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Old January 21st, 2010, 12:38 PM   #1
Chatton11
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HADRIAN'S WALL - The Roman Wall from Wallsend to Bowness, and "The Romans in Northern England" generally

Hadrian's Wall through the Centre of Newcastle.

This might be one for you Historian.

While browsing wikipedia at work, ahem, I mean...on lunch.... I came across a reference to a replica roman milecastle behind the Newcastle Arts Centre at the location where it would have been on Hadrians Wall.

Is this right?

.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; January 25th, 2014 at 01:48 AM.
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Old January 21st, 2010, 11:32 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by Chatton11 View Post
This might be one for you Historian. While browsing wikipedia at work, ahem, I mean...on lunch.... I came across a reference to a replica roman milecastle behind the Newcastle Arts Centre at the location where it would have been on Hadrians Wall. Is this right?
I am not a real expert on Hadrians Wall, either in Newcastle or anywhere else, but I am aware about 'Milecastles', which were built on the wall at intervals of every Roman Mile.

It certainly seems like there was a milecastle in that location and I have two sources of reference for this . . .

(1) I know, from looking at the 'Newcastle Arts Centre' Website (which is on our websites thread) that they themselves have always said that their premises were built on the site of a Roman Milecastle, as their introduction on their website homepage states . .

"Newcastle Arts Centre is in the heart of Newcastle, a short walk from the Central Railway Station and Metro and is well known for ‘details’ art materials store, its Gallery and Black Swan venue. Opened in 1988 by Prince Charles and built on the site of a Roman Mile Castle the Arts Centre provides space for cultural industries such as Watkinson Glass, Dave Fry Ceramics, Sumo Design, Generator music development agency, Savage Guitar Studio and Skimstone artistic media community".


(2) Then, from the JSTOR, Indiana University Press website, I have the below article . . .

http://www.jstor.org/pss/526196

Taking these two sources, I think it is very likely that what you read is correct!

.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; January 25th, 2014 at 01:49 AM.
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Old January 22nd, 2010, 10:29 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by Chatton11 View Post
This might be one for you Historian. While browsing wikipedia at work, ahem, I mean...on lunch.... I came across a reference to a replica roman milecastle behind the Newcastle Arts Centre at the location where it would have been on Hadrians Wall. Is this right?
Chatton . . further to the info in "Post 1138" above, I am attaching here a second copy of the JSTOR article on the 'Westgate Road Milecastle', as (because of some facet/properties of the JSTOR website) the image I 'embedded' at Post 1138 is NOT ALWAYS available!

I have printed it off and scanned it in to insert from my own site (so it is not quite as 'clear' but is still readable). See below . . .

Also, here is the LINK - http://www.jstor.org/pss/526196

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Old January 22nd, 2010, 11:08 AM   #4
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Thanks NH, very interesting!
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Old March 13th, 2010, 07:42 PM   #5
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Not entirely sure if it's art but have just been down the Business Park to watch the torches being lit for the Hadrians Wall Illumination... I know it's not strictly speaking the line of the wall but they've chosen to use the Hadrian's Wall Trail instead
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Old March 13th, 2010, 07:45 PM   #6
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Not entirely sure if it's art but have just been down the Business Park to watch the torches being lit for the Hadrians Wall Illumination... I know it's not strictly speaking the line of the wall but they've chosen to use the Hadrian's Wall Trail instead

Photo taken at the rehearsal . .




Why is it being held on March 13th or "Two Ides"?

It is celebrating "Anna Parenna" - the eve of the Ancient New Year. Anna Parenna is the Roman goddess of the new year. Her festival was celebrated on March 15. This date is the infamous "Ides of March": Click here for a wonderful explanation of "The Ides of March. Apparently Test Cricket was born this day in 1876! The Romans gave various explanations to the origin or her name, amnis perennis ("eternal stream"): she was a river nymph; her name was derived from annis ("year"); she was a moon-goddess of the running year; also, she was equated with Anna, the sister of Dido, who was received in Latium by Aeneas, but drowned herself in a river. In the class-struggle between the patricians and plebeians she chose the side of the plebeians.
The illumination is also celebrating the 400th anniversary of the Romans officially leaving these shores. (And more closer to home - it is also British Tourism Week: 15-23rd March.)


A 'mock up' of what it should look like . .

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Old March 14th, 2010, 12:52 PM   #7
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.

Sunday Sun, 14th March 2010 . .

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Old May 29th, 2010, 12:48 PM   #8
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Clayton painting returns home to Hadrian’s Wall
May 29 2010 by Tony Henderson, The Journal



A PORTRAIT of one of the North East’s leading lights of the 19th Century returned home yesterday after its owners ran out of walls to hang it on.

A 6ft by 4ft painting of John Clayton – who saved large tracts of the Roman Wall in the 19th Century – was unveiled at English Heritage’s Chesters Roman fort on Hadrian’s Wall in Northumberland.

The Chesters estate was the home of archaeologist and lawyer Mr Clayton, who as town clerk of Newcastle for 45 years worked closely with developer Richard Grainger and architect John Dobson to create what is now known as Grainger Town in the city. He died in 1890, aged 98.

His portrait has hung on the walls of law firms in Newcastle since it was painted in 1863, when Clayton was 71.

But it was donated to Chesters fort by the Newcastle office of lawyers Eversheds after the firm moved to open plan offices and no longer had anywhere to hang it.

The newly-restored portrait will hang in the recently-refurbished on-site Edwardian museum, which houses Clayton’s stunning collection of Roman antiquities.

Kevin Booth, senior curator with English Heritage North East collections team, said: “Clayton was a great man, as well as a respected antiquarian, and it’s wonderful to see the portrait hanging so close to the fort. “We’re very grateful to Eversheds for gifting the portrait to us and returning it to a place that honours the role and work that Clayton put into the conservation of Hadrian’s Wall.”

The portrait of Clayton depicts him dressed in his familiar black suit with robe and cravat and the portrait highlights his achievements as he gestures towards a window leading to Grey Street in Newcastle – which he was involved in creating. Clayton was a reluctant sitter and there are only three paintings of him in existence.

Even less is known about the artist. Census data suggests that he could be Edward Sawyer, born in 1828 in North Shields but living first in Bishopwearmouth in Sunderland and then Newcastle.


FULL ARTICLE HERE - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...1634-26545778/
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Old August 9th, 2010, 03:03 PM   #9
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Eagles Have Landed opens at Segedunum
August 9th 2010, by Liz Walker, Evening Chronicle



A dramatic new exhibition brings to life the impact of the arrival of the Roman Army on the people of the North East.

From spin and propaganda techniques to shock and awe tactics, The Eagles Have Landed features a wealth of stories that capture how the appearance of the soldiers in the region in the winter of 72/73AD affected civilian life.

The major exhibition is now on display at Segedunum Roman Fort, Baths and Museum in Wallsend and is part of their 10th birthday celebrations.

The Eagles Have Landed exhibition has been created by the team of experts at Carlisle’s Tullie House Museum & Art Gallery, with help from Hadrian’s Wall Heritage.

Containing more than 40 precious artefacts, including armour fittings, leather tent fragments, coins, pottery and a Roman letter, the exhibition will bring history to life.

It examines several themes, such as “shock and awe”, “exploring supply and commerce, spin and propaganda”, and “relationships between Romans and local people”.

The exhibition’s creators hope to get across what it was like to be on the northern Frontier of the Roman Empire, and how we can compare that with events taking place now.

It is also part of a project to develop a ‘Roman Frontier: stories beyond Hadrian’s Wall’ Gallery and complementary tourism trail at Tullie House Museum & Art Gallery and Carlisle, which aims to attract an additional 50,000 visitors a year.

For more information about the exhibition go to www.hadrians-wall.org
or, contact the Hadrian’s Wall Information Line on 01434 322002, or visit www.tulliehouse.co.uk

The exhibition will run until October 3.


ARTICLE HERE - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/north...2703-27026439/
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Old March 2nd, 2011, 10:12 AM   #10
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3D film of life on Hadrian's Wall given premiere
by Tony Henderson, The Journal, March 2nd 2011


THE Romans marched across Northumberland yesterday – in cutting edge 3D.

The world premiere of The Edge of Empire – The Eagle’s Eye, which portrays life on Hadrian’s Wall, was staged at the Tyneside Cinema. The Edge of Empire is the first 3D film produced in the North East for a regional visitor attraction.

It is also the first 3D venture by Newcastle-based Dene Films, which was set up in 1992 and has turned out more than 5,000 commercials, TV programmes and corporate films.

The Edge of Empire is part of a £6.2m revamp of visitor and exhibition facilities at Vindolanda Roman fort in Northumberland and its sister site the Roman Army Museum at Carvoran, backed by the Heritage Lottery Fund and One North East.

The film will be on permanent show at Carvoran’s cinema when the attractions re-open to visitors on March 12. At yesterday’s premiere were members of the top Roman re-enactment group the Ermine Street Guard and pupils from Haltwhistle Community Campus who will soon be studying the Romans.

The £350,000 film features Sima the eagle from the Kielder Bird of Prey Centre and real wolfhounds.

The docu-drama story focuses on Aquila, a foreign recruit into the Roman army, and the reality of life on the Wall and at forts like Vindolanda.

The new-look Vindolanda and Carvoran will be officially opened on April 19 by the Duchess of Northumberland.

TV historian and broadcaster Dan Snow said: “Vindolanda is one of the most important Roman sites in the world.”


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz1FQpDCUjw
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Old March 15th, 2011, 11:48 AM   #11
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Roman tablets go on show at Vindolanda
by Tony Henderson, The Journal, March 15th 2011



THE Roman Army may have carved out one of the greatest empires in history, but visitors to a Northumberland outpost will find the pen has turned out to be just as mighty as the sword.

Letters unearthed at Vindolanda in Northumberland have returned to the Roman fort from the British Museum in London.

The letters, or thin wooden writing tablets, have been excavated at Vindolanda since 1973 and since then around 1,800 have been sent to the museum. They went there because Vindolanda did not have the sophisticated facilities needed to display them.

But now the Northumberland attraction and its sister site, the Roman Army Museum at Carvoran, have just re-opened after a £6.2m transformation, backed by the Heritage Lottery Fund and One North East. And one of the first facilities to be created as part of the revamp was an atmospheric, vault-like room with the latest environmental technology to house the letters safely.

The British Museum agreed to loan nine letters to Vindolanda and they have now gone on show. Vindolanda had to send a stream of condition reports for months to the British Museum before the letters were sent home (on loan) to Northumberland.

The letters are expected to be on loan for up to three years and it is hoped that will be followed by a rolling programme of similar loans.


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz1GeymrYzY

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Old April 26th, 2011, 01:04 PM   #12
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HADRIAN'S WALL - The "Roman Wall" across England from Wallsend to Bowness on Solway

Hadrian's Wall scheme set to open this weekend
by Tony Henderson, The Journal, April 26th 2011


Visitors at Housesteads Fort on Hadrian's Wall

A SCHEME that aims to boost environmentally-friendly tourism around Hadrian's Wall will open this weekend.

The Hadrian’s Wall passport scheme will start on May 1, with passport stamps available at sites along the 84-mile Hadrian’s Wall National Trail route until October 31.

This year an extra stamp is available from Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery in Carlisle where a new Roman Frontier gallery will open on June 25.

A total of 10,600 people walked the Wall trail end to end last year, taking an average of seven days to complete it. Thousands more people took shorter walks around the Roman sites and on the specially planned circular routes.

Nigel Mills, access director for Hadrian’s Wall Heritage Ltd, said: “The summer passport is a fun way for walkers to record their journey as they go and gives them a lasting record to take home. But it also has a serious side as part of the conservation of the archaeology and landscape around Hadrian’s Wall.

“Many areas of the trail are archaeologically important. Earthworks and masonry may be visible but equally they may lie buried underneath the path.

“So as part of our Every Footstep Counts code we encourage people to walk during the drier summer months when the ground surface is generally stronger, we ask walkers not to walk on the Wall itself and to walk side-by-side rather than in single file to spread the load.


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz1KcsOW6tQ
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Old June 21st, 2011, 11:06 AM   #13
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Letter reveals historian’s role in persuading the National Trust to take on Housesteads
by Tony Henderson, The Journal, June 21st 2011


A CHANCE find by heritage volunteer Liz Hayward has proved a turn up for the book for two major North East visitor attractions.

Liz’s discovery of a set of history books in a shop has thrown new light on how Housesteads Roman fort on Hadrian’s Wall in Northumberland came to be saved for the nation. The books were part of the library of the eminent historian George Macauley Trevelyan, who grew up at the family home at Wallington in Northumberland.

They have now returned “home” to Wallington, where they have gone on show to visitors at the National Trust property.

Liz, who lives in Humshaugh in Northumberland, has been a volunteer with the book conservation team at Wallington for 11 years. She was visiting the Barter Books shop in Alnwick when she came across a set of seven volumes of the History of Northumberland, which was started in 1817 by the Rev John Hodgson, who is buried at Hartburn near Wallington.

One of the books was signed by G M Trevelyan, who later lived at Hallington Hall, near Wallington, and also bore the signature of Newcastle architect John Dobson.

Inside one of the books was a letter dated 1929 to G M Trevelyan from the archaeologist and university teacher Robert Carr Bosanquet, who lived at Rock in Northumberland, on negotiations over turning over Housesteads to the Government’s Ministry of Works or the National Trust. Pasted into the book was also an aerial view of Housesteads from the 1920s.

It seems from the letter that G M Trevelyan had a hand in persuading the National Trust to take on Housesteads, said the site’s property manager Andrew Poad.


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz1PtpoX0xW
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Old August 12th, 2011, 10:22 AM   #14
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Award for Edge of Empire film
showing life on Hadrian's Wall

by Tony Henderson, The Journal, August 12th 2011


A FILM by Newcastle firm 'Dene Filmslooking' made in 3D, about what life was like for the troops on Hadrian’s Wall, has landed an international award.

The Edge of Empire – the Eagle’s Eye was part of a £6.2m revamp of visitor and exhibition facilities which opened earlier this year at Vindolanda Roman fort in Northumberland and its sister site the Carvoran Roman Army Museum at Greenhead, where it is shown daily.

It is the first 3D venture by Newcastle-based Dene Films, which was set up in 1992 and has turned out more than 5,000 commercials, TV programmes and corporate films.

At the 2011 US International Film and Video Awards, Edge of Empire was awarded the silver prize in the Specialty Production category, placing it in the top three productions of its kind worldwide.

There were more than 1,000 entrants from 22 different countries at the awards. Dene Films submitted two TV programmes – both scooped a gold award. One programme, the Last Cast, dealt with the mothballing of the Redcar steel plant on Teesside and the other focussed on stammering in children.

Dene, where there are 20 people involved in film production, makes a wide range of independent films, TV programmes, corporate and marketing films and commercials. Dene managing director Steve Salam said: “We were up against the world’s best and we proved we can make films of this quality in the region.


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz1Uni9UGZc
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Old August 17th, 2011, 12:53 PM   #15
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Been looking at this photograph on the City Libraries Archive Collection @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/newcast...es/4076420230/ and am scratching my head trying to work out where this location is - so the question is does anyone out there know? - looks like it could be under Byker Road Bridge?

The text with the photograph is:

003985:The Roman Wall at Ouseburn C. 1880

Description : The photograph shows three stones which mark the line of the wall at OuseburnRoman


image hosted on flickr
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Old August 17th, 2011, 01:29 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
Been looking at this photograph on the City Libraries Archive Collection @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/newcast...es/4076420230/ and am scratching my head trying to work out where this location is - so the question is does anyone out there know? - looks like it could be under Byker Road Bridge?

The text with the photograph is:

003985:The Roman Wall at Ouseburn C. 1880

Description : The photograph shows three stones which mark the line of the wall at OuseburnRoman


image hosted on flickr
Steve,
my first thought was that the buildings on the left of the Ouseburn are the original Northumbrian Lead Works, now part of the farm area. I have an old photo of the area viewed from the bridge which shows a similar type of path but only on the Lead works side! Do you think this photo has been scanned in the wrong way? I've done it a few times in my archive

Hpe this helps.

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Old August 17th, 2011, 05:19 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
Been looking at this photograph on the City Libraries Archive Collection @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/newcast...es/4076420230/ and am scratching my head trying to work out where this location is - so the question is does anyone out there know? - looks like it could be under Byker Road Bridge?

The text with the photograph is:

003985:The Roman Wall at Ouseburn C. 1880

Description : The photograph shows three stones which mark the line of the wall at OuseburnRoman


image hosted on flickr
The brickwork to the right of the photo as well as that behind the low building with all the glass windows are two pillars of the Byker Bridge.http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?hl=en-...314.51,,0,5.08 It's more than likely that they have been covered by the tarmac footpath.
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Old August 17th, 2011, 05:29 PM   #18
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The brickwork to the right of the photo as well as that behind the low building with all the glass windows are two pillars of the Byker Bridge. It's more than likely that they have been covered by the tarmac footpath.
Hi Guys

Thanks for the input, I think we are all agreed that it is Foundry Lane looking through the Byker Bridge arches towards Crawfords Buildings which has long since been demolished.

Such a shame that the stones are covered up, assuming of course they are part of the Roman Wall
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Old August 17th, 2011, 06:09 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
Hi Guys

Thanks for the input, I think we are all agreed that it is Foundry Lane looking through the Byker Bridge arches towards Crawfords Buildings which has long since been demolished.

Such a shame that the stones are covered up, assuming of course they are part of the Roman Wall
Yes, and they also managed to cover up the section they found above Melbourne Street.

http://www.reid-architects.com/Hotel...tle/index.html

I don t think I d be as smug about burying it as they are. These things can be incorporated into a modern structure in a sensitive and visually appealing way.

image hosted on flickr


This gives some summaries of findings in the area.

http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/p...-refs-indx.pdf

There are also other references:

Quote:
The path of the Wall through the Ouseburn ravine is not known but the review undertaken in 1929 shows the line of the ditch presumed as Ascending Stepney bank. Foundations of the wall were found at the south end of St. Dominic's church at the west end of Byker Bridge. From here it ran in a straight line to where the Sallyport was built as part of the Town Walls in the 13th century.
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Old August 17th, 2011, 10:20 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
Been looking at this photograph on the City Libraries Archive Collection @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/newcast...es/4076420230/ and am scratching my head trying to work out where this location is - so the question is does anyone out there know? - looks like it could be under Byker Road Bridge?

The text with the photograph is:

003985:The Roman Wall at Ouseburn C. 1880

Description : The photograph shows three stones which mark the line of the wall at OuseburnRoman


image hosted on flickr
Steve,
the line of Hadrians wall is shown on this map. This should then give you the location of the photo.

image hosted on flickr


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