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Old April 9th, 2019, 12:25 AM   #161
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A report on the French-language branch of the Chinese international channel CGTN regarding the deepening and expansion of the Port of Abidjan. Of course it's a bit propagandistic, but very interesting nonetheless. French and Chinese subtitles. The Malian guy interviewed in the middle of the video speaks an amazingly good Mandarin Chinese, I'm impressed.

The Chinese guy leading the project says that China's investment in Côte d'Ivoire's infrastructure won't end there, as they are also interested in expanding the port of San Pedro in the west of the country, and they are also interested in the coastal highway to be built between Abidjan and San Pedro (300 km).

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Old April 9th, 2019, 12:55 AM   #162
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why are you impressed by him speaking mandarin. would you be impressed with him speaking french. it's just a language
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Old April 9th, 2019, 12:58 AM   #163
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Mandarin Chinese is much harder to learn than French. It's a tonal language, with completely different vocabulary (whereas bambara already possesses many French words in its vocabulary).
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Old April 9th, 2019, 01:08 AM   #164
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Olivilo View Post
Mandarin Chinese is much harder to learn than French. It's a tonal language, with completely different vocabulary (whereas bambara already possesses many French words in its vocabulary).
no language is any harder to learn than any other. my language is tonal as hell but i also speak english just as fluently. im reading tht bambara is tonal as well
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Old April 28th, 2019, 06:01 PM   #165
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Something which we will start seeing much more in the foreseeable future. China will largely decide the direction of development in Africa.

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Old April 29th, 2019, 05:18 AM   #166
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ekema View Post
no language is any harder to learn than any other. my language is tonal as hell but i also speak english just as fluently. im reading tht bambara is tonal as well
Don't you get tired of being wrong? Seriously, you should be exhausted lol

Very, very obviously, some languages are much more difficult to learn than others
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Old April 29th, 2019, 09:27 AM   #167
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diggerdog View Post
Don't you get tired of being wrong? Seriously, you should be exhausted lol

Very, very obviously, some languages are much more difficult to learn than others
It depends on your starting point. E.g. Dutch is very easy for English speakers to learn but Chinese is really challenging. But for Japanese speakers Chinese is relatively easier due to shared characters and vocabulary. No language is objectively more difficult - it depends on where you start.
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Old April 29th, 2019, 10:35 AM   #168
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Yes obviously it depends on your individual starting point. For English speakers, Mandarin is incredibly challenging to learn, whereas Spanish or Dutch is much more comfortable.
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Old May 1st, 2019, 04:08 AM   #169
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diggerdog View Post
Not shouting, not a Boer and ... not an idiot lol

You were saying Mandarin is just as easy to learn as French. Its not. And yes, starting point and context is important - we are plainly not talking about learning Mandarin from, lets say, a Japanese pov.
So as Olivilo said, it is very impressive that the Malian guy was speaking good Mandarin.
nothing in my statement is wrong. no language is any harder than any other. i also mention bambara, which may be the speaker's first language and how it is tonal.
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Old May 1st, 2019, 04:28 AM   #170
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Writing was introduced to Bambara by the French. It is written in the Latin script. Additionally it borrows many loan words from French. So if the speaker's first language was Bambara, then speaking French for him would be no surprise at all - speaking fluent Mandarin, however - yes, impressive.
The original, simple statement by Olivilo was just that - simple. Yet you are somehow, once again, confused.
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Old May 2nd, 2019, 12:04 AM   #171
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diggerdog View Post
Writing was introduced to Bambara by the French. It is written in the Latin script. Additionally it borrows many loan words from French. So if the speaker's first language was Bambara, then speaking French for him would be no surprise at all - speaking fluent Mandarin, however - yes, impressive.
The original, simple statement by Olivilo was just that - simple. Yet you are somehow, once again, confused.
You’re making stuff up. Firstly it seems Bambara was original written in an Arabic sort of script first. But what was writing have to do with an interview ? The guy was speaking, not writing.

In regards to loan words it’s again you’re talking rubbish. Even Chinese has loan words. All languages take words from others. The Japanese say Konpyūtā for computer. It’d be a stretch to claim them as belonging to some Anglo language group. What Olivio is trying to do is wipe away the African identity and suggesting they’re part of some french culture. It’s an idea of cultural genocide which you clearly buy into. My language carries English words but that doesn’t make speakers of it somehow part of some English system so viewing a a speaker of my Language in awe at their Chinese speaking ability because they’re in your narrow mind they’re English based speakers is stupid. Same goes for Bambara being viewed as french speakers
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Old July 20th, 2019, 10:23 PM   #172
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Nigerian youth's graduation countdown in south China

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Old August 15th, 2019, 11:20 AM   #173
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Huawei helped African governments spy on political enemies – Report

Huawei employees helped cybersecurity forces in Uganda and Zambia spy on political opponents, according to a report by The Wall Street Journal.

These employees reportedly helped government officials in these two companies to intercept and bypass encrypted chats as well as to track the locations of political opponents.

The report said there was no evidence that Huawei executives in China were aware of or sanctioned the alleged espionage activities of its employees in these countries.

Additionally, there was no evidence that the Huawei employees alleged to be aiding cybersecurity forces in these countries were conducting spying activity on behalf of the Chinese government.

In a statement to CNBC, Huawei refuted the allegations in the report, stating that it has never engaged in hacking activities.

“After a thorough and detailed internal investigation on the points raised by the WSJ’s reporting team, Huawei rejects completely these unfounded and inaccurate allegations against our business operations in Algeria, Uganda and Zambia,” Huawei said.

“Our internal investigation shows clearly that Huawei and its employees have not been engaged in any of the activities alleged. We have neither the contracts nor the capabilities to do so.”

https://mybroadband.co.za/news/secur...es-report.html
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Old August 25th, 2019, 01:26 AM   #174
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China awards scholarships to 310 Ghanaian students

ACCRA, Aug. 23 (Xinhua) -- The Chinese government has awarded 310 Ghanaian students full scholarships to study in various Chinese universities in the 2019/2020 academic year, Chinese Ambassador to Ghana Wang Shiting said here on Friday.

According to Wang, Ghana receives the highest number of scholarships from China among all African countries, and the move is in line with the Chinese government's commitment to Ghana's human resources development.

"You are the future of Ghana, the future of the China-Ghana friendship and the future of the world. China and Ghana share the same belief that investing in education is investing in the future," the ambassador told the scholarship beneficiaries.

In 2018 alone, China awarded 1,329 student visas for Ghanaians seeking to further their education in China.

Ghana and China have enjoyed warm and friendly bilateral relations and would continue to do so, Ghanaian Minister for Education Matthew Opoku-Prempeh said.

"We have witnessed several generous scholarship awards from the Chinese government. This is a great testimony of the level of cooperation between Ghana and China in the area of human resource development," the minister said.

Isaac Safo, a beneficiary on his way to a prestigious university in Nanjing, east China, told Xinhua: "I am proud of this opportunity because it will allow me to learn from the Chinese way of doing things and become as unique as they are."

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/afr..._138334067.htm
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Old August 27th, 2019, 11:18 PM   #175
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China awards scholarships to 259 Tanzanian students

DAR ES SALAAM, Aug. 19 (Xinhua) -- The Chinese embassy in Tanzania on Monday announced the awarding of Chinese government scholarships to 259 Tanzanian students for 2019.

Wang Ke, the Chinese Ambassador to Tanzania, said the scholarships are awarded by the Chinese government and universities to the Tanzanian students through the Tanzanian Ministry of Education, Science and Technology.

She urged the students to study hard in Chinese universities and acquire skills and knowledge that will be applied to the development of Tanzania upon completion of their studies.

"I hope they will become the backbone for Tanzania's economic and social development, as well as Tanzania's industrialization," said Wang.

Wang encouraged Tanzanian students studying in China to witness China's development process and learn from the county's development experience.

In addition, the scholarships will enhance the mutual understanding and friendship between the peoples of China and Tanzania, she said.

Wang said the cooperation in education has been deepened in recent years. Up to now, China has provided to Tanzania about 1,900 scholarships, and vocational training programs for some 6,100 Tanzanians to study in China.

Joyce Ndalichako, the Minister for Education, Science and Technology, thanked the Chinese government and Chinese universities for doubling the number of scholarships from 120 in 2018 to 259 in 2019.

Ndalichako said the scholarships were crucial to Tanzania's development as Tanzania required higher skilled experts in pushing forward the industrialization agenda.

She assured China of Tanzania's determination to continue cherishing the cordial relations between the two friendly countries.

Ndalichako urged the recipients of the scholarships to be goodwill ambassadors of Tanzania by showing outstanding performance and hard working.

She also urged them to embrace China's advanced technology for the benefit of Tanzania.

Sania Kasyanjur, speaking on behalf of the students, promised to work hard in their studies and abide by Chinese laws and regulations in the universities.

"We thank the Chinese government for giving us this lifetime opportunity," said Kasyanjur.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/afr..._138321457.htm
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Old September 28th, 2019, 05:30 PM   #176
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African writers are using science fiction to explore deepening relations with China




Nedine Moonsamy
Senior Lecturer, University of Pretoria

In 2007 the then President of China, Hu Jintao, delivered a speech to South Africans acknowledging the benefits of a strategic partnership. He also stressed that the connection is not merely pragmatic. It must, he argued, serve to honor and deepen the countries’ long abiding friendship in the future.

The idea of friendship has undoubtedly informed the nature of Sino-African engagement. But if we use contemporary science fiction as a barometer, African sentiment towards China appears more inclined towards dystopian forecasts.


Science fiction writing often serves as a thought experiment that explores shared and hidden beliefs whose material and political reverberations lie further in the future. Various short stories portray how China’s economic ascension, operating under the guise of African development, uses technology as a means to invade and control Africa.

Narratives of this kind surface neo-colonial fears that a “new scramble for Africa” seems imminent. But they also provide a speculative arena to interrogate how we ultimately perceive the value, use, and future of Sino-African political friendship.

As I’ve explored in my research, this means that science fiction can serve as an imaginative production of political theory. It intercedes in ways that international relations cannot because of the confines of diplomacy.

Three stories
My research focused on three short science fiction stories from Africa.


In the first, Tendai Huchu’s The Sale, China has taken control of Zimbabwe through the production of a corporatized state called CorpGov. It’s a surveillance state that leaves no room for political dissension. Zimbabwe has been purchased by China in a piecemeal fashion. It is now set to lose its last free portion of land in a final sale. When a young Zimbabwean man fails to prevent the sale of this remaining plot of land, he succumbs to despair and puts himself in the path of a Chinese bulldozer.

His suicide evokes a sense of profound helplessness and warns that China will need to be vehemently counteracted in the near future to protect Zimbabwe’s already breached borders. Huchu’s narrative provides a sharp sense of clarity that makes the story incredibly impactful.

The pathos of The Sale holds a mirror up to China. It communicates an earnest appeal for more humane engagement. Yet the heaviness of its dystopian narrative also breeds a spirit of nihilism or Afropessimism. This overrides any sense of African accountability in the degenerative state of future Sino-Zimbabwean relations.

Abigail Godsell’s Taal (an Afrikaans word meaning “language”) is self-conscious in this regard. It’s set in the year 2050 after a nuclear war between China and America has left the entire globe in a state of desolation. As a result, the South African government willingly signed over ownership of the country to China in exchange for protection.


The central protagonist, an especially resentful young woman named Callie, has joined a militant rebel group in a covert attempt to overthrow the Chinese. But after injuring a soldier, she pulls off his helmet and is surprised that he converses in Afrikaans because, to all other appearances, he is Chinese. The fact that he speaks Afrikaans implies he is a South African. She is stupefied by the exchange: it highlights her simplistic understanding of what the enemy should look like.

This uncanny revelation undoubtedly draws attention to the spectral presence of Chinese-South Africans who have not received due recognition as bona fide citizens.

Callie, who is initially critical of Chinese propaganda, begins to read her positionality as a South African freedom fighter on equally problematic terms. Her defensiveness drops and she confesses that South Africa was caught off-guard amid a global crisis. The country did not have a sufficient national security plan; China has offered significantly more protection than the South African government was capable of at the time.

Godsell’s introspective narrative shift focus away from Chinese agitation. It allows the reader to consider the nature of South African apathy by conveying that the country may not lack a fighting spirit but, unlike China, lacks the necessary foresight and organization to bolster the nation.


Negative representations of China in the African imaginary gesture at the idea that a certain amount of envy informs the continent’s responses to China. They also suggest that African countries can benefit from emulating China’s uncompromising nationalistic and commercial drive. This possibility is more fully explored in Mandisi Nkomo’s Heresy.

Nkomo’s narrative is set in the year 2040. South-South interactions challenge the global status quo. China has risen in global economic rankings. But South Africa has not fallen under its sway: the nations are caught up in a highly competitive space race. South Africa is determined to not be outdone by the Chinese and channels its resources in meeting this goal.

Heresy conveys how Africans can construct an invisible enemy out of China by exponentially accelerating South African development. This light-hearted narrative assumes the challenge of imagining the current tension of Sino-African relations otherwise. It shows how friendly rivalry can inadvertently lead to African progress.

Rethinking friendship
In their book Friendship and International Relations, academics Andrea Oelsner and Simon Koschut write that it is “necessary to think of international friendship not as something that is merely being performed at the intergovernmental level but as something that is being enacted in the day-to-day activities and imaginations at all levels of society.”


This certainly includes science fiction narratives that present us with a “succession of literary experiments, each one examining a small part of a much larger image and each equally necessary to the greater vision”.

Through these short stories, it immediately becomes possible to consider how China-Africa relations need not result in Chinese neocolonialism and African exploitation. They offer us more creative approaches to political friendship by reinventing and reinterpreting the roles of both parties in their narratives.

Similarly, pursued in this way, the future of China-Africa relations need not be seen as a singular act of solidarity that demands repeating. Instead, it could be viewed as a more fluid encounter that allows for mutual investment in world building projects while also providing enough objective distance to nurture difference and autonomy.The Conversation


https://qz.com/africa/1717547/scienc...medium=twitter
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Old November 29th, 2019, 11:28 AM   #177
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3rd Chinese factory in Johannesburg raided this month for hiring illegal immigrants and dangerous labour standards:

Hawks bust another ‘horror’ factory



An old, two-plate stove, covered in dried-up mielie pap, is the first object you see as you enter the “staff kitchen” at Jiebo Home Trading in Industria, west of Johannesburg. From the fire-charred walls to the gravy-stained floors, the place is airless and filthy.

Fruit flies hover around the toilet seat of the unisex bathrooms next to the kitchen. There is no water and workers have to fill a bucket with water from the adjacent kitchen to flush the toilets.

A stack of discarded Jiebo Home Trading posters, titled “Luxury Comforter Set” surround Mohammed’s workstation. The words “Made in China” are also boldly written in the top-right corner of the poster, together with images of the various types of blankets the factory produces.

Mohammed, who is 34 years old, arrived in South Africa after failing to secure employment in Lilongwe, where he was b

On Wednesday, Jiebo Home Trading was one of two businesses bust by the Hawks, the department of labour and the department of home affairs. The operation was aimed at cracking down on factories that have failed to comply with labour legislation. Human trafficking was also suspected, but none was found in this case.

Documents from the Companies and Intellectual Properties Commission (CIPC) show the company was first registered in 2009, with Chinese citizen Jie Zhang listed as its sole director.

Zhang was not on the premises when the raid happened, but workers tell journalists that she usually does not come to the factory but manages a store at the Dragon City Wholesale Mall in Fordsburg where the blankets are sold.

The department of labour closed down the factory following the raid. Most of the workers, including Mohammed, were found to not have work permits, and were taken to the Langlaagte police station, pending their deportation.

Jiebo is the third factory in Gauteng raided by authorities this month. Another factory in the same area as Jiebo was also raided on Wednesday and a similar operation was conducted two weeks ago at the Beautiful City factory in Village Deep, Johannesburg.

Four men and three women were arrested in the operation after the authorities found that they had failed to comply with various labour laws, including subjecting workers to forced labour and trafficking illegal migrants. The seven have not been formally charged and remain in custody.

Following the crackdown, the Chinese embassy in South Africa accused the labour department of “raising criticisms” on social media towards Chinese businessmen and the wider Chinese community.

The first press statement by department of the labour, released on November 14, stated that a “Chinese factory” was bust in a joint operation following a tip-off. A second media statement, with the headline “Seven Chinese and Taiwanese nationals busted for alleged human trafficking and violation of labour laws remanded in custody,” was released on November 21 after the suspects appeared in court.

The embassy has accused the labour department of failing to verify the nationalities of two parties involved in the factory: the owner, Shih Shen, who has a South African ID that was found in his possession during the raid, and another suspect, Kevin Tsao, who is also a South African citizen.

The embassy says the press statements by the department of labour make no mention that the two parties, Shih and Tsao, are South African citizens.

In a letter seen by the M&G, sent to both the department of labour and the department of international relations and co-operation, the Chinese embassy accused the labour department of releasing unverified information to the public, including the nationalities of the suspects arrested at Beautiful City.

The Chinese embassy has asked that the department of labour delete the two media statements about the raid to “eliminate negative influence on social media caused by fake news”.

The embassy objected to the second press statement, which it says implies that Taiwan is a nation, “a severe violation of the One-China Principle, which is enshrined and established in the UN Resolution 2758 and universally recognised.”

https://mg.co.za/article/2019-11-29-...horror-factory
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Old December 2nd, 2019, 05:59 AM   #178
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Chinese embassy in SA using a Gmail account

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Old December 9th, 2019, 05:20 AM   #179
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Four people admit guilt in landmark Chinese hate speech case in South Africa

Racist and hateful statements made on social media after TV news show about Chinese demand for donkey skins
The Chinese Association demands unconditional apologies and other penalties against those accused



Four of 12 people in South Africa accused of hate speech against local Chinese people have admitted guilt and agreed to hundreds of hours of community service as punishment – even before the case has ended.
The matter stems from anti-Chinese comments made on social media in January 2017 after a video went viral showing the slaughter of donkeys for their skins, allegedly to be illegally exported for the Chinese medicinal market.
Among the most offending comments were that Chinese were “vile, barbaric people” who were “scum of the Earth”.

The Chinese Association (TCA) took the matter to South Africa’s Equality Court, which was set up to protect people’s rights in the post-apartheid era.
The TCA was outraged at apparent calls for the “genocide” of Chinese people. One social media post suggested: “I think we should start killing their (Chinese) children for a (hangover cure)”.
The court, which heard the case in Johannesburg, ordered the four individuals last week to post an unconditional apology to Chinese South Africans on their social media accounts, to be pinned there for six months.
For their community service of 500 hours, the four have agreed to remove anti-Chinese hate speech on social media platforms.

The Chinese who call South Africa home, despite the violence and xenophobia
The case played out against a backdrop of recent and repeated bouts of xenophobia in South Africa where foreigners are often falsely accused of “stealing” local South Africans’ jobs.
Dozens of people have been killed or injured and many foreigners’ businesses and homes burned and looted in recent outbreaks – though most of the violence is aimed against black Africans from outside South Africa.
The 12 respondents were accused under South Africa’s hate speech laws, which prohibit collective attacks on groups of people and calls for violence against them.
Donkey-hide gelatin has no commercial value in Africa but is highly sought after in China as an ingredient for traditional medicine. File photo: AFP
Donkey-hide gelatin has no commercial value in Africa but is highly sought after in China as an ingredient for traditional medicine. File photo: AFP
Most of the remaining respondents are contesting the complaints against them, with one failing to appear at all.
The four admissions of guilt came as the TCA wrapped up its case and before any formal defence had been presented.
At issue is whether the offending comments could be defended as free speech as enshrined in South Africa’s human rights-oriented constitution.
Among the four to admit guilt was Dawn Reeve, whose comment was: “The Chinese are destroying the earth … we have to retaliate. I don’t know how anyone can support a f#[email protected] Chinaman they are the rot of the earth”.
Reeve admitted that this comment constituted unfair discrimination, hate speech and harassment against the Chinese community.
Another defendant Lana Berger wrote on Facebook: “I wish they would start wiping themselves out”. She had argued that the word “they” in her post referred to donkey killers and others like them, but conceded it could be read as an attack on Chinese people.
Is Hong Kong racist? Prejudice against ethnic minorities, especially Africans, undermines city’s claim to be truly international
The TCA, which represents the interests of more than 100,000 Chinese South Africans, was confident the court would rule in its favour on all counts.
“We believe the court will see that our case against these heinous comments is indisputable,” said TCA chairperson Erwin Pon.
“In a diverse democracy such as ours, underpinned by principles of equality and dignity, it cannot be acceptable to say about a particular group of people, ‘wipe them out’ or ‘get rid’ of them.”
TCA vice-chairman Francis Lai Hong added: “TCA is pleased that we were able to present evidence on the history of racism that has faced our community and on how, too, hate speech and racism impact us currently.
“Through this case, the Chinese experience in South Africa has finally been made visible.”
The case continues in South Gauteng High Court’s Equality Court in February next year.

https://www.scmp.com/news/world/afri...ech-case-south
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Old December 9th, 2019, 06:44 AM   #180
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Positive development
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