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Old November 25th, 2012, 05:15 PM   #21
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Old November 25th, 2012, 05:24 PM   #22
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Tanzania: Zanzibar's Malaria Success a Potential Banana Skin
25 APRIL 2010
Zanzibar City — Efforts to combat malaria in Zanzibar have seen the prevalence rate come down from 35 percent before 2008 to below 1 percent, but health officials are worried the gains could be reversed.

"Despite the achievements in reducing malaria, a lack of funds for awareness[-raising], indoor residual spraying and surveillance, is a challenge. Also, we have a problem with people's resistance to behavioural change, particularly in keeping the environment clean and in the use of mosquito nets," said Mwinyi Msellem, head of the diagnostic unit at the Zanzibar Malaria Control Programme (ZMCP).
http://allafrica.com/stories/201004260347.html

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Old November 25th, 2012, 07:29 PM   #23
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Can you guys summarize the articles or bold the important parts, especially the title. I don't think anyone wants to read a jumbled mess of paragraphs.

Hint: don't just copy and paste. I say that because it copies everything on the page.
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Old November 25th, 2012, 07:36 PM   #24
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Old news I read last week.....

Kenya’s life expectancy jumps to 64 years
http://www.nation.co.ke/News/Kenyas-...5/-/index.html

The life expectancy of a Kenyan has increased to 64 years up from 55 two years ago, a report released on Sunday shows.

The data compiled by the University of Nairobi in partnership with 12 other universities worldwide notes that the life of Kenyans has improved substantially and they can expect to live longer.

Universities that took part in the research include South Pacific (Fiji), James Cook (Australia), Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (England), Mahidol (Thailand), Singapore’s National University, Nanyang Technological University and Organisation for Tropical Studies (Costa Rican).


Others are Hub University (Denmark), University of Hawaii (USA), University of Papua New Guinea and Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia (Brazil).

The report seeks to define the challenges facing people living in the torrid zone and the efforts to improve their lives and environment.

According to the report, infant mortality in the tropics has fallen from 161 deaths per 1000 live births to 58 between 1950 and today, but in the rest of the world it is 33.

The exception is Central and Southern Africa, where although infant mortality rates have fallen significantly, high mortality rates in the non-infant population, largely related to HIV and Aids, have constrained overall improvements in life expectancy.”

And of the ten nations with the lowest life expectancy between 2005-10, seven are in the tropical region of Central and Southern Africa.

But it reveals that life expectancy in the tropics has increased by 22.8 years to 64.4 years between 1950 and 2010 and the gap between the life expectancy of women and men has widened in favour of women over the same period.
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Old November 25th, 2012, 08:26 PM   #25
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Old December 2nd, 2012, 09:46 AM   #26
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2nd December 12
NSSF to establish five state of the art clinics
Mwinyi Sadallah
The National Social Security Fund (NSSF) is planning to establish five state of the art clinics to treat major ailments in the country.

The pension fund’s director general Dr Ramadhan Dau made this announcement yesterday in Zanzibar when speaking to the Editors Forum.
He said the clinics would help treat a number of chronic diseases, a move that would help save foreign exchange spent in sending people abroad for treatment.
The clinics would be equipped with the best of modern medical equipment, including information and communication technology systems, he said, noting that
the project is likely to be completed in February next year with the first major clinic being built in Dar es Salaam.
Patients who have been going outside the country for treatment would now be treated in the country, he said, unveiling information that NSSF has signed an agreement with Apollo Hospital of India whereby its specialists would be made available to treat patients in the country via a video-camera system.
Under such arrangements diagnosis is made in India and the results brought back through the ICT system to enable treatment to take place, he said.
“The clinic that is expected to be established in Dar es Salaam would be operational as early as next February,” he affirmed, elaborating that the major objective of implementing the project is to assist the government in reducing costs incurred in transferring patients abroad.
The agreement with Apollo Hospital involves the latter furnishing the NSSF clinics with modern medical equipment. Zanzibar stands to benefit from the health facilities as one of the clinics is to be built in the Isles, he said.
Other centres where the facilities are expected to be set up are Mwanza, Arusha and Mbeya, with the total cost being put at about TSh 4.8 billion.
Having built the clinics, the next stage will be the construction of an Apollo Hospital, whose architectural designs are now being worked upon, Dr Dau indicated.
Yacoub Kidula, the NSSF director for planning and investment, said the projects would add value to the lives of Tanzanians as the health facilities would benefit the general public, including non-NSSF members.
NSSF signed the agreement with Apollo Hospital last year in the presence of President Jakaya Kikwete and Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, he explained.
The major clinic would be allocated at the Bibi Titi and Morogoro roads junction, whose construction is underway, a major project for the pension fund whose members now reach about 600,000 countrywide, he added.
GUARDIAN ON SUNDAY
http://www.ippmedia.com/frontend/fun...le.php?l=48572
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Old December 3rd, 2012, 02:13 PM   #27
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3rd December 12
Tanzania to produce biolarvicide in 2015
Sylivester Domasa
Tanzania will beef up its capacity to combat malaria in 2015 after the start of production of a biolarvicide in Kibaha District, Coast Region, which will be used to spray mosquito breeding areas.

This was revealed by Cuban Ambassador to Tanzania Jorge Luis Tormo in an interview with The Guardian over the weekend.

The ambassador said Tanzania was among other countries in Africa characterised by high incidence of malaria due to a combination of climatological and socio-economic factors.

He said upon completion of the plant Tanzania will have a big capacity to produce the compound and biofertilizers in the continent.
“Tanzania has been supporting Cuba for decades now; so, we also thought of offering support in different areas, including technical support, especially in the fields of medicine,” he said.

Prof Eng Ricardo de Campos, Labiofam SA Director for sub-Saharan Africa, said biolervicide can be sprayed in polluted rivers, choked drains, stagnant pools and other mosquito breeding areas.

The director said following preliminary research the company has carried out for over 20 years in Africa, the use of biolarvicide was the best approach because mosquitoes are found mostly in surroundings.

He said the plant will have the capacity to produce at least six million litres of biolarvicide a year.

He explained that the compound does not harm human beings, wildlife, fish, beneficial predatory insects or the environment.
It can also be used in areas where chemical larvicides could not be used due to resistance or were hazardous to non-target species such as fish or where there was risk of contamination.

He said the technology was introduced by Cuba and had recorded successful stories wherever it was adopted.

Once the plant goes into operation, the country would export the compound to other countries which are also in dire need of the eco-friendly anti-malaria product.

It is estimated that over 2 million children and expectant mothers in Africa die of Malaria a year.

Meanwhile, Campos said the project was to have been completed at the end of this year but it was pushed forward to the second semester of 2013 following a fraudulent appropriation of money deposited as payment for earlier chosen contractor.

A Cuban lawyer specialising in international commercial law, who is a legal advisor to Labiofam Enterprises, confirmed the incident, adding that the matter was now with the Prevention and Combating of Corruption Bureau (PCCB) for investigation.

In November 2010, Tanzania and Cuba signed a memorandum of understanding for the implementation of the plant, with National Development Corporation pledging to chip in USD 23 million for its construction.

Malaria has been affecting about 16 million people in the country annually but the government of Tanzania has been taking initiatives to fight the disease, including distribution of treated mosquito nets and indoor residual spray.

The preliminary results of the 2011-2012 Tanzania HIV/Aids and Malaria Indicator Survey released recently showed that malaria prevalence in children in Tanzania aged below five years has fallen by 44 per cent since 2007.

Health and Social Welfare minister Dr Hussein Mwinyi said the drop was a big achievement in the country’s efforts to combat malaria.

He said in 2007 the percentage of children under the age of five with malaria was 18 per cent, but in the 2011-12 THMIS, as measured by a rapid diagnostic test, the prevalence had declined to 10 per cent.

THE GUARDIAN
http://www.ippmedia.com/frontend/fun...le.php?l=48608
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Old December 6th, 2012, 12:08 AM   #28
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Two vaccines to be introduced in Dar
Thursday, 06 December 2012 00:37

By Mbarwa Kivuyo
The Citizen Correspondent

Dar es Salaam. Tanzania will this week witness the introduction of two vaccines under the auspices of Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (Gavi).
The two vaccines, pneumococcal and rotavirus, will protect children against pneumonia and diarrhoea, respectively. The two diseases claim lives of millions of children worldwide.

Gavi policy and performance managing director Nina Schwalbe said Tanzania was unique in the sense that for the first time the country was introducing two vaccines at once. She said this in Bagamoyo yesterday, when Gavi board members visited Ifakara Health Institute (IHI) clinical trial facility. According to Ms Schwalbe, the launch of the pneumonia and diarrhoea vaccines will take place during the Gavi partners’ forum scheduled for Dar es Salaam from yesterday to tomorrow.

She explained that the partners’ forum would be attended by about 700 delegates from all over the world representing all key players in vaccines and immunisation programmes.
Ms Schwalbe added that the delegates came from developing and donor countries, the World Health Organisation, Unicef, the World Bank, the vaccine industry in both industrialised and developing countries, research and technical agencies, civil society organisations, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and other private philanthropists.

Gavi is a public-private partnership focused on saving children's lives and protecting people's health by increasing access to immunisation in developing countries. Gavi board members, who visited the IHI’s clinical trial facility in Bagamoyo, said Tanzania was in the forefront to look for lasting solutions to African public health problems.

Bagamoyo District medical officer Dr Mastidia Rutaihwa told Gavi delegates that the district had advanced in the implementation of immunisation programmes. Dr Rutaihwa noted that the introduction of both the pneumococcal and rotavirus vaccines would bring Tanzania to a higher level in terms of “averting deaths due to preventable childhood diseases.”

Ms Schwalbe said she appreciated the cutting-edge research going on in Tanzania and promised that Gavi would continue working with institutions like IHI in the search for tools to protect children’s lives.

IHI is known for its clinical trials involving the testing of safety and efficacy of a malaria candidate vaccine called RTSS and TB drugs.
The TB phase II clinical trials of the new TB drug candidates PA-824 and moxifloxacin in combination with pyrazinamide started in Bagamoyo early this year.
The TB trial is also taking place at the National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR) in Mbeya. Dr Klaus Reither from IHI told the delegates that the TB vaccine trials made the country an important partner in international TB clinical trial networks.

http://www.thecitizen.co.tz/news/4-n...roduced-in-dar

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Old December 8th, 2012, 10:47 PM   #29
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Trial results create prospect of a malaria-free Africa
IN SUMMARY

Some commentators have moaned about the disappointing results of the latest round that showed less efficacy among children aged 3-4 months compared with previous trial among ages 5-17.
Other commentators see the slightest efficacy among any age group as a big win for Africa.
There have been mixed reactions regarding the results of the malaria vaccine trial released in November that showed efficacy levels lower than previous trial results.

While some commentators have moaned about the disappointing results of the latest round that showed less efficacy among children aged 3-4 months compared with previous trial among ages 5-17, other commentators see the slightest efficacy among any age group as a big win for Africa.

This is because malaria is claiming nearly a million people per year in sub-Saharan Africa alone and, unfortunately, the majority of those dying are children aged under five years.

“The trials we have conducted indicate that the vaccine as it is can help to protect young babies against malaria. More importantly, we observed that it provided this protection in addition to the widespread use of bed nets by the trial participants,” said Salim Abdulla, a principal investigator for the vaccine trial from the Ifakara Health Institute of Tanzania.

Assuming the vaccines achieve near 100 per cent efficacy levels in curbing malaria, what will be the impact? The Institute of Security Studies (ISS), a pan-African think tank on human security issues, attempts to answer this question by building a scenario of a malaria-free sub-Saharan Africa by 2025.

According to a new policy briefing released by the ISS and written by Jonathan Moyer and Graham Emde, a malaria-free sub-Saharan Africa will eliminate 12 million deaths resulting from malaria, with the greatest absolute reduction in Nigeria and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

It will add more than 50 million years of healthy life, increase overall economic output by nearly $430 billion largely due to increases in production, increase per capita income for Africans by more than $30 per person in 2050 and prevent nearly 2.5 million people from living on less than $1.2 per day in 2050.

“Malaria eradication would contribute nearly $430 billion to Africa’s economy by 2050, but it would also be an expensive investment,” notes the report by the ISS, Malaria No More: Expectations for Eradication.

It is expected that developing a vaccine will cost $1 billion. In addition, the World Health Organisation currently estimates that it will cost $5.1 billion each year from now until 2020 just to reach malaria control targets.

“Economic costs and benefits aside, policymakers must consider the implications for African people. Eliminating the disease would prevent 12 million deaths and 50 million years of life lived with a disability by 2050. These humanitarian impacts should be reason enough to make malaria eradication a top priority,” says the ISS report.

It notes that while eradicating malaria will not solve all of Africa’s social and economic problems; it will, however, be a step in the right direction and could contribute to broader and more comprehensive efforts to truly transform the future of the continent.

Meaningful gains

According to the policy brief, while by 2050, the population of Africa would be only about 0.03 per cent larger in a scenario in which malaria was fully eradicated by 2025, this difference in population would have small impacts on the overall size of the labour force, education spending, and health spending.

However, the full elimination of malaria would lead to increases in overall economic output. Currently, efforts directed towards eradication of the disease are multi-pronged, giving hopes for success as long as the efforts are sustained.

In most countries, education on the use of treated mosquito nets is being encouraged, with governments across Africa scrapping the import duty on the nets and others encouraging local manufacturing of the nets.

There are also efforts to seek different medicines for the disease , with the medicines with the highest comparable efficacy levels being recommended by the WHO and national health departments for use in public and private health centres. And research is going beyond the medical field.

Users of smartphones, for example, can download a free application that emits ultrasonic waves that repeal mosquitoes. Recently, consumer electronics manufacturer LG Electronics unveiled an air conditioner that also emits similar waves to repel mosquitoes.

Xinhua
http://www.theeastafrican.co.ke/news...n/-/index.html
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Old December 12th, 2012, 01:34 AM   #30
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2 more child vaccines come aboard in Dar es Salaam
By In2EastAfrica Reporter


In less than a week after it announced the introduction of two new vaccines, Tanzania has announced that it is in the final steps to introduce the Hepatitis B (HPV) and second dose of measles vaccines in 2014.


Dr Hussein Mwinyi

Last Thursday, the government announced the introduction of Pneumococcal Vaccine or Pneumonia Vaccine and Rotavirus Vaccines which are aimed at protecting children under five years of age against pneumonia and diarrhea. Vaccination starts early next month.

Speaking at the International Conference for Immunization held in the city, the Minister for Health and Social Welfare, Dr Hussein Mwinyi, said all the achieved milestones are meant to ensure all children country-wide receive vaccinations under the campaign christened as “Reaching Every Child Approach.”

We need to ensure these children are reached by immunization services through the Reaching Every Child Approach. Our mission is to build on past achievements and use our knowledge and experience to save more lives,” he said. He said the last Effective Vaccine Management Assessment conducted in mid-2012 indicated that Tanzania has greatly improved in the vaccine management at all levels.

Dr Mwinyi noted that Tanzania has expanded the vaccine storage capacity at National Vaccine Level five times compared to 2008 whereas in each region it has managed to install Movable Cold Rooms. The minister said the Cold Rooms have the capacity ranging between 30 and 40 cubic metres to ensure all traditional and new vaccines are accommodated.

He added that the country’s priority was now on installing the District Vaccine Stores. However, he said there were some challenges accompanying the recorded achievements including shortage of skilled staff, inadequate allocation of funds to support immunization services, lack of reliable transport for vaccine distribution and lack of adequate funds for supervision at region and district levels.

The minister thanked the World Health Organization (WHO) for choosing Tanzania to host the 4th Annual Regional Conference on Immunization with the theme “Innovation, access and the rights of all to vaccines.”

“This is an important forum in the African region bringing together partners and experts in the area of immunization to review the progress and make recommendation of the following year,” he said.

The minister said the immunized children, who are protected from the threat of vaccine-preventable diseases, have the opportunity to thrive and a better chance of realizing their full potential.

He said Reaching Every District reaching Every Child approach has made Tanzania routine immunization vaccination coverage to be above 80 per cent in most of the districts in the country in five consecutive years and above 90 per cent at national level in three consecutive years.

Speaking at the event, Dr Luis Chambo of the WHO, said the introduction of the vaccinations was great achievements and the perfect illustrations of the progress the country has made in improving its immunization programme.

“The leadership and commitment of President Jakaya Kikwete has allowed Tanzania to remain on track in achieving some of the health-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by attaining the highest immunization coverage in the last two years,” he said.

The conference is attended by more than 200 participants from various African countries and Development Partners supporting various health programmes in the continent.

By PIUS RUGONZIBWA, Tanzania Daily News

Do you have a story or an article to publish? Please email us to [email protected].
http://in2eastafrica.net/2-more-chil...dar-es-salaam/
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Old December 14th, 2012, 12:21 AM   #31
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The Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital (MTRH) has commissioned an oxygen and gas piping project, which is valued at approximately Sh83 million.

The hospital director, John Kibosia, said the project will ensure the institution has uninterrupted supply of oxygen and other medical gases. “This will also save the institution a lot of money that would have otherwise gone into purchasing the same,” he said.

The contractor for the piping of oxygen and other medical gases, Onsite Gas Systems International, completed the project last month.

Dr Kibosia said the hospital is committed to providing excellent healthcare, training and research services. NHIF supported the Oxygen and Gas Piping Project in collaboration with Indiana University.

He also disclosed that the hospital has earmarked Sh1 billion for setting up a cancer and chronic disease centre and Sh90 million for the construction of modern mental health ward. Between Sh400 million and Sh600 million will be used for equipping the centre while the rest will be used in the facility.

Speaking during the groundbreaking ceremony for the construction of the centre, Dr Kibosia said the centre will help the increasing number of patients in the region who are suffering from cancer and other chronic diseases.

“The complex, once operational, it will help alleviate the suffering of the patients in this region who have been affected by increase of non-communicable diseases such as cancer,” said Dr Kibosia.

He also disclosed that the hospital in partnership with Dutch agency, have plans to expand the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) from the current six-bed to a 20-bed facility.

“Plans are also underway to upgrade the Cardiac ICU to six beds,” said Dr Kibosia adding that the hospital will also be re-designing the accident and emergency unit.

He disclosed that the ground breaking for the 60-bed Shoe 4 Africa Children hospital will be done at the end of the year.

He said cancer is a global health problem and accounts for one in eight deaths worldwide, outpacing Aids, tuberculosis, and malaria combined.

Dr Kibosia said in the next 10 to 15 years, according to World Health Organisation (WHO), the incidence of new cancers will rise to 15 million cases annually, 75 per cent in developing countries.

He lamented the country has only four radiation oncologists, six medical oncologists, four paediatric oncologists and no trained surgical oncologists with MTRH having two doctors who are currently undergoing training in Medical Oncology, one in Alexandria University, Egypt and the other in Stellensbosch University, South Africa.


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Old December 15th, 2012, 06:21 PM   #32
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Geza Ulole will talk and talk but hopefully the fact that we know him will make him responsible. Geza with the cream coat with his wife. You are too old man! Get a life!

You are the oldest troll on this site!
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Old December 16th, 2012, 02:17 PM   #33
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I can't believe he is THAT old. What are you doing with your life?
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Old December 16th, 2012, 03:21 PM   #34
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Old December 18th, 2012, 05:28 AM   #35
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Penda Health, a Nairobi-based women’s healthcare provider, has attracted renewed interest from investors after winning an international competition for small and medium-sized enterprises from emerging economies.

Competition for the BiD Network Entrepreneur of the Year 2012 was open to SMEs from emerging markets with viable business models that require funding of between $10,000 (Sh850,000) and $5,000,000 (Sh425 million) over the next five years.

The award ceremony was held in the Hague, Netherlands.

Penda Health co-founder Nicholas Sowden said in an interview that the healthcare firm had established contact with at least six investors following the win.

He said negotiations with the potential financiers are still at an early stage, but estimated that Penda Health will require about Sh85 million ($1 million) for expansion in the next two years.

“From 2014 we plan to be opening a clinic a month,” Mr Sowden told the Business Daily. Penda Health’s business model is based on serving a large number of low-income patients who are shunned by bigger hospitals that target higher profit margins.

The firm specializes in women health services such as breast and cervical cancer screening and family planning, in addition to general consultation, diagnostic tests and medicines.

Penda Health, which so far has one branch based in Kitengela, received $100,000 (Sh8.5 million) from six US and local investors in August to expand its business.

The money was raised from Eleos Foundation, an American group, and G7, a local investment company.

The health clinic said in August it charges outpatient consultation fee of Sh150 per patient, which increases to an average revenue per visit of Sh610 for patients who require medicine or several tests.

The Penda Health clinic has capacity to serve at least 80 patients a day and generate $50,000 (Sh4.2 million) in annual revenues, returning a 25 per cent profit margin.

A clinic needs initial working capital of $30,000 (Sh2.5 million) and it takes seven months to break even.

Penda Health won the top prize out of eight finalists shortlisted from hundreds of proposals presented at the Growing SMEs conference held on November 15.

Divine Masters, a food processing plant based in Uganda and AxIs, a Rwandese IT company, were among the eight finalists.

BiD International, the competition’s organisers, focuses on SMEs in emerging economies, acting as a bridge to link entrepreneurs and potential financiers.
http://www.businessdailyafrica.com/W...z/-/index.html
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Old December 19th, 2012, 12:13 AM   #36
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NSSF to establish modern clinic in Arusha
Specialists to be drawn from Apollo hospital in India

Arusha residents will soon benefit from the National Social Security Fund (NSSF) planned modern clinic to treat major ailments.

The pension fund’s director general Dr Ramadhan Dau said five modern and well-equipped clinics would be established in five different regions.

He made the announcement last week in Zanzibar when speaking to the Editors Forum.

He was quoted by the Guardian as saying the clinics would help treat a number of chronic diseases, a move that would help save foreign exchange spent in sending people abroad for treatment.

The clinics would be equipped with the best of modern medical equipment, including information and communication technology systems.

The project is likely to be completed in February next year with the first major clinic being built in Dar es Salaam.
In recent months Aga Khan hospital also established a well equipped clinic in Arusha’s Central Business District
Patients who have been going outside the country for treatment would now be treated in the country, Dr Dau said, unveiling information that NSSF has signed an agreement with Apollo Hospital of India whereby its specialists would be made available to treat patients in the country via a video-camera system.

Under such arrangements diagnosis is made in India and the results brought back through the ICT system to enable treatment to take place, he said.

The agreement with Apollo Hospital involves the latter furnishing the NSSF clinics with modern medical equipment. Other centres where the facilities are expected to be set up are Mwanza, Zanibar and Mbeya. The project is expected to cost about TSh 4.8 billion.

NSSF signed an agreement with Apollo Hospital last year in the presence of President Jakaya Kikwete and Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh to build Apollo hospital in Tanzania.
http://arushatimes.co.tz/Local%20News_1.html
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Old December 20th, 2012, 11:49 AM   #37
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Government to spend 15bn/- on new hospital in Tanga
By In2EastAfrica Reporter


The Tanzania government is to spend about 15bn/- for construction of Tanga city hospital in order to reduce burden from the regional referral hospital of Bombo.


Bombo Regional Referral Hospital in Tanga

The Tanga City Medical Officer, Dr Peter Neema, told the ‘Daily News’ in his office that construction work which has already started, was being done by Ibra Contractors from Dar es Salaam.

He further said so far they have started with the consultation block which has to be accomplished by the end of this year or early next year. Dr Neema noted that the city council has allocated about 24 hectares of land for the project, enough to accommodate a large project like a hospital.

According to him, the hospital will have 24 storey buildings to cater for the present and future medical needs of the residents of Tanga city.

“This will be one of the modern and biggest city hospitals in the country – and it might be bigger than even Bombo referral hospital in terms of area and buildings,” he explained. He estimated that the hospital will have about 400 beds and that Tanga was a fast growing city, therefore even the hospital was planned to cater for the needs of a growing population now and 50 years to come.

The city medical officer called upon Tanga residents to come up and contribute for the rapid development of the hospital, instead of leaving everything to the government. Dr Neema said the government will implement the project in phases, depending on the availability of funds, but if residents contribute, then the process will be faster.

By NESTORY NGWEGA, Tanzania Daily News
http://in2eastafrica.net/government-...ital-in-tanga/
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Old December 20th, 2012, 01:16 PM   #38
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KNCU starts mother, child health programme
By In2EastAfrica Reporter


The Kilimanjaro Native Cooperative Union (KNCU) has started a Mother Child Health programme in collaboration with ZENSHO of Japan and Family Planning Association (UMATI), Union Board Chairman Mr Maynard Swai has said.


Mr. Meynad Swai

Mr Swai said the programme has been introduced in nine primary cooperative societies under KNCU with the aim of providing quality services to mothers and their children, safe delivery, family planning and education on HIV/AIDS.

The chairman stated that to-date there were 24 health service providers who have been posted to six primary cooperative societies, saying the target was to establish the programme in all 92 societies under the union.

Established in 1959, UMATI is an autonomous, not for profit organization providing sexual and reproductive health education, information and services in Tanzania.

Meanwhile, Mr Swai said that the union has started implementing a Health Insurance Policy, whose idea was hatched in 2007, since April 2011 after KNCU was sponsored by a Holland-based NGO, “Pharma Access.”

Mr Swai said the policy was initially introduced in five primary cooperative societies with the ultimate goal of introducing the policy to all 92 societies under KNCU. According to him, at the moment there are 8,000 members who have access to quality health services covered under the policy.

By PETER TEMBA, Tanzania Daily News

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Old May 13th, 2013, 06:03 AM   #39
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Scientists in Kenya have launched research of a vaccine to be used against African swine fever. The study is still at an early stage where scientists at the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) are identifying antigens and best-bet delivery systems to be used.

“Research in this area, with the ultimate goal of generating resistant and productive domestic pigs, is just beginning,” said ILRI molecular biologist Dr Richard Bishop.

He said that ILRI has just been awarded major funding from BMZ for vaccine development in collaboration with FLI (Riems) Germany to help save the global pig industry that is worth $150 billion.

Africa-wide economic impacts of swine fever are hard to quantify due to a dearth of disease recording, especially as this infection rapidly turns lethal in pig herds and active surveillance for the infection is rare. The prevalence of the disease has thwarted investment in the smallholder pig sector.

The disease is still emerging in Africa and in the last 20 years, it has spread to parts of West Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius and most recently (in 2011) to Chad from Cameroon.

In Uganda, pig numbers have increased to four million today and continue to rise from 100,000 in the 1970s and pork consumption is now close to that of beef.

There were 20 recorded outbreaks of African swine fever in Uganda in 2010 alone.

“This is an underestimate due to a difficulty in diagnosing the disease and under-reporting of livestock diseases,” Bishop said.

Although the absolute total number of pigs kept in Africa remains relatively small (less than 50 million), pig keeping is very profitable for many of Africa’s rural poor, providing a flexible means of generating an income in the right environments.

Bishop noted that experimental live attenuated vaccines already exist, providing proof of concept for the feasibility of developing a recombinant vaccine against this disease.


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Old May 17th, 2013, 12:17 AM   #40
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Niger offers cash reward to help eradicate Guinea worm


May 14 (Reuters) - Niger is offering cash rewards to anyone reporting a case of Guinea worm as part of efforts to permanently eradicate the parasitic disease in the impoverished West African nation, the health ministry said.

Though it once afflicted around 3.5 million people annually across Asia and Africa, according to the U.S.-based Carter Center, Guinea worm disease is now on the verge of being eradicated worldwide.

Niger had been due to join the list of countries free from the disease last year before an influx of some 60,000 refugees fleeing fighting in neighbouring Mali where the parasite is present.

Anyone reporting a case of Guinea worm, confirmed as such by health authorities, would be offered a reward of 20,000 CFA francs ($39.58).

"A reward of 40,000 CFA francs ($79.17) will be offered to anyone sick with Guinea worm who declares themselves to health workers within 24 hours of the worm's emergence," the health ministry said in a statement late on Monday.

Landlocked and largely desert, uranium-producing Niger is the world's least developed country according to the United Nation's Human Development Index's ranking of 185 nations.

Guinea worm disease, or dracunculiasis, is transmitted through contaminated water and causes painful skin lesions incapacitating victims and making them unable to work or attend school.

South Sudan accounted for 521, or around 96 percent, of the world's remaining cases of the disease last year, though a small number of cases were also reported in Ethiopia, Chad and Mali. ($1 = 505.2620 CFA francs) ($1 = 505.2620 CFA francs) (Reporting by Abdoulaye Massalatchi; Writing by Joe Bavier)
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