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Old July 14th, 2019, 10:53 PM   #421
franciscoc
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The Isabelline Gothic was the dominant architectural style of the Crown of Castile (Spain) in the late-15th century.
It represents the late Gothic, with original features and decorative influences of the Castilian tradition, the Flemish and the Mudéjar.

The dome and the Constable chapel in Burgos Cathedral











Church of San Pablo (Valladolid)









Colegio de San Gregorio (Valladolid)














Last edited by franciscoc; July 15th, 2019 at 08:35 PM.
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Old July 14th, 2019, 10:54 PM   #422
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^ I adore it. Love how they included carvings of lions. Did the Kingdom of Castile later merged with Leon? My all time favorite coat of arms from that epoch is the one by the kingdom of Leon.


After they merged with Castile this was the coat of arms of the Kingdom of Leon, am I right? I haven't done much reading on the topic, although I should. However it was all families merging and looking for interests I suppose - to me the Spanish affairs of the time appear very similar to the ones in England, even thought I admit I haven't read enough so I may be wrong.


Why do I love it so much? The answer is: the use of purple color, I adore it, it was used on the flags of the Byzantines. We've had two flags apparently (this is all very questionable - there are no proofs) yellow flag with a black double headed eagle (the one head was Rome, the other Constantinople) for peaceful time. The other was a purple flag, apparently it had a more furious looking double headed eagle - used for wartime. Now it's true the double headed eagle was used a symbol, it is also true the Byzantines got obsessed with purple silk, they named palaces after the purple color, that's how much they loved it, but still no proof about the actual flags.

The use of purple is something the Byzantines inherited from Rome - 80% of the world's porphyry (rare ancient purple marble) is still in Rome. It was excavated from Egypt.
Sorry for the long off topic.
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MARCUS VITRUVIUS POLLIO | DE ARCHITECTURA | LIBER IV
Columnae corinthiae praeter capitula omnes symmetrias habent uti ionicae,
sed capitulorum altitudines efficiunt eas pro rata excelsiores et graciliores,
quod ionici capituli altitudo tertia pars est crassitudinis columnae, corinthii tota crassitudo scapi.
igitur quod duae partes e crassitudine corinthiorum adiciuntur,
efficiunt excelsitate speciem earum graciliorem.


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Old July 14th, 2019, 10:57 PM   #423
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Palace of El Infantado (Guadalajara)













Monastery of San Juan de los Reyes (Toledo)











Castle of Manzanares el Real (Madrid)










Last edited by franciscoc; July 15th, 2019 at 08:36 PM.
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Old July 15th, 2019, 04:08 PM   #424
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Tom Tower

Christ Church, Oxford

Built: 1681-1682

Architect: Christopher Wren


Description:

The main gate to Christ Church, Oxford had always been intended to have a tower on it.
However when the building's funder, Cardinal Wolsey, fell from power in 1529, work on it stopped with only the gate itself being finished.
This would have been a very late Gothic building to begin with, but when the matter of eventually finishing it came up,
Christopher Wren argued that it "ought to be Gothick to agree with the Founders worke", thus giving it this
unique 17th century Gothic addition.

On the last picture you can see the constrast between the highly detailed gate
and the more calm, orderly (and I presume) classicaly influenced tower.



Bruce Clarke, on Flickr


Bruce Clarke, on Flickr


Keith Mac Uidhir, on Flickr


Keith Mac Uidhir, on Flickr


Timothy Burling, on Flickr

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Old July 15th, 2019, 07:36 PM   #425
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continuation of Isabelline Gothic

Miraflores Charterhouse (Burgos)









San Jerónimo el Real (Madrid)









Chapel of the Vélez (Murcia)










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Old July 15th, 2019, 08:31 PM   #426
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Palace of Jabalquinto, Baeza (Jaén)







Cloisters of Santo Domingo Convent, Jerez de la Frontera (Cádiz)











Vaults of the Cathedral of Seville






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Old July 15th, 2019, 10:35 PM   #427
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Architecture lover View Post
^ I adore it. Love how they included carvings of lions. Did the Kingdom of Castile later merged with Leon? My all time favorite coat of arms from that epoch is the one by the kingdom of Leon.
It did indeed.



Quote:
Originally Posted by franciscoc View Post
Monastery of San Juan de los Reyes (Toledo)
With permiso:


Hallway by Gerwin Filius, en Flickr



By Daderot
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/F...Spain_-_07.JPG



https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/F...steria_004.JPG

By Antonio Velez



By PMRMaeyaert

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/C...M_079725_E.jpg


As for the cathedral of Seville (I assume we're speaking about flamboyant gothic specifically here):


DAV_6159 Trasaltar de la Catedral de Santa María de la Sede by David Barrio López, en Flickr
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Old July 16th, 2019, 09:02 PM   #428
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Architecture lover View Post
Did the Kingdom of Castile later merged with Leon?
The definitive union of the kingdoms of Leon and Castile took place in 1230.
The Kingdom of León presents two pecularities: it has been recognized by UNESCO as the cradle of European parliamentarism

http://www.unesco.org/new/en/communi...entary-system/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histor...arliamentarism

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cortes...C3%B3n_of_1188

and it has the oldest heraldic emblem in Europe. The purple lion appears for the first time in 1126 and predates other emblems, such as the English leopards (1158), the castle of Castile (1177), the French lily flowers (1179) and the eagle of the Holy Roman Empire (1200).
I haven't found any reference to Byzantium in the birth of this emblem but I think that some influence should have due to the prestige that Byzantium and its symbolic purple color had in the medieval European imaginary.
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Old July 17th, 2019, 12:07 AM   #429
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Had no idea it was the absolute first symbol! It makes it even greater now. Just iconic.
The purple lion also takes part of the current coat of arms of Spain. I believe the only country that uses purple as a color in all of Europe in modern ages, which makes it even more special.
To me, it's a strong, bold color to be used in any of the national symbols. I associate it with power gained throughout in-depth, meticulous intellectualism.

The purple lion on a silver flag is to me the best symbol ever. Cheers to that kind of aesthetics.

Here on the other side of the Mediterranean, almost every single country uses the double headed Eagle as a symbol in any way - Greece, Albania, Montenegro, Serbia. But none of these were thoughtful enough to put it on a purple colored standard. That's because wisdom have left these places a long time ago.

If we could personalize wisdom, she'd be this gorgeous (probably brown haired, fair skinned woman) in a tight purple silk dress saying to the Balkans: I'm never coming back. I'm being hilarious now. XD
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MARCUS VITRUVIUS POLLIO | DE ARCHITECTURA | LIBER IV
Columnae corinthiae praeter capitula omnes symmetrias habent uti ionicae,
sed capitulorum altitudines efficiunt eas pro rata excelsiores et graciliores,
quod ionici capituli altitudo tertia pars est crassitudinis columnae, corinthii tota crassitudo scapi.
igitur quod duae partes e crassitudine corinthiorum adiciuntur,
efficiunt excelsitate speciem earum graciliorem.


Last edited by Architecture lover; July 17th, 2019 at 12:14 AM.
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Old July 17th, 2019, 12:56 AM   #430
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Lichfield rivals Notre Dame de Paris in beauty, I think, to my eyes ND's west towers always looked incomplete truncated somewhat (but certainly cannot dispute it's magnificence), that's why I like these soaring stone towers pointing to heaven. Both were started in the 11th century. Notre Dame's main tower is actually 9 metres shorter than Lichfield's but ND is 15 metres longer.
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Old July 17th, 2019, 12:57 AM   #431
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The vaulting on the Cathedral of Seville is just too much beauty for the senses to take in, absolute perfection. I must visit Seville one day.
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Old July 17th, 2019, 10:12 AM   #432
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the largest gothic one in the world
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Old July 17th, 2019, 01:31 PM   #433
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I agree with everything both of you have said.
No disrespect to Notre Dame of Paris in any way, it's a beautiful building, but France has so much more than that. I mean the Gothic style itself was called Francigenum Opus in Latin - literally meaning the French Work.
To me the Chartres, or Reims Cathedrals are ever greater than the one in Paris.

Lichfield is however my new favorite, previously that place was hold by Salisbury cathedral for me. Love the stone spires.
The one in Lincoln used to had the biggest spires ever built, but they weren't built from stone, so they collapsed. It was the first building in centuries to finally surpass the great pyramid of Giza in height - globally. When they were still standing.
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MARCUS VITRUVIUS POLLIO | DE ARCHITECTURA | LIBER IV
Columnae corinthiae praeter capitula omnes symmetrias habent uti ionicae,
sed capitulorum altitudines efficiunt eas pro rata excelsiores et graciliores,
quod ionici capituli altitudo tertia pars est crassitudinis columnae, corinthii tota crassitudo scapi.
igitur quod duae partes e crassitudine corinthiorum adiciuntur,
efficiunt excelsitate speciem earum graciliorem.


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Old July 17th, 2019, 06:12 PM   #434
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Agree on all points and thanks for additional tidbits of info, have seen Chartes and was astounded that something like this was built in what appears to be the middle of nowhere, the juxtaposition left me in awe. The height also greater than NDdeP, Rouen being the tallest in France. Reims is an absolute masterpiece with exquisitely refined parapets towers.

I have always dreamed of doing a tour of the great gothic cathedrals of Europe with a friend who did his PHD on French cathedrals years ago...and somehow devise an objective way to assess and rank their beauty.
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Old July 17th, 2019, 06:14 PM   #435
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VITORIA MAN View Post
the largest gothic one in the world


So you mean Seville? Largest by volume or mass I am assuming. I believe Ulm is the tallest gothic cathedral.
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Old July 17th, 2019, 09:00 PM   #436
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Unusual amount of glass for a medieval building ...

Schlieff Tenement

Gdańsk, Poland



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Old July 17th, 2019, 09:05 PM   #437
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Appears so well preserved! The amount of glass does give a little bit of Tudor vibe.
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MARCUS VITRUVIUS POLLIO | DE ARCHITECTURA | LIBER IV
Columnae corinthiae praeter capitula omnes symmetrias habent uti ionicae,
sed capitulorum altitudines efficiunt eas pro rata excelsiores et graciliores,
quod ionici capituli altitudo tertia pars est crassitudinis columnae, corinthii tota crassitudo scapi.
igitur quod duae partes e crassitudine corinthiorum adiciuntur,
efficiunt excelsitate speciem earum graciliorem.


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Old July 17th, 2019, 09:52 PM   #438
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citysquared View Post
So you mean Seville? Largest by volume or mass I am assuming. I believe Ulm is the tallest gothic cathedral.
Both volume and surface. But not length or height.

There's a bit of a contest with Milan's duomo, though.
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Old July 18th, 2019, 10:10 PM   #439
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Toledo Cathedral | Toledo | SPAIN

I. The Primate Cathedral of Saint Mary of Toledo is a Roman Catholic church in Toledo, Spain.
II. The cathedral of Toledo is one of the three 13th-century High Gothic cathedrals in Spain and is considered,
in the opinion of some authorities, to be the magnum opus of the Gothic style in Spain.

III. It was begun in 1226 under the rule of Ferdinand III and the last Gothic contributions were made in the 15th century when,
in 1493, the vaults of the central nave were finished during the time of the Catholic Monarchs.


For many years, an unwritten popular tradition has held that there was originally a church from the era of the first Archbishop Eugene (Saint Eugene of Toledo) located in the same place as the present cathedral.
This church was consecrated for a second time in the year 587, after having undergone some alterations, as testified by a 16th-century inscription preserved on a pillar in the rear of the nave of the church which states:

In the name of the Lord the Church of Saint Mary was consecrated as Catholic, the first day of the ides of April,
in the joyful first year of the reign of our most glorious king Flavius Reccared, Era 625.






TLD_Cathedral_01 by chiang_benjamin, on Flickr


Facade by Dmitry Shakin, on Flickr


Toledo cathedral (2) by damian entwistle, on Flickr


Toledo cathedral 12 apostles by damian entwistle, on Flickr


Source


Toledo at dusk by Víctor Del Olmo San Roman, on Flickr
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MARCUS VITRUVIUS POLLIO | DE ARCHITECTURA | LIBER IV
Columnae corinthiae praeter capitula omnes symmetrias habent uti ionicae,
sed capitulorum altitudines efficiunt eas pro rata excelsiores et graciliores,
quod ionici capituli altitudo tertia pars est crassitudinis columnae, corinthii tota crassitudo scapi.
igitur quod duae partes e crassitudine corinthiorum adiciuntur,
efficiunt excelsitate speciem earum graciliorem.

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Old July 29th, 2019, 03:58 PM   #440
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I've tried to find aerials, and there are some stunning aerial pictures of the cathedral out there on the internet - unfortunately most of them stock - royalty photos, unavailable for sharing.

La Seu | Palma Cathedral | SPAIN

I. The Cathedral of Santa Maria of Palma, more commonly referred to as La Seu, is a Gothic Roman Catholic cathedral located in Palma, Majorca, Spain.
II. Designed in the Catalan Gothic style but with Northern European influences, it was begun by King James I of Aragon in 1229 but only finished in 1601.
III. It sits within the old city of Palma atop the former citadel of the Roman city, between the Royal Palace of La Almudaina.
IV. It also overlooks the Parc de la Mar and the Mediterranean Sea.





28th May 2018. La Seu, Cathedral of Santa Maria of Palma, Parc de la Mar, Palma, Majorca by Barnsley Victor, on Flickr


Cathedral, Mallorca by petrk747, on Flickr


La Seu by michael_hamburg69, on Flickr


Mallorca, Trip to Palma de Mallorca, Cathedral of the holy Maria, 58 by Andy von der Wurm, on Flickr


Palma de Mallorca, Spain The Cathedral of Santa Maria of Palma by Matilda Diamant, on Flickr


I like the lights on the pillars, in a way they have a very Spanish charm. Also in a very odd way the remind me of Claw (a video game I liked as a kid ).
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MARCUS VITRUVIUS POLLIO | DE ARCHITECTURA | LIBER IV
Columnae corinthiae praeter capitula omnes symmetrias habent uti ionicae,
sed capitulorum altitudines efficiunt eas pro rata excelsiores et graciliores,
quod ionici capituli altitudo tertia pars est crassitudinis columnae, corinthii tota crassitudo scapi.
igitur quod duae partes e crassitudine corinthiorum adiciuntur,
efficiunt excelsitate speciem earum graciliorem.

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