchy survived in the legal acts (it had however no special privileges).





Quote:
Originally Posted by maharski View Post

Parę zdjęć z lutego 2016 roku z dni otwartych:
1.


2.


3.


4.


5.


6.


7.


8.







the castle is currently under renovation (there will be museum, restaurant and mini brewery) :

http://zamekzator.pl/przebudowa-i-re...rpomalopolska/

Szydlowiec castle

In the 13th century, there was a knight’s castle in the area of ​​the present castle, which was a center of local lands. It protected the crossing of the river Korzeniówka on the local trade route. Perhaps at the turn of 1259/1260, it was alongside with the village destroyed during the Mongol invasion.

The next phase of construction is the 14th-15th century walls of the court of irregular stone. Its founder was Jakub and Sławek, ancestors of the Szydłowiec family.

In the years 1470-1480 Stanisław Szydłowiecki, castellan of Radom, built a stone castle composed of a residential building and a gate tower, connected by defensive walls.

In the years 1515-1526 Mikołaj Szydłowiecki, who held the dignity of the supremus thesaurarius, transformed the defensive site into a renaissance residence. In 1550 Szydłowiec passed to the hands of the Radziwiłł family, who held it until the beginning of the 19th century, making further modernizations.

In 1821 the castle was bought by Anna Sapieżyna, who sold it to the government of the Kingdom of Poland.

The castle was erected on the island among the floodplains of the river Korzeniówka. In the 15th century it consisted of a residential building erected from stone. It had four floors with three rooms on each of them. The second element of the castle was a quadrangular tower situated in the western part of the island. Both buildings probably were surrounded by the perimeter of the ramparts. Expansion after 1515 led to the creation of a three-winged residension, closed by the south by wall curtain. The eastern wing formed a house of 14×55 m. The northern wing created a dwelling house and added two lodgings from the west.

The castle survived to our times in the form of a renaissance, magnate residence with a readable medieval layout. It now houses the Museum of Folk Musical Instruments.































[IMG][/IMG]
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Old April 2nd, 2019, 02:13 AM   #424
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Krakow :

Lobzow palace

Palace in Lobzow is the second most important royal residence in Krakow
after Wawel.

During the course of its almost seven-hundred-year-old history, the complex had undergone several stages of thorough reconstructions and adaptations.
One could say that it was doomed to constant changes.

https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pa%C5%..._%C5%81obzowie

















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Old April 2nd, 2019, 03:34 PM   #425
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Lubcha Castle

Belarus


Quote:
Lubcha Castle (Belarusian: Любчанскі замак) was a residential castle of the Radziwill family on the left bank of the Neman River at Lubcha near Navahradak.

The castle began its life in 1581 as a fortified residence of Jan Kiszka, a powerful Calvinist magnate. It had timber walls, a single stone tower, and was surrounded by moats on three sides, the fourth side protected by the river.

Lubcha later passed to Janusz Radziwiłł, Great Hetman of Lithuania, who expanded the castle by adding three stone towers. In 1655 it was taken and devastated by the rebellious Cossacks under Ivan Zolotarenko.

Only the barbican and one other tower were left standing after the Cossack incursion. The deserted estate changed owners several times, remaining untenanted until the mid-19th century, when a Gothic Revival palace was built on the grounds.

The Lubcha estate suffered much damage during both world wars. The palace was reduced to a shell in 1914 and was remodeled into a school building by the Soviets in 1947. In the early 21st century, some of the castle walls were rebuilt by a team of volunteers










Niemcewicz Manor

Belarus


Quote:
The Niemcewicz Estate in the village of Skoki is a unique and significant object of historical and cultural heritage, the only architectural structure of its kind in the vicinity of Brest. The homestead was built presumably in 1777. Julian Ursyn Niemcewicz lived here (1757-1841) - a writer, publicist, statesman and an adjutant of Tadeusz Kosciuszko, one of the authors of the first Constitution in Europe (1791). It was in the walls of the estate on the 15th of December 1917 that a protocol was signed on a cessation of arms between Soviet Russia and the German Empire.





Sviatsk/Svyatsk Palace-Manor

Belarus


https://vetliva.com/tourism/what-to-...revne-svyatsk/








Palace in Gardin

Belarus


Build in 1770, belonged to Četvertinskiai (in pol. Chetvertinsky (?)) and Poniatowski families.

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Old April 2nd, 2019, 09:52 PM   #426
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Plinkšiai Manor

Lithuania


First manor was build around 1751. However this building replaced it in 1870–1880. Belonged to Pliateriai (ger. Plater, Plaeter).

https://lt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plink%C5%A1i%C5%B3_dvaras




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Old April 3rd, 2019, 12:13 AM   #427
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some updates from Belarus. Thanx RokasLT for the presentation of our castles and palaces. The palace is being restored in Svyaсk now. Unfortunately I have only summer photos of last year.













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Old April 3rd, 2019, 12:21 AM   #428
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Halšany Castle (Belarusian: Гальшанскі замак, Lithuanian: Alšėnų pilis, Polish: Zamek holszański) is the ruined residence of the Sapieha magnate family in Halshany.



The current structure was built about 1610 by Paweł Stefan Sapieha to replace an older castle of the Holszanski princely family, of whom Sapiehas were descendants and heirs.

Also known as the Black Castle (although it is built of red brick), the residence formerly rivaled Mir Castle as the most elegant private château of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. The name Black Castle in fact originally applies to a fictional building from a book by Uladzimir Karatkievich, which was loosely based on Halshany Castle.















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Old May 2nd, 2019, 02:41 PM   #429
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Umiastovskiai (pol. Umiastovski) palace

Vilnius

XVIII 60's-70's







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Old May 19th, 2019, 01:07 AM   #430
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tunejadzec View Post
Halšany Castle (Belarusian: Гальшанскі замак, Lithuanian: Alšėnų pilis, Polish: Zamek holszański) is the ruined residence of the Sapieha magnate family in Halshany.



The current structure was built about 1610 by Paweł Stefan Sapieha to replace an older castle of the Holszanski princely family, of whom Sapiehas were descendants and heirs.

Also known as the Black Castle (although it is built of red brick), the residence formerly rivaled Mir Castle as the most elegant private château of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. The name Black Castle in fact originally applies to a fictional building from a book by Uladzimir Karatkievich, which was loosely based on Halshany Castle.

is this it?



1 by Robert Maciejewski, on Flickr


2 by Robert Maciejewski, on Flickr


3 by Robert Maciejewski, on Flickr


4 by Robert Maciejewski, on Flickr


6 by Robert Maciejewski, on Flickr


7 by Robert Maciejewski, on Flickr


5 by Robert Maciejewski, on Flickr


8 by Robert Maciejewski, on Flickr


10 by Robert Maciejewski, on Flickr


9 by Robert Maciejewski, on Flickr


11 by Robert Maciejewski, on Flickr


13 by Robert Maciejewski, on Flickr


16 by Robert Maciejewski, on Flickr
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Old July 1st, 2019, 10:36 PM   #431
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Palace in Mała Wieś, Mazovia, Poland
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