African Health Care News - Page 3 - SkyscraperCity
 

forums map | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Continental Forums > Africa > General Forums > Business, Economy and Infrastructure

Business, Economy and Infrastructure Our architecture, infrastructure, transport, economy and other related discussions


Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old July 23rd, 2014, 06:30 AM   #41
NicSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 8,747
Likes (Received): 8382

SA child Aids deaths plummet

A highly respected study has found deaths of young children from Aids have decreased more than tenfold in the past decade in South Africa.

Published in The Lancet on Tuesday, the study was conducted by an international consortium of researchers led by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington.

“More people die from HIV/Aids in South Africa than anywhere else in the world but substantial progress has been made in saving young children from the disease, according to a new, first-of-its-kind analysis of trend data,” said Andre Pascal Kengne of the South African Medical Research Council.

The data demonstrated “the need to be diligent in prevention and treatment efforts to decrease incidence and mortality rates for all age groups”.

Washington University explained: “Researchers found the scale-up of interventions for HIV/Aids – including antiretroviral therapy, programmes to prevent mother-to-child transmission and the promotion of condom use – have helped drive reductions in years of life lost to the disease, particularly in more recent years.

“HIV/Aids is increasingly a condition people live with rather than die from, and the world has added nearly 20 million life years as a result of these programmes.

The university reported that in South Africa, it was likely that expanded access to child-focused interventions had contributed to preventing new HIV infections and deaths among children under five years old.

There were over 56 000 new HIV/Aids infections recorded for this age group in 2003 but 10 years later, that number had fallen to 7 611.

Dr Christopher Murray, IHME director and one of the authors of the study, said: “The global investment in HIV treatment is saving lives at a rapid clip. But the quality of antiretroviral programmes varies widely. In order to reduce HIV-related deaths even further, we need to learn from the best programmes and do away with the worst ones.”

The study also found that TB and malaria were killing fewer South Africans than in 2000, when the Millennium Development Goals were established to stop the spread of these diseases by next year.

“Of these three diseases, South Africa has shown the greatest gains against malaria, recording a 13 percent decline in malaria mortality rates from 2000 to 2013. By contrast, the global rate of decline was 3 percent during this time.

“The country aims to eliminate malaria by 2018,” the study reported.

http://www.iol.co.za/news/south-afri...8#.U88q_vmSzZE
NicSA está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old September 4th, 2014, 03:09 AM   #42
NicSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 8,747
Likes (Received): 8382

New state-of-the-art hospitals to be built in SA

About 43 new state-of-the-art hospitals are expected to be built across South Africa within the next five years.

Over and above, 216 new clinics will also be built by the national Department of Health, and 816 old hospitals across the country will be renovated, said Health Minister Dr Aaron Motsoaledi.

Minister Motsoaledi was speaking to media after the official opening of the R1-billion Dr Harry Surtie Hospital in Upington, on Tuesday.

The Hospital was officially opened by President Jacob Zuma, as part of government's infrastructure roll-out programme.

Minister Motsoaledi said these developments will be done to accomplish the National Health Insurance (NHI) mission, which will ensure that everyone has access to appropriate, efficient and quality health services.

He said his department deliberately built state-of-the-art hospitals in small towns and rural areas to provide quality services to the public.

“… quite often when you ask doctors why they don’t go to the rural areas, they will tell you that there is no equipment. Some will tell you that they want to advance their careers and it won’t be possible in rural area,” said Motsoaledi.

He said the equipment found in the recently built hospitals was of a world class standard, and it was advanced in technology.

He added that SA has talented medical practitioners, health professionals and clinical technologists.

“One of the state-of-the-art equipment in Dr Harry Surtie Hospital is the Lodox Machine (X-ray scanner), a South African product… which was invented in SA,” said the Minister.

Motsoaledi added that by building these hospitals in rural communities, more doctors will be attracted to serve the public regardless of their residential areas.

“It will also be important to get some medical students to come and help people in rural areas,” said Mostoaledi.

A community member, who attended the opening ceremony, Mponeng Mabe, 62, of Pabalelo location, said she was delighted to have the hospital built closer to her community.

Before the new hospital opened, Mabe used to take two taxis to get health services from the old Gordonia hospital.

“Whenever I got transferred there [Gordonia] by the clinic, I got so frustrated by the thought of sitting for almost an hour in a taxi not feeling well, plus I would have to queue again when I get to the hospital. This is great for us, I am really happy,” said Mabe, who lives almost eight kilometres away from the new 327-bed hospital.

Another resident who visited a neighbour admitted at the hospital, Sonia Lephepha, also from Pabalelo, said it has been her long term wish to have a hospital closer to her because she was aging.

“My husband and I are aging, and travelling to the hospital is already a problem. So I am happy because I just take one taxi from my house to this new hospital,” said the 63-year-old Lephepha.

Lephepha, who has been living at Pabalelo for more than 30 years, said she was aware that the new hospital, located in Progress, will also create jobs for youth in Upington and neighbouring areas.

“Maybe my children or grandchildren will work at the hospital,” she said.

Zuma said building decent health facilities is designed to move South Africa a step forward.

“Together we will move our country forward to security and comfort for all.

“I committed our Government during the State of the Nation Address this year that the target for this administration is to ensure that at least 4.6-million people are enrolled in the anti-retroviral programme,” said the President.

Zuma was pleased to realise that the construction of Dr Harry Surtie hospital did not only offer health services, but created more than 200 direct and indirect jobs to residents of Upington and surrounding Areas.

Public Works MEC David Rooi said women contractors also participated in building the hospital.

“We want to make sure that we develop women contractors,” MEC Rooi said.

The new hospital serves the western half of the Northern Cape Province, as Upington alone has a population of about 70 000 people.

Nursing College expands

“Many people in and around the area of Upington continue to benefit, and economic growth and development shows positive trends. However, we must intensify our efforts at improving on training on clinical staff,” Zuma said.

He said the transfer of hospital services from the old Gordonia Hospital to the new Dr Harry Surtie Hospital has provided an opportune moment for training through expanding Nursing College facilities.

“In addition to the Henrietta Stockdale Nursing College in Kimberley, I am pleased to announce that there will be satellite colleges in Upington, De Aar and Kuruman,” said Zuma.

He further announced that the new Upington Nursing College will be located at the old Gordonia Hospital site.

“There will be improved access to training for our nurses and ensuring that training takes place within the province,” President Zuma said.

He said part of the college will provide training for Emergency Care services.

He said through Service Transformation Plan (STP), government is committed to the reconfiguration of services, to ensure a larger proportion of the population have appropriate access to district, regional and tertiary hospital services.

The expansion of regional services in the new Dr Harry Surtie Hospital will reduce referrals to Kimberley and improve local access to more specialist services.

Zuma said Dr Harry Surtie, a dentist whom the new hospital is named after, always put the interests of people first.

“He gave assistance to people who could not afford treatment. We dare not fail him,” he said.

Northern Cape Premier Sylvia Lucas said it was important to acknowledge the role played by people who struggled due to apartheid, but fought for freedom of the country.

“I don’t think we can express our appreciation enough for having this kind of facility erected in our town,” said Lucas, speaking in a tent full of more than 2 500 residents from Upington and surrounding areas.

http://www.engineeringnews.co.za/art...-sa-2014-09-03
__________________

Lydon, Yoniii, BenjaminEli liked this post
NicSA está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old February 28th, 2015, 05:33 PM   #43
Combobulate
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 1,153
Likes (Received): 1764

Combobulate no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old February 28th, 2015, 10:40 PM   #44
Yoniii
Registered User
 
Yoniii's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 10,395
Likes (Received): 3622

Ethiopia should definitely be red. I'd rather treat myself than go to a gov. hospital. The doctors and nurses are hero's, struggling with the little they have. Hospitals are heavily underfunded.
Yoniii no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 2nd, 2015, 06:44 PM   #45
popa1980
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 16,318
Likes (Received): 4304

I was surprised by the doctors salaries in SA- very good considering its a developing country and the low cost of living. I saw something like £35000 p.a for a senior doctor. In the UK you will earn 3-4 times that amount but obviously cost of living is far more. So its quite proportionate.
popa1980 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 5th, 2015, 10:24 PM   #46
Kenguy
Registered User
 
Kenguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Eldoret, Kenya.
Posts: 10,660
Likes (Received): 3271

I think the definition for Kenya on that map is spot on.
__________________
The African Renaissance.
Kenguy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2015, 08:30 PM   #47
NicSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 8,747
Likes (Received): 8382

World's first successful p-e-n-i-s transplant carried out in South Africa

South African scientists have announced the world's first successful p-e-n-i-s transplant, helping a 21-year-old who suffered an amputation following a botched traditional circumcision three years ago.

Professor Andre van der Merwe, head of Stellenbosch University's Division of Urology, announced details of the "ground-breaking" operation at Tygerberg Hospital in Bellville, Cape Town.

The nine-hour operation, which involved the attachment of a p-e-n-i-s taken from a donor who had died, was carried out in December. The results were announced on Friday after doctors confirmed that the recipient of the donor organ has made a full recovery and is sexually active.

Mr van der Merwe said the recipient, whose identity has not been revealed, had to have his p-e-n-i-s amputated three years ago after developing complications from a traditional circumcision.

The practice is seen as a rite of passage for young South African boys entering manhood including Nelson Mandela. He described the traditional stay in the bush that accompanies the operation in his book Long Walk to Freedom.
However, experts believe that up to 250 initiates lose their penises to amputation each year, and many more suffer horrific disfigurements because of unskilled or unscrupulous practitioners, unsterilised instruments and infection.
Mr van der Merwe said the prevalence of such practices, and of severe complications, meant it was fitting that South African surgeons should be able to offer a way back.

"For a young man of 18 or 19 years the loss of his p-e-n-i-s can be deeply traumatic. He doesn't necessarily have the psychological capability to process this. There are even reports of suicide among these young men," he told News 24 during a briefing in Cape Town on Friday.

"There is a greater need in South Africa for this type of procedure than elsewhere in the world, as many young men lose their penises every year due to complications from traditional circumcision." Dr van der Merwe said one previous penile transplant attempt had failed.

Nine other patients are now scheduled for transplants, which could also help those with penile cancer and severe erectile dysfunction.
He said the first recipient had regained sexual function and was "very excited".

"Our goal was that he would be fully functional at two years and we are very surprised by his rapid recovery," he said.

Prof Frank Graewe, head of the Division of Plastic Reconstructive Surgery at Stellenbosch University, said the operation represented "a massive breakthrough".

"It's a massive breakthrough. We've proved that it can be done – we can give someone an organ that is just as good as the one that he had," he said. "It was a privilege to be part of this first successful p-e-n-i-s transplant in the world."


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worl...th-Africa.html
__________________

Nostra, BenjaminEli liked this post

Last edited by NicSA; March 13th, 2015 at 08:41 PM.
NicSA está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old April 16th, 2015, 12:54 PM   #48
NicSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 8,747
Likes (Received): 8382

South Africa and US collaborate on medical research

The South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC) and the American National Institutes of Health (NIH) are awarding 31 grants to American and South African scientists to support research targeting HIV/Aids, tuberculosis and HIV-related co- morbidities and cancers.

The NIH is a unit of the US's Department of Health and Human Services.
Totalling $8-million in first-year funding, the awards are the first to be issued through the South Africa–US Program for Collaborative Biomedical Research. The programme, which was established in 2013 with funding from NIH and SAMRC, is designed to foster and/or expand basic, translational, behavioural and applied research to advance scientific discovery among American and South African researchers working collaboratively in the areas of HIV/Aids and TB.

The new awards will support research conducted at eight South African institutions and link scientists at these institutions with American researchers at more than 20 US-based research organisations, including the NIH.
"South Africa is a major partner in the fight to end both HIV/Aids and tuberculosis," said Anthony S Fauci, the managing director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), which is part of the NIH.

Scientific collaboration
"These new awards tap the scientific expertise of both of our countries in an effort to further key research in these disease areas. We are particularly gratified to work with the South African Medical Research Council given its history of visionary leadership and outstanding commitment to fostering biomedical research excellence and innovation."

Among the newly funded research projects are those targeting HIV prevention, particularly among high-risk young women; identifying HIV-infected individuals and determining how best to link them to and retain them in medical care; developing strategies for optimising the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of HIV-associated cancers; and addressing scale-up of TB prevention and treatment strategies, particularly among TB-infected mothers and children.

Twelve of the awards will support two years of research; 19 awards will fund five- year collaborative projects. The list of initial 24 awards will be updated to include the seven remaining projects once they are awarded.
In addition to NIAID, other NIH institutes and centres participating in the South Africa–US Program for Collaborative Biomedical Research include the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute of Mental Health, the Fogarty International Center and the Office of AIDS Research.
It is anticipated that NIH and SAMRC will solicit additional applications for the programme in two years.

American partners
NIAID conducts and supports research — at NIH, throughout the US, and worldwide — to study the causes of infectious and immune-mediated diseases, and to develop better means of preventing, diagnosing and treating these illnesses.
NIH is the US's primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and investigates the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases.

Read more: http://www.southafrica.info/about/he...#ixzz3XSrks1rt
__________________

BenjaminEli liked this post
NicSA está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old April 16th, 2015, 06:03 PM   #49
Adm.Adama
Registered User
 
Adm.Adama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Sugoii & Baka
Posts: 12,396
Likes (Received): 9082



NPR News

Quote:
The idea for an African CDC first came to light at the 2013 African Union Special Summit on HIV and AIDS, Tuberculous and Malaria in Abuja, Nigeria. If Ebola wasn't the specific catalyst for forming the African CDC, the epidemic definitely sped up the timeline, U.S. health officials said Monday.

The African CDC will initially set up shop in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, which is home to the African Union. That should happen later this year.

Soon after, five regional centers will open at undetermined locations across the continent. Field epidemiologists will staff each location and "will be responsible for disease surveillance, investigations, analysis and reporting trends and anomalies," the CDC said Monday in a statement.


Heffernan photographs health care worker Martha Lyne Freeman.
GOATS AND SODA
An Artist's Brainstorm: Put Photos On Those Faceless Ebola Suits
In the event of a health emergency — such as Ebola — the office in Addis Ababa will act as a central command post, organizing and deploying teams of medical workers.

Some of that disease surveillance and emergency dispatching is already happening, says Dr. Thomas Kenyon, director of the U.S. CDC's Center for Global Health. The African CDC will "take advantage of existing structures to make it additive to what's already there," he tells NPR.

In other words, the African CDC won't create an epidemiological infrastructure from the ground up. It doesn't need to. What it will do is link together agencies and laboratories in various countries that aren't always great at talking to each other. "Countries that might be weak in one diagnostic area can benefit from a neighbor who might have a lot of capability in that area," Kenyon says.

To help make this happen, the U.S. CDC is donating both brainpower and troops on the ground. The Atlanta-based organization says it will provide "technical expertise" and help in the African CDC's long-term, strategic planning. It will also embed two public health leaders at the temporary headquarters in Addis Ababa and about 10 to 12 epidemiologists and support staff.

The CDC already trains hundreds of African epidemiologists each year, Kenyon says, and the establishment of an African CDC will help coordinate that force.

Of course, all of this comes at a cost. But how much funding it will take to get the African CDC off the ground isn't something either side is touting. Those figures are still being worked out, Kenyon says. But the 54 member states of the African Union will ultimately be responsible for funding the organization.

"I think we're all going to have to do our part," Kenyon says, "but the leadership and real commitment will have to come from African governments themselves."
__________________
"In a country well governed, poverty is something to be ashamed of. In a country badly governed, wealth is something to be ashamed of." - Confucius


Karibu Kenya

KENYA SSC

Yoniii, cityboy20, BenjaminEli liked this post
Adm.Adama no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 27th, 2015, 07:02 PM   #50
NicSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 8,747
Likes (Received): 8382

Tygerberg breakthrough to revolutionise burn treatment

Until recently the outlook for patients in South Africa with extensive burns was bleak. The best they could hope for were highly specialised transplant techniques, depending on the availability of resources. If they survived, patients faced long and excruciating hospital stays, with mixed results at the end of their treatment alongside a very substantial bill. In some cases the total cost of skin grafting can be up to R1 800 000.

A new technique developed by doctors at Tygerberg Hospital is now challenging this prognosis for serious burn victims, offering life-saving, viable and affordable treatment and making their previously bleak outlook much brighter.

Dr Wayne Kleintjies, head of the adult burn unit at Tygerberg Hospital developed the new technique, which makes use of the patient’s own skin, which is then externally cultivated in a laboratory from skin harvested via a skin biopsy. Other options, using skin from donors or other species are soon rejected and have proven to be of limited value. The new technique is remarkable in the sense that it offer patients treatment at the fraction of the cost that similar techniques would normally cost. "With our new technique, we treated the first patient with a total cost of R995," Dr Kleintjies said.



http://www.health24.com/Medical/Skin...tment-20150527
__________________

Diggerdog, hsark, BenjaminEli liked this post
NicSA está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old May 30th, 2015, 05:33 PM   #51
Combobulate
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 1,153
Likes (Received): 1764

Namibia with one of the continent's higher per capita GDPs stands out. Zambia is surprising.

Quote:
Prevalence of undernourishment: measures the probability that a randomly selected individual in the population is consuming an amount of dietary energy, which is insufficient to cover her/his requirements to lead an active and healthy life.


Quote:
World Food Summit (WFS) goal: to eradicate hunger in all countries, with an immediate view to reducing the number of undernourished people to half their present level no later than 2015.


Quote:
Millennium Development Goal 1, target 1C: halve, between 1990-92 and 2015, the proportion of people suffering from undernourishment, or reduce this proportion below 5 percent. This measures the proportion of the population below the minimum level of dietary energy consumption (undernourishment). The assessment is not conducted for developed regions.

Source:FAO
__________________

EdnilsonQ liked this post
Combobulate no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 14th, 2015, 04:05 PM   #52
NicSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 8,747
Likes (Received): 8382

SA leads Africa in WHO targets

SA is the only African state that has met the targets set by the World Health Organisation’s (WHO’s) international health regulations, which detail the plans and infrastructure countries need to have in place to respond to a public health emergency like Ebola.

The finding underscores the weakness of most of the continent’s health systems.

This emerged on Monday at a high-level meeting on global health security convened by the WHO in Cape Town, which aims to develop a framework for countries to meet their obligations under these regulations.

The regulations were agreed to by the WHO’s 190 member states 10 years ago to prevent, detect and respond to health emergencies of global concern — yet only two thirds of members have met their obligations, said WHO assistant director-general Keiji Fukuda. "In order for countries to do so, there needs to be a combination of political will, technical know-how and funding, and for many countries that has proved difficult," he said.

Dr Fukuda said global health threats, such as Ebola and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, had become more difficult to manage and the world needed to be better prepared for the next threat.

"There is no organisation, no single entity, no country that can do this by itself. The clock is ticking. The question is how do we accelerate our response (and) leap ahead in strengthening countries’ preparedness," he said.

http://www.bdlive.co.za/national/hea...-goal-in-sight
NicSA está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old September 4th, 2015, 06:51 PM   #53
NicSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 8,747
Likes (Received): 8382

Great work and challenges faced at Western Cape hospital


NicSA está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old September 9th, 2015, 02:44 PM   #54
Arsenalno1
BANNED
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Uige - Maquela Do Zombo
Posts: 1,150
Likes (Received): 2037

Very sad for Angola. Rather invest billions in military and not health care. Here are the consequences.

The oil-rich West African nation of Angola has a dubious distinction. Its child morality rate is the world's worst: 157 kids out of every 1,000 die before their 5th birthday. By comparison the child mortality rate in the U.S. is 7 deaths per 1,000. In Europe it's between 3 and 4.

The numbers are part of a report with a mix of promising and depressing news. Things are far better now than they used to be. Back in 1990, almost 13 million children under age 5 died. Aggressive efforts to improve pediatric health in some of the poorest parts of the world have been partly responsible for bringing that number down to an estimated 6 million this year.

But geography is a killer. "A child born in a low-income country is, on average, 11 times as likely to die before the age of 5 as a child in a high-income country," according to the report.

The most significant progress on child mortality globally over the last 25 years was recorded in Asia and Latin America but some African nations made great strides. Liberia, Malawi and Rwanda all saw their child mortality rates drop by roughly 75 percent over this period. But the top pediatric killers globally remain diseases that disproportionately hit African children — malaria, diarrhea and pneumonia.

The report also notes that most of these kids pass away in their first month of life.

The good news is that overall odds of survival are improving for children in every country except three (see below).

http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsand...-u-s-vs-angola
Arsenalno1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 15th, 2015, 06:11 PM   #55
Combobulate
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 1,153
Likes (Received): 1764

Combobulate no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 17th, 2015, 04:17 PM   #56
Arsenalno1
BANNED
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Uige - Maquela Do Zombo
Posts: 1,150
Likes (Received): 2037

Absolutely embarrassing for Angola. A country that has been at peace for 13 years now, still has a high child mortality rate. Its absolutely ridiculous. Now that theres a crisis going on in the country, I am sure, the child mortality rate will rise even more.
Arsenalno1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 22nd, 2015, 12:19 AM   #57
NicSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 8,747
Likes (Received): 8382

After a 70 year wait, is universal health care finally coming to South Africa?

What do you do when over half of health sector spending is available to less than a fifth of the population? When only 16% have private health insurance and the 84% who do not are forced to turn to a public sector overstretched and understaffed?

The problems are manifold, the solutions never easy, but South Africa is on the brink of overhauling its health care system -- and it's a plan 70 years in the making.

Universal health coverage in on the horizon, and would bring free at the point of delivery health care to a country blighted by the unequal provision of services.

Dismissed by certain parties as a pipe dream and looked upon with suspicion by others, the plan has been fraught with difficulties.

But with the imminent release of a government white paper outlining a new National Health Insurance (NHI) scheme, there is new hope for millions that they will now be able to access far greater primary health care.

Health care is a $29 billion dollar industry in South Africa, accounting for 8.5% of the country's GDP -- a figure expected to rise. But for many medical professionals and politicians within the country, the disparity between the services available is problematic.

"The distribution of money between the private and public sectors is very similar to the U.S.," says Professor Diane McIntyre, founding director of the Health Economics Unit at the University of Cape Town. "Utterly unaffordable" is the way she describes the private sectors of both countries.

In South Africa, private medical schemes offer first class facilities and quality of care, whilst public hospitals, though offering free child and antenatal care, are understaffed and underfunded. More than half of general practitioners engage in private work, says McIntyre. For specialists, the figure is closer to 70%.

Like the U.S., "it's very much two systems running in parallel," says Daygan Eagar, program manager at the Rural Health Advocacy Project. He warns that "we don't want to go where the U.S. is going."

Policies such as President Obama's Affordable Care Act "don't undo the 'for profit' elements that make health care so expensive and access so difficult for people."

Instead, South Africa is going down a different route -- one entirely of its own making.

Read more: http://edition.cnn.com/2015/09/21/af...l-health-care/
__________________

Arsenalno1 liked this post
NicSA está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old September 25th, 2015, 11:46 PM   #58
JustWatch
Moderador
 
JustWatch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Lyon | Luanda
Posts: 6,517
Likes (Received): 14374

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arsenalno1 View Post
Absolutely embarrassing for Angola. A country that has been at peace for 13 years now, still has a high child mortality rate. Its absolutely ridiculous. Now that theres a crisis going on in the country, I am sure, the child mortality rate will rise even more.
Those numbers are 2x higher than 2013 .

Angola is in peace but Angolans aren't.
__________________

Arsenalno1 liked this post
JustWatch está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old September 26th, 2015, 01:42 AM   #59
NicSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 8,747
Likes (Received): 8382

Nigeria reaches polio 'milestone'

Nigeria has been removed from the list of polio endemic countries in what is being regarded as a "milestone" on the quest to eradicate the disease.
The announcement by the World Health Organization (WHO), was made at a meeting of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) in New York.

It follows Nigeria going more than a year without a case of wild - naturally occurring - polio.

Three years without cases are required before it can be declared polio free.
The decision means there are just two endemic countries - Pakistan and Afghanistan - where transmission of the paralysing virus has never been interrupted.

Jean Gough, Unicef country representative in Nigeria, told me: "This is an important milestone, but it is too early to celebrate. We need to continue the efforts at every level if polio is to be eradicated."

Polio is spread by poor sanitation and contaminated water and usually affects children.

The virus attacks the nervous system and can cause irreversible paralysis - usually of the legs - within hours.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-34328447
__________________

JustWatch liked this post
NicSA está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old November 16th, 2015, 12:40 PM   #60
Combobulate
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 1,153
Likes (Received): 1764

__________________

JustWatch, Yoniii liked this post
Combobulate no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 05:02 PM. • styleid: 14


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us