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Old May 19th, 2014, 08:12 AM   #4701
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Remember When: Clayton Street, then and now.
By David Morton, The Chronicle, May 14th 2014


Clayton Street, bustling with activity in the early years of the last century

In the image above, we show one of the fascinating old postcards donated to the Chronicle by a kind reader recently. Clayton Street is bustling with activity in our main image which dates from the early years of the last century. On the left there is a sign “Brooks for hats” above the shop on the corner, while the trundling tram has an advert for Colman’s mustard which is still popular a century on.


The “to let” sign on the left is indicative of Clayton Street in 2014.

Trade today certainly isn’t as brisk as in our older picture, and footfall here lags behind other busier shopping sectors of the city. Gone sadly, is the Woolworth store which closed in recent years, while Jackson the Tailor was a long-term fixture in the premises on the far right.

Built in 1837 by Richard Grainger, the street was named after John Clayton, the 19th century town clerk and antiquarian. Back then, it joined up with Blackett Street, opposite Old Eldon Square.


Read More - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/lifes...castle-7116963
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Old May 19th, 2014, 01:42 PM   #4702
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January 24th 2010.

Salvation Army Men’s Social Services Centre, City Road, Newcastle.

Trying to find buildings by Ryder and Yates in their native North-East surviving in their original condition is tricky today. The recent book on the practice, by Rutter Carroll for the RIBA/English Heritage and The Twentieth Century Society, offers a few clues but is necessarily illustrated mainly with vintage photographs. There are many beautiful houses for private clients, mainly from the 1950s, but most of these have been drastically altered. There is also a clutch of major office buildings at Killingworth, with which Ryder and Yates achieved a national renown, but only the British Gas Research Station – now again on the market – is worth close scrutiny today.

But visitors to the North East need go no further than central Newcastle to find two of Ryder and Yates’s most interesting and best preserved buildings. One is MEA House, detailed on the Twentieth Century Society’s Seventies campaign: http://c20society.org.uk/docs/campaigns/70s.html. The other is the Salvation Army’s social services centre not far north of the Tyne Bridge.

The Men’s Social Services Centre for the Salvation Army, and completed in 1974, replaced a ‘Men’s Palace’ or itinerants’ hostel that had been demolished for an office development. A curved linear building in blue brindle brick, the building sits in a commanding position adjoining the seventeenth-century Keelman’s Hospital in City Road. Ryder first proposed two parallel blocks, but then he noted a proposed road improvement that introduced a curve and this prompted him to change the roadside block accordingly. This larger, three-storey range held the principal accommodation, with bedrooms on the ground and second floors and communal rooms on the first. 184 men were housed in dormitories and small rooms, and there were day rooms, a restaurant, facilities for the elderly and a small hospital.

This mix of accommodation is blithely concealed behind a carefully irregular façade that holds few clues to what lies within. The carefully arranged fenestration, its proportions echoing those of Le Corbusier’s Modular, allowed for maximum flexibility in the plan so that three bedroom units could be formed from two if required, while having an asymmetry that played down the building’s institutional aspect. This apparently casual arrangement of windows is interrupted only by a first-floor picture window serving the dining room. Most striking is the central entrance, whose curved access ramp is answered by a boomerang-shaped canopy on spindly columns.

It is in such details that Ryder and Yates’s pedigree is revealed: the pair met when in 1948 they joined the team assembled by Berthold Lubetkin to build a new town at Peterlee in County Durham. Gordon Ryder was locally-born and trained, while Peter Yates had worked with Clive Entwistle in Paris and was noted as an artist as well as an architect – he was personally acquainted with Le Corbusier, the other great influence on the practice.

The curved canopy somewhat resembles that at Lubetkin’s Highpoint II in Highgate, as does the rooftop penthouse with its arched paraboloid roof – here the superintendent’s flat. Ryder and Yates had formed their partnership in 1953 and these details were honed by the pair over many years, particularly as larger jobs came their way in the 1960s. Another regular feature of their work, seen at the Salvation Army, was the mounding of the surrounding landscape into what Yates termed ‘earth sculptures’.

The nature of the Salvation Army building suggested the use of hard, uncompromising materials that would require little maintenance and be hygienic. Blue brickwork was commonly used by the practice as exterior cladding, and was here also used internally. The full height, narrow strip windows were formed from steel, pivoted vertically and originally had bright green sliding shutters to give unity to the façade.

The building continues to function as a social services centre for the Salvation Army.

The book Ryder and Yates, by Rutter Carroll in the series Twentieth Century Architects was published in March 2009 at £20 and is available to order from The Twentieth Century Society.

Elain Harwood is a historian with English Heritage and co-editor of the series Twentieth Century Architects. Her Pevsner City Guide, Nottingham, was published in 2008, and she has just finished a PhD on London’s South Bank.

An exhibition of Peter Yates' art will be held at Margaret Howell, 158 Wigmore Street, London, W1 in April 2010. Further details to be announced.

http://www.c20society.org.uk/docs/bu...the_month.html

Salvation Army's City Road centre is set to close
By Sarah Scott, The Chronicle, May 19th 2014


The Salvation Army's City Road Centre

The Salvation Army's City Road centre, which offers emergency accommodation for men with substance issues, is in the process of closing
leaving dozens of vulnerable men in need of a bed, as a result of Newcastle City Council’s redesign of crisis services. Officials from the Salvation Army charity confirmed that they had entered a formal consultation period with staff but a source close to the centre said service users and workers were devastated by the news. “The men are really upset, devastated,” said the source. “Staff have assured them they will work to do whatever to get them a good offer.”

The council says just three beds are being lost in the city as a result of the changes, as other services will cater for those affected. There is no suggestion that any of the 30 to 40 men who are currently staying at the City Road site will end up homeless, but the race is on to find alternative accommodation. A Salvation Army spokesperson said: “As a result of an unsuccessful tender bid to deliver homelessness services, we can confirm that we are in the process of decommissioning our service at City Road.

A Newcastle City Council spokesman said: “The City Council has recently finished a major piece of work to redesign services that help people cope with crisis. By doing this we have managed to reduce our spending by nearly a quarter but only lost three beds. “We understand that the Salvation’s Army City Road building will close, but we’re confident its residents will be accommodated elsewhere, and we’ll be working closely with the Salvation Army to support this change.”

Read More - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...centre-7137707

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Old May 19th, 2014, 02:00 PM   #4703
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Wonder what will happen with the building ?
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Old May 19th, 2014, 02:29 PM   #4704
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Wonder what will happen with the building ?
Knocked down and student accommodation I would imagine.

I know you live close by, I have left City Road now. The behaviour of the residents and the way it was run by the Salvation Army is a blight on the area and I am glad they have lost their contract.

It will lead to a massive reduction in crime and anti social behaviour in the area.
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Old May 19th, 2014, 02:39 PM   #4705
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Knocked down and student accommodation I would imagine.

I know you live close by, I have left City Road now. The behaviour of the residents and the way it was run by the Salvation Army is a blight on the area and I am glad they have lost their contract.

It will lead to a massive reduction in crime and anti social behaviour in the area.
The problems will be displaced surely?

There is Cherry Tree View off Elswick Road which was recently built as NCC emergency accommodation (replacing Hill Court in Pitt Street) so that might be where they end up?
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Old May 19th, 2014, 02:59 PM   #4706
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Knocked down and student accommodation I would imagine.

I know you live close by, I have left City Road now. The behaviour of the residents and the way it was run by the Salvation Army is a blight on the area and I am glad they have lost their contract.

It will lead to a massive reduction in crime and anti social behaviour in the area.
In fairness it's not been too bad for me. I ve lived here for perhaps 11 years and have had one car break in which probably isn t a bad average [as it happens from a Sally A resident, lifted about 3 hours later by the Polis]. I do see the odd local 'character' and [recently] there has been a bit more cider drinking at the edge of the verge by the Hostel but I ve had more disturbance problems from stags and hens and students.

However, I am a bit further away [ I assume you were Gibson st ish - and that end could have had a lot more problems].

You can make an argument that it s a site worth a fortune and if they can sell it and 'do more good' with the money elsewhere it's no bad thing. In other words can they do more in a 'lower rent' area [not being snobbish - simply that if you can help 50 people there and 100 if it's a half mile further out then it's an easy choice.]

If the rooms are 'en suite' it could be cheaply converted into a hotel ?
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Old May 19th, 2014, 06:25 PM   #4707
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The problems will be displaced surely?

There is Cherry Tree View off Elswick Road which was recently built as NCC emergency accommodation (replacing Hill Court in Pitt Street) so that might be where they end up?
Hopefully whoever runs the other emergency accommodation might take their responsibilities to their neighbours more seriously.
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Old May 19th, 2014, 08:17 PM   #4708
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Late Shows

I was out and about on Saturday night to the Late Shows, checking out various buildings and would highly recommend this next year (as it's an annual event!).

Having wandered to Biscuit Factory (downstairs to the Artist's Studios in the basement), checked out the Northern Print Studio (Artists showing off printing techniques), we then were off to 36 Lime Street (yet more Artist's studios in a fantastic building next to the Cluny).

After this walked to the Quayside where we queued up to go into the northern Tower of the Tyne Bridge where there was an art/sound installation (regarding Cancer treatment). Great to be this to hear the rumble of the traffic on the bridge above, but no pictures as completely dark - and my camera-phone, well...

Finally to Neville Hall and the Mining Institute where we were able to walk around the building (Library, Lecture Hall and Bar). We were also able to go upstairs to the top floor where the local Treasurer told us about the top floor which used to be owned by the Masons.

https://www.mininginstitute.org.uk/index.html

There's lots already on the forum, but it seems as if the Mining Institute bought out the front section that was owned by the Masons. This is shown in the link as the Arbitration Hall which was where the Unions and the Owners would meet and set the coal prices.

This room used to be held for the Mason's meetings where the windows and roof were blacked out/covered over as no natural light was allowed in whilst the meetings were going on. You can also see the square areas with no carpet where the Masons chairs were positioned.

We were also told that the lift used by the Masons should not have been allowed as it doesn't actually go to the Library level, so is going to be taken out. As the Mining institute now have this additional section at the front, they're looking for money from the Lottery, etc. to be able to do the front up which would include training staff on repairing the stained glass.

Finally they're also looking at making more of the possible Roman wall section which is located just outside; we were told that it was a 95% chance that it was part of the original wall, so this would be included in any restoration work.



The glass ceiling (originally hidden and boxed over)



In the Library (where there was an acrobatic display on)





All photos taken by me on my dodgy camera phone (and hosted on Photobucket)
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Old May 19th, 2014, 10:13 PM   #4709
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Didn't hear about the late shows until the Saturday by which everything good was booked up and I had plans made.

Thought it might have had a mention on SCC.

Good pics by the way despite it being a phone.
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Old May 19th, 2014, 10:31 PM   #4710
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcastle Historian View Post
The origins of the building you mention was discussed back on January 13th 2010, on this thread . . .

https://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...99&postcount=3

It has been MANY different hotels since it originally opened as "The Centre Hotel", but as a fairly recently built hotel, which seems to keep on making some money under many different owners, I can't imagine that it would be a candidate for 'pulling down'.

.
This, after Commercial Union House, is the building I'd most love to see demolished.

The connected building that used to house the snooker club and some sort of job centre/training place must also be completely empty now?

I used to be a daily visitor to the building, being a member of both the gym on the top floor (ex NE1 club) and the snooker club. I was told at the time the gym closed that there were serious problems with the building, possibly the pool area, that it wasn't possible/feasible to fix.

I haven't been up there for a long time but imagine, given the lack of anything up there, that the walkways are pretty bleak.
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Old May 19th, 2014, 11:40 PM   #4711
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Originally Posted by Newcastle Historian View Post
Salvation Army's City Road centre is set to close
By Sarah Scott, The Chronicle, May 19th 2014


The Salvation Army's City Road Centre

The Salvation Army's City Road centre, which offers emergency accommodation for men with substance issues, is in the process of closing
leaving dozens of vulnerable men in need of a bed, as a result of Newcastle City Council’s redesign of crisis services. Officials from the Salvation Army charity confirmed that they had entered a formal consultation period with staff but a source close to the centre said service users and workers were devastated by the news. “The men are really upset, devastated,” said the source. “Staff have assured them they will work to do whatever to get them a good offer.”

The council says just three beds are being lost in the city as a result of the changes, as other services will cater for those affected. There is no suggestion that any of the 30 to 40 men who are currently staying at the City Road site will end up homeless, but the race is on to find alternative accommodation. A Salvation Army spokesperson said: “As a result of an unsuccessful tender bid to deliver homelessness services, we can confirm that we are in the process of decommissioning our service at City Road.

A Newcastle City Council spokesman said: “The City Council has recently finished a major piece of work to redesign services that help people cope with crisis. By doing this we have managed to reduce our spending by nearly a quarter but only lost three beds. “We understand that the Salvation’s Army City Road building will close, but we’re confident its residents will be accommodated elsewhere, and we’ll be working closely with the Salvation Army to support this change.”

Read More - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...centre-7137707

.
A couple of old photos of the Salvation Army building looking a lot more imposing than it does when I drive past it on the way to/from work every day.





Both photos from Something Concrete + Modern and courtesy of Philipson Studios
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Old May 20th, 2014, 11:55 AM   #4712
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Godscrasher View Post
Didn't hear about the late shows until the Saturday by which everything good was booked up and I had plans made.

Thought it might have had a mention on SCC.

Good pics by the way despite it being a phone.
It was mentioned on SSC:

https://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=165
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Old May 20th, 2014, 12:00 PM   #4713
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Originally Posted by Godscrasher View Post
Didn't hear about the late shows until the Saturday by which everything good was booked up and I had plans made.

Thought it might have had a mention on SCC.

Good pics by the way despite it being a phone.
There were some sites such as the Castle & Keep that needed booking but all the ones we visited were open...partly because we only heard about it late aswell

Next year, I'll try to remember to send a reminder!

Add after Steve's comment:
Well there you go, I should take more notice!
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Last edited by stef23; May 20th, 2014 at 12:02 PM. Reason: Noted Steve's reply
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Old May 20th, 2014, 12:31 PM   #4714
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stef23 View Post
Added after Steve's comment:
Well there you go, I should take more notice!

Both Steve's post (Post 165 on the 'Architecture' Thread) and your post about your visit, with photos (Post 167) have now been indexed.

I had not got around to it previously, "Update Date" now shown on Opening Post as todays date, 20/05/2014.
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Old May 20th, 2014, 12:45 PM   #4715
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I've walked inside the upper walkways a few times and see that there used to be shops there which look as though they haven't been open in years. Surely this building has even less going for it now and is asking for a big developer now the oxford is being redeveloped.

It could be a nice urban quarter, rip the blue carpet up and put some grass down.
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Old May 20th, 2014, 01:08 PM   #4716
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Originally Posted by Godscrasher View Post
I've walked inside the upper walkways a few times and see that there used to be shops there which look as though they haven't been open in years. Surely this building has even less going for it now and is asking for a big developer now the oxford is being redeveloped.

It could be a nice urban quarter, rip the blue carpet up and put some grass down.
Some images of the walkways @ https://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=4549 - thankfully taken in daytime, wouldn't fancy venturing along there in the dark
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Old May 20th, 2014, 01:42 PM   #4717
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Board of Trade Labour Exchange - Old Royal Infirmary

I spotted this old advertising sign during a visit to Beamish Museum on 18th May 2014.



The sign advertises the Board of Trade Labour Exchange at the Old Royal Infirmary on The Forth.

This is a scan from the 1914 OS Map showing the location.


Images hosted on www.steve-ellwood.org.uk


This is an image of the Infirmary, courtesy of the Newcastle City Libraries Archive Collection on Flickr. It would be good to think that this was the building used as the Labour Exchange, certainly has a 'daunting' look to it.

044333:The Infirmary Forth Banks Newcastle upon Tyne Unknown Pre-1906
Type : Lantern Slide Description : A view of the exterior of the Infirmary Forth Banks Newcastle upon Tyne taken before 1906.

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Old May 20th, 2014, 02:00 PM   #4718
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I've walked inside the upper walkways a few times and see that there used to be shops there which look as though they haven't been open in years.
I could be wrong (I usually am!) but I have no recollection of there ever being shops here, I think I remember it as the entrance to Madisons night club which was considered very classy in its day.
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Old May 20th, 2014, 02:03 PM   #4719
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I thought the roman wall was located underground next to the mining institute?
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Old May 20th, 2014, 02:06 PM   #4720
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So I take it 'Madisons nightclub' is lying derelict on the other side of the door and I guess that it is a vast space with it being a nightclub. This would be a good place for an urban ex.
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