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Old March 9th, 2013, 06:59 AM   #401
exseed
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I wish the U.S. could at least make a few (it really doesn't have to be all) international airports allow international transits within the terminals. Some of the ideal hubs seem to already have sufficient facilities that only require a bit of modification; i'm thinking of terminals that cater to predominantly international flights: for example, Concourse J at MIA, Tom Bradley at LAX, and Terminal 4 at JFK. A complete rebuilding of terminals isn't needed at all, but rather, just the addition of a transfer area in the arrivals corridor which includes a TSA check and then a corridor/stairs/escalator/elevator back to the departures level (this is how transfers are handled in most other parts of the world). Also, the airport should dedicate said terminal (or just part of it) to international flights only, and secure the departures level in such a way that one can't illegally enter the U.S. (this involves merely making the departures TSA check one-way only; once you're past the security check into departures, you can't go back out). If the U.S. could do away with the tedious, complex, and sometimes expensive process that it forces international transiting passengers to endure, then maybe U.S. airports can become more appealing hubs to people travelling from South America to Europe and vice-versa, for example, since U.S. carriers often have the lowest fares between the two continents. Under the current system, many would-be transit passengers choose other alternatives due to reasons like the visas being too expensive, not being able to qualify, or not wanting to spend 2 or more hours going through immigrations, baggage claim, customs, and then re-checking baggage, security, etc... In a proper international terminal, these passengers would be able to go through to another country without having to officially enter the U.S. Additionally, International terminals that are more transit-passenger friendly could possibly bring in more duty free sales revenue as a result of the increase in transiting passengers.
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Old March 9th, 2013, 08:33 PM   #402
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stupid american rules! no wonder people are hating their governments everyday, i had to take another flight as well because they didn't let me go form Amsterdam to Minneapolis to a canadian city.
ps: nothing harmful will happen if someone has a transit in us airport and the states its not his final destination and most of danger in states is coming from american citizens.
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Old March 10th, 2013, 03:19 AM   #403
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Quote:
Originally Posted by exseed View Post
I wish the U.S. could at least make a few (it really doesn't have to be all) international airports allow international transits within the terminals. Some of the ideal hubs seem to already have sufficient facilities that only require a bit of modification; i'm thinking of terminals that cater to predominantly international flights: for example, Concourse J at MIA, Tom Bradley at LAX, and Terminal 4 at JFK. A complete rebuilding of terminals isn't needed at all, but rather, just the addition of a transfer area in the arrivals corridor which includes a TSA check and then a corridor/stairs/escalator/elevator back to the departures level (this is how transfers are handled in most other parts of the world). Also, the airport should dedicate said terminal (or just part of it) to international flights only, and secure the departures level in such a way that one can't illegally enter the U.S. (this involves merely making the departures TSA check one-way only; once you're past the security check into departures, you can't go back out). If the U.S. could do away with the tedious, complex, and sometimes expensive process that it forces international transiting passengers to endure, then maybe U.S. airports can become more appealing hubs to people travelling from South America to Europe and vice-versa, for example, since U.S. carriers often have the lowest fares between the two continents. Under the current system, many would-be transit passengers choose other alternatives due to reasons like the visas being too expensive, not being able to qualify, or not wanting to spend 2 or more hours going through immigrations, baggage claim, customs, and then re-checking baggage, security, etc... In a proper international terminal, these passengers would be able to go through to another country without having to officially enter the U.S. Additionally, International terminals that are more transit-passenger friendly could possibly bring in more duty free sales revenue as a result of the increase in transiting passengers.
My point exactly.
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Old September 8th, 2013, 04:52 PM   #404
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U.S. air traffic control overhaul at risk - aerospace trade group CEO

WASHINGTON, Sept 5 (Reuters) - An overhaul of the U.S. air traffic control system that would help airlines navigate crowded air routes is likely to be further delayed by U.S. budget cuts, the head of the nation's chief defense and aerospace industry lobbying group said on Thursday.

NextGen, a staged program that will shift air-traffic control systems to global positioning satellites from radar, requires about $1 billion a year in federal investment and is expected to be completed in 2025, Marion Blakey, chief executive of the Aerospace Industries Association, said at the Reuters Aerospace and Defense Summit.

It is the biggest aviation infrastructure upgrade since radar in the 1940s, she added.

However, budget cuts required by sequestration - a procedure in U.S. law that limits the size of the federal budget - may prompt the Federal Aviation Administration to raid money set aside for infrastructure projects and use it to pay for ongoing expenses, Blakey said.

"The chances are excellent that the investment accounts will be hit much the hardest," she said, speaking at the Reuters office in Washington, D.C. Blakey is also a former FAA administrator.

"The investment that's required can be derailed in the course of a single year - 2014 - by the sequestration cuts."

When the government is faced with curtailing current operations, which is felt immediately, "usually what has to go is the R&D, the investments," she said. "That's what we very much fear because it's eating this country's economic seed corn in a terrible way."

Delay of the NextGen system could affect the capacity of the U.S. air system, which is projected to handle 1 billion passengers in 2015, up from 780,000 in 2010. The impact could be felt especially at congested hubs where airlines already are "bumping up against" system capacity. That means a tiny hiccup in the system can cause many canceled flights at a hub.

Earlier on Thursday, United Continental Holdings Inc's chief financial officer said the airline is using new slim seats and other measures to both upgrade planes and allow them to carry more passengers efficiently. John Rainey said he was concerned about sequestration's effect on air traffic control and towers.

"The more important thing for us is really the air traffic control situation," he told Reuters. "I'm glad it was rectified quickly" when the FAA got authority to shift money and end the furloughs, he said. "I hope that we would have a thoughtful approach to sequestration, not have any type of capricious cuts like that which would certainly hurt a particular segment of the economy more than others."

Aerospace and airline executives expect U.S. air travel to increase about 5.5 percent a year. But some have raised concerns that growth could falter if the FAA is not able to keep control towers open or has to furlough air-traffic controllers once again, as it did earlier this year, because of budget cuts.

Blakey said she will leave soon for a conference in China to discuss airport infrastructure development there. The system is undergoing rapid growth and had large delays this summer.
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Old November 3rd, 2013, 02:59 PM   #405
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U.S. to allow expanded electronic device use on flights

WASHINGTON, Oct 31 (Reuters) - The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said on Thursday it will allow airlines to expand the use of portable electronic devices in flight.

The agency said it is immediately providing airlines with guidance for implementation, the time frame for which is expected to vary among carriers.

"Passengers will eventually be able to read e-books, play games, and watch videos on their devices during all phases of flight, with very limited exceptions," the FAA said.

The move would still prevent use of mobile phones for voice communications on flight. That issue is under the jurisdiction of the Federal Communications Commission.
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Old April 23rd, 2014, 05:59 PM   #406
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Airline says teenager survived flight over Pacific in jet wheel well

April 21 (Reuters) - A teenaged boy has survived a flight from California to Hawaii in the wheel well of a jetliner, an airline said on Sunday.

The 16-year-old, who was not identified, was spotted by airline personnel after Hawaiian Airlines flight 45 landed in Maui on Sunday morning on a flight from San Jose, California, the airline said. The workers then notified security.

FBI officials confirmed that the boy had traveled from San Jose to Maui in the plane's wheel well, the airline said. The flying time from San Jose to Hawaii is more than five hours.

Hawaiian Airlines had no information about how the boy had managed to survive at an altitude of tens of thousands of feet that jets on that route over the Pacific typically fly at.

"Our primary concern now is for the well-being of the boy, who is exceptionally lucky to have survived," Hawaiian Airlines said in a statement, adding it and its contractors in San Jose were "ready to assist various government agencies in their investigation of this incident."
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Old August 28th, 2014, 08:43 PM   #407
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Australia's Qantas, Virgin allow smartphones throughout flights

SYDNEY, Aug 26 (Reuters) - Australian airlines Qantas Airways Ltd and Virgin Australia Holdings Ltd said passengers can use smartphones and tablets throughout flights from Tuesday after a regulator relaxed a ban on electronic devices on planes.

The airlines said they would start letting passengers use personal electronic devices for the duration of their flight after Australia's Civil Aviation Safety Authority followed a similar ruling from the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration in 2013.

The Australian airlines will hope giving customers almost continuous access to personal devices will increase their appeal as they engage in a price war with each other and other market participants. Currently, passengers are forced to switch off devices until the plane reaches cruising altitude.

The two domestic rivals are expected to post annual net losses later this week.

"We're delighted to give Qantas customers the freedom and flexibility to use their personal electronic devices from the moment they board the plane until they disembark," Qantas Domestic chief executive officer Lyell Strambi said in a statement.

Virgin Australia chief customer officer Mark Hassell said the high number of passengers who travel with a smartphone or tablet shows "how valuable gate-to-gate access is to their overall travel experience".
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Old September 2nd, 2014, 12:56 AM   #408
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I think text messaging/whatsapp is more than enough...
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Old September 2nd, 2014, 12:32 PM   #409
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Come fly in China, the entire flight is people blasting movies and shows from their phones and tablets. Headphones? Of course not!

I fly in China a lot, and recently every flight is a cacophony of game shows, talk shows, kids cartoons, anti-Japanese war epics, sword fight movies etc.

I can't wait until they get cell service here. Then every few minutes will be WEIIIIIIII!!!!!
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Old September 2nd, 2014, 07:17 PM   #410
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Severiano View Post
Come fly in China, the entire flight is people blasting movies and shows from their phones and tablets. Headphones? Of course not!

I fly in China a lot, and recently every flight is a cacophony of game shows, talk shows, kids cartoons, anti-Japanese war epics, sword fight movies etc.

I can't wait until they get cell service here. Then every few minutes will be WEIIIIIIII!!!!!
China civil aviation rules forbid the use of mobile devices on aircraft at any time.
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Old September 3rd, 2014, 08:15 AM   #411
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And like all the rules in China, everyone follows them perfectly.
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Old September 5th, 2014, 10:38 PM   #412
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If I've got my Shure noise isolating in ears and my 13,000+ song iPod I'm happy for people to chat and such. However I'm not totally happy with mobile phones, yes technology is getting better and such, my point of view id rather have no phones on a flight where people can chat on.

However, if people want to message on WhatsApp/iMessage or browse the web via WiFi, id be happy to pay a premium for a WiFi password for my plane, even if it was £19.99 per flight as thats what Carriers would rip you off to i guess. If it brought a large Carrier an extra £2,500 a flight, I'm sure they wouldn't really mind. If Carriers could get an extra £100m a year profit via WiFi passwords I'm pretty sure they would be happy for the larger carriers.

Lets see where technology and research takes us.
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Old September 5th, 2014, 11:07 PM   #413
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Are planes going to end up being segregated into talking/no-talking sections?
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Old March 8th, 2019, 02:48 PM   #414
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Mar 6, 2019
Airlines call for faster training of controllers to ease delays
Excerpt

BRUSSELS (Reuters) - European airline chiefs on Wednesday called for a shake-up of air traffic control, including greater competition and faster training, to ease bottlenecks that led to rising delays in 2018.

Ryanair Chief Executive Michael O’Leary hit out at what he called the “scam” of high charges for the use of airspace despite strikes and staff shortages and called for the training time for new controllers to fall to 6 months from 2-3 years.

“We can train someone to fly an airplane in 6 months - not to be a captain, but to fly the plane. Air traffic control is a fundamentally simple process. It is not complicated,” he told Reuters after chairing an industry report on air traffic delays.

Unions immediately rejected the suggestion.

“For the public, we could compare our work with what is done by surgeons. Obviously, no one would accept to have surgery with a student who only has a 6-month training,” said Jean-Denis Larrere, First Vice President of ATCEUC, which coordinates the work of European air traffic control unions.

Air traffic control (ATC) strikes and staff shortages cost the EU economy 17.6 billion euros ($19.9 billion) in 2018 in the worst year of delays for air passengers in nearly a decade, industry association Airlines for Europe (A4E) said.

The “disgraceful” delays are caused by a combination of strikes, poor management and delays in implementing new European Union-wide regulations, IAG Chief Executive Willie Walsh said.

The number of EU passengers hit by ATC delays rose 26 percent on the previous year to 334 million, A4E said.

More : https://www.reuters.com/article/us-e...-idUSKCN1QN0YH
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Old November 25th, 2019, 01:55 PM   #415
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Asian airlines cautious about outlook for 2020: AAPA
Excerpt
Nov 25, 2019

HONG KONG (Reuters) - Asian airlines are cautious about the outlook for 2020 after trade disputes undermined confidence and led to economic growth below initial forecasts this year, the head of the Association of Asia Pacific Airlines (AAPA) said on Monday.

Airline passenger growth in Asia has moderated this year to 4.4% in the nine months ended Sept. 30, down from 7.7% for the same period in 2018, AAPA statistics show. Asian cargo carriage fell 5.8% in the first nine months of the year amid a U.S.-China trade war.

“I think we need to be a little bit cautious,” AAPA Director General Andrew Herdman told Reuters of the 2020 outlook after having met Asian airline chief executives in Kuala Lumpur on Friday.

“If it turns out to be a bit better than expected then we will be ready to respond.”

AAPA moved the meeting to Kuala Lumpur after cancelling plans for a larger gathering in Hong Kong, citing the “unpredictability” of the situation following months of often violent protests in the Chinese-controlled city.

More : https://www.reuters.com/article/us-a...-idUSKBN1XZ0EC
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