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Old March 24th, 2011, 11:49 AM   #1
Newcastle Historian
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CUMBRIA HISTORY - Stories/Photos from and about the past in Cumbria ('Cumberland and Westmorland' as was)

Blaze at poet’s historic home
by Rachel Wearmouth, The Journal, March 24th 2011


THE North home of William Wordsworth was damaged by a blaze in the early hours of yesterday.

Five fire crews were called to Allan Bank, in Cumbria’s Grasmere, after a fire broke out in the roof and spread to the first floor of the house once inhabited by the poet laureate.

The tenants of the property, which now belongs to the National Trust, escaped unharmed. An investigation was launched yesterday to determine how the damage to the historic country home happened.

Canon Hardwicke Rawnsley, one of the three founders of the National Trust, bought Allan Bank in 1915 and left the property to the trust when he died in 1920.

The organisation still owns the building and adjoining land, although it is not open to the public. A spokesperson for the National Trust said: “Allan Bank was given to us by Canon Rawnsley. William Wordsworth lived there between 1808 and 1811, between the ages of 38 and 41.


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz1HVNEPdmp

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Old May 13th, 2011, 09:59 AM   #2
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Historic Local First Day Covers.


This Cover was issued on 9th March 1985, to mark the 150th Anniversary of the Newcastle and Carlisle Railway . . .

The railway was built by the Newcastle and Carlisle Railway Company, the requisite Act of Parliament gaining Royal Assent on 22 May 1829. The line was built in sections from 1834 onwards. The first section (Hexham -Blaydon) opened in March 1835, the date chosen as the start date for this 150 year anniversary.





Actually, services on the line were quickly suspended after the March opening, until May, after a local landowner objected to the use of locomotives (seemingly specifically prohibited by the Act of Parliament). The entire route between Carlisle London Road railway station and Redheugh in Gateshead was formally opened to passengers on 18 June 1838.

A temporary Tyne bridge was built at Scotswood to allow trains to reach a terminus in Newcastle - this opened on 21 October 1839. N&CR trains first used Newcastle Central Station on 1 January 1851.

The N&CR was absorbed into the North Eastern Railway on 17 July 1862. From 1864, trains ran to Carlisle Citadel station, and the old London Road station was closed. In 1870, the temporary bridge at Scotswood was removed, and a new iron Scotswood Bridge was built to replace it.

On 4 October 1982, British Rail closed the Scotswood Bridge, which had become uneconomic to maintain. Tyne Valley trains from Newcastle were diverted to use the present route, crossing the King Edward VII Bridge south-west of Newcastle Central Station, and running via Dunston to Blaydon, on a line which was upgraded to carry passenger traffic.

Former stations on the line include Scotswood, Elswick, Greenhead and Gilsland.



NB - A complete list of all the 'Local Commemorative First Day Covers' in this series, is now listed on the INDEX Thread under the letter "F" (First Day Covers) with direct links to the post containing each individual cover - https://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...61&postcount=7

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Last edited by Newcastle Historian; July 3rd, 2014 at 08:37 PM.
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Old December 26th, 2012, 07:20 PM   #3
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Ancient Map aids plans for return of native woodlands
The Journal, December 26th 2012


Philip Howard in front of Naworth Castle, with a 17th century plan (below) depicting a formal woodland to be recreated


A MAP dating from the 1600s will be used to create new native woodlands near Hadrian’s Wall. The Forestry Commission has pledged £94,000 from the English Woodland Grant Scheme for an ambitious project which will boost wildlife and improve river water quality at Naworth Castle, near Brampton in Cumbria.

Eight new woods covering 50 acres will be planted, expanding existing mature woodlands. Forestry chiefs have allocated the top rate of grant for the venture as it will help improve water quality in Carling Gill and the River Irthing, which both flow through the estate. Using the 400-year-old map from the family archives, there are plans to recreate a formal woodland known as Lord William’s Wood and the Long Walk

New planting on the estate will include oak, rowan and cherry and will steer clear of historic features. They include four scheduled ancient monuments, such as the ruins of a bastle, which is a fortified medieval farmhouse dating to the time of the Reivers. The estate also includes part of Hadrian’s Wall.


Read More (Two Pages) - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz2GBB7IsBX
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Old May 10th, 2013, 03:41 AM   #4
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There's no cumbria forum to ask this on

So, I'm wondering can anyone think of an iconic symbol for Carlisle/Cumbria?
Tyne and Wear has the angel or the bridges, Tees has the transporter bridge or Stephenson's rocket, what about Carlisle?
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Old May 10th, 2013, 03:53 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyr View Post
There's no cumbria forum to ask this on

So, I'm wondering can anyone think of an iconic symbol for Carlisle/Cumbria?
Tyne and Wear has the angel or the bridges, Tees has the transporter bridge or Stephenson's rocket, what about Carlisle?
Tricky one that, didn't think we extended that far really. Apologies if I am incorrect!

Always thought the Rocket was a Newcastle thing anyway?

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Old May 10th, 2013, 07:04 AM   #6
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Cumbria.....maybe the lakes and Kendal Mint Cake. Or nuclear power.
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Old May 10th, 2013, 10:04 PM   #7
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Serious suggestions: The lake district including some specific features like Pillar Rock, Napes Needle, Striding Edge etc. Sheep/wool. The most iconic symbol of Carlisle would surely be the castle.

Suggestions of restricted seriousness: Sheep with a greater than the average number of legs, gap-toothed farmers wearing trousers held up with baler twine.
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Old June 29th, 2013, 01:50 AM   #8
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An old fire station in Carlisle
could become an Arts Centre.

By BBC News, Cumbria, 28th June 2013


The old fire station recommended for the new facility

A NEW £1m Arts Centre could be built in an old fire station in Carlisle to help develop arts and culture in the city.

Carlisle City Council wants to transform the former fire station on Warwick Street to provide space for galleries, workshops and meeting rooms.

It is hoped the development will provide "exciting opportunities" for local artists and groups.


Read More - http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cumbria-23095713
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Old July 2nd, 2014, 02:58 PM   #9
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From today's Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...-drama-7357198

North East historian reveals rail journey to remember
Jul 02, 2014 10:55 By Tony Henderson


Artists John Wilson Carmichael's study of the opening of the Newcastle-Carlisle railway

Trundling along for hours at 20mph, in the dark, in the rain, behind a spark-spitting locomotive.

That was the experience of the first passengers courageous or curious enough to take part in the inaugural journey on the Newcastle-Carlisle railway line. Their experience sounds like the original rail trip from hell But in the pioneering and intoxicating days of early rail travel in the region, perhaps they regarded their part in transport history in an entirely different light.

Previously, we have seen how people flocked to try out the Newcastle-North Shields route, which was launched 175 years ago. But exactly a year earlier, it was the Newcastle-Carlisle line opening which was on everybody’s lips.That was a journey which those who took part would never, ever forget.

Pat Newman is secretary of the Warwick Bridge and District Local History Group, near Carlisle. Living in the Station House at Head’s Nook, just yards from the rail line, she was perfectly placed to research the details of that first passenger run. Pat carried out much of her work on newspapers of the time, including The Journal, in Newcastle City Library. The result is the history group’s booklet A Grand Event: The Opening of the Newcastle and Carlisle Railway. One of the aims of the day was to demonstrate the power of the new technology.

“The arrangements were that people from Carlisle should go to Newcastle for breakfast and return with the people of Newcastle to Carlisle for dinner, and the Newcastle people to return home that evening – thus putting in the power of any man to travel a distance of 180 miles in one day,” ran a report of the time. Pat says: “Before the railway it took almost a day to travel by stagecoach to Newcastle, a day to conduct business, and a day to travel back – three days out of a working week.”

Read more @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...-drama-7357198

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Old March 15th, 2015, 06:20 PM   #10
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Newcastle University dig wins national award

From today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...tional-8843850
Newcastle University dig wins national award
12:20, 15 March 2015 By Tony Henderson


Archaeologists Tony Wilmott, (left) and Ian Haynes at the site

A dig project on a Roman temple site has won a national award.

The excavation, led by a team from Newcastle University, scooped the prestigious Current Archaeology magazine award following its discovery of colossal “mystery monuments” at the site in Maryport in Cumbria. Current Archaeology is the UK’s best-selling archaeology magazine and the award ceremony was part of the annual Current Archaeology Live! conference at the University of London’s Senate House. Voted for by subscribers and members of the public, the Current Archaeology awards recognise the outstanding contributions to understanding of the past made by the people, projects, and publications featured in the pages of the magazine over the previous 12 months.

The Maryport dig was one of six archaeological research projects across the country to be nominated for the title Current Archaeology Research Project of the Year 2015, sponsored by Oxbow Books.

In 2011 the Senhouse Museum Trust initiated a campaign of excavation which has been undertaken by the team from Newcastle University, supported by local volunteers, over the last four years. The fifth and final season will take place this summer. Speaking at the award ceremony Rachel Newman from the site’s Senhouse Museum Trust said: “We are absolutely delighted that this excellent project funded by an independent charity has won such a prestigious award.”

Read more @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...tional-8843850
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Old March 15th, 2015, 07:26 PM   #11
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The New Houses in Whitehaven, a development from the late 18th century when the town industrialised and which survived until 1938 when the last residents were decanted to a new council estate. This photo date from the twenties.
http://partleton.co.uk/backrow2.jpg

Source - The Partleton Tree @ http://partleton.co.uk/

Last edited by Steve Ellwood; March 15th, 2015 at 07:49 PM. Reason: Source added
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Old April 13th, 2015, 11:20 AM   #12
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This from the News & Star,--

Bid re-launched to turn former Roman fort into international attraction

Published at 08:01, Monday, 13 April 2015

Efforts to turn a former Roman fort into an international visitor attraction are being re-ignited by new owners.

The future of the Alauna fort and a model farm at Maryport has been safeguarded by a new charity taking control of the site.

Details of the deal are revealed today along with hopes that telling the world of the fort’s huge historical importance could draw in tourists and an economic boost.

The North of England Civic Trust (NECT) has acquired the site from the Hadrian’s Wall Trust (HWT) after eight months of negotiations.

Historians have been closely watching what the future could hold for the site after it was revealed last summer that HWT was to be wound up.

Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/bi...tion-1.1204955
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Old May 16th, 2015, 01:10 PM   #13
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This from the News & Star,--

New owners hoping to restore Netherby Hall to former glory

By Jenny Brown

Last updated at 14:05, Friday, 15 May 2015

An historic mansion house built on the site of a Roman fort is to be restored and could be opened for the public.



Netherby Hall, near Longtown, is set to be brought back to its former glory thanks to new owners Gerald and Margo Smith.

The couple, who live near Edinburgh, bought the 36-acre estate – one of the most historic estates in north Cumbria – for £2.5m in October last year.

They have submitted plans for repairs and refurbishments to the windows of the Grade II-listed main hall and want to build four homes in the grounds.

It is the start of a major project to put the building back into good order.

Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/ne...lory-1.1212360
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Old May 23rd, 2015, 11:15 AM   #14
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This from the News & Star,--

Royal visit to mark Quintinshill rail disaster centenary

Last updated at 14:37, Friday, 22 May 2015

Royalty, politicians, military veterans and relatives of the victims have marked the 100th anniversary of Britain’s worst rail disaster.



The Princess Royal and First Minister Nicola Sturgeon attended a special service in Gretna on the Scottish-English border on the centenary of the Quintinshill rail crash.

Among the near 230 people who died were two Carlisle railway workers, train driver Francis Scott and fireman James Hannah.

At 6.50am on May 22 1915, a train packed with First World War troops travelling from Larbert, Stirlingshire, collided with a local passenger service.

Straight afterwards, a Glasgow-bound express train smashed into the wreckage at the Quintinshill signal box, setting off a devastating fire which engulfed the troop train, packed with nearly 500 members of the Leith Battalion of the Royal Scots.

More than 200 soldiers and 12 civilians were killed and a further 246 people were injured.

The troops were on their way to Liverpool, where they were due to sail to the front line of the war in Gallipoli.

Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/ro...nary-1.1213853
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Old June 16th, 2015, 10:09 AM   #15
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This from the News & Star,--

Dodo meets the Romans in Carlisle museum's new exhibition

By Kelly Pattison

Last updated at 12:08, Monday, 15 June 2015

Your eyes aren’t deceiving you – both of these extinct specimens came together for a mid-morning museum show with a difference in Carlisle.



Roman centurion Dave Crone even captured his once-in-a-lifetime meeting with Dodo with a selfie on his smartphone as the past and present came together to celebrate a new cultural exchange which is blossoming between Tullie House in Carlisle and the world’s oldest public museum.

Professor Paul Smith, director of the Oxford University Museum of Natural History, said: “It has been a really good cultural exchange tour visiting 28 museums across the country as part of our celebrations marking our nomination for the museum of the year awarded by the Arts Fund Prize.”

Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/do...tion-1.1218229
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Old June 18th, 2015, 10:43 AM   #16
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This from the News & Star,--

Team share high hopes for final few months of Roman dig

By Vivienne Paterson

Last updated at 13:50, Wednesday, 17 June 2015

The last pieces of an almost 2,000-year puzzle may finally be put in place.





History-lovers and archeologists have started on the final dig of the award-winning Maryport Roman Temples archaeology project, which has already upturned some of the theories on military religious practice in the days of the Empire.

The excavation is a five-year project commissioned by the Senhouse Roman Museum Trust and supported by Newcastle University.

The new landowner of the Camp Farm site is the North of England Civic Trust, which has allowed this final year of excavation to proceed.

Overseen by Professor Ian Haynes from Newcastle University and site director Tony Wilmott, the dig has already shown the existence of a temple and a complete new altar to add to the internationally-important Senhouse collection.

Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/te...-dig-1.1218751
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Old June 30th, 2015, 11:48 AM   #17
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This from the News & Star,--



News & Star
News

Griffin finds a new home at Carlisle cathedral

By Nick Griffiths

Published at 12:29, Monday, 29 June 2015

Work to recreate the splendour of Carlisle Cathedral’s stonework has taken a big step forward.



The first replacement carved stone, of a griffin, has been fixed into place – one of the ornate decorations planned for six pillars at either side of a main entrance.

It is part of a restoration process that has seen repairs carried out to the stonework, work that officials say have been needed for the past 20 years.

A spokeswoman for the cathedral said: “This is a significant moment in the ongoing restoration of the stone work on Carlisle Cathedral’s south porch.

Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/gr...dral-1.1220681
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Old July 24th, 2015, 11:34 AM   #18
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Suppose this could article could also been posted on the Media -------This from the News & Star,--

Maryport Roman dig to be given BBC TV airing

By Jenny Barwise

Last updated at 11:22, Thursday, 23 July 2015

A dig taking place in Maryport will be aired on television.



The Roman Temples Project, which has been running in the town for the past four years, will feature on the new series of BBC2’s Coast programme at the end of the month.

The dig, near Camp Farm, has been investigating Roman mystery monuments in the town and recently won the research project of the year in a top archeology magazine award.

In 2011, the Senhouse Museum Trust initiated a campaign of excavation which has been undertaken by a team from Newcastle University, supported by local volunteers at the site near Camp Farm

Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/ma...ring-1.1223425
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Old August 13th, 2015, 11:06 AM   #19
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This from the News & Star,--

Five-year Roman dig at Maryport ends this week


By Liam Waite

Last updated at 13:23, Wednesday, 12 August 2015


A monumental five-year excavation project draws to a close this week.

The last week of the final excavation by Maryport Roman Temples Project team, which began in 2011 after being commissioned by the Senhouse Museum Trust, is due to end on Friday.

The archaeology project, which has been supported by Newcastle University, has seen a team spend around eight weeks on the Camp Farm site each summer.

This year the team, overseen by Newcastle University’s Professor Ian Haynes and site director Tony Wilmott, demonstrated that the temples discovered in 2011 formed part of a large monument complex, unlike anything discovered on Britain’s Roman frontier before.

The complex was at least 80 metres by 50 metres in size and was an engineering marvel dominated by a substantial precinct with sea cobble floors – the large, smooth stones found on beaches. There, many of Maryport’s internationally important altars may once have stood.


Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/fi...week-1.1225294
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Old September 8th, 2015, 12:14 PM   #20
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This from the News & Star,--

Romans and barbarians go to war at Hadrian's Wall

By Jonny Irving

Last updated at 15:14, Monday, 07 September 2015

A vicious battle between Roman soldiers and Barbarians was played out at the fort of Birdoswald on Hadrian’s Wall.

The clock was turned back 2,000 years on Saturday when hundreds of spectators watched a re-enactment of a brutal conflict between two of history’s most recognisable forces.

The battle featured 130 re-enactors who had made the journey from across Europe to Cumbria especially for the event. It was part of a special series of a festival organised by English Heritage to celebrate the history of Hadrian’s Wall.

The soldiers and Barbarians emerged from their respective camps armed with spears, swords and shields ready for battle.

Both sides met in the middle of the field they’d chosen for battle and prepared themselves for the ‘brutality’ ahead.

It was the Barbarians that made the first move, attacking in waves but one by one they were killed off until the final remaining warriors surrendered.

At this point a loud cheer came from the Roman soldiers as they signalled that the battle against their foes had been won.

Spectators lined up along the side of battlefield trying to get a glimpse of the high-paced action.

Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/ro...wall-1.1227042
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