The Big Space Exploration Thread - Page 241 - SkyscraperCity
 

forums map | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Fun Forums > Space, Science & Technology

Space, Science & Technology shaping tomorrow's world


Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old September 14th, 2019, 08:38 AM   #4801
RyukyuRhymer
普通モデレーター Moderator
 
RyukyuRhymer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: お前のお尻
Posts: 2,302
Likes (Received): 8396

Water vapor detected for the first time in an exoplanet!

this video explains about its situation well and its challenges in harboring life

__________________
Visit the:
Japan Thread

will101 liked this post
RyukyuRhymer no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old September 14th, 2019, 11:44 AM   #4802
Kyll.Ing.
Registered User
 
Kyll.Ing.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Trondheim
Posts: 1,865
Likes (Received): 5987

Quote:
Originally Posted by RyukyuRhymer View Post
Water vapor detected for the first time in an exoplanet!

this video explains about its situation well and its challenges in harboring life
So does XKCD, a little quicker:

Source
__________________
Kyll.Ing. está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old September 17th, 2019, 07:52 AM   #4803
japanese001
Registered User
 
japanese001's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 4,192
Likes (Received): 1235

SpaceX Starhopper
https://www.spacex.com/



China Link Space
http://linkspace.com.cn/

__________________

mopc, streetscapeer, Anticalaca, will101 liked this post

Last edited by japanese001; September 17th, 2019 at 07:59 AM.
japanese001 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 17th, 2019, 07:29 PM   #4804
mopc
Registered User
 
mopc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Santos Sao Paulo
Posts: 18,961
Likes (Received): 18406

Awesome. We need many SpaceX's around the world, so that space can finally happen
__________________
THREAD TO ACCESS ALL MY THREADS
BRAZIL URBAN TRANSPORT COMPILATION - full updates of all projects on first page!
BRAZIL GENERAL INFRASTRUCTURE -
LINGU═STICA - CETICISMO

Teslatron liked this post
mopc no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 23rd, 2019, 02:30 PM   #4805
bd popeye
Registered User
 
bd popeye's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Cedar Rapids IA USA
Posts: 12,364
Likes (Received): 17938

CHINA


A Long March-3B carrier rocket blasts into space with the 47th and 48th satellites of BeiDou Navigation Satellite System at 05:10 a.m. from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in Sichuan Province, Sept. 23, 2019. (Photo: China News Service/Zhang Wenjun)




A Long March-3B carrier rocket blasts into space with the 47th and 48th satellites of BeiDou Navigation Satellite System at 05:10 a.m. from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in Sichuan Province, Sept. 23, 2019. (Photo: China News Service/Zhang Wenjun)

__________________
Big Daddy Popeye US Navy/retired

August 1971 - August 1991

I yam what I yam!

Chinese Around the World Daily Photos!!!| SSC

Today's United States Navy...| SSC

Old Pics New York City! | SSC

Anticalaca, will101 liked this post

Last edited by bd popeye; September 23rd, 2019 at 03:20 PM.
bd popeye no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 23rd, 2019, 05:06 PM   #4806
Anticalaca
Registered User
 
Anticalaca's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 1,330
Likes (Received): 1428

The Starhopper is very interesting because finally we have a reliable retro-rocket ship that can acomplish a soft landing.

But, that's it. Space X is and probably will be, at most, a cargo service contractor to the ISS. It didn't even send a human to LEO so far, and the time aches. Their promises fall year by year.
Anticalaca no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 23rd, 2019, 06:41 PM   #4807
Teslatron
Registered User
 
Teslatron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Brooklyn, New York
Posts: 268
Likes (Received): 549

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anticalaca View Post
The Starhopper is very interesting because finally we have a reliable retro-rocket ship that can acomplish a soft landing.

But, that's it. Space X is and probably will be, at most, a cargo service contractor to the ISS. It didn't even send a human to LEO so far, and the time aches. Their promises fall year by year.
They will be sending 2 people to the ISS sometime later this year/early next year. Sending humans to LEO was never their goal in the first place, so unless someone pays them, they are not sending anyone to LEO or the Moon. I also do not understand why you think they are slow/stagnant... Sure their promises and schedule are aggressive, but even with delays, they still have a much faster pace of innovation compared to their competition.
__________________

Marsupalami liked this post
Teslatron no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 23rd, 2019, 06:42 PM   #4808
Kyll.Ing.
Registered User
 
Kyll.Ing.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Trondheim
Posts: 1,865
Likes (Received): 5987

Their schedule last slipped when their testing spare Dragon 2 capsule went through an unscheduled disassembly during a test of the abort system. Their first manned flight is still scheduled for "late 2019", but I believe they have to undergo an in-flight abort test first, which is still not on the schedule. So yeah, I'd expect to have to wait for Space X to send up people for at least half a year more, possibly a year and a half. That being said, if not for that failure their first crewed launch would have been the day before yesterday. They are getting closer and closer to the date. It will be exciting to see of Boeing's schedule holds, with Starliner launching with people in November.
Kyll.Ing. está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old September 23rd, 2019, 09:15 PM   #4809
Anticalaca
Registered User
 
Anticalaca's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 1,330
Likes (Received): 1428

Quote:
Originally Posted by Teslatron View Post
They will be sending 2 people to the ISS sometime later this year/early next year. Sending humans to LEO was never their goal in the first place, so unless someone pays them, they are not sending anyone to LEO or the Moon. I also do not understand why you think they are slow/stagnant... Sure their promises and schedule are aggressive, but even with delays, they still have a much faster pace of innovation compared to their competition.
Sending people to the ISS is sending them to LEO, of course. So, I would say its their goal. Musk say they will do it and each time is delayed.

SpaceX existed from more than 10 years. Such a pace is dissapoiting to say the least. NASA was created in 1958 with no space experience, 3 years later they made a ballistic flight, 4 years later they made an orbital flight, and 10 years later they sent people to orbit the Moon.

Most of us remember SpaceX was going to (circumnavegate) the Moon in 2018. Even if they manage to send people to the ISS once in the nearly future, I wonder how cheaper could be. NASA's got 50 years of experience. The russians got their Soyuz. Only time will say.

I don't think they're slow or stagnant. They are a private contractor with risk investments, and I figure they can do that much, that's all. Even if NASA and the tax payed money are the ones that go with the bill with some contracts, SpaceX has a top. Sending cargo to the ISS is a great deal, no doubt about it. But, they showed their probable limit.
Anticalaca no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 23rd, 2019, 09:40 PM   #4810
Teslatron
Registered User
 
Teslatron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Brooklyn, New York
Posts: 268
Likes (Received): 549

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anticalaca View Post
Sending people to the ISS is sending them to LEO, of course. So, I would say its their goal. Musk say they will do it and each time is delayed.
Sending humans to LEO or the Moon is not Elon Musk's goal. He will do it only to make money for his R&D. His goal is to go to Mars, not LEO or the Moon. ISS cargo/human flights/satellite launch is just a business for him to get enough funds to build a rocket to go to Mars.
Quote:
SpaceX existed from more than 10 years. Such a pace is dissapoiting to say the least.
No, this is a very fast pace in the rocket business. For example, NASA has been building the Orion capsule alone for the past 15 years, at an R&D cost far greater than what SpaceX spend on building Falcon 1, Falcon 9, Falcon Heavy, reusable first stage, drone ships, Dragon capsule, new test stands, launch sites, factories, new rocket engines, etc. Just to to give another example, the closest private US competitor to SpaceX is Blue Origin, and they have been around for longer than SpaceX, haven't achieved nearly as much, and Bezos put a lot more money into that company compared to what Musk put into SpaceX.
Quote:
NASA was created in 1958 with no space experience, 3 years later they made a ballistic flight, 4 years later they made an orbital flight, and 10 years later they sent people to orbit the Moon.
NASA did it with an army of 100,000 people and a virtually unlimited budget (I believe the Apollo program was 4% of the total US federal budget). SpaceX is a private effort using a miniscule amount of funds compared to that.
Quote:
Most of us remember SpaceX was going to (circumnavegate) the Moon in 2018.
That is because the individual who booked that flight changed plans and wants to go on the Starship instead of the original Dragon2.
Quote:
Even if they manage to send people to the ISS once in the nearly future, I wonder how cheaper could be. NASA's got 50 years of experience. The russians got their Soyuz. Only time will say.
It will be an order of magnitude cheaper than NASA solution (SLS+Orion, or Space Shuttle before that).
__________________

Diggerdog, Anticalaca, SvŠrtede, tram liked this post

Last edited by Teslatron; September 23rd, 2019 at 09:53 PM.
Teslatron no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 24th, 2019, 02:15 AM   #4811
Diggerdog
Registered User
 
Diggerdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 4,513
Likes (Received): 2656

Lol first time I have heard someone trying to explain how NASA gets things done faster than SpaceX

SpaceX is absolutely groundbreaking, a desperately needed breath of fresh air. The innovation and pace they developed the reusable rockets was nothing short of amazing. Without them, well - too depressing to contemplate actually.
Mars is the main goal obviously - and thanks to SpaceX we have a real chance of getting there in a few years. If we were still relying on NASA that would be decades
__________________

Kyll.Ing., Teslatron, Marsupalami liked this post
Diggerdog no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 24th, 2019, 04:23 AM   #4812
Anticalaca
Registered User
 
Anticalaca's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 1,330
Likes (Received): 1428

Quote:
Originally Posted by Teslatron View Post
Sending humans to LEO or the Moon is not Elon Musk's goal. He will do it only to make money for his R&D. His goal is to go to Mars, not LEO or the Moon. ISS cargo/human flights/satellite launch is just a business for him to get enough funds to build a rocket to go to Mars.

No, this is a very fast pace in the rocket business. For example, NASA has been building the Orion capsule alone for the past 15 years, at an R&D cost far greater than what SpaceX spend on building Falcon 1, Falcon 9, Falcon Heavy, reusable first stage, drone ships, Dragon capsule, new test stands, launch sites, factories, new rocket engines, etc. Just to to give another example, the closest private US competitor to SpaceX is Blue Origin, and they have been around for longer than SpaceX, haven't achieved nearly as much, and Bezos put a lot more money into that company compared to what Musk put into SpaceX.

NASA did it with an army of 100,000 people and a virtually unlimited budget (I believe the Apollo program was 4% of the total US federal budget). SpaceX is a private effort using a miniscule amount of funds compared to that.

That is because the individual who booked that flight changed plans and wants to go on the Starship instead of the original Dragon2.

It will be an order of magnitude cheaper than NASA solution (SLS+Orion, or Space Shuttle before that).
Thanks for the detailled answer. Seriously, I aprecciate your effort. Now, let's see...

Until the things made by SpaceX are done and examined, it's hard to infer if they actually would be cheaper.

Think for example in NASA in the 70's and the introduction of the Shuttle. It was going to be cheaper, they told, because it was going to be -partially- reusable. It was not cheaper. That's why it was abandoned (after waste, relativelly speaking, lots of money). And since 2011 untill today, they buy seats in the russian Soyuzs (which, by the way, were reintroduced just after the russians made a similar test with their short-lived Shuttle, the Buran)

NASA got 6 decades of experience. And hardware tested and upgraded several times. It's way possible that the SpaceX manned spacecrafts (if they happen to see the pad someday) would be a financial dellusion as the Shuttle. Maybe NASA could use their own rockets and capsules again. Not neccesarilly to go back to the Moon, but at least to go to the ISS again, like was done as routine until 2011. Going to LEO is clearly way cheaper.

NASA's current budget is not really efficient, that's for sure. I just happen to read (and then, done the maths to check it out) that NASA's spendings in the XXI century (that is, in 2001-2019) are about the same that all they happen to spend in 1958-1970 (and yes, with the obvious adjustments in $ purchase power; in fact, using the very NASA's price index chart). Of course, there are some more years in the first period, but considere the fact that NASA was built from zero in 1958-1970; the comparison is still illustrative.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Yu...upuP-kIddNYVp2
Anticalaca no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 24th, 2019, 10:32 AM   #4813
Kyll.Ing.
Registered User
 
Kyll.Ing.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Trondheim
Posts: 1,865
Likes (Received): 5987

The problem with NASA is that they are effectively micro-managed by Congress, whose instructions can and do change fundamentally every four years. The SLS is effectively a giant jobs creation program, where NASA is instructed to use these-and-those subcontractors from these-and-those states for these-and-those parts. The desired result is not to build a rocket as effective and efficiently as possible, it's to secure jobs in the home states of various Congresspeople, to help them win the next election. It's inefficient and wasteful on purpose (but at least nothing compared to Roscosmos).

The way NASA works now compared to the 1960s is staggeringly different. I agree that the shuttle was a bit of a dead end; it too was bogged down by political requirements. An engineering marvel, but hellishly expensive.

And as for NASA using their own rockets and capsules to go to the ISS, well... the problem with that is that there currently is no capsule, and there hasn't been any since the Apollo capsule was retired. Those were all replaced by the Shuttle, which hasn't itself been replaced yet. The Shuttle was the only spacecraft used by NASA to go to the ISS.

The fact of the matter is that there haven't been that many crewed spacecraft that ever went to orbit (disregarding the experimental planes that went high enough to classify as space by some definitions, but not nearly fast enough to stay up there): Mercury, Gemini, Apollo and the Shuttle. Those are all the crewed spacecraft ever flown by NASA. The Soviets (and subsequently, the Russians) only ever had three as well: Vostok (the one used by Gagarin and five others after him) Voskhod (flew only two crewed launches in '64 and '65) and Soyuz. The Chinese have only ever flown the Shenzhou, which has only flown six missions with crew on board. And those, my friend, comprise a full and complete list of spacecraft that have taken people into orbit, ever, anywhere.

Luckily, the US has three spacecraft in late stages of development: Boeing's Starliner, which seems on track to become the first one to get off the pad with people inside; SpaceX's Dragon 2, apparently slated to be the next in line; and Blue Origin's New Shepard Crew Capsule, which seems to be a few years from going to orbit. Then there's the Orion jobs creation program, in development for 15 years so far and maybe crewed flight will be achieved in three years. But Orion is a little overkill to take to the ISS, it's designed for missions much further out. NASA doesn't have any plans to build spacecraft for low Earth orbit themselves, they will just contract launches from any of the three above. I wonder what Roscosmos will do then, as they are practically kept financially afloat by selling seats on the Soyuz at extortion prices, and any replacements for Soyuz only exist on the pipe dream level.
__________________

SvŠrtede, Teslatron liked this post
Kyll.Ing. está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old September 24th, 2019, 06:01 PM   #4814
Teslatron
Registered User
 
Teslatron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Brooklyn, New York
Posts: 268
Likes (Received): 549

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyll.Ing. View Post
Luckily, the US has three spacecraft in late stages of development: Boeing's Starliner, which seems on track to become the first one to get off the pad with people inside; SpaceX's Dragon 2, apparently slated to be the next in line; and Blue Origin's New Shepard Crew Capsule, which seems to be a few years from going to orbit. Then there's the Orion jobs creation program, in development for 15 years so far and maybe crewed flight will be achieved in three years. But Orion is a little overkill to take to the ISS, it's designed for missions much further out. NASA doesn't have any plans to build spacecraft for low Earth orbit themselves, they will just contract launches from any of the three above. I wonder what Roscosmos will do then, as they are practically kept financially afloat by selling seats on the Soyuz at extortion prices, and any replacements for Soyuz only exist on the pipe dream level.
This is true when it comes to manned vehicles. There is also a cargo version of Dream Chaser that is set for launch in 2021-ish (it is obviously meant to be a manned spacecraft in the future). The new cargo resupply missions to ISS that started this year are going to be using upgraded Cygnus, Dragon 2, and Dream Chaser, and the crewed flights will be on Dragon 2 and CST-100.
US space sector is actually pretty exciting right now. Lots of all kinds of new stuff is in development.
__________________

Kyll.Ing. liked this post

Last edited by Teslatron; September 24th, 2019 at 06:09 PM.
Teslatron no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 25th, 2019, 02:14 PM   #4815
bd popeye
Registered User
 
bd popeye's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Cedar Rapids IA USA
Posts: 12,364
Likes (Received): 17938

CHINA





China sent a new satellite into planned orbit from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China's Gobi Desert on September 25, 2019.





The Yunhai-1 02 satellite, launched on a Long March-2D carrier rocket at 8:54 a.m. (Beijing Time), will be mainly used for detecting the atmospheric and marine environment and space environment, as well as disaster control and other scientific experiments. Both the satellite and the carrier rocket were developed by the Shanghai Academy of Spaceflight Technology of the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation. (Photo: China News Service/Wang Mingyan)
__________________
Big Daddy Popeye US Navy/retired

August 1971 - August 1991

I yam what I yam!

Chinese Around the World Daily Photos!!!| SSC

Today's United States Navy...| SSC

Old Pics New York City! | SSC

Orion602, Anticalaca, will101 liked this post
bd popeye no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 26th, 2019, 12:30 AM   #4816
japanese001
Registered User
 
japanese001's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 4,192
Likes (Received): 1235

__________________

srbija, GM, will101 liked this post
japanese001 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 26th, 2019, 09:39 PM   #4817
Mplsuptown
Registered User
 
Mplsuptown's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Minneapolis MN
Posts: 2,657
Likes (Received): 1156

Anyone watch Ad Astra yet? Pretty cool. There were certainly aspects of 2001 A Space Odyssey. The opening scene with the Space Elevator, the moon base that they showed, awesome, the pirate chase and the Mars base with the underwater swim. Really enjoyable but I still don't know what the name of the movie means.
__________________
I ain't got time to breed

*And Major D., just leave the angry man's post up. - spectre000

GM liked this post
Mplsuptown no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 26th, 2019, 10:41 PM   #4818
warda.yasir994
BANNED
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Posts: 1
Likes (Received): 0

This thread is nice, i love to explore space and know info on it...
warda.yasir994 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 26th, 2019, 10:47 PM   #4819
tinyslam
Registered User
 
tinyslam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 1,676
Likes (Received): 1069

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mplsuptown View Post
Anyone watch Ad Astra yet? Pretty cool. There were certainly aspects of 2001 A Space Odyssey. The opening scene with the Space Elevator, the moon base that they showed, awesome, the pirate chase and the Mars base with the underwater swim. Really enjoyable but I still don't know what the name of the movie means.
I believe it is Latin for "to the stars".
__________________

Mplsuptown liked this post
tinyslam no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 26th, 2019, 11:05 PM   #4820
GM
Vivre haut
 
GM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Nantes, RezÚ, Pays de Retz
Posts: 6,476
Likes (Received): 7484

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mplsuptown View Post
Anyone watch Ad Astra yet? Pretty cool. There were certainly aspects of 2001 A Space Odyssey. The opening scene with the Space Elevator, the moon base that they showed, awesome, the pirate chase and the Mars base with the underwater swim. Really enjoyable but I still don't know what the name of the movie means.
Yes, I really enjoyed this movie, like a mix between 2001 and Apocalypse Now.
It's quite rare to have some serious Sci-Fi movie (I mean a movie which isn't about ET robots with stupid CGI explosions) these days.
__________________
My youtube channel

Mplsuptown liked this post
GM no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 


Reply

Tags
space thread

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 12:16 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us