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Old November 10th, 2015, 01:05 PM   #21
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This from the News & Star,--

Turner watercolour is centrepiece of new Tullie House display

By Chris Story

Last updated at 11:49, Tuesday, 10 November 2015

A celebrated Turner watercolour of Cumbria is the centrepiece of a major new exhibition.



His Ullswater, Cumberland artwork, painted in 1833, offers a special take of life in one of the most picturesque pockets of Cumbria.

It features as part of In The Most Perfect Piece, which has opened at Tullie House in Carlisle.

The watercolour made the headlines in 2005 when it was bought following a fundraising drive by the Wordsworth Trust at Dove Cottage in Cockermouth.

It can be seen alongside two other Turner painting from Tullie House’s own collection as part of the exhibition.

Tullie House director Hilary Wade said: “We are delighted to be showing these outstanding works.

“This is a great opportunity for our visitors to view three Turner watercolours and an important oil painting of the Lake District together in our Spotlight gallery.

“We are grateful to both the trustees of the Wordsworth Trust and Lakeland Arts for lending us these treasures from their collections.”

One of the other Turner images shows Queen Mary’s Tower at Carlisle Castle, which dates to Turner’s visit to the area in 1797, when he was aged 22.

The picture now has added interest because the tower was demolished in 1834.

Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/tu...play-1.1230211

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; February 10th, 2016 at 01:06 AM. Reason: Repaired broken image link
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Old November 20th, 2015, 12:01 PM   #22
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This from the News & Star,--

Proposal to close Carlisle's Tullie House museum one day a week

By Matthew Cobb

Published at 09:26, Thursday, 19 November 2015

Carlisle's Tullie House could close for one day a week as councillors consider slashing its funding by more than £200,000.



Other cash-saving proposals include scrapping free activities such as lunchtime lectures and toddler sessions.

Money-saving moves could also see the venue no longer hold weddings and corporate events.

In 2010, both the Carlisle City Council and Tullie House agreed to set up a charitable trust to run the museum and art gallery.

But the following year it was then transferred from the council to an independent company, with the council still supplying funding.

However two years ago, the council cut the cash it gives by £250,000 and is now proposing to slash the sum handed over by a further £214,000 in 2016-17.

One solution which will be considered by the authority is the possibility of closing the museum on one day per week. The museum is currently open seven days a week, between 10am and 5pm, Monday to Saturday and 11am to 5pm on Sundays between April 1 and October 31.

It is also open between 10am and 5pm and midday to 4pm between November 1 and March 31.

Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/pr...week-1.1230629

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; February 10th, 2016 at 01:04 AM. Reason: Repaired broken image link
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Old December 5th, 2015, 11:22 AM   #23
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This from the News & Star,---

Talks over sale of historic Cumbrian building

By Emily Parsons

Published at 09:35, Saturday, 05 December 2015

NEGOTIATIONS will now begin in the hope of selling an historic Penrith building.

The future of Eden Council’s Mansion House offices is another step closer to being decided, after councillors agreed to let officers begin discussions.

Two separate organisations have expressed an interest in buying the Grade II*-listed building, with both submitting bids.

Mansion House is on the market with a price tag of £1.1m, but it has not been revealed what the expressions of interest are for.

The move is a vital step towards securing the go-ahead of the council’s One Site Project. This would see the addition of an extension on the Town Hall, allowing all staff to work under one roof – cutting annual costs by more than half.

Money from the Mansion House sale would be used to pay for the proposed three-storey extension, which would also include an extended reception area and waiting room, plus new interview and meeting rooms.

The recommendations approved on Wednesday night also included the potential sale of two pieces of council-owned land for housing in Penrith.

Eden Council’s leader, Kevin Beaty, said: “I am delighted that members have supported further negotiations over the sale of Mansion House.

“This is a key part of the council’s One Site Project, which would be a key development for the north of Penrith. It also offers significant organisation benefits for the council and can improve how the public access our services.

Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/ta...ding-1.1231286
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Old January 8th, 2016, 10:39 AM   #24
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This from the News & Star,--

Shock closure of £2.4m Cumbrian mining museum

Published at 12:06, Thursday, 07 January 2016

Whitehaven’s £2.4 million coalmining museum at Haig Pit has closed because of financial difficulties.



In a shock announcement, the Board of Trustees said they hoped it would only be temporary.

Key funders Heritage Lottery said: “This is very sad news and our thoughts go out to everyone who has been affected.”

The museum opened its doors to the public last February, expecting to attract 15,000 visitors in its first year.

And while it has exceeded its projected footfall, it appears to have hit several problems, some financial.

A Heritage Lottery Fund spokesman said: "While the organisation has received the majority of the HLF grant, one payment was withheld awaiting financial and other information. But we are aware that the organisation face wider financial challenges beyond this.

“Our staff have worked closely with Haig over many years and we will continue to offer our support during these challenging times.”

The HLF is to meet with Copeland mayor Mike Starkie and the other main funder, Copeland Community Fund, shortly “to explore options for the best way forward.”

There are hopes the closure will only be temporary, as pleas for support and further financial aid are being made.

In the meantime, while a solution is sought, bookings for events are to be cancelled and regular users of the venue informed.

A museum statement said: “We regret to inform that the museum, visitor attraction, cafe and events venue is currently closed.”

Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/sh...seum-1.1232611

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; February 10th, 2016 at 01:02 AM. Reason: Repaired broken image link
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Old January 11th, 2016, 12:06 PM   #25
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This from the News & Star,---




‘Spectacular’ Roman finds uncovered at site of new council HQ in Carlisle

By Freya Findlay

Last updated at 11:27, Saturday, 09 January 2016



Their calls come after it was revealed that archaeologists have excavated about 50 graves under the new £10.4 million County Council Building on Botchergate in Carlisle city centre.

Well preserved pottery, including plates, jugs, platters and pots were found in the graves along with the cremated remains of people who lived in Carlisle in the first and second century – highlighting an important place in history for an area which is the modern-day centre of the city’s nightlife scene.

Under Roman law, the dead had to be buried outside the town so graves lined the old Roman road, where Botchergate and London Road are now.

Archaeologists suspect the pottery was made locally specifically for use in burials, but that the people buried in the cemetery were immigrants who were associated with the soldiers, perhaps family members or camp followers.

The full extent of the excavation’s significance will not be known until all the findings have been analysed but Frank Giecco, technical director of Wardell Armstrong Archaeology, which is running in the project, said the quality of the pottery is “spectacular”.

Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/sp...isle-1.1232696

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; February 10th, 2016 at 01:01 AM. Reason: Repaired broken image link
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Old January 14th, 2016, 11:18 AM   #26
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This from the News & Star,---

Carlisle council could take over city’s Guildhall Museum

By Duncan Bick

Last updated at 09:34, Thursday, 14 January 2016

Carlisle's only medieval home could become a council house.



The Guildhall Museum – which is located in a 15th century property – could be taken over by the city council.

This announcement came at a full meeting of the authority where a business plan for Tullie House – which is in charge at the other site – was discussed.


A report to councillors stated that the trust in charge of it needs to consider the possible relocating of collections from the Guildhall, which is on Fisher Street, in the city centre, to Tullie House because of increasing cash pressures. It states that running the former as a museum “poses difficulties”.

“The displays are situated on the first and second floor and as such provide restricted access (there is no lift and only one narrow staircase) and secondly the building is structurally fragile so visitor numbers have to be restricted (to comply with engineering and insurance advice).

“The trust considers that it is no longer possible to operate the Guildhall as a museum without major investment, which we are not in a position to make.”

Former mayor of Carlisle Ray Bloxham, a Conservative who represents Longtown and Rockcliffe, was concerned about this.

He said: “Would they [Carlisle’s mayor, council leader and executive] agree with me that the suggestion in the Tullie House business plan that the Guildhall would possibly close would be a tragedy and shameful?

Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/ne...seum-1.1232916

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; February 10th, 2016 at 01:00 AM. Reason: Repaired broken image link
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Old February 9th, 2016, 06:47 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denm View Post
This from the News & Star,---


‘Spectacular’ Roman finds uncovered at site of new council HQ in Carlisle

By Freya Findlay

Last updated at 11:27, Saturday, 09 January 2016

Their calls come after it was revealed that archaeologists have excavated about 50 graves under the new £10.4 million County Council Building on Botchergate in Carlisle city centre.

Well preserved pottery, including plates, jugs, platters and pots were found in the graves along with the cremated remains of people who lived in Carlisle in the first and second century – highlighting an important place in history for an area which is the modern-day centre of the city’s nightlife scene.

Under Roman law, the dead had to be buried outside the town so graves lined the old Roman road, where Botchergate and London Road are now.

Archaeologists suspect the pottery was made locally specifically for use in burials, but that the people buried in the cemetery were immigrants who were associated with the soldiers, perhaps family members or camp followers.

The full extent of the excavation’s significance will not be known until all the findings have been analysed but Frank Giecco, technical director of Wardell Armstrong Archaeology, which is running in the project, said the quality of the pottery is “spectacular”.

Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/sp...isle-1.1232696
Did a bit of digging (pun intended) after reading the above article (now at http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/Sp...5e7943e2922-ds ) as I work on Botchergate and I am interested in the Romans & their way of life.

Seems a bit odd, linking to archaeology reports on this forum, but I found the following reports.

http://wa-archaeology.com/2855-botch...atest-updates/

http://wa-archaeology.com/2867-botch...gin-to-emerge/

http://wa-archaeology.com/2882-botch...roman-activity

http://wa-archaeology.com/2898-botch...ecorded-dates/

At least there was some civilisation in Botchergate when the Romans were around

EDIT

This Cumberland News item also has photos of some of the articles found
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Old February 19th, 2016, 04:44 PM   #28
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I wasn't sure where to put this post (and the ones following) as they concern historic buildings in Carlisle but the trip out to photograph them was spurred by a recent planning application. Apologies if I have got it wrong.

As the application (to demolish part of the goods station) was refused I suppose there is no development (for now)

The Newcastle & Carlisle Railway's first station in Carlisle was situated just off London Road. After this station was superseded by the opening of Citadel Station it was demolished and replaced (in 1881) with a goods station. The buildings survive, although most of the trackwork was removed a few years ago.


An overview of the Goods Station, with the office in the foreground and the shed behind. It is the office building which was the part to be demolished, with the shed behind remaining.



A closer view of the office building. It looks forlorn, and the reports appended to the planning application show that it is little more than a shell, with the upper floors and ceiling having collapsed.



Daylight can clearly be seen through the roof



Evidence of the date of building



The site safety notice. Plenty of warnings here,and also the remains of the cobbled forecourt of the station.



The Goods Shed is a Grade II listed building, having apparently been listed as recently as 16th November 2015 https://historicengland.org.uk/listi...-entry/1430159. Despite that the future doesn't look great for it in my opinion. Hope I am wrong.
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Old February 19th, 2016, 04:56 PM   #29
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On the opposite side of London Road from the Goods Shed is the Railway Inn, built in 1837 as the Railway Hotel to serve the N & C station. I guess that it was one of the earliest station hotels and has none of the grandeur which later station hotels often displayed. It has been empty since 2005.

It is also Grade II listed: https://historicengland.org.uk/listi...-entry/1430159

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Old February 19th, 2016, 05:12 PM   #30
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And just down the road from the goods shed is the tram depot, built by the City of Carlisle Tramways Company in 1900. It ceased to be a tram depot in 1931 but has survived, having a variety of uses.

A side view of the building, with the goods shed safety notice in front of it.



And from London Road. The front section was until recently HSS Hire Supplies. The rear section has been in use for most of my time in Carlisle as vehicle repair workshops. There was a fire in the rear of the building about a decade ago but the building was repaired.



An interesting little bit of Carlisle for transport history enthusiasts like me. Pity that the nearby Cowans Sheldon factory has all gone

Full size images at https://madannie.smugmug.com/Other-S...Town/n-XTDRLj/
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Old February 19th, 2016, 06:57 PM   #31
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I did, of course, forget to link to the planning application in question .

http://publicaccess.carlisle.gov.uk/...LI_DCAPR_67166

The document containing photos of the interior of the office building is a PDF:

http://publicaccess.carlisle.gov.uk/...15-2050209.pdf
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Old February 23rd, 2016, 12:46 PM   #32
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This from the News & Star,--

Carlisle railway bridge will be demolished despite campaign



AN HISTORIC railway bridge will be knocked down despite a bid to try and save it from demolition.

Network Rail insist that what is left of a former bridge over the Carlisle to Newcastle line, in the Botcherby area of the city, will be brought down to save money and to reduce the risk of trespass and vandalism.

That’s despite a call from Robert Betton, an independent councillor who represents Botcherby on both the city and county council, to stop its demolition and to conserve the structure.

Work on what’s left of the old bridge, which dates back to the 1800s, was due to start last Sunday with reports of some vehicles moving in ready to start the demolition.

But work did not start as planned, causing confusion among some locals.
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Mr Betton has attempted to have the landmark listed with Historic England to prevent its demolition, but his application was turned down. He’s now set about gathering support from the city council and Carlisle’s MP John Stevenson

Despite Mr Betton’s fight, Network Rail says work will still be going ahead, though it has been delay

Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/Ca...c9174b7f217-ds
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Old February 23rd, 2016, 05:40 PM   #33
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What puzzles me about that bridge is that it remained standing after the adjacent bridge over the Settle & Carlisle line was demolished about a decade ago, leaving a ridiculous stump.

I must get out and photograph it before it disappears, having not done so for the S & C bridge.
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Old February 24th, 2016, 09:30 AM   #34
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Planning application for the demolition appeared last week:

http://publicaccess.carlisle.gov.uk/...LI_DCAPR_67595
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Old February 26th, 2016, 02:14 PM   #35
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The bridge in question, photographed this morning:

From the south, with the old road alignment clearly visible and the replacement Eastern Way on the right



From the north, with a fortuitously timed train (shame I forgot to change the shutter speed, though) and the Settle & Carlisle in the background:



And a more side-on view of the bridge:


https://madannie.smugmug.com/Other-S...Town/n-XTDRLj/
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Old March 17th, 2016, 11:35 AM   #36
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This from the News & Star,--

Tourist attraction set to benefit from £1m cash boost



16 March 2016 4:41PM

£1 MILLION is to be spent bringing an historic tourist attraction in north Cumbria back to its former glory.

The Lowther Estate has pledged to invest the money over the next year as part of its 25-year-plan to restore the castle and re-discover its gardens after 70 years of abandonment.

A further £2m has been earmarked to help maintain and develop the castle in the future.

Jim Lowther, chairman of Lowther Estates Trust, said: “We have ambitious plans for Lowther Castle. We’re on track to create a remarkable and visionary destination for Cumbria.

"Lowther Castle is not only safe and secure for the present generation, it will continue to delight and inspire future generations.”

Plans are in place to revive and expand the gardens to become a centre of horticultural excellence in the north.

This summer, £250,000 will be invested in a woodland children’s play area.

Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/la...39f250be12f-ds
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Old July 11th, 2016, 02:25 PM   #37
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Carlisle celebrates centenary of pioneering brewing scheme

From The News and Star, 11-07-2016

Quote:


Carlisle is celebrating one hundred years since the beginning of the State Management Scheme this July, with events held across the city.

Twenty former state management pubs will be housing exhibitions about their history under the scheme, including Bookcase, the former headquarters.

Across the city there will be food and drink festivals, oral histories, and even an exhibition from Tullie House, which launches with a beer festival on July 16.

The festival will feature an afternoon of family games, special events and the opportunity to sample beers from the Carlisle Brewing Company.

Introduced at the height of World War I to reduce drunkenness among those in the arms industry, the State Management Scheme saw the nationalisation of the brewing, distribution, and selling of alcohol in Carlisle and its surrounding areas.

Whilst the scheme was ended by the conservative party in 1971, it’s had a lasting legacy in the city.

“There’s nowhere like Carlisle with a 50-odd year long history of state management” says Viv Dodd from the State Management Story.

“It’s had a great impact on drinking culture in this country, including introducing food to pubs, introducing games to pubs, and greatly influencing architecture through Harry Redfern’s designs”.

Harry Redfern was the head architect of the scheme, designing many pubs around the city including the Spinners Arms in Cummersdale, which is now also the site of Carlisle Brewing Company.
Full story at http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/Ca...8f7ea3ef2ec-ds

The State Management Story Website

Time to get out and photograph those state management pubs
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Old August 4th, 2016, 09:23 AM   #38
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This from the News & Star,--

Discover city’s hidden history



3 August 2016 6:19PM

Residents and visitors are being handed the freedom of Carlisle’s historic Citadel this summer.

Guided tours around the buildings, which have been central to Carlisle’s life for hundreds of years, will take place throughout this month.

Parts of the East Tower, previously used as council office space, are open for the first time.

John Robson, 73, from Carlisle, is one of the guides on the Citadel tours and thinks people should know more about the history around them.

He said: “It’s called hidden history for a reason.

“People pass these towers every day and haven’t got a clue what is in them.

“They never see what’s in here.

“All of this is the wonderful history of the city.”

The Citadel was first built in the recognisable form we know today in 1541.

A Moravian engineer was drafted in by Henry VIII to revamp the city’s defences during the reformation.

Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/la...79a90352149-ds
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Old August 22nd, 2016, 11:07 AM   #39
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This from the News & Star,--


Dig sheds light on lost cathedral history





Dig sheds light on lost cathedral history


Archaeological dig outside the Fratry in the grounds of Carlisle Cathedral.
19 August 2016 3:11PM

Artefacts found during a dig in the grounds of Carlisle Cathedral are undergoing analysis by experts, with archaeologists describing the discoveries as "exciting".

Floor tiles - believed to be medieval - and stained glass fragments were unearthed as history hunters explored part of the city centre site.

These are now being looked at following the finish of the three-week dig, which will have been witnessed by passers-by walking through the grounds

Archaeologists were exploring the area in front of the Fratry, where Carlisle Cathedral is planning a new building to develop its educational set-up.

The dig was carried out by Oxford Archaeology North to evaluate the ground ahead of the development.

Dr Adam Tinsley, from the organisation, told the News & Star: "That gives the architects a better idea of what structures and deposits they are going to come across and whether they are significant or not.

Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/Di...8fed9500f88-ds
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Old September 2nd, 2016, 10:51 AM   #40
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This from the News & Star,--

Iconic castle saved after five-year battle




1 September 2016 12:05PM

An historic Cumbrian castle will reopen its doors as an international centre of peace and reconciliation.

The sale of Rose Castle sparked concern among locals and historians, who feared it may be bought by developers.

The 13th-century property was the home of the Bishop of Carlisle until 2009.

In 2011 Church Commissioners decided it was simply too costly to maintain the building and announced their intention to sell.

The Rose Castle Foundation was formed several years ago, and has been working to buy it with the intention of using it as a base for an international centre of reconciliation and peace.

This week the sale was completed, including the castle, gardens, a farmhouse, cottages and 65 acres of land.

Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/la...b1e33965395-ds
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