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Old January 14th, 2005, 04:29 AM   #1
BVictor1
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O'Hare International Airport Expansion

First of all, I believe that the airport should be expanded. Here is an article from Crain's Chicago Business.


January 13, 2005


No red flags over O'Hare expansion in FAA report
Critic says FAA 'cooking the books'


(AP) — Diverting planes to nearby airports won't reduce delays at O'Hare, according to a government report released Thursday that Chicago officials hope will help speed their plans for expanding one of the nation's busiest airports.

The Federal Aviation Administration's draft environmental study raises no red flags over the city's proposal to add runways and reconfigure existing ones at O'Hare. It also discounts several alternative proposals for reducing delays.

Among those alternatives was a plan that called for greater use of airports in Milwaukee, Rockford and Gary, Ind.

"It doesn't meet the criteria of handling all the growth that's going to come at O'Hare in the coming years," FAA spokesman Tony Molinaro said Thursday.

Molinaro stressed that the city's plan is not a shoo-in yet. The FAA has scheduled public hearings on its environmental study next month and is slated to release a final report in July that could include recommended changes.

The FAA's decision on O'Hare expansion is expected in September.

"We're very happy with where we're at in this process," said Rosemarie Andolino, executive director of the city's O'Hare Modernization Program.

Andolino said she expects the FAA will approve the city's $15 billion plan, and contractors will be ready to break ground immediately. The plan calls for opening the first new runway in 2007, with the project due to end in 2013.

The FAA report found that the number of people affected by high noise levels would slightly increase after expansion - from about 22,000 in 2002 to 24,000 in 2018. The new runway configuration would mean less noise to the northwest and south and more for suburbs east and west of O'Hare, Molinaro said.

Air pollution would also increase slightly with more planes coming into the airport, although it would still fall within levels accepted by the government, the report said.

The report compared the city's runway plan to two others devised by FAA experts and found it would reduce delays the most in the long run. The city says overall delays would plummet by 79 percent once the runways are built.

Joe Karaganis, an attorney for communities and churches opposed to expansion, said the FAA report was designed to pave the way for approval of the city's plan. He accused the agency of discarding other alternatives - including the use of regional airports - without truly studying them.

"The FAA has been cooking the books on this thing all the way along," Karaganis said.

Karaganis argues the city won't be able to get the bonds and passenger fee increases required to fund the project. He also says the city has not backed up its contention that delays would decrease, and lawsuits over moving cemeteries in the path of the new runways could stop the project altogether.
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Old January 14th, 2005, 05:22 AM   #2
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^The suburbs are adamant, although I think they will ultimately not succeed.

However, as much as I"m tempted to label them as crazy NIMBY's, and be angry at their attempts to halt O'Hare's progress, I see their point of view. These are real families with real homes, and surely they have lived in these homes for years, perhaps a few generations. The prospects of their homes and property being demolished must be very disturbing, and probably seems quite unfair.

Not sure if I can blaim them. Many of them may even have loved ones buried in this cemetary. In my culture, we don't bury the dead--we cremate them. But if burial was a part of my cultural beliefs, I would be very upset to see a deceased family member's grave be removed.
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Old January 14th, 2005, 05:29 AM   #3
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The vast majority of these homes were built after O'hare became Chicago's main Airport. These people were very much aware that they were moving near the world's busiest airport, and that airports require expansion to remain competative. And now they are complaining. Oh well. The airport was there first. If they dont like it, they can relocate. I would not complain about the stench in the air if i moved near a waste water reclamation plant. people need some damn common sense.

And this is not the suburbs vs Chicago. This is Bensonville and Elk Grove Village vs The Other 9.5 million people of Chicagoland. These towns would be nothing without O'Hare, and by opposing expansion, they are really showing thier ignorance and arrogance. Why did you zone residential near the airport? And the comfort of a few hundred does not outweight the travel needs of millions, and the stability of the US air network. Im sorry, but these people really are @$$holes. Those that need to relocate are getting much more than market values for thier home, they shouldnt be complaining at all.

Last edited by Rivernorth; January 14th, 2005 at 05:37 AM.
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Old January 14th, 2005, 05:37 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rivernorth
The vast majority of these homes were built after O'hare became Chicago's main Airport. These people were very much aware that they were moving near the world's busiest airport, and that airports require expansion to remain competative. And now they are complaining. Oh well. The airport was there first. If they dont like it, they can relocate. I would not complain about the stench in the air if i moved near a waste water reclamation plant. people need some damn common sense.

And this is not the suburbs vs Chicago. This is Bensonville and Elk Grove Village vs The Other 9.5 million people of Chicagoland. These towns would be nothing without O'Hare, and by opposing expansion, they are really showing thier ignorance and arrogance. Why did you zone residential near the airport? And the comfort of a few hundred does not outweight the travel needs of millions, and the stability of the US air network. Im sorry, but these people really are @$$holes. They are getting much more than market values for thier home, they shouldnt be complaining at all.
^I see your point. However, I'm sure this "grand scheme" is not something these homeowners were likely aware of. Either way, these provincial suburban ass-clowns will lose in their struggle, and Chicago's cash-cow O'Hare airport will expand into the next era
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Old January 14th, 2005, 05:37 AM   #5
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i got my fingers crossed
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Old January 14th, 2005, 05:38 AM   #6
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I don't.

The FAA ain't a joke. If they approve it, Daley will pull out the bulldozers.

Bye bye, ugly suburban houses!!
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Old January 14th, 2005, 11:42 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rivernorth
The vast majority of these homes were built after O'hare became Chicago's main Airport. These people were very much aware that they were moving near the world's busiest airport, and that airports require expansion to remain competative. And now they are complaining. Oh well. The airport was there first. If they dont like it, they can relocate. I would not complain about the stench in the air if i moved near a waste water reclamation plant. people need some damn common sense.

And this is not the suburbs vs Chicago. This is Bensonville and Elk Grove Village vs The Other 9.5 million people of Chicagoland. These towns would be nothing without O'Hare, and by opposing expansion, they are really showing thier ignorance and arrogance. Why did you zone residential near the airport? And the comfort of a few hundred does not outweight the travel needs of millions, and the stability of the US air network. Im sorry, but these people really are @$$holes. Those that need to relocate are getting much more than market values for thier home, they shouldnt be complaining at all.
I couldn't agree with you more.
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Old January 15th, 2005, 12:40 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rivernorth
The vast majority of these homes were built after O'hare became Chicago's main Airport. These people were very much aware that they were moving near the world's busiest airport, and that airports require expansion to remain competative. And now they are complaining. Oh well. The airport was there first. If they dont like it, they can relocate. I would not complain about the stench in the air if i moved near a waste water reclamation plant. people need some damn common sense.
This is a pretty ignorant statement. The people in the path of the airport do not live there by choice. The live there because they can't afford to live anywhere else. So before labelling people idiots, ask yourself this: What's better; a house by O'Hare or no house at all.
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Old January 15th, 2005, 12:50 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by STR
This is a pretty ignorant statement. The people in the path of the airport do not live there by choice. The live there because they can't afford to live anywhere else. So before labelling people idiots, ask yourself this: What's better; a house by O'Hare or no house at all.
one could justify sprawl out in Grundy and Kane counties with what you just said. And land by Ohare is not the cheapest land in the metro, there are many areas that are more affordable, and in more stable neighborhoods.
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Old January 15th, 2005, 01:10 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rivernorth
one could justify sprawl out in Grundy and Kane counties with what you just said. And land by Ohare is not the cheapest land in the metro, there are many areas that are more affordable, and in more stable neighborhoods.
One could justify sprawl that way, but how often do developers build affordable housing in Kane, Lake, Will or wherever?

And O'Hare land varies greatly depending on use. The residential houses are very cheap. That's why a large percentage of Bensenville residents are 1st generation immigrant families.
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Old January 15th, 2005, 06:02 AM   #11
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O'Hare plan hits Latinos, FAA says
Minorities affected more, report finds

By Jon Hilkevitch
Tribune transportation reporter
Published January 14, 2005

A disproportionate number of minority residents would be forced to move from their homes under Chicago's plan to expand O'Hare International Airport, and five nearby suburbs would suffer the greatest increase in airplane noise, according to a preliminary FAA analysis released Thursday.

The city's planned relocation of homes and businesses to make way for new runways would directly affect 2,631 people, according to the Federal Aviation Administration's draft environmental impact statement on the $15 billion airport project. About 1,600 of the total are members of minority communities, and of them, most are Hispanic.

Most of them live or work south of O'Hare where a controversial far-south runway--the linchpin of the city's plan to increase flight capacity--would be built.

"Businesses could be negatively impacted by the loss of minority residents," the FAA study said.

The demolition of homes and businesses would also result in an annual tax loss estimated at $5.6 million to schools and other taxing bodies in Cook and DuPage Counties, based on 2002 tax bills, the study found.

Meanwhile, the FAA's 5,000-page draft report on the airport project disagreed with the Daley administration's contention that 195,000 permanent jobs would be created in the region. The FAA study determined 90,000 new jobs would result by 2018, but 40,000 of those would be created even without the O'Hare project.

Rosemarie Andolino, director of the airport expansion project, said the city's goal is to increase flight capacity and reduce delays by creating a more efficient airport.

"Whether it's 195,000 new jobs or 90,000 new jobs, it is still a win-win for the region," Andolino said.

The FAA study also determined that 2,073 more housing units than today would be exposed to noise levels averaging 65 decibels or louder during the day and night. The FAA has identified 65 decibels as the upper level at which most land-planning uses are compatible with aviation noise.

The areas in question are mostly in Park Ridge, Rosemont and Schiller Park on the east side of the airport, and Wood Dale and Bensenville west of the airport, the FAA said.

The FAA assessment did not endorse Chicago's eight-runway reconfiguration of O'Hare. A final decision is expected in September. The agency said it will continue to study two alternative airfield layouts that would modify city plans to construct the far-south runway, which would cause the most displacement of residents and businesses.

But the FAA analysis concluded that some type of reconstruction is needed at O'Hare and that the city's plan reduces airport delays at least until flight volume grows to 1.2 million annually. O'Hare handled 992,471 flights in 2004.

The FAA support for expanding O'Hare was based on flight and passenger forecasts showing the combined growth expected at airports in Gary, Milwaukee, Rockford and a planned airport near Peotone in Will County would fail to equal the growth projected at O'Hare.

"That is not to say that building Peotone and expanding the existing airports in the region are not needed," said FAA spokesman Tony Molinaro. "But they didn't pass the test" as an alternative to expanding O'Hare, he said.
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Old January 15th, 2005, 06:08 AM   #12
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FAA: Alternatives wouldn't solve O'Hare problems

January 14, 2005

BY MARK J. KONKOL Transportation Reporter



Building a south suburban airport and sending more flights to smaller regional airfields wouldn't be enough to relieve gridlock at O'Hare Airport, according to a federal study of Chicago's plans to expand the world's busiest airport.

The Federal Aviation Administration's environmental impact statement, released Thursday, found Mayor Daley's expansion plan wouldn't have a significant negative impact on the surrounding area.

Specifically, the number of people affected by airport noise would increase by only 22,000 by 2018. Expansion would create more pollution, but it wouldn't exceed federal limits.

Runway configuration cited

The report also determined that alternatives to the city's plan to decrease delays that did not involve reconfiguring runways wouldn't work. "The current runway system is the primary constraint on operations at O'Hare," the report states. "Improving the airspace at O'Hare without also making improvements in the runway capacity would be akin to adding new entrance ramps on a highway without adding new lanes."

O'Hare Modernization Program executive director Rosemarie Andolino said that finding mirrors Daley's position.

"O'Hare's problem can only be resolved at O'Hare. You can only decrease the delays by building runways and creating a parallel runway configuration. And you can only increase capacity by doing the same," Andolino said during a taping of "At Issue" on WBBM Newsradio 780, which will air at 9 a.m. and 9 p.m. Sunday.

Foes eager to debunk study

Expansion opponents said they haven't had time to review the gigantic report and declined to comment on specific findings. The project's biggest foes -- officials in Bensenville and Elk Grove Village -- called the FAA report "illegal" and said they look forward to debunking "Chicago's big lie."

"Chicago has a long history of exaggeration and deception when it comes to its O'Hare expansion plans. The explanation is simple: O'Hare expansion fails miserably on its merits, something that would become obvious if the FAA were complying with its constitutional and statutory responsibilities," Elk Grove Village Mayor Craig Johnson said Thursday.

The environmental impact statement also states inflation would increase the expansion project's cost from $6.6 billion to $7 billion. And other costs, including proposed terminal construction and western access -- would bring the expected total to $14.1 billion.
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Old January 15th, 2005, 04:37 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Urban Politician
^The suburbs are adamant, although I think they will ultimately not succeed.

However, as much as I"m tempted to label them as crazy NIMBY's, and be angry at their attempts to halt O'Hare's progress, I see their point of view. These are real families with real homes, and surely they have lived in these homes for years, perhaps a few generations. The prospects of their homes and property being demolished must be very disturbing, and probably seems quite unfair.

Not sure if I can blaim them. Many of them may even have loved ones buried in this cemetary. In my culture, we don't bury the dead--we cremate them. But if burial was a part of my cultural beliefs, I would be very upset to see a deceased family member's grave be removed.
Actually, out by Elgin where I live the attitude toward O'Hare expansion is generally positive. I think that it is mostly Elk Grove and Bensenville that oppose it and I can certainly see why.
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Old January 17th, 2005, 08:16 PM   #14
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No. Milwaukee should get larger
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Old January 19th, 2005, 07:59 PM   #15
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No. Milwaukee should get larger
Wrong for so many reasons.
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Old January 19th, 2005, 08:17 PM   #16
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^Note the sarcasm in my post.
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Old January 20th, 2005, 06:57 AM   #17
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The dying gasp of the NW Cook and NE DuPage Republican Machine. Look at what has happened to those who opposed the O'Hare project: Pate Phillips retired, Phil Crane lost, the state GOP wouldn't fund Peter Fitzgerald's re-election bid and Henry Hyde's margin was down to a very vunerable 26,000 votes. Far western GOPers like Bob Schillerstrom and Denny Hastert are more than happy to sell out their party brethren for a piece of the O'Hare pie.
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Old January 21st, 2005, 04:17 AM   #18
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Quote:
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The dying gasp of the NW Cook and NE DuPage Republican Machine. Look at what has happened to those who opposed the O'Hare project: Pate Phillips retired, Phil Crane lost, the state GOP wouldn't fund Peter Fitzgerald's re-election bid and Henry Hyde's margin was down to a very vunerable 26,000 votes. Far western GOPers like Bob Schillerstrom and Denny Hastert are more than happy to sell out their party brethren for a piece of the O'Hare pie.
As much as I would love to see that Republican Machine die for its sins, it has as much chance of dying as bacteria in a moist sponge. (i.e. no chance) There are simply too many suburban conservatives to sustain it.
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Old January 21st, 2005, 07:03 AM   #19
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Things change. Democratic candidates are starting to rack up big margins in suburban Cook. The margins in DuPage are much closer. The suburban GOP will revive someday but its hard points will be further out in the sprawl.
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Old January 21st, 2005, 07:40 PM   #20
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Quote:
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Things change. Democratic candidates are starting to rack up big margins in suburban Cook. The margins in DuPage are much closer. The suburban GOP will revive someday but its hard points will be further out in the sprawl.
^Interesting point. However, Republicans will continue to destabilize because they keep having to move outward, on with the sprawl. Democrats, however, are strengthening at the local level because they are remaining centered around Chicago and the inner ring suburbs and are promoting infill development around their strongholds instead of moving from place to place.
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