HADRIAN'S WALL - The Roman Wall from Wallsend to Bowness, and "The Romans in Northern England" generally - Page 2 - SkyscraperCity
 

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Old August 18th, 2011, 12:29 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WilfBurnsFan View Post
Assuming the OS surveyors weren't just taking a punt at it/relying on info from some old boy they'd met coming out of The Ship/were coming out of The Ship themselves after a refresher. OS archaeological information is notoriously unreliable until OGS Crawford was appointed in the 1920s and took the Survey by the scruff of its neck and gave it a good shaking (as far as archaeological information was concerned).
Wilf,
This is from the 1942 OS map. Sorry it's not in colour but there was a war on you know!

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Old August 18th, 2011, 11:07 AM   #22
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Here are some extracts from Archaeological Interventions by CEU, CAS and CfA on Hadrian’s Wall, 1976–2000 compiled by Tony Wilmott and Paul Austen

Quote:
187 Byker, 260–282 Shields Road, NZ 2720 6486. Trial trenching 1979
Trenching took place on the probable line of the Wall in advance
of the construction of a new supermarket. The trenches on both
the west and east side of the site revealed the edge of a mortary
spread. It is assumed, from its nature, that this soil spread was the
debris from a robbed wall of substantial size, and in view of the
earlier evidence, it was concluded that the spread represented
debris from the robbing and/or destruction of Hadrian’s Wall
itself (Bennett 1998, 2).
Quote:
65 Byker 36–78 Shields Road, NZ 264 648. Trial trenching, 1987
Four north–south trial trenches were excavated between the new
west end of the Byker by-pass and the original line of the Shields
Road. All four trenches revealed modern demolition debris
directly overlying boulder clay, shallow to the east end, slightly
deeper (up to 700mm) at the west end. No archaeological
indications of either the Wall or the Wall ditch were found.
347 Byker, 4–36 Shields Road, NZ 264646. Trial trenching, 1985
Trial trenching was carried out at the east end of Byker Bridge
between the south end of Shields Road and Stephen Street in
advance of by-pass construction. The trenches were excavated to
a depth of 3m below the present ground surface and encountered
only 19th-century dumped waste and building debris. There was
no indication of the Roman levels or of the level of the natural
subsoil, indicating that there has been considerable dumping and
alteration to the original land surface levels (Bennett 1998, 23).
Quote:
Byker, Stepney Bank, NZ 262645. Trial trenching 1989
Two trial trenches, were excavated in an attempt to locate the line
of Hadrian’s Wall near its crossing of the Ouseburn. The site was
heavily disturbed, and no archaeological features were recorded
(Frere 1990, 315).
Quote:
302 Byker, St Dominics Priory, NZ 2585 6445. Trial trenching, 1981
Six trenches were cut in advance of housing development.
Substantial remains of the Wall were found in two parallel
trenches. The trench-built foundation to the Wall was 2.3–2.65m
wide, consisting of a clay-bound rubble core faced with large,
roughly shaped, sandstone blocks. There was no trace of mortar.
The north face of the single surviving course of superstructure
rose vertically from the foundation, but that on the south was
offset by 100m, giving a width of 2.2m (Bennett 1989, 22).
Quote:
140 Newcastle upon Tyne, Jubilee Road, NZ 2560 6427.
Trial trenching, 1978. Trial trenching on the line of Hadrian’s Wall between Melbourne Street and Jubilee Road in advance of housing development.
Masonry of the Wall was found surviving immediately beside Grenville Terrace, where it had been located in 1925, and immediately east of Jubilee Road (Bennett 1998, 22).
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Old August 18th, 2011, 11:39 AM   #23
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You wouldn't have the map to the west would you - showing Melbourne St and Sallylport Tower ?
Not sure how this 1914 OS map scan will come out but the course of Hadrians Wall can be seen by the dotted line coming from the left crossing very close to the Sallyport and going right underneath Garth Heads.

However a words of caution as the map shows the course of the Wall much further to the North of Westgate Road as it passes the Assembly Rooms area. However the position may well be incorrect in view of the discovery of Milecastle at the Newcastle Art Centre - see http://davidfryceramics.com/archive/archaeology

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Old August 18th, 2011, 12:03 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
Not sure how this 1914 OS map scan will come out but the course of Hadrians Wall can be seen by the dotted line coming from the left crossing very close to the Sallyport and going right underneath Garth Heads.

However a words of caution as the map shows the course of the Wall much further to the North of Westgate Road as it passes the Assembly Rooms area. However the position may well be incorrect in view of the discovery of Milecastle at the Newcastle Art Centre - see http://davidfryceramics.com/archive/archaeology
Many thanks for that. It ties with what I'd seen in some archaeological report [which I am now b#gge#ed if I can find] that there had been an excavation under what is now Sallyport house. However assuming the orientation is right at that point there must be a fair old kink in it as evidence was definitely found under the Staybridge on the Corner of Melbourne and Gibson.
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Old September 24th, 2011, 10:04 AM   #25
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Warning over risk to Northumberland green belt
by Adrian Pearson, The Journal, September 24th 2011


There are concerns that the new laws do not offer enough protection for sites such as Hadrian's Wall

GREEN BELT sites across Northumberland will come under threat as a result of Government planning changes, ministers have been warned. Northumberland County Council is the latest authority to consider the impact of a series of radically pro-business changes to national planing guidelines.

Ministers want councils to increase the number of homes built and to judge all planning applications on the assumption they will be granted unless there is a strong reason against giving the go-ahead.

Already this week Newcastle and Gateshead have said they will have to build around 10,000 new homes on green belt land as a result of Government changes. Now Northumberland has revealed it too may have to allow villages to expand considerably in order to meet planning changes.

Officers at Northumberland County Council are keen to see more affordable housing allowed in rural areas in order to turn around a situation in which many people cannot afford to buy property in the villages they grew up in, but because the Government is removing the focus on using up previously developed land first, builders will be given a much stronger hand to move for expansion into the green belt.


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz1Yr47zp2M
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Old November 6th, 2011, 06:04 PM   #26
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The Journal, Wednesday 2nd November 2011 (this article was not published on-line) . . .

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Old November 6th, 2011, 06:51 PM   #27
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Monkchester - Real or Myth

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Originally Posted by Newcastle Historian View Post
.
The Journal, Wednesday 2nd November 2011 (this article was not published on-line) . . .
It certainly is an interesting discussion point as to whether the religious settlement of Monkchester actually existed.

Oddly enough I'm reading A.W. Purdie's new book "Newcastle The Biography" and he makes the point that there is no known documentary or archaeological evidence to support the theory that the Roman Fort of Pons Aelius was occupied by Monks upon the withdrawal of the Roman Army in 400 A.D.

Purdie does mention some documentary evidence in as much as Monks from Evesham ventured North in 1074 to find Monkchester but found 'not any remains of its former Sanctity, no Footsteps of the Religious People who had formerly dwelt there'.

No doubt the research and dating of the skeletons found in the cemetery will give a better idea of the date, however it is strange that if Monkchester (City of the Monks) did indeed exist as an Anglo-Saxon religious foundation then there would have been contemporary records.

The Anglo-Saxon Church that is mentioned in Tony Henderson's piece is under one of the railway viaduct arches and these photographs were taken 18t September 2011. Opinion appears to vary on what in truth the remains represent, could be a Church or even the base of a Church Tower





Talking of archaeology - the book 'Digging Deeper: the archaeology of Newcastle and Gateshead from the earliest times to the middle ages' by Dave Heslop and Zoe McAuley and published by Tyne Bridge Publishing is released this coming Tuesday, 8th November 2011.

Courtesy of the Tyne Bridge site @ http://www2.newcastle.gov.uk/tbp.nsf...25782D003413AA
Description
In the beginning was the river. Long before the Romans built their world famous Wall from Wallsend to the Solway Firth there were Tynesiders living by the River Tyne, that vital source of food, communication, a barrier and a protection. Some of the earliest inhabitants left only traces for archaeologists to investigate, buried beneath layers of subsequent human activity. Later peoples left more obvious clues to their lives in the form of graves, walls, buildings, belongings and litter. Archaeologists are the detectives who painstakingly unpick these accidental clues to make us a window into the lives of our ancestors, which seem so different to our own. Tyne and Wear County Archaeologist Dave Heslop, and archaeological researcher Zoe McAuley tell the story of the excavations and exciting discoveries made in Newcastle and Gateshead. Detailed and colourful reconstructions of Roman and Medieval Tyneside, and a wealth of finds illustrations and excavation photographs bring these vanished worlds to life. Foreword by John Grundy Published in association with Tyne & Wear Archives and Museums.
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Old November 9th, 2011, 05:11 PM   #28
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In continuation of post 2594 and 2595 - This second article is from The Journal, Wednesday 9th November 2011 (it was not published on-line) . . .



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Old March 27th, 2012, 01:24 PM   #29
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Exciting season of discovery set to begin at Vindolanda
by Tony Henderson, The Journal, March 27th 2012


AT LEAST two more forts remain to be discovered this year on one of the prime sites on Hadrian’s Wall in Northumberland. The first of 650 volunteers from all over the world will start the 2012 excavation season next week at Vindolanda. All places were snapped up within hours of bookings opening online.

Under the direction of Dr Andrew Birley, the excavations promise to be one of the most exciting campaigns for many years on the Roman site.

Digging teams, boosted by Canadian students from the University of Western Ontario, will tackle a field to the north of the main site, where traces of two very early forts were discovered in 2010.


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz1qJbw8RRm
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Old May 14th, 2012, 12:47 PM   #30
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The Roman Wall, Northumberland.

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Walking on the roman Hadrian Wall, England by dirk huijssoon, on Flickr
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Old June 29th, 2012, 10:28 AM   #31
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Hadrian's Wall ends at Tynemouth Priory claims archaeologist
by Joanne Butcher, The Journal, June 29th 2012


WALLSEND does not mark the end of Hadrian’s Wall, an archaeologist claims. The Roman Wall is generally believed to start at Bowness in Cumbria and stretch as far as Wallsend, but Clifford Jones believes it is time to rip up the guidebooks, claiming the wall would actually have reached as far as Tynemouth Priory on the East coast.

“After 20 years’ research I simply couldn’t accept the generally-accepted view of the wall,” said Mr Jones, a former archeologist with Lancaster University and a committee member of the Northern branch of the Council for British Archaeology. Lets look at one the biggest clues: Wallsend simply isn’t at the end of the landmass. Why does the wall make it to Bowness and not Tynemouth? A few things don’t add up."

Mr Jones believes it is unthinkable that the Romans would build a fortress across the country and just leave the last four miles open to barbarian enemies. It is possible Segedunum was just a branch of the wall, and there was a separate wall which ran to North Shields from Newcastle,” he said.


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz1zAWyFYjl
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Old June 29th, 2012, 10:33 AM   #32
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More likely, surely, that there was a village of unconquerable Celtic Shieldsmen in the Tynemouth area, and the Romans simply didn't dare build further east than Wallsend.
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Old July 10th, 2012, 10:40 AM   #33
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New project looks at hidden parts of Hadrian’s Wall
by Tony Henderson, The Journal, July 10th 2012


MORE than 500 people are expected to join in a community archaeology project now that it has been backed by a £400,000 award. The Heritage Lottery Fund award has gone to Tyne and Wear Archives & Museums for its Hadrian’s Wall and its Legacy on Tyneside venture. The project will begin in the autumn and aims to uncover more about the history of Hadrian’s Wall, from urban Tyneside to the Tyne Valley in Northumberland.

Sections of the Wall which will be a focus for research include the remains of the Roman Fort of Condercum in Benwell in Newcastle, sections of the Wall in Wallsend and Central Newcastle, Roman finds from Gateshead and the “lost” Roman road between Chesters and Corbridge, as well as Arbeia Roman Fort at South Shields, for many years the supply base for the Wall.

Ged Bell, of Tyne and Wear Archives & Museums, said: “This is a very exciting project which will reveal more about one of our region’s most important landmarks, from its starting point in Wallsend and heading as far west as Hexham and Corbridge. There will be opportunities for members of the public to get involved in everything from hands-on excavation work to surveying and desk-based research.”

The project hopes to unearth details about the lesser-known sections of Hadrian’s Wall, including large sections hidden under modern roads and buildings, and to raise awareness of the Wall in local communities. Participants will have the chance to learn a range of archaeological skills and there will be opportunities for people of all ages to get involved, working alongside professional archaeologists and historians.


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz20CtxlCEo
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Old August 27th, 2012, 10:41 PM   #34
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One of Newcastle numerous 'hidden streams'

With all of these burns heading south to the Tyne, is there any record of how the Romans built their wall over them all?

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Old August 27th, 2012, 10:44 PM   #35
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With all of these burns heading south to the Tyne, is there any record of how the Romans built their wall over them all?

I've often wondered about that, especially where Hadrians Wall crossed over the Ouse Burn. But would imagine that they simply bridged the waterways and put bars up to stop intruders.
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Old August 27th, 2012, 10:52 PM   #36
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I've often wondered about that, especially where Hadrians Wall crossed over the Ouse Burn. But would imagine that they simply bridged the waterways and put bars up to stop intruders.
Possibly they had a fortified bridge like this

http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/d...hadrians-wall/

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Old August 28th, 2012, 02:21 PM   #37
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Segedunum Roman Fort - Story to be told in new Exhibition
by Tony Henderson, The Journal, August 28th 2012


Segedunum in 1975

THE STORY of the rescue of a Roman fort hidden beneath terraces of homes is to be told in a new exhibition. When Victorian streets were cleared near Swan Hunter’s shipyard in Wallsend in North Tyneside in the 1970s, archaeologists carried out a trial dig. It was thought that any traces of Segedunum fort would have been lost due to centuries of previous development.

However, what the sample dig found was enough for plans to develop the cleared site to be scrapped. There followed nine years of annual excavations from 1975, led by the late Charles Daniels, a lecturer in archaeology at Newcastle University. During the nine years of digging, a complete plan of the base was recovered and made Segedunum the most excavated fort along Hadrian’s Wall, with surviving foundations of many buildings and part of the Wall itself.

Now an appeal is being made for people who took part in the digs to come forward with their memories, photographs and any keepsakes. The digs were staffed by university students, volunteers and young people on work experience schemes of the time. The personal stories and pictures will help shape the autumn exhibition which will explore the history of the fort and the development of the surrounding area.



Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz24qJ0EEk8
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Old August 29th, 2012, 02:10 PM   #38
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Roman Temple of Antenociticus at Condercum (Benwell)

Took a trip up to Condercum yesterday to get some new photographs of the Roman Temple as the one's I had were from about 13 years ago, i.e. from the early days of digital!

Roman Temple of Antenociticus at Condercum (Benwell), Newcastle upon Tyne. (Broomridge Avenue)

Antenociticus was a Roman God and this Temple which stood outside of the Condercum Fort was dedicated to that entity. The Temple probably stood amongst a civilian settlement which had arisen outside of the Fort. It is unknown whether Antenociticus was a local God as the only reference found has been at Benwell.

The name Antenociticus has been translated as “God of the Antler-fringed forehead”.

Discovered in 1862 in what were the grounds if Condercum House.

Measuring 18 by 10 feet.

During the 1862 excavation two altars were located and these are currently held in the Great North Museum. The one’s on site are replicas. Also found were parts of a statue which is thought to have been of Antenociticus, a head with a torc around the neck and hair on the head with curls going forward resembling two horns. Parts of a leg and forearm were also found.

















These shots from the Museum of Antiquaries taken circa 1999




Photographs hosted on http://ellwood.fototime.com/Roman%20...20Condercum%20
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Old August 29th, 2012, 06:50 PM   #39
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With all of these burns heading south to the Tyne, is there any record of how the Romans built their wall over them all?

.
I've been reading through J Collingwood Bruce's Handbook to the Roman Wall and he has a sketch of a culvert that he claims was built in Hadrian's Wall to allow the Sugley Burn to pass through up near Denton Burn.

Evidently the circular arch is the drain which was built for the later West Road and the slabs underneath are the remains of the culvert built by the Romans on which the Wall would have stood. The culvert consisting of two lines of massive stones laid parallel to each other, about two feet apart. the top was covered overby other large blocks, giving the conduit a height equivalent to its breadth, the seems to have been the usual way of allowing brooks to pass the Wall.

As to the Ouseburn specifically, even Bruce confirms that no trace of the Wall can be found in the valley leading from Milecastle 3 which was at the Eastern end of what is now Byker Bridge.

This is Bruce's illustration, now well out of copyright.


Scan hosted on www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
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Old August 31st, 2012, 09:43 AM   #40
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Connecting Light Art is planned for Hadrian's Wall
The Journal, August 31st 2012



GLOWING orbs scattered along Hadrian’s Wall are set to light up the sky this weekend. The interactive art installation called 'Connecting Light' is made up of balloons fitted with LEDs and radio transmitters. Part of the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad, the 400-tethered balloons will shine when members of the public send messages through handheld devices. Information sent in through smartphones and computers will be encoded and communicated to the transmitters to make the balloons pulsate with colour.

Best seen at a selection of nine locations spanning one of the Roman Empire’s most important structures, the impressive installation is designed to help people views borders in a new light. It is the brainchild of the New York art-collective YesYesNo, founded by digital artist Zach Lieberman. He said: “The idea is to re-imagine the border not as something that divides but something that connects.

“We have designed a series of networked weather balloons, which can talk to each other sending messages along the length of the wall. The overall effect will be to show pulses of light as communication passes between the balloons and with the audience, who we’ll also invite to submit messages to directly control the installation.” The installation will be operational tonight and tomorrow between 8pm and 11pm and anyone hoping to take part will need to register as a ‘connector’


Read More (Two Pages) - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz256igJUCG
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