Flagstaff, AZ: East Route 66, Sunnyside - SkyscraperCity
 

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Old January 2nd, 2019, 05:57 AM   #1
xzmattzx
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Flagstaff, AZ: East Route 66, Sunnyside

East Route 66 is a linear neighborhood, made up of the business strip along the historic US Route 66 corridor east of Downtown Flagstaff. The neighborhood begins east of Downtown, just past Elden Street, and ends at the split between the old Route 66 and current US Route 89, just west of Country Club Drive. The neighborhood developed when US Route 66 was commissioned in 1926, utilizing the National Old trails Highway that was built in the 1910s. As the main "Okie" route, providing a route west to California from the Dust Bowl-ravaged Oklahoma, Route 66 brought drivers from the Midwest and Great Plains. Hotels and motels, gas stations, and restaurants sprouted up along the road since people needed food, provisions, and lodging on their way west. After the Great Depression and World War II, traveling for pleasure supplanted traveling out of necessity, and even more motels and other businesses opened up along the route.

Interstate 40 was completed in 1968, taking away most of Flagstaff's east-west through-traffic. Community involvement stipulated interchanges to allow travellers to exit and utilize local businesses, which helped keep Route 66 businesses from withering away. In 1993, the old Route 66 right-of-way, known as Santa Fe Avenue, was renamed Route 66, to capitalize on growing interest in post-war times and architecture.

Today, East Route 66 still serves tourists looking for cheap lodging, but increasingly serves local residents. Slowly, mid-century motels from Route 66's heyday are being demolished for modern buildings, many of which lack a distinctive architectural style that was more common when the old motels needed to lure weary travelers to comfortable rooms. Still, East Route 66, together with Downtown Flagstaff and West Route 66, comprise the largest concentration of Route 66 buildings anywhere along the old route.


Buildings on East Route 66.



The Whispering Winds Motel, on East Route 66 below Cherry Hill.



The Dog Haus, on East Route 66 at Switzer Canyon Road. The restaurant was built in the late 1960s. The building was originally the Der Weinerschnitzel, which was the place where Jackson Browne, co-author of the Eagles' hit song "Take It Easy", was ogled by a woman in a Toyota truck as she pulled out of the parking lot. Browne incorporated the moment, which was attributed to the town of Winslow for artistic liberty, into the song.



Relax Inn, on East Route 66 by Switzer Canyon Road.



Travelers Inn, on East Route 66 by Switzer Mesa. The motel was built in 1948, and was originally the Skyline Motel.



The Travelodge, on East Route 66. The motel was originally the King's House Hotel.



Western Hills Motel, on East Route 66 at Ponderosa Parkway. The motel was built in 1953, and features the oldest neon sign in Flagstaff.



America's Best Value Inn, on East Route 66 below McMillan Mesa.



Wonderland Motel, on East Route 66 near the eastern edge of McMillan Mesa. The hotel was built in 1956.



The 66 Motel, on East Route 66 near Main Street.



The Rodeway Inn, on East Route 66. The motel was originally the Royal Inn.



A mechanic shop, on East Route 66 at 1st Street.



The Flagstaff Motel, on East Route 66 at 1st Street.



A Walgreen's, on East Route 66 at 4th Street. The store is evidence of Route 66's transition to a local highway, with I-40 built to the south.



The Americana Inn, on East Route 66 near Postal Boulevard.



A body shop on East Route 66.



The Mountain View Inn, on East Route 66. The motel was originally the Geronimo Motel.



The Best Western Pony Soldier, on East Route 66 near Steves Boulevard. The motel was built in 1963 as the Pony Soldier Hotel.



Miz Zip's, on East Route 66 near Steves Boulevard. The restaurant opened in 1942.



El Pueblo Motel, on East Route 66. The motel was built in 1936.



The motel was opened by Phillip Johnson, who is famous for developing the Navajo Code Talker program in World War II.



A mechanic shop, on East Route 66 near Park Drive. The shop was originally a Phillips 66 "batwing"-style gas station, and was built in 1963.



An auto shop, on East Route 66 at Park Drive.



The Crown Railroad Café, on East Route 66. The restaurant was built in the mid 1960s.



The Museum Club, on East Route 66 near Park Drive. The log structure was originally built by Dean Eldredge as his house and taxidermy museum.



When Eldredge died in 1936, it was turned into a nightclub.



Starlite Lanes, on East Route 66. The bowling alley was built in 1957.



Many modern buildings along East Route 66, like these at Fanning Drive, house chain restaurants.



Mount Elden towers over much of Flagstaff, including East Route 66, rising to 9,301 feet in elevation, with a topographic prominence of 1,219 feet.



The businesses along Route 66 basically reach an eastern terminus where Route 66 splits with US Route 89, which heads north towards Glen Canyon Dam. Beyond this modernist-style sign at East Route 66 and US Route 89 is a section of paving of Route 66 when it was straightened as it entered Flagstaff in 1947. The section is now preserved as part of a bicycle path.






Sunnyside is a neighborhood on the east side of Flagstaff, on the other side of McMillan Mesa from Downtown. The neighborhood is bounded by McMillan Mesa to the west, East Route 66 to the south, Fourth Street to the east, and Cedar Avenue to the north.

The neighborhood was developed in 1925, on what was originally a ranch. Sunnyside, along with Greenlaw Estates, was collectively known as East Flagstaff while unincorporated. The neighborhood was annexed into Flagstaff in 1959. Originally populated with prominent upper middle class White families, Sunnyside now also has substantial Hispanic population. While the neighborhood had higher crime in the 1990s and into the 2000s as upper middle class residents moved to other areas of town, Sunnyside has seen its crime go down significantly in recent years.


Sunnyside is marked with these distinctive street signs.



Houses on First Street.



Houses on First Avenue.



A house on First Street, with another house on Second Avenue in the distance.



A Mexican restaurant, at Second Street and Second Avenue.



Houses on Second Street.



Houses on Second Street.



Houses on Fourth Avenue.



A church on Fourth Avenue.



Houses on First Street.



Houses on Main Street.



A house on East Street.



A Mormon church on East Street.



Apartments on Sixth Avenue.



Apartments on Sixth Avenue.



An elementary school on Sixth Avenue.



Houses on Rose Street.



A building on Sixth Avenue.



A house on Center Street.



Houses on Colanthe Avenue.



A bank on West Street.

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Old February 21st, 2019, 04:31 AM   #2
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Thank you for these photos - I lived for three years in Northern AZ, and it's good to see that stretch hasn't changed; it was already a 'classic' in the 90s. I stayed at the Pueblo and other very inexpensive old motels along 66 when i'd visit Flagstaff. The oldest motels were $19/night back then.
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Old February 27th, 2019, 05:57 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjfjapan View Post
Thank you for these photos - I lived for three years in Northern AZ, and it's good to see that stretch hasn't changed; it was already a 'classic' in the 90s. I stayed at the Pueblo and other very inexpensive old motels along 66 when i'd visit Flagstaff. The oldest motels were $19/night back then.
Apparently things are changing slowly. A couple of the mid-century motels were demolished in the last 10 years. But for the most part, it appears to be intact. The motels are still cheap. I stayed in one a couple years ago for $35!
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