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Old March 8th, 2011, 06:26 AM   #1
PerfectionsArchitect
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Busiest Shipping Seaports In Africa: Business And Development News

http://www.oceanfreightusa.com/shipref_tws.php#S&P_AF

AFRICA

Algeria, Capital: Algiers. Key Seafreight Ports:

*
Algiers
*
Annaba
*
Ghazaouet
*
Oran
___________________________________________________________________________________




Angola & Cabinda, Capital: Luanda. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Luanda
* Lobito
* Nambibe



___________________________________________________________________________________


Benin, Capital: Porto Novo. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Cotonou

___________________________________________________________________________________

Botswana, Capital: Gaborone. Key Seafreight Ports:

* None. Land Locked country. Ocean freight via ports in South Africa


___________________________________________________________________________________

Burkina Faso, Capital: Ouagadougou. Key Seafreight Ports:

* None. Land Locked country. Ocean freight via ports in Togo, Ghana and Ivory Coast

___________________________________________________________________________________



Burundi, Capital: Bujumbura. Key Seafreight Ports:

* None. Land Locked country. Ocean freight via ports in Tanzania

___________________________________________________________________________________



Cameroon, Capital: Yaounde. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Douala

___________________________________________________________________________________


Central African Republic, Capital: Bangui. Key Seafreight Ports:

* None. Land Locked country. Ocean freight via ports in Cameroon


___________________________________________________________________________________


Chad, Capital: N'Diamena. Key Seafreight Ports:

* None. Land Locked country. Ocean freight via ports in Cameroon


___________________________________________________________________________________

Congo (The), Capital: Brazzaville. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Pointe Noire
___________________________________________________________________________________




Congo (The Democratic Repablic of)
, Capital: Kinshasha. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Matadi
* Boma
* Banana
___________________________________________________________________________________




Djibouti, Capital: Djibouti. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Djibouti

___________________________________________________________________________________



Egypt, Capital: Cairo. Key Seafreight Ports:

*
Alexandria
*
Port Said
*
Suez
*
Damietta
___________________________________________________________________________________




Equatorial Guinea, Capital: Malabo. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Malabo (in Island)
* Bata (on African continent)

___________________________________________________________________________________


Eritrea, Capital: Asmera. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Assab
* Massawa

___________________________________________________________________________________



Ethiopia, Capital: Addiss Ababa. Key Seafreight Ports:

* None. Land Locked country. Ocean freight via ports in Djibouti

___________________________________________________________________________________


Gabon, Capital: Libreville. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Libreville
* Port Genti

___________________________________________________________________________________


Gambia, Capital: Banjul. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Banjul

___________________________________________________________________________________


Ghana, Capital: Accra. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Tema
* Takoradi
___________________________________________________________________________________




Guinea, Capital: Conakry. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Conakry
* Kamsar
___________________________________________________________________________________




Guinea Bissau, Capital: Bissau. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Bissau
___________________________________________________________________________________




Ivory Coast, Capital: Abijan. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Abijan
* San Pedro

___________________________________________________________________________________



Kenya, Capital: Nairobi. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Mombasa
* Lamu
___________________________________________________________________________________




Lesotho, Capital: Maseru. Key Seafreight Ports:

* None. Land Locked country. Ocean freight via ports in South Africa

___________________________________________________________________________________



Liberia, Capital: Monrovia. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Monrovia
* Buchanan
* Cape Palmas
* Greenville
___________________________________________________________________________________




Libya, Capital: Tripoli. Key Seafreight Ports:

*
Tripoli
*
Benghazi
*
Tobruk
*
Marsa el Brega


___________________________________________________________________________________

Madagascar (Island), Capital: Antananarivo. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Toamasina
* Mahajanga
* Antsiranana

___________________________________________________________________________________


Malawi, Capital: Lilongwe. Key Seafreight Ports:

* None. Land Locked country. Ocean freight via ports in Tanzania


___________________________________________________________________________________


Mali, Capital: Bamako. Key Seafreight Ports:

* None. Land Locked country. Ocean freight via ports in Senegal and Gambia

___________________________________________________________________________________


Mauritania, Capital: Nouakchott. Key Seafreight Ports:

*
Nouakchott
*
Nouadhibou

___________________________________________________________________________________



Morocco, Capital: Rabat. Key Seafreight Ports:

*
Casablanca
*
Agadir
*
Tangier
*
Melilla (under Spanish jurisdication)

___________________________________________________________________________________


Mozambique, Capital: Maputo. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Maputo
* Beira
* Nacala
___________________________________________________________________________________



Namibia, Capital: Windheoek. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Walvis bay
* Luderitz

___________________________________________________________________________________



Niger, Capital: Niameyt. Key Seafreight Ports:

* None. Land Locked country. Ocean freight via ports in Nigeria


___________________________________________________________________________________



Nigeria, Capital: Abuja. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Apapa (Lagos)
* Port Harcourt
___________________________________________________________________________________



Rwanda, Capital: Kigali. Key Seafreight Ports:

* None. Land Locked country. Ocean freight via ports in Tanzania

___________________________________________________________________________________


Senegal, Capital: Dakar. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Dakar
* Kaolack

___________________________________________________________________________________



Sierra Leone
, Capital: Freetown. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Freetown

___________________________________________________________________________________


Somalia, Capital: Mogadishu. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Mogadishu
* Berbera
* Merca
___________________________________________________________________________________




South Africa, Capital: Pretoria (administrative); Cape Town (legislative); Bloemfontein (juducial). Key Seafreight Ports:

*
Durban*
*
Cape Town
*
Port Elizabeth
*
East London
___________________________________________________________________________________



Sudan, Capital: Khartoum. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Port Sudan
* Suakin
___________________________________________________________________________________




Swaziland, Capital: Mbabane. Key Seafreight Ports:

* None. Land Locked country. Ocean freight via ports in South Africa


___________________________________________________________________________________


Tanzania, Capital: Dar Es Salaam. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Dar es Salaam

___________________________________________________________________________________


Togo, Capital: Lome. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Lome

___________________________________________________________________________________



Tunisia, Capital: Tunis. Key Seafreight Ports:

*
Tunis
*
Bizerta
*
Sfax
*
La Goelette


___________________________________________________________________________________


Uganda, Capital: Kampala. Key Seafreight Ports:

* None. Land Locked country. Ocean freight via ports in Kenya



___________________________________________________________________________________


Western Sahara, Capital: None. (Territory contested by Morocco and Polisario Front). Key Seafreight Ports:

*
Ad Dakhla
*
Laayoune (El Aaiun)
___________________________________________________________________________________



Zambia, Capital: Luska. Key Seafreight Ports:

*
None. Land Locked country. Ocean freight via ports in Tanzania
___________________________________________________________________________________




Zimbabwe, Capital: Harare. Key Seafreight Ports:

* None. Land Locked country. Ocean freight via ports in Tanzania
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Old March 8th, 2011, 06:34 AM   #2
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I made this thread to discuss and evaluate how the shipping ports of African countries may be interval in effecting its trade.Any news on your major shipping ports do contribute.
Quote:
http://allafrica.com/stories/201103021084.html

Nigeria: Congestion Looms At Lagos Port as Cargo Release Password Stalls Operations

Lagos — Congestion looms at Lagos ports, following the inability of the senior officers assigned by the Nigeria Customs Service, NCS, to assess the password for release of consignments from the ports, claiming that they do not have the password.

Vanguard gathered that the Customs management had restricted the password to officers of the rank of Assistant Controllers, ACs, and Deputy Controllers, DCs, in its bid to block revenue leakages and check clearance of prohibited goods.

However, at one of the ports in Lagos, a DC, who was suppose to have the password told agents he did not have it and sent them to the office of the Public Relations Officer, PRO.

Three agents, who visited one of the ports in Lagos to clear the goods of their principles, were tossed between the terminals, where their goods are, the office of the PRO and the office of the Customs Area Controller, CAC.

President of the Lagos Chamber Commence and Industry, LCCI, Julie Ogboru, confirmed to Vanguard that as at last week, there was actually one of the senior officers at the Tin-Can Island port but noted that after discussion with the CAC, the situation had changed.

Meanwhile, the Customs management has described the planned strike by some agents as cheap blackmail aimed at preventing the Service from performing its duty.

A statement by Joseph Attah, Deputy Public Relations Officer of the NCS, said: "We are aware that the real reason for this blackmail is the management decision to restrict the power of release to officers of higher ranks, Assistant Comptrollers and Deputy Comptrollers as against relatively junior officers who were in charge on till now."

Customs commended for anti-smuggling activities

THE Nigeria Customs Service, NCS, has been commended for its anti-smuggling activities and revenue drive in the past one year. Managing Director of Destiny Shipping 39 Limited, Mr. Peter Amaechi, gave this commendation in Lagos, yesterday.

Amaechi described seizures and revenue boost in all Customs Commands in the country as an indication that the service has changed for the better as a result of the persistent call by its Comptroller-General, Alhaji Abdullahi Dikko.

"This is an indication that the service has been completely transformed due to the campaign for attitudinal change by Dikko," he said.

He also observed that Customs was winning the war against smuggling at the ports and border posts, explaining that since public officers are criticised when they do something wrong, they should also be commended when they performed creditably well.

"Alhaji Dikko has done wonderfully well since he became the Comptroller-General of the Customs Service," he said.

.as Customs intercepts N58m worth of fake drugs

LAGOS- The Federal Operations Unit Zone A, Ikeja of the Nigerian Customs Service has intercepted a container loaded with fake drugs worth N58 million and other contraband items.

The Command also intercepted 200 pieces of fairly used tyres concealed in a truck load of manufacturing chemicals.
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Old March 8th, 2011, 06:35 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerfectionsArchitect View Post





Congo (The Democratic Repablic of)
, Capital: Kinshasha. Key Seafreight Ports:

* Matadi
* Boma
* Banana
Banana port construction is still in the pipeline. Not a port yet.
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Old March 8th, 2011, 06:40 AM   #4
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Quote:
http://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/...news&Itemid=64

Nigeria: Lagos Ports Record 190 Vessels in One Month

According to the Shipping Positions from the Nigerian Ports Authority (NPA) covering Apapa and Tin Can Island ports, 138 vessels have either berthed or being expected between the first week of February and February 27, for Apapa alone.


The Shipping Position for Tin Can Island Ports showed that 52 vessels have either berthed or also being expected from the seaport during the same period.

Prominent among the imports are 49 tanker vessels that are either discharging or expected with petroleum products in the two seaports.

A breakdown showed that Apapa has a record of 37 tanker vessels , while Tin Can has 12 vessels with petroleum products.


Among the petroleum products are aviation fuel (Jet A1), diesel, (AGO), fuel (PMS), base oil and kerosene, with PMS dominating the import.


Other consignments indicated by the Shipping Positions include rice, fish, used vehicles, coal, coastic soda, bulk wheat, bulk sugar and general cargo.


It was gathered that many of the vessels spend about two weeks before leaving the port, a development which industry stakeholders described as not the best if Nigeria hopes to be the hub of shipping activities in the West African sub-region.


The Shipping Position showed that 22 tanker vessels are awaiting berth, after arriving the Lagos territorial waters since February 1.


The implication of a ship spending so long a time before discharging her cargos is that importers have to pay more the shipowners have a way of building whatever is lost in terms of ship turnaround into freight.


Some factors, including lack of adequate cargo handling equipment and space could be responsible for the delay.
Record high of shipments in the shortest month at that.
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Old March 8th, 2011, 06:49 AM   #5
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Nigeria: Lagos Dockworkers Protest Non-Payment of Terminal Benefits
Quote:
http://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/...news&Itemid=69



Tens of dockworkers stormed Ibru Tank Farms along Apapa-Oshodi Expressway by Warehouse Bus Stop to protest against non-payment of their severance package and unlawful termination of their appointments by Ibru Organisation and 16 other stakeholders operating at the jetty.

The protesting workers told Daily Independent the operators have refused to pay them terminal service benefit for 15 to 20 years and also failed to pay their salaries, wages and other entitlements from 2007 till date.

The dockworkers, who claimed that they were unlawfully disengaged after the port concessioning, said about 20 of them had died as a result of the hardship they have been facing because of non-payment of their entitlements and loss of job.

Besides, they lamented that many of them now suffer mental torture while some others have had the stability of their homes jeopardised since they could no longer fulfil their fatherly responsibilities.

Spokesman of the group, Austin Akpa, told newsmen that 198 of them were thrown out of job without compensation "and out of the number, about 20 have died out of suffering," he added sorrowfully.

So far, they have been doing everything possible to let the stakeholders see reason why they should not be "inhumanly treated but all to no avail," Akpa stated.
"We have been on this matter for years. We have even been to the Senate, but the stakeholders have refused to listen to us", he said, adding, "the time has come for the government and the whole world, particularly the international maritime bodies to save us from dying."

"We are demanding for our rights and we will not relent until we get it. We appeal to the appropriate authorities to prevail on the stakeholders to pay us our entitlements for peace to reign", he added.

During the peaceful protest which lasted for hours and witnessed by a team of policemen from Trinity Division of Nigeria Police, the aggrieved dockworkers carried placards bearing the pictures of their dead colleagues while some of them still nursing injuries in the course of duty also relayed their predicaments.

They gave the names of the deceased to include Andy Ezeh; Felix Ighoh; Samuel Akin; Paul Uche among others.

Attempts by Daily Independent correspondent to get the responses of the stakeholders were unsuccessful as the gates to the companies were locked while security agents prevented anybody from going near it.
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Old March 8th, 2011, 06:56 AM   #6
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http://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/...news&Itemid=69

Nigeria: Importers urge govt to invest in ports

Importers of second hand ve-hicles and other stakeholders have urged the Federal Government to support the Nigerian Ports Authority’s (NPA) initiatives in developing new port facilities so that the country can compete favourably in the West and Central Africa sub regions.

Speaking at a forum in Lagos last Friday, the Managing Director of Bolas Motors and spokesman of the group, Mr Sesan Abolarinwa, commended the Federal Government for increasing the age limit of fairly used vehicles that can be imported into the country.

Abolarinwa said it was inevitable for the government to invest in the new port facilities to cope with the increasing cargo traffic and port congestion.

The importer also urged the Managing Director, NPA, Omar Suleiman to impress the need to have a modern port in the country.

New facilities, Abolarinwa said, should be designed to meet the logistics needs of the maritime industry while anticipating the need for future development.

He called on the government to help in the funding of maritime researches saying the sector lacks in-depth investigation due to poor funding.

Abolarinwa said it was inevitable for the government to invest in the new port facilities to cope with the increasing cargo traffic and port congestion.

He told reporters that the increase in the age limit from 10 to 15 years would stop diversion of goods particularly vehicles to neighbouring ports in the West African sub-region and lead to increase in vehicle traffic in the country.

The importer also noted that the removal of wrecks and the deepening of the Lagos channel by the NPA would facilitate trade by attracting bigger vessels and lead to increase in gross registered tonnage vessels and ships turnaround time.

‘‘The maritime industry has experienced an appreciable development in recent years. That development is set to stay. World trade continues to shift global markets and production lines make new demands on transport systems, and on ports in particular.

‘‘Ports serve the national interest, supporting the competitiveness of national and regional economies. It is in the nation’s interest that our ports remain able to handle cargo trade and its potential development efficiently and sustainably.

The maritime industry, Abolarinwa said, was in dire need of a number of reforms.
He said: "New port facilities would help to bring the industry to international standards.
"The importers lamented that the Federal Government like most practitioners in the maritime industry do not live by the rules guiding the profession which they said has resulted in a number of problems in the sector.

"The maritime industry requires reforms; reform by way of standardising, educating, informing, sanitising the practice and making it global because the mere mention of the words import and export trade means we are not doing it locally but across borders. Therefore, there are set rules, information and knowledge that operators must possess," he said.

"I am pleased to observe that, the media is now playing a crucial role in the maritime sector but most of those covering the beat lack in-depth investigation due primarily to funds and assistance for training by government agencies such as the Ministry of Transport, Nigerian Ports Authority (NPA), Nigerian Maritime Administration and Safety Agency (NIMASA), among others.

"It will also be necessary to request for federal funding of the private research initiative as is in the Institute of Freight Forwarders of Nigeria (IFFN) to properly put in place a research body that will do all investigation regarding the maritime sector and equip the nation’s shelves with quality books and information that will promote the sector and can stand the test of time," Abolarinwa said.
Another stakeholder, Mr Frances Agboke, said the maritime industry is endowed with enormous natural resources which can provide great potential and opportunities necessary to achieve rapid and sustainable growth and development.


"Based on this development and strategic position we occupy in the industry and sub-region for the development of human capital for an enhanced economy, it is expected of us to train our youths to develop interest in maritime education.

To meet the manpower requirement for the manning of the nation’s fleet, Agboke also canvassed robust, consistent, versatile and dynamic maritime policies which are in tandem with global issues to achieve the desired level of efficiency in the maritime sector.

Agboke also advocated for the need to conduct a manpower audit for the industry.
He lamented that the country, despite its huge population has no maritime university compared to countries like the Philippines which he said has over 40 maritime academies with half of the nation’s population.


The Philippines, Agboke said, now supplies over 30 per cent of the world’s seafarers requirement.
He noted that Philippines earns over $1.5 billion from reparation from seafarers.
Agboke called on the Federal Government to provide holistic intervention rather than isolated intervention.

Last edited by PerfectionsArchitect; March 8th, 2011 at 07:04 AM.
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Old March 8th, 2011, 07:51 AM   #7
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Berbera port is slated to be rehabbed in the next coming months. British investors came to visit for a delegation a month ago as Somaliland is trying to curry investment to build a railroad from Berbera at least to the Ethiopian border. I'm trying to get more information on this plan.
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Old March 8th, 2011, 06:38 PM   #8
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in TEU tangier port will be at 8.5 million and 13 in the world.

i don't see any african port in those top position in the world in the near future.
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Old March 8th, 2011, 06:52 PM   #9
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source: Port strategy.

Quote:
Changing the guards
22 Sep 2010

The order of things is changing in Mediterranean container transhipment operations.

Gioia Tauro, once the new kid on the block that shook up Mediterranean container handling operations overall, can now be viewed as part of the establishment, facing the unenviable task of needing to re-engineer itself in order to compete with a new generation of lower cost hubs.

In March this year, Gioia Tauro announced that it was laying off 280 workers, around a quarter of its payroll, in response to falling cargo volume and increased competition from the new Tanger Med container terminals.

Malta Freeport, like Gioia Tauro, can be regarded as part of the old order but in contrast to Gioia Tauro has just announced that it is to press ahead with the expansion of its Terminal 2. The North Quay will be extended from 480 metres to 668 metres and the West Quay from 118 metres to 312 metres. The terminal area will be increased by 25,500 square metres.

As indicated above, one of the premier forces of change is the new Tanger Med port which under its phase one development offers a 3m teu capacity. Two terminals have been developed under the port’s phase one development: TC1 started operations in the summer of 2007 and is managed by APM Terminals with its local partner the Akwa Group. TC2, which opened in October 2008, is managed by Eurogate Tanger, a consortium of terminal operators Eurogate of Germany and Contship Italia with the shipping lines CMA-CGM and MSC also partners in the project.

The impact of the opening of Tanger Med on container transhipment operations in the Mediterranean has been immediate. The two terminals employ labour forces at around 25%-30% of the cost of more mature transhipment operations in the Med and this factor combined with the proven capability of the Tanger Med terminals to deliver high performance standards (in excess of those offered by the long established parties) has naturally acted as catalyst to the switch of volume to Tanger Med.

Algeciras, Malaga and Gioa Tauro have all suffered as a result of this trend.
And it is expected to be progressive; MSC is expected to move more volume through Tanger Med in 2010 which could negatively impact other established hubs such as Valencia. Overall, the port’s two terminals offer a throughput capacity in excess of 3m teu which is certainly adequate to handle the short to medium-term requirement particularly with the recent economic downturn in play. In 2009, the combined throughput of the two terminals accounted for 1.2m teu.

The economic crisis has also served to delay the second phase expansion of Tanger Med, the proposed TC3 and TC4 terminals. TC3 was planned to deliver another 3m teu of capacity for a dedicated terminal to be used by Maersk and operated by its sister company APM Terminals.

Maersk, however, has now decided not to go-ahead with the project. It says it will keep it under review but for the time being the door is closed on it. The plan for TC4, however, is still on track albeit with a time line pushed back from initiation in 2012 to 2014 and with some structural changes in terms of management – notably PSA International has withdrawn from the project and the Moroccan state port operator, Marsa Maroc, has taken over its role as concession holder and operator.

Another growing force in Mediterranean container transhipment operations is the East Port Said container terminal which is now proceeding with its second phase development.

Also now returning to the fore, after a postponement when the economic crisis hit, is the Kuwait and Gulf Ports International (KGLPI)-backed project to build, finance and operate a major container terminal development in Damietta, Egypt. This will eventually offer an annual capacity of 4m teu. Both the latter projects, like those referenced in Tanger Med, have shipping line equity partners, another major dynamic that is changing where transhipment business is undertaken in the Mediterranean.
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Old March 8th, 2011, 07:03 PM   #10
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Yes, but Tanger Med is still under construction - atm capacity is only 2 million teu.
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Old March 9th, 2011, 02:08 PM   #11
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Kenya: A Watershed Moment At the Port

Kenya: A Watershed Moment At the Port




Quote:
http://www.maritimesun.com/news/keny...t-at-the-port/

Growing opposition to privatisation is blocking urgently needed expansion of the port of Mombasa which this year has exceeded its cargo handling capacity.

Last year the port handled over 20 million tonnes of goods, or 50 per cent more than in 2009, and this figure is expected to hit a new high this year.

Despite some improvements, the port is still underperforming because reforms have not kept pace with growth in cargo volumes, maritime experts say.

As a result the port has lost significant business as a trans-shipment facility, according to a World Bank report that describes the port as the East Africa’s most important asset.

Largest market

Trans-shipment business to Dar es Salaam, the largest market for this kind of activity, was stopped in 2007 due to congestion at the terminal container yard.

“Absence of reforms and new investments will result in increased vessel delays, port congestion surcharge and higher costs to customs,” says the report, Running on one engine: Kenya’s uneven economic performance with a keen focus on port of Mombasa.

The existing container terminal was designed to handle 250,000 20-foot units (Teus), but last year it handled about 700,000 Teus. The volume of containerised cargo has been growing bymore than 10 per cent annually since 2005.

The report released last June says there needs to be clarification of a full timetable to make Mombasa a landlord port – where frontline cargo handling is concessioned to the private sector – as well as identification of the roles of the Kenya Ports Authority and private sector.

Otherwise, the port could become an impediment to economic growth in the entire East Africa region whose economies are projected to grow by over 5 per cent this year.

Among projects earmarked for expansion is the extension of Berth 18, which will take 24 months and was supposed to have been carried out in 2006, according to port officials.

Berths 18 and 9 cannot accommodate three vessels calling at the port due to the growing tendency of shipbuilders to make longer vessels. This has led to delays, and last year MSC shipping line threatened to slap the KPA with a congestion surcharge due to inefficiencies at the port that led to delays in securing a berth. The Vessel Delay Surcharge (VDS) can go as high as $50,000 (Sh4.1 million) a day.

Private sector

The second container terminal, being funded by the Japanese to a tune of Sh16 billion, will create an additional capacity of 1.2 Teus and will be fully operated by the private sector. The construction of the project was due to be completed more than two years ago.

Berths 11-14, initially constructed to handle conventional cargo and which now form part of the first phase of the planned privatisation, will be converted into a full-fledged container terminal with modern container handling equipment such as ship-to-shore gantry cranes.

The port is relying today on conventional berths to handle containerised cargo, using Berths 5-7, 11 and 13-14 to reduce the overwhelming traffic in containerised vessels, shifting delays to conventional cargo berths, according to engineer Joseph Atonga, the port’s operations manager.

The port master plan, which was revised in 2009, emphasised the role of private sector in the planned expansion with the port only serving as a landlord.

But the World Bank report cited the need to undertake institutional, regulatory and legal reforms before undertaking reforms and investments at the port.Efforts to obtain comment from KPA management were unsuccessful.

“Private investment, which would lead to new local jobs, greater port efficiency and a positive impact on growth in the region have been thwarted by vested narrow interests seeking to maintain the status quo,” noted the report.

On job losses, which Dock Workers Union secretary-general Simon Sang estimates will be over half the current workforce of 7,000 employees, the report says: “And whilst unions and their workers might legitimately fear downsizing, this should be viewed in the context of the government plans to extend the port and the situation on the ground today.”

It is believed that the KPA workforce is already bloated, and a head count to flush out ghost workers is expected to begin on February 24.

Elections for secretary-general of DWU will be held before May, and those opposing Mr Sang see his stand on privatisation as a strategy to draw workers away from him.

A section of dock workers supporting privatisation are rallying behind former Wundanyi MP Mwandawiro Mghanga, who declared his interest in the position this week.

ODM and PNU legislators in the region have also opposed privatisation. The politicians see the process as a ploy to “rob” the Coast of its major source of revenue.

Speaking during a workers’ meeting two weeks ago, ODM MPs Hassan Joho (Kisauni), Ramadhan Kajembe (Changamwe) and Masoud Mwahima (Likoni) said that they would not allow the sale of the port to continue because it would impoverish their voters.

Institutional reforms

Kenya Shippers Council executive officer Gilbert Langat said the country has not created sufficient institutional reforms to guarantee efficient operations at a privatised port.

Based on the Container Freight Stations experience, lack of regulatory measures may create inefficiencies at the port if privatisation is carried out in the current environment,” he said.

Kenya Transport Association chairman Paul Maiyo said the government has no business in port operations, adding that most of the successful ports in the world are operated by private players.

However, the government should identify operators who will bring maximum benefits to the country, he said.

“We should not see a situation where expatriates are brought to do jobs that can be done by Kenyans,” he added.

The Kenya Private Sector Alliance chief executive Carole Kariuki said the port needs to modernise its facilities to enhance efficiency and service delivery.

“The government may not have sufficient funds to complete this process, and hence the need for the private sector to step in to provide the much needed funds.”

Kenya International Freight and Warehousing Association chairman Hezron Awiti also supported privatisation, but said that it should be above board.

Kenya Ships Agents Association chairman David Mackay said, in principle, privatisation of the container terminal will improve efficiency at the port.

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Old March 9th, 2011, 02:12 PM   #12
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State pledges to revamp ‘dying’ shipping firm
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http://www.standardmedia.co.ke/Insid...hipping%20firm
The Government has announced plans to revamp the moribund Kenya National Shipping Line (KNSL).

Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Transport, Dr Cyrus Njiru, said in Mombasa that KNSL remained one of the most viable parastatals, which has the potential to transform the country’s labour market and boost employment in the maritime sector.

"We have space and opportunities exist to enable KNSL play a role in helping the maritime sector grow," he said.

The PS made the remarks while presiding over the re-launch of the Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (SCTW).

The launch also marked graduation of 20 personnel drawn from Kenya Ports Authority (KPA) and Kenya Ferry Services (KFS).

Hiring ships

KNSL, which was established in 1988 by the Government, does not have its own vessels and has been operating as a shipping coordinator for other international shipping lines as well as acting as a clearing and forwarding agent for government imported cargo.

Shipping experts, however, argue that failure by KNSL to own a vessel denies the parastatal a chance to maximise on earnings and instead depends on hiring ships to transport its cargoes.

And speaking on the sidelines of the ceremony, the PS reiterated that the port of Mombasa was not up for sale.

"There should be no disagreement over the port. It is not being offered for sale to anyone. It will remain a public entity," explained the PS.

The PS further reckoned that Bandari College will continue to offer a world-class standard training for the maritime labour market.

He directed the management of KPA, KFS and KNSL to form a joint committee to help in fast tracking reforms at the college.

He said the Kenya Navy will also be invited to participate in the task force, which will report its findings to him in two months time.
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Old March 9th, 2011, 02:17 PM   #13
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Kenya: Shipping Lines to Charge Port for Delays
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http://allafrica.com/stories/201101280087.html

Nairobi — Fears have emerged of some shipping lines slapping Mombasa port with the punitive Vessel Delay Surcharge (VDS) due to alleged inefficiencies in cargo handling.

Vessels calling at the port are spending up to 12 days, which is sufficient to justify demurrage charges, according to maritime experts.

Up to seven days are spent as the ship waits to be sailed onto the harbour by the Kenya Ports Authority (KPA) pilots as required.

A ship spends another four to five days at the port waiting to berth, the operators of shipping lines who spoke to the Nation but did not wish to be identified for fear of victimisation said.

"This translates to daily operating costs (DOC) in terms of fuel, crew wages, ship maintenance, container hire and the attendant piracy risk," one of the sources said, adding that while calculating the average time spent in port by ships, KPA did not consider days a vessel spent in high seas awaiting entry.

In monetary terms, with a fuel consumption of 35 metric tonnes per day, waiting period immediately translates to close to $200,000, added the source. Shipping lines charge VDS at the rate of US $400-600 per Twenty Foot Equivalent Unit (Teu).

KPA managing director Gichiri Ndua denied knowledge of the impending levy saying it was not justifiable since the port was performing well.

But the Container Freight Stations Association chairman Mr Feisal Abbas claimed two leading lines have already issued warnings of intention to introduce VDS.

In case a VDS is imposed on all cargo flowing into Mombasa port, the end user would be expected to foot the extra cost, meaning that the cost of imports through the port which serves the entire east and central African region would shoot up.

It is KPA that decides which cargo should go to which Container Freights Stations (CFS) after the shipping lines were acrimoniously stripped of that role mid last year and according to industry sources, the shipping lines' threat to impose the VDS could be a form of retaliation.

In August last year, Mediterranean Shipping Company (MSC) announced a US $100 VDS per Teus it called a "congestion surcharge", citing performance constraints due to delays.

"Please be informed that due to persistent berthing delays and poor operational performance at the port of Mombasa, we have decided to apply congestion surcharge of US $100 per Teu on import cargo with effect from August 1, 2010 bill of lading date," said the notice.

However, Kenya Maritime Authority (KMA) director general Nancy Kirigithu termed the charge unjustifiable since the port was not facing any serious congestion and instructed the shipping line to withdraw the levy. But causes of delays, which are related to capacity constraints, have not been addressed.

The move by the shipping lines comes at a time when labour performance at the port is said to be at its lowest, with claims of workers being induced to off load cargo from the ships.

On average, it takes 3-4 days to off-load a vessel carrying only 1000 TEUs, with the end result that the vessel will finally spend some 10-12 days in Mombasa.

"Some shipping lines are forced to pay a fee to KPA workers in some cases to increase productivity on crane operations. For example an incentive of $1.5 per container at the container terminal and $2 per tonne bulk cargo is paid out," said a shipping agent.

"There is no efficient flow of the containers to the CFSs causing congestion at the container terminal, which affects the performance," the agent said, adding that the delay could be deliberate.

CFS operators' main source of revenue is the storage charges levied against importers who are not able to clear cargo within five days free storage period.

As an extension of the port, operators are supposed to apply KPA tariffs and have little room for introducing their own charges.

Importers pay US $ 25 (Sh2,000) per day for storage of a 20-ft container for the two weeks after free storage period. After this period, custom warehouse rent is paid to KRA.

CFSs, as per their level of performance agreement with KPA, are supposed to move containers to their yards within 48 hours. However, according to Mr Ndua, it is extremely difficult to clear a container within 48 hours due to long custom procedures.

Local shippers are not allowed to clear their containers from the port even if documentation is ready. The containers must move to the CFSs, which do not have any contractual arrangement with the shipping lines since the port of discharge according to the bill of lading is Mombasa port.

"In case of damage when the cargo is moving to the CFSs, issues of compensation normally get murky due to contractual obligations," another agent said, adding that it did not make sense to transfer the consignment to a CFS without involving the shipping line.

A recent study by the World Bank -- Running on one Engine -- said that the port has not kept pace with the demand.

"Despite some improvements, the port is still underperforming. Reforms have not kept up with the momentum in other African countries and the port remains heavily congested, which explains why it has lost business as a transshipment port," the report said.

The port which was expected to hit the 20 million installed capacity last year, has not increased its capacity commensurate with the growth of cargo volumes.

For instance, plans to extend berth 19 to a length of 760 metres to enable it to handle 3 ships of a length of over 200 metres each was due in 2006. Berth works by China Roads and Bridge Corporation will take 18 months.
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Old March 9th, 2011, 02:28 PM   #14
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Interesting Read

http://www.nation.co.ke/News/Arms+ex...z/-/index.html

Arms expected at the port ‘include rockets’

Quote:

* Shipping company says the cargo had been properly declared contrary to earlier claims

The arms being shipped to Kenya include rockets, according to impeccable security and shipping sources.

And the shipping company handling the consignment, that was held briefly in Angola, said the containers were properly declared contrary to earlier reports.

Maersk Lines Limited spokesperson Kevin Speers, in an email, said the four containers in question consist of ammunition, which was properly declared when the vessel arrived in Lobito, Angola.

“The containers were in plain view, and in fact, before entering the harbour, the vessel raised the internationally recognised flag indicating hazardous cargo was on board,” Mr Speers said.

He denied claims that the cargo was concealed. The ship was in Lobito for 12 days offloading food aid before Angolan authorities raised discrepancies with the documentation, Mr Speers said.

“Maersk Line Limited along with the crew have fully cooperated with Angolan authorities as they have verified the documentation and inspected the ship. We will continue to cooperate with Angolan authorities and work with US government officials until the ship is under way,” Mr Speers said.

However, he did not explain the itinerary of the ship, Maersk Constellation, or the expected date of arrival in Mombasa. He also declined to disclose who the consignee of the four containers was.

Military spokesperson Bogita Ongeri said the military frequently bought weapons through various agents. The ownership of the consignment could only be explained when it arrives at Mombasa port, he said.

Government spokesman Alfred Mutua said the consignment was for use by the Kenyan military. This rekindled memories of another arms shipment whose documents showed it was destined for Southern Sudan but the government insisted it was for the Kenyan military.

The ship transporting the 33 Russian made tanks was hijacked by pirates and the crew held hostage for months before being released.

The military later made a public show of receiving the tanks. If the shipment to Southern Sudan had been confirmed, Kenya would have been in violation of UN resolutions outlawing arms sale to the whole of Sudan.

The latest shipment had raised questions when it was suggested that it contained bullets when the Kenyan military industry produces them for their use.

Earlier reports said the vessel was detained at the port of Lobito after Angolan authorities questioned part of its cargo.
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Old March 11th, 2011, 06:36 PM   #15
I.M Boring
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerfectionsArchitect View Post
....
Lest us ignore the fact that the ship was hijacked months ago for just a second.
That equipment was part of a larger purchase of around 110 T72 tanks, artilery pieces, APCs etc intended for the KENYAN ARMY. Nobody has provided any real proof that it was intended for S Sudan.

Besides, what do we have to gain in purchasing dozens of tanks for another country?
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Old March 12th, 2011, 08:18 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I.M Boring View Post
Lest us ignore the fact that the ship was hijacked months ago for just a second.
That equipment was part of a larger purchase of around 110 T72 tanks, artilery pieces, APCs etc intended for the KENYAN ARMY. Nobody has provided any real proof that it was intended for S Sudan.

Besides, what do we have to gain in purchasing dozens of tanks for another country?
Oil perhaps.
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Old March 12th, 2011, 09:36 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I.M Boring View Post
Lest us ignore the fact that the ship was hijacked months ago for just a second.
That equipment was part of a larger purchase of around 110 T72 tanks, artilery pieces, APCs etc intended for the KENYAN ARMY. Nobody has provided any real proof that it was intended for S Sudan.

Besides, what do we have to gain in purchasing dozens of tanks for another country?
OIL and market access.
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Old March 12th, 2011, 09:55 PM   #18
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I doubt that since we could just as easily trade with Uganda.
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Old March 12th, 2011, 10:42 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I.M Boring View Post
I doubt that since we could just as easily trade with Uganda.
Looks like you don't know about Kenya's investments in SSudan.

But's relations goes Beyond than just buying Tanks and weapons on behalf of SPLA.

Kenya played a very critical in SSudan's struggle.
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Old March 14th, 2011, 11:45 AM   #20
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Zimbabwe exports are mostly through Mozambique and South Africa, Swaziland might be the same as well.
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