Republic of Venice | Serenýsima Rep¨blica VŔneta - SkyscraperCity
 

forums map | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Forums > Architecture > European Classic Architecture and Landscapes

European Classic Architecture and Landscapes All related to historical buildings and landscapes of the old world.


Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old November 20th, 2018, 01:49 PM   #1
Architecture lover
Purple Blooded
 
Architecture lover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Illyria
Posts: 2,874
Likes (Received): 4428

Republic of Venice | Serenýsima Rep¨blica VŔneta

REPUBLIC OF VENICE | SEREN╠SIMA REP┘BLICA V╚NETA

I. The Republic of Venice (Italian: Repubblica di Venezia, Venetian: Rep¨blica de VenŔsia),
was a sovereign state and maritime republic in northeastern Italy,
which existed for a millennium between the 8th century and the 18th century.
II. It was based in the lagoon communities of the historically prosperous city of Venice,
and was a leading European economic and trading power during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.
III. In this thread we share the unique architecture of Venice.







Painting by Giovanni Antonio Canal - Canaletto


By-User-Jack-Keilo-On-Wikimedia

__________________
You take me there you take me where
the kingdom comes. You take me to
and lead me through Babylon.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
I feel you your heart it sings.
I feel you the joy it brings.
Where heaven waits there's golden
gates and back again. You take me to
and lead me through oblivion.
Where angels sing spread their wings
my love's on high. You take me home
to glory's throne by and by.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
Architecture lover está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old November 20th, 2018, 02:33 PM   #2
Architecture lover
Purple Blooded
 
Architecture lover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Illyria
Posts: 2,874
Likes (Received): 4428

PAŁASO DOGAL | DOGE'S PALACE
I. Built in Venetian Gothic.
II. Some Byzantine-Venetian architecture characteristics of the original structure can still be seen at the ground floor,
with the wall base in Istrian stone and some herring-bone pattern brick paving.





Doge's Palace by Steve Scott, on Flickr


Venice - Doge's Palace St Mark's Square by Le Monde1, on Flickr


Doge's Palace, Venice by camerajohn, on Flickr


Doge's palace by Mira Mechtley, on Flickr


Doge's Palace by janlichterman, on Flickr


Doge's Palace. by Duncan Wilson, on Flickr


Doge's Palace by Brian Dooley, on Flickr


Doge's Palace by Glyn Williams, on Flickr

Source


Source
__________________
You take me there you take me where
the kingdom comes. You take me to
and lead me through Babylon.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
I feel you your heart it sings.
I feel you the joy it brings.
Where heaven waits there's golden
gates and back again. You take me to
and lead me through oblivion.
Where angels sing spread their wings
my love's on high. You take me home
to glory's throne by and by.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
Architecture lover está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old November 21st, 2018, 02:57 PM   #3
Architecture lover
Purple Blooded
 
Architecture lover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Illyria
Posts: 2,874
Likes (Received): 4428

ST MARK'S BASILICA | BAX╔ŁEGA DE SAN MARCO

I. The Patriarchal Cathedral Basilica of Saint Mark (Italian: Basilica Cattedrale Patriarcale di San Marco),
is the cathedral church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Venice, northern Italy.
II. It is the most famous of the city's churches and one of the best known examples of Italo-Byzantine architecture.
III. For its opulent design, gold ground mosaics, and its status as a symbol of Venetian wealth and power,
from the 11th century on the building has been known by the nickname Chiesa d'Oro (Church of gold).
IV. The only rightful successor of Byzantium (Eastern Roman Empire).





Source

Venice. Southern Fašade of St. Mark's Cathedral and the Doge's Palace by Cornell University Library, on Flickr


Venice by billpillar, on Flickr


St. Mark's Basilica Italy by Mailbox Happiness-Angee at Postcrossing, on Flickr


18th August 2017. St. Mark's Basilica, Venice, Italy. by Barnsley Victor, on Flickr



Source


St. Mark's Basilica by Meghan Linehan, on Flickr


View of the Tetrarchs and the side of St. Mark's Basilica by Steven Zucker, on Flickr


IMG_0957 by Chris Gordon, on Flickr


IMG_0962 by Chris Gordon, on Flickr



Marble columns in facade of St Mark's Basilica by bruceheavin, on Flickr


Basilica San Marco by Peter, on Flickr


Italy_2012-05-28_03-40-57 by Ozloty, on Flickr


St Mark's Basilica, Venice by Ekaterina Kuzmina, on Flickr


Basilica di San Marco Domes II by Paul Turner, on Flickr


St Mark's Domes by tonyz123456, on Flickr


Basilica di San Marco from the campanile by Francis Mansell, on Flickr


Basilica di San Marco from the Campanile (bell tower) at night DSC02507 by Clive Bottomley, on Flickr


Triumphal Quadriga Venice by Brian, on Flickr


The horses by Nick Thompson, on Flickr
__________________
You take me there you take me where
the kingdom comes. You take me to
and lead me through Babylon.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
I feel you your heart it sings.
I feel you the joy it brings.
Where heaven waits there's golden
gates and back again. You take me to
and lead me through oblivion.
Where angels sing spread their wings
my love's on high. You take me home
to glory's throne by and by.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
Architecture lover está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old November 21st, 2018, 06:37 PM   #4
Architecture lover
Purple Blooded
 
Architecture lover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Illyria
Posts: 2,874
Likes (Received): 4428

PROCURATIE

I. The oldest of the buildings is the Procuratie Vecchie on the north side of the Square,
built as a two-storey structure in the twelfth century.
II. The Procuratie Nuove, on the south side of the Square was begun in 1586 by Vincenzo Scamozzi
in a more strictly Classical style and completed by Longhena in 1640.
III. Today, the Napoleonic Wing (Procuratie Nuovissime) and part of the Procuratie Nuove house the Correr Museum.

IN 2017, ENGLISH ARCHITECT SIR DAVID CHIPPERFIELD WAS APPOINTED TO SUPERVISE RENOVATION OF THE PROCURATIE VECCHIE.





Piazza San Marco from Above by Tim Sackton, on Flickr


Venezia by Juan Llanos, on Flickr


20120925_235_Venise-Procuratie Vecchie by gthirionet, on Flickr


Venedig alte Prokuratien by wolf, on Flickr


Venice - Les Procuratie (2012 08 24) by filoer, on Flickr


la Libreria Marciana, la Loggetta du campanile et les Procuraties by Mhln, on Flickr


Piazza San Marco depuis la Basilique by Mhln, on Flickr
__________________
You take me there you take me where
the kingdom comes. You take me to
and lead me through Babylon.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
I feel you your heart it sings.
I feel you the joy it brings.
Where heaven waits there's golden
gates and back again. You take me to
and lead me through oblivion.
Where angels sing spread their wings
my love's on high. You take me home
to glory's throne by and by.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
Architecture lover está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old November 22nd, 2018, 12:43 PM   #5
Architecture lover
Purple Blooded
 
Architecture lover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Illyria
Posts: 2,874
Likes (Received): 4428


AERIAL VENICE

I. It is situated across a group of 118 small islands that are separated by canals and linked by over 400 bridges.
II. The islands are located in the shallow Venetian Lagoon,
an enclosed bay that lies between the mouths of the Po and the Piave rivers (more exactly between the Brenta and the Sile).
III. Parts of Venice are renowned for the beauty of their settings, their architecture, and artwork.
IV. The lagoon and a part of the city are listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.





Source


So far I've focused on some of the major landmarks across Piazza San Marco,
from now on I'll focus a little more on the Grand Canal and the dazzling numerous Palazzo buildings.


Source: reneedoylephotography


Source

__________________
You take me there you take me where
the kingdom comes. You take me to
and lead me through Babylon.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
I feel you your heart it sings.
I feel you the joy it brings.
Where heaven waits there's golden
gates and back again. You take me to
and lead me through oblivion.
Where angels sing spread their wings
my love's on high. You take me home
to glory's throne by and by.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
Architecture lover está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old November 22nd, 2018, 10:19 PM   #6
Architecture lover
Purple Blooded
 
Architecture lover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Illyria
Posts: 2,874
Likes (Received): 4428

PALAZZO CAVALLI-FRANCHETTI

I. Palazzo Cavalli-Franchetti is a palace in Venice, Italy,
not far from the Ponte dell'Accademia and next to the Palazzo Barbaro on the Grand Canal of Venice.
II. The palace was erected in 1565.
III. In the 19th century it was internally modernised and externally enriched in Venetian Gothic style,
with rich window framing, by a series of grand owners.





Source


Palazzo Cavalli-Franchetti, visto da ponte Accaemia, Venezia by Fabrizio Pivari, on Flickr


Palazzo Cavalli-Franchetti by Brian Dooley, on Flickr


Venice - Palazzo Cavalli Franchetti Gussoni (2012 08 26) by filoer, on Flickr


Veneto Institute of Science, Letters and Art by Brian Dooley, on Flickr


Venice Palazzo Staircase [Explored] by Duane Moore, on Flickr


Veneto Institute of Science, Letters and Art by Brian Dooley, on Flickr


Source

THE WELL


Source
__________________
You take me there you take me where
the kingdom comes. You take me to
and lead me through Babylon.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
I feel you your heart it sings.
I feel you the joy it brings.
Where heaven waits there's golden
gates and back again. You take me to
and lead me through oblivion.
Where angels sing spread their wings
my love's on high. You take me home
to glory's throne by and by.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
Architecture lover está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old November 23rd, 2018, 06:36 PM   #7
Architecture lover
Purple Blooded
 
Architecture lover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Illyria
Posts: 2,874
Likes (Received): 4428

FONDACO DEI TURCHI | FONTEGO DEI TURCHI

I. The Fondaco dei Turchi is a Veneto-Byzantine style palazzo,
later on named as the Turks' Inn, on the Grand Canal of Venice, northeast Italy.
II. The palace was constructed in the first half of the 13th century by Giacomo Palmier, an exile from Pesaro.
III. The Venetian Republic purchased it in 1381 for Niccol˛ II d'Este, the Marquess of Ferrara.





Source


DSC00326 by Robert Millier, on Flickr


Veneza by AndesSemParar, on Flickr


Fondaco dei Turchi - Natural History Museum by Alan Aplin, on Flickr


Detail, Fondaco dei Turchi by Will Bakker, on Flickr


Fondaco_di_Turchi_Venice by Ian Harrold, on Flickr


Venezia by Carmelo Raineri, on Flickr


Venezia - Canal Grande - Fontego dei turchi ! by Maria Adelaide Mondini, on Flickr


20100108-IT-VEN-092 by Andrew Ross, on Flickr
__________________
You take me there you take me where
the kingdom comes. You take me to
and lead me through Babylon.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
I feel you your heart it sings.
I feel you the joy it brings.
Where heaven waits there's golden
gates and back again. You take me to
and lead me through oblivion.
Where angels sing spread their wings
my love's on high. You take me home
to glory's throne by and by.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
Architecture lover está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old November 23rd, 2018, 07:19 PM   #8
Architecture lover
Purple Blooded
 
Architecture lover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Illyria
Posts: 2,874
Likes (Received): 4428

TEATRO LA FENICE

I. Teatro La Fenice is an opera house in Venice, Italy.
II. It is one of "the most famous and renowned landmarks in the history of Italian theatre", and in the history of opera as a whole.
III. Especially in the 19th century, La Fenice became the site of many famous operatic premieres
at which the works of several of the four major bel canto era composers ľ Rossini, Bellini, Donizetti, Verdi ľ were performed.





Source


la fenice by blucolt, on Flickr


Source


Source


Source


Source


Source


Venezia-57_1800_1198 by Corrado Benanzioli, on Flickr


Fondamenta de la Fenice by Brian Dooley, on Flickr




Source



Source

__________________
You take me there you take me where
the kingdom comes. You take me to
and lead me through Babylon.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
I feel you your heart it sings.
I feel you the joy it brings.
Where heaven waits there's golden
gates and back again. You take me to
and lead me through oblivion.
Where angels sing spread their wings
my love's on high. You take me home
to glory's throne by and by.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.

Last edited by Architecture lover; November 23rd, 2018 at 07:26 PM.
Architecture lover está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old November 26th, 2018, 12:01 PM   #9
Architecture lover
Purple Blooded
 
Architecture lover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Illyria
Posts: 2,874
Likes (Received): 4428

People of the Venetian Republic

ANTONIO CANOVA | BORN: 1 NOVEMBER 1757 POSSAGNO, REPUBLIC OF VENICE

I. Antonio Canova was an Italian Neoclassical sculptor, famous for his marble sculptures.
II. Often regarded as the greatest of the Neoclassical artists,
his artwork was inspired by the Baroque and the classical revival,
but avoided the melodramatics of the former, and the cold artificiality of the latter.



The monument where he was buried | October 25, 1822, Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari, Venice, Italy


Source

Below are some of his famous works.
Pauline Bonaparte as Venus Victrix | 1808


Rome_6M7A0878 by Jan HallbŠck, on Flickr

Theseus and the Centaur | 1819


canova_theseus_centaur_1819 by Art Gallery ErgsArt - by ErgSap, on Flickr

Hebe | 1796



Napoleon as Mars the Peacemaker | 1806
The original marble went to the United Kingdom. This is a bronze copy in a courtyard in Milan.


Source


Source


Source

__________________
You take me there you take me where
the kingdom comes. You take me to
and lead me through Babylon.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
I feel you your heart it sings.
I feel you the joy it brings.
Where heaven waits there's golden
gates and back again. You take me to
and lead me through oblivion.
Where angels sing spread their wings
my love's on high. You take me home
to glory's throne by and by.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
Architecture lover está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old November 26th, 2018, 08:29 PM   #10
GeneratorNL
From Holland with love
 
GeneratorNL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Antwerp / Rotterdam
Posts: 4,834
Likes (Received): 7517

Amazing thread! I can see you've put a lot of work in it. Please continue!
GeneratorNL está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old November 26th, 2018, 11:22 PM   #11
Architecture lover
Purple Blooded
 
Architecture lover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Illyria
Posts: 2,874
Likes (Received): 4428

Thank you! Currently I'm obsessing with the Venetian Republic and all the mystic haze it caused.
After all, these people decided to construct a city (even more a Republic) over a lagoon.

Sometimes I feel like we (Europeans) fall so low. I saw a massive dam built in China for some of its huge rivers that were flooding a lot of regions.
The Venetian lagoon is the perfect place for such dam, and it doesn't even have to be so big, to protect this authentic diamond of a city from further floods + sinking - the last remain of the few Byzantine jewels in Europe.

This photo shows the exact places were such 'Gates' for water in and out of the lagoon were supposed to get constructed. Corruption and unwillingness stood on the project's way for too many years now. If we had them built by now, people could've focus on reconstruction on the Venetian Gothic palaces all over the place.
The first flood happened in the 60's - after people throw some industrial waste in the Venetian lagoon.



Anyways there will be more of me in this thread! Cheers to you, I'm happy that you enjoy this thread!
__________________
You take me there you take me where
the kingdom comes. You take me to
and lead me through Babylon.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
I feel you your heart it sings.
I feel you the joy it brings.
Where heaven waits there's golden
gates and back again. You take me to
and lead me through oblivion.
Where angels sing spread their wings
my love's on high. You take me home
to glory's throne by and by.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
Architecture lover está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old November 27th, 2018, 12:00 AM   #12
keepthepast
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 1,263
Likes (Received): 2404

good to be obsessing on something as nice as Venice. Great thread and thank you the effort!
keepthepast no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 1st, 2018, 06:57 PM   #13
Architecture lover
Purple Blooded
 
Architecture lover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Illyria
Posts: 2,874
Likes (Received): 4428

SANTA MARIA ZOBENIGO

I. The Chiesa di Santa Maria del Giglio is a church in Venice, Italy.
II. The church, whose name translates into St. Mary of the Lily referring to the flower
classically depicted as being presented by the Angel Gabriel during the Annunciation.
III. The edifice is situated on the Campo Santa Maria Zobenigo, west of the Piazza San Marco.
IV. It was rebuilt by Giuseppe Sardi for Admiral Antonio Barbaro between 1678 and 1681
and has one of the finest Venetian Baroque facades in all of Venice.





Source


Venice Underwater by Alvise Dorigo, on Flickr


Different Eras - Self Glorification by Luc Boonen, on Flickr


Source


Source


Source
__________________
You take me there you take me where
the kingdom comes. You take me to
and lead me through Babylon.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
I feel you your heart it sings.
I feel you the joy it brings.
Where heaven waits there's golden
gates and back again. You take me to
and lead me through oblivion.
Where angels sing spread their wings
my love's on high. You take me home
to glory's throne by and by.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.

Notgnirracen, PeruGian12, franciscoc liked this post
Architecture lover está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old December 2nd, 2018, 01:42 AM   #14
Architecture lover
Purple Blooded
 
Architecture lover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Illyria
Posts: 2,874
Likes (Received): 4428

CA' D'ORO | PALAZZO SANTA SOFIA

I. One of the older palaces in the city, it is known as Ca' d'Oro ("golden house")
due to the gilt and polychrome external decorations which once adorned its walls.
II. The palace was built between 1428 and 1430 for the Contarini family,
who provided Venice with eight Doges between 1043 and 1676.
III. The architects of the Ca d'Oro were Giovanni Bon and his son Bartolomeo Bon.






Carlo Naya (1822-1881) - "Venice. Ca' D'Oro Palace".


Source


Ca' d' Oro by Cool Zoom, on Flickr


Venice 2006 slides by dvdbramhall, on Flickr



Venezia - Ca D'oro by Xavier Rius, on Flickr


Veneza by AndesSemParar, on Flickr


Source


Venise-412 by shogunangel, on Flickr


Patio Ca' d'Oro by Luis Freire, on Flickr


Ca' d'Oro_ piano terra by z t, on Flickr


Ca d'Oro 02 by Luigi Tiriticco, on Flickr


Mosaics at the Ca' d'Oro, Venice by Rubicon Explorer, on Flickr


fullsizeoutput_1b394 by dvdbramhall, on Flickr
__________________
You take me there you take me where
the kingdom comes. You take me to
and lead me through Babylon.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
I feel you your heart it sings.
I feel you the joy it brings.
Where heaven waits there's golden
gates and back again. You take me to
and lead me through oblivion.
Where angels sing spread their wings
my love's on high. You take me home
to glory's throne by and by.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
Architecture lover está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old December 2nd, 2018, 10:34 PM   #15
Architecture lover
Purple Blooded
 
Architecture lover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Illyria
Posts: 2,874
Likes (Received): 4428

What's Byzantine in Veneta

CA' LOREDAN

I. Ca' Loredan is a former palace of the Loredan family in Venice, northern Italy.
II. It is located in the sestiere (district) of San Marco, and faces the Canal Grande, not far from the Ponte di Rialto.
III. Together with the annexed Ca' Farsetti, it is currently home to the city's municipal council.
IV. It features a beautiful Byzantine pillared entrance.





Carlo Naya - Palazzo Loredan, Venezia, ca 1880 by The History of Photography Archive, on Flickr


Source


Ca' Loredan, Venezia by SebastiÓ Giralt, on Flickr


Source


Ca' Farsetti e Palazzo Loredan - Canal Grande, Venezia by Dan, on Flickr
__________________
You take me there you take me where
the kingdom comes. You take me to
and lead me through Babylon.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
I feel you your heart it sings.
I feel you the joy it brings.
Where heaven waits there's golden
gates and back again. You take me to
and lead me through oblivion.
Where angels sing spread their wings
my love's on high. You take me home
to glory's throne by and by.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.

franciscoc, PeruGian12, Notgnirracen liked this post
Architecture lover está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old December 6th, 2018, 05:35 PM   #16
A l e x
marochini putane casini
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Venetia
Posts: 9,683
Likes (Received): 7287

Quote:
Originally Posted by Architecture lover View Post
Thank you! Currently I'm obsessing with the Venetian Republic and all the mystic haze it caused.
After all, these people decided to construct a city (even more a Republic) over a lagoon.

Sometimes I feel like we (Europeans) fall so low. I saw a massive dam built in China for some of its huge rivers that were flooding a lot of regions.
The Venetian lagoon is the perfect place for such dam, and it doesn't even have to be so big, to protect this authentic diamond of a city from further floods + sinking - the last remain of the few Byzantine jewels in Europe.

This photo shows the exact places were such 'Gates' for water in and out of the lagoon were supposed to get constructed. Corruption and unwillingness stood on the project's way for too many years now. If we had them built by now, people could've focus on reconstruction on the Venetian Gothic palaces all over the place.
The first flood happened in the 60's - after people throw some industrial waste in the Venetian lagoon.

Anyways there will be more of me in this thread! Cheers to you, I'm happy that you enjoy this thread!
You can't build a dam between a lagoon and the sea and still call it a lagoon. Sea water entering the lagoon twice a day is essential for the survival of the city and the lagoon's ecosystem, keeping salinity high and eliminating waste.

That's the reason why the MOSE project, scheduled to be partly operational next fall, is a mobile structure, blocking the inlets when exceptional phenomenons takes place, and disappearing under water once the tide has retired. It is true that the project has been riddled with corruption and design flaws and now that it's about to be completed the main concern is about the enormous maintenance costs that the structure will have.

As for the floods (called "acqua alta", high water), they have always existed, but their frequence and severity dramatically increased during the XX century, mostly because intensive use of fresh water from the aquifer by the industrial port of Marghera caused the seabed to lower significantly.

Since the early days of the Republic venetians took extensive measures to defend their lagoon from both erosion and swampification. Rivers were deviated, the sandbars ("lidi") separating the lagoon from the sea were reinforced, buildings were elevated.

The exceptional acqua alta from 1966 resulted as a combination of factors: as I cited a progressive lowering of the seabed caused by extensive water pumping (no waste spills involved) made the city more vulnerable. Furthermore, lack of maintenance of the centuries-old defence barriers on the lidi allowed the water to enter the lagoon from everywhere, not just the inlets. The general morphological decay of the lagoon exacerbated the process.

And, of course, there were extreme weather conditions: exceptional rains had caused severe floods throughout Italy (notably in Florence). In Venice, strong south-east winds (the main cause of acqua alta) enhanced the peak of the astronomical tide and the old barriers on the lidi were overthrown by the huge mass of water entering from the sea. The first tide wave being trapped inside the lagoon by the wind, allowing the second one to come six hours later without the first had flowed back to the Adriatic sea.

The acqua alta of 1966 caused tremendous damage to the city's fabric, with most ground floors being abandoned by their inhabitants in the following years. On the other hand, the event raised awareness all over the world about the fragility of Venice and the necessity of taking action to prevent further damage.

Half a century later the city is still in great danger, although a lot has been done and further work is on the way.
__________________
var Stato = true;
var soldiRubati = 0;
while (Stato) {
soldiRubati++;
}

Cameraman89, Union.SLO liked this post
A l e x no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 7th, 2018, 12:36 PM   #17
Architecture lover
Purple Blooded
 
Architecture lover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Illyria
Posts: 2,874
Likes (Received): 4428

There was a beautiful research by the BBC, a lady had written a column and to paraphrase her words, here's what she said: "When I first visited Venice, I've realized only people from Italy could've built something like that, only they could've come up with such idea initially (well before others as usually), and only they could nonchalantly see their city flooded for several times from the 60's onward and do, basically nothing, until they learn the city itself started sinking, so it's not just the flooding anymore.

Your MOSE project - it has so far cost more than five billion euros, yet the panels that were already built got a mechanical problem and got stuck underwater, so they were basically unusable. Don't even let me started on the fact they do not protect the city from bigger floods. I remember your mayor was arrested in a major corruption scandal because of that very same project, or wasn't he? What happened to the people who were once masters of infrastructure? Who built roads, massive aqueducts, and thousands of amphitheaters across an Empire that was far bigger than Italy nowadays. You have Italy today and you can't even manage its internal affairs because of corruption? What happened to the line: "Aut inveniam viam aut faciam" - "I shall either find a way or make one." I believe it resonated with the people from that peninsula perfectly. I guess I was wrong.

The Nederlands is bellow sea level, yet it manages to keep un-flooded, some of its projects that were build with extremely similar systems of elevation of panels used to cost no more the 500 millions, and unlike those of Venice, they work. Go figure.

My interest in Venice comes from the actual Latin people from Byzantium who used to live on most of the Balkan peninsula as native people, before the Slavic came. The natives left Constantinople and went to found Venice, while the city of Constantinople immediately fall to the Ottomans, leading to 500 years of what we call over here - Ottoman slavery, where people were forced to convert from Christianity into Islam quite forcefully. The Latins of this peninsula were the actual Byzantines - no wonder they themselves called Byzantium - an Eastern Roman Empire, the term Byzantium was coined only in the Renaissance to make a nice distinction between the ancient Roman Republic and the later stages.

Anyways, nothing worse than a lion that fall asleep. If Venice stands for lions well I better hope they wake up and do something clean without dirty corruption and misery to protect their city. All the best on that way.
__________________
You take me there you take me where
the kingdom comes. You take me to
and lead me through Babylon.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
I feel you your heart it sings.
I feel you the joy it brings.
Where heaven waits there's golden
gates and back again. You take me to
and lead me through oblivion.
Where angels sing spread their wings
my love's on high. You take me home
to glory's throne by and by.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
Architecture lover está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old December 7th, 2018, 05:43 PM   #18
A l e x
marochini putane casini
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Venetia
Posts: 9,683
Likes (Received): 7287

Quote:
Originally Posted by Architecture lover View Post
There was a beautiful research by the BBC, a lady had written a column and to paraphrase her words, here's what she said: "When I first visited Venice, I've realized only people from Italy could've built something like that, only they could've come up with such idea initially (well before others as usually), and only they could nonchalantly see their city flooded for several times from the 60's onward and do, basically nothing, until they learn the city itself started sinking, so it's not just the flooding anymore.

Your MOSE project - it has so far cost more than five billion euros, yet the panels that were already built got a mechanical problem and got stuck underwater, so they were basically unusable. Don't even let me started on the fact they do not protect the city from bigger floods. I remember your mayor was arrested in a major corruption scandal because of that very same project, or wasn't he? What happened to the people who were once masters of infrastructure? Who built roads, massive aqueducts, and thousands of amphitheaters across an Empire that was far bigger than Italy nowadays. You have Italy today and you can't even manage its internal affairs because of corruption? What happened to the line: "Aut inveniam viam aut faciam" - "I shall either find a way or make one." I believe it resonated with the people from that peninsula perfectly. I guess I was wrong.

The Nederlands is bellow sea level, yet it manages to keep un-flooded, some of its projects that were build with extremely similar systems of elevation of panels used to cost no more the 500 millions, and unlike those of Venice, they work. Go figure.
I'm not defending the MOSE project, and I think nobody in Venice would. It's a solution, but for a number of reasons it's by far not the best they could come up with.
The project itself was developed, conducted and paid for by the Italian government, completely overriding the local authorities and in fact going against the position of the city council.
As sometimes happens with projects this big, when there is no local involvement and those who are supposed to control look the other way, money gets wasted and corruption flourishes. Not only in Italy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Architecture lover View Post
My interest in Venice comes from the actual Latin people from Byzantium who used to live on most of the Balkan peninsula as native people, before the Slavic came. The natives left Constantinople and went to found Venice, while the city of Constantinople immediately fall to the Ottomans, leading to 500 years of what we call over here - Ottoman slavery, where people were forced to convert from Christianity into Islam quite forcefully. The Latins of this peninsula were the actual Byzantines - no wonder they themselves called Byzantium - an Eastern Roman Empire, the term Byzantium was coined only in the Renaissance to make a nice distinction between the ancient Roman Republic and the later stages.
Venice was not founded by people from Costantinoples, although the strict connection between the city and the Eastern Roman Empire allowed it to prosper and keep its independence over the first centuries of its existence.

The name Venezia comes from the roman region Venetia et Histria, which derived from the ancient people Venetii (in greek enet˛i). The Venetii were allies of the Romans and eventually melted in what would become the Latin people.

The Venetian lagoon had been inhabited for centuries, mostly by small communities of fishermen and sea salt harvesters.

By the end of the Western Roman Empire, the constant Barbarian raids (especially from Huns) led thousands of inhabitants from the surrounding roman cities of Altinum, Tarvisium, Patavium and Iulia Concordia to flee to the lagoon for safety. The first permanent settlements were scattered throughout the lagoon, that back then was much larger, going from Ravenna to Duino.

During the gothic war the lagoon fell under control of the Exarcate, but differently from other territories controlled by the Greek, Venetia soon rejected the byzantine duke and elected its own. The Empire reacted but a second revolt forced the Emperor to concede the Venetian settlements to elect their own leader, a practice that would end up lasting more than a thousand years.

Note that by the time the Exarcate had come to an end, Venice didn't even formally exist yet. It was only later, when the political and religious power settled near the market of Rivo Alto (Rialto), that the city of Venice was officially born. From there on it outgrew in importance every other settlement, to the point that today only a few of those still exist.

Even if the city was still part of the Eastern Roman Empire, its ties with Costantinople progressively weakened and by the IX century the connection was merely formal. Nonetheless, Venice kept boasting these ties for political purposes, because being formally part of a different catholic Roman Empire (even if in fact independent) allowed it to keep its independence from the Holy Roman Empire.

This didn't stop them from sacking Costantinople during the IV Crusade, an event that eventually led to the fall of the city to the turks and the end of the Empire. But, by then, Venice was already an independent Maritime superpower and had been so for centuries.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Architecture lover View Post
Anyways, nothing worse than a lion that fall asleep. If Venice stands for lions well I better hope they wake up and do something clean without dirty corruption and misery to protect their city. All the best on that way.
Venice today is only the shadow of what it used to be, a precious mausoleum of its former power and glory. The conquest by Napoleon and later the annexation to Italy caused an irreversible decline to the city that once was considered to be the richest in the world.

So the lion is non asleep, he's dead for good. Today the city is part of one of the richest regions of Italy, Veneto, that partly encompasses its former land dominions. Its heritage is still strong, as is his cultural legacy. The people of Veneto still largely speak and understand the venetian language, and the marble lions of St. Mark still ornate its cities' squares and buildings, as they do in Istria and on the greek islands that were once part of the Republic.

But when it comes to political and economical power, Venice is simply no longer relevant. What remains is a complicated city with complicated problems, with its incomparable beauty being the incipit of its death sentence.
__________________
var Stato = true;
var soldiRubati = 0;
while (Stato) {
soldiRubati++;
}

Architecture lover, Roman_P liked this post
A l e x no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 8th, 2018, 01:06 PM   #19
Architecture lover
Purple Blooded
 
Architecture lover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Illyria
Posts: 2,874
Likes (Received): 4428

It is pretty much as you've said it. But many people miss the fact that half of the Balkan peninsula had Latin speaking people as its inhabitants, and they were native people here (now just as minorities, which I believe it's truly a shame) they used to live north of the Greeks ever since antiquity, and most definitely helped making the Slavic people educated since they had no alphabet when they came here in the VI century, their alphabet was written by families who used to live in Thessaloniki.

Emperor Justinian of the Byzantines was born near Skopje, and he himself was actually a native Latin speaker - noted as the guy who built the Agia Sophia, the landmark church of Constantinople - now Istanbul.
Constantinople used to have a Latin speaking population almost till the very end, or to be precise till the usurper Andronikos Komnenos of the Greeks, made the infamous Massacre of the Latins in April 1182. An event that later led to the the sack of Constantinople in the IV Crusade, by the Latins who used to seek revenge (this does not imply I justify those acts). After Andronikos Komnenos made the massacre of Constantinople most of the Latin speaking people fled to Venice, and that's why so many buildings in Venice look Byzantine, those people took the construction techniques along with them. Those horses posted few posts above were once in Constantinople, the purple marble pillars, it is all so Roman in character, and after the Latin people were forced to leave their own home, of course they were willing to take back to Venice, what they've considered to be their's.

If there was no Latin people in Byzantium, there wouldn't have been any single reason for them to call themselves Eastern Roman Empire. The people who controlled the finance in Constantinople were Latin, very well to the infamous massacre.

The fall of Byzantium in my opinion didn't happened with the Turks attacking us. It happened when the Greeks started to disagree with the Latins in a city in which they both lived together for a millennium.

Your last paragraph makes me truly sad, because it's an undisputed truth. I believe modern Italy shouldn't ignore Byzantium, or attribute it as a Greek Empire, it was not. It was an empire where both Greek and Latin people used to live and cooperate, and it was called an Eastern Roman Empire.
Here we celebrate Byzantium because of people who built the giant marvels such like the Agia Sophia, because they knew how to organize and manage a society. No one should ignore the fact they were Latin. Why? No Latin people - no Agia Sophia. No Agia Sophia - no Byzantine legacy. I hope you can partly understand what I'm willing to say.
__________________
You take me there you take me where
the kingdom comes. You take me to
and lead me through Babylon.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
I feel you your heart it sings.
I feel you the joy it brings.
Where heaven waits there's golden
gates and back again. You take me to
and lead me through oblivion.
Where angels sing spread their wings
my love's on high. You take me home
to glory's throne by and by.
This is the morning of our love.
It's just the dawning of our love.
Architecture lover está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old December 13th, 2018, 05:54 PM   #20
A l e x
marochini putane casini
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Venetia
Posts: 9,683
Likes (Received): 7287

__________________
var Stato = true;
var soldiRubati = 0;
while (Stato) {
soldiRubati++;
}
A l e x no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 04:36 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us