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Old January 26th, 2013, 02:53 PM   #21
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Well, autonomous or remote controlled, the amount of required power would be the same for either. Maybe it'll be powered by hydrogen fuel cells and will actively seek out power to replenish itself on its own - breaking down water into hydrogen and then converting it into electricity. Or maybe it'll utilize plutonium and just use its decay for power

In any case, I'm sure they have brighter minds than ours working on that problem.

If we look at the 2013 stage, it is still connected to a power cable
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Old January 26th, 2013, 05:49 PM   #22
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Most likely robots in future will carry portable nuclear power sources, like in iron man movie
This is already a reality: the nuclear generator MMRTG, used on Mars rover Curiosity.

Last edited by ramanujann; January 26th, 2013 at 05:55 PM.
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Old January 26th, 2013, 06:11 PM   #23
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I would imagine that a major concern with nuclear powered soldiers would be if terrorists capture one.
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Old January 29th, 2013, 03:47 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ramanujann View Post
Most likely robots in future will carry portable nuclear power sources, like in iron man movie
ty.
that is not reasonable old fashioned thinking especially we have no idea how to convert nuclear power

human body uses about 80-200wats
not much
if we could produce long enough carbon nanotubes we have very strong efficient artificial muscles
and with them you can use biological fuel almost like with humans


no need for nukes
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Old February 7th, 2013, 11:31 PM   #25
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DLR Robotic Motion Simulator cuts costs by re-purposing industrial robot arm



Computer simulations designed to teach people how to operate a vehicle can reproduce a reasonable facsimile of real-world conditions, but they lack one key ingredient: a realisic sense of motion. That's why companies like Toyota has spent millions developing motion simulators that typically move on six hydraulic arms to recreate the sensation of actual driving. Now, the German Aerospace Center (DLR) has built a cost-effective motion simulator powered by a single industrial robot arm that can handle extreme scenarios, such as spin maneuvers and even flight take-off and landing.



The DLR Robotic Motion Simulator uses KUKA's mass-produced industrial robot components, thus saving a great deal of the cost normally attributed to commercial motion simulators. In 2006 KUKA re-purposed its robot arm for theme parks with the RoboCoaster, followed by the RoboSim 4-D Simulator in 2009, so it was only a matter of time before the German Aerospace Center modified the arm for its own purposes.



The KUKA robot arm is strong enough to lift a car chassis, so it's perfectly suited to lifting and spinning you around inside a lightweight virtual reality cabin. Once you're strapped in, the top shell of the pod acts as a hemispherical projection screen, giving you a wide field of view. The arm provides pitch, yaw, and roll, while the entire rig moves back and forth on a track.



Developed to study human-machine interfaces, simulation environments, visualization and more, the system uses the commercially-available Modelica software. Researchers at DLR have been contributing to the Modelica software library for more than a decade, including the development of DLR SimVis. It can simulate complex physical systems including mechanical, electrical, hydraulic, and other sub-components for a variety of vehicles and scenarios.



To take advantage of this flexibility, the DLR Robotic Motion Simulator features modular components that can be switched in short order to suit a variety of situations – from driving a road vehicle to flying a helicopter or other aircraft. That means it will have plenty of training applications, but it also looks like a hell of a lot of fun. You can watch it in action in the following video.

SOURCE:http://www.gizmag.com/dlr-robotic-mo...mulator/26040/
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Old February 7th, 2013, 11:31 PM   #26
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Bionic man: Rex goes on show



A million dollar bionic man called Rex, built to showcase the extent to which technology can reproduce human parts, made his debut at London’s Science Museum on Tuesday.

Eighteen companies and universities lent artificial limbs, organs and other parts for incorporation into Rex. British contributions include synthetic blood from Sheffield University, artificial lungs from Haemair of Swansea, an artificial pancreas from De Montford University and bladder, ear, trachea and arteries from University College London.

Rex’s head is modelled on Bertolt Meyer, a Swiss psychologist who uses a bionic hand and who will present a Channel 4 documentary about what he called “this uber-exciting project”. His skull was reproduced in London by Cavendish Imaging, using 3D printing from a high-definition CT scan.



“I’ve looked around for new bionic technologies, out of personal interest, for a very long time and . . . until five to six years ago nothing much was happening,” said Mr Meyer. “Then suddenly we get this explosion of innovation.”

Shadow Robot, a London company, assembled Rex’s components into a humanoid whole. “It was surprising how many artificial human parts we could get hold of,” said Rich Walker, managing director.

However some vital parts are missing, including stomach and intestines, so Rex cannot eat or drink. “We looked at the digestive system but could not find an appropriate one in the time available,” added Mr Walker.

More importantly, Rex cannot think. His “chatbot” artificial intelligence enables him to have a very simple conversation with a real human but no attempt was made to simulate the human brain.

Rex is not immortal. After spending a month in London at the Science Museum he will travel to Washington DC to go on display at the Smithsonian Museum.

Then he will return to London, where the Shadow Robot team will disassemble him and return all the component parts to the companies and universities that supplied them.

SOURCE: http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/c44d9...#axzz2KFMfTjMO
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Old February 10th, 2013, 09:28 PM   #27
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That is very impressive and would be even more relevant in the longevity thread. Androids can be designed better than human bodies, no need to replicate every organ, but as far as extending our lives and making us more durable, we need superior equivalents of every organic constituent of our bodies.
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Old February 26th, 2013, 02:37 AM   #28
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Handy Robots

[IMG]http://t0.************/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT6RVGFeStYJv81e8lEacHxJY0iktuj87dsAnQggyR_JNC3SRLY[/IMG]

The human hand, a masterpiece of evolution, has for a long time been impossible to recreate artificially. Its complex mechanics and high sensitivity have challenged the best masters of robotics. Now, as if straight from science fiction, a robotic hand is a reality.



A more intelligent robotic hand is the goal of a European Union research project that has just presented its results at Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris. Researchers from six EU countries joined forces to make a hand that looks, reacts and behaves like the real thing.

"It's a real challenge to create an artificial hand, because one must recreate our hand movements that are already quite complicated,"
says Robotics Professor Véronique Perdereau, co-ordinator of the UPCM/HANDLE project.

Humans naturally adapt their grasp, placing fingers correctly to manipulate various objects. For robots, it is a much tougher task. Learning from the human hand, scientists made a large database of various grips and movements that the robot uses to get the required results.

"The hand needs to be equipped with various sensors to collect as much information as possible about what happens when the hand approaches the object, when it picks up the object, and while it's manipulating the object - and its movements need to be reproduced with high dexterity, resembling our natural actions, which is extremely difficult," says Perdereau.

Using video cameras, the robot studies its surroundings before planning its movements. From its database, it chooses the right actions to complete the task successfully.

"It uses a colour camera that collects distance data to detect the required object and any possible obstacles. Based on the shape of the object, it can determine how to seize it avoiding any collisions, and thanks to fingertip sensors, it can be sure that the grasp it has chosen is correct," says research engineer Guillaume Walck.

As proof of its dexterity, the robotic hand can rotate the object it has lifted from a surface: a soda can can be picked up with just two fingers, and then the hand modifies its grasp to hold it with three fingers while pouring the drink.

The pressure feedback from the fingers is particularly important when dealing with delicate objects.

"This hand has multiple degrees of freedom that allow it to address very fine and complex manipulation tasks, giving it enough dexterity to manipulate extremely fragile objects, such as lightbulbs," says robotics researcher at the CEA Mathieu Grossard.

Scientists believe that human-like robots can integrate more easily into our human-designed world, using the same objects we normally use. In many situations, they can give a helping hand to make our work and lives safer and more enjoyable.

"If we manage to imitate human dexterity, then we can imagine robots that will be capable to work alone in dangerous environments, such as nuclear objects or space. And much closer to home, we could have robotic assistants able to help elderly or disabled people, who may need such support and some company," suggests Perdereau.

That is the goal that will be brought closer by several follow-up research projects.

SOURCE: http://www.euronews.com/2013/02/25/handy-robots/
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Old February 26th, 2013, 10:38 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bitreaktor View Post
that is not reasonable old fashioned thinking especially we have no idea how to convert nuclear power

human body uses about 80-200wats
not much
if we could produce long enough carbon nanotubes we have very strong efficient artificial muscles
and with them you can use biological fuel almost like with humans


no need for nukes
Or just replicate the current method of biologically producing ATP (energy) from fat, and load the robots with a chunk of fat. 1 pound of fat is equivalent to 3,500 calories - enough to keep a man running at a regular pace for up to 10 hours.
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Old February 26th, 2013, 01:05 PM   #30
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I just opened a thread about bionics, so we can cover this specific topic better (it doesn't really belong in robotics):

BIONICS - Human augmentation - Tech in humans - Cyborgs, baby!
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Old February 27th, 2013, 12:35 AM   #31
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Killer robots must be stopped, say campaigners


A scene from the 2003 film Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines.
Scientists say killer robots are not science fiction.

'Autonomous weapons', which could be ready within a decade, pose grave risk to international law, claim activists

A new global campaign to persuade nations to ban "killer robots" before they reach the production stage is to be launched in the UK by a group of academics, pressure groups and Nobel peace prize laureates.

Robot warfare and autonomous weapons, the next step from unmanned drones, are already being worked on by scientists and will be available within the decade, said Dr Noel Sharkey, a leading robotics and artificial intelligence expert and professor at Sheffield University. He believes that development of the weapons is taking place in an effectively unregulated environment, with little attention being paid to moral implications and international law.

The Stop the Killer Robots campaign will be launched in April at the House of Commons and includes many of the groups that successfully campaigned to have international action taken against cluster bombs and landmines. They hope to get a similar global treaty against autonomous weapons.

"These things are not science fiction; they are well into development," said Sharkey. "The research wing of the Pentagon in the US is working on the X47B [unmanned plane] which has supersonic twists and turns with a G-force that no human being could manage, a craft which would take autonomous armed combat anywhere in the planet.

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Old March 1st, 2013, 10:15 AM   #32
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Finally a new update for Big Dog! It can now throw stuff.



It can finally play throw and fetch now....with humans.
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Old March 1st, 2013, 11:30 AM   #33
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Now that's scary..
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Old March 2nd, 2013, 02:37 PM   #34
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Old March 3rd, 2013, 01:23 AM   #35
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Quote:
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Finally a new update for Big Dog! It can now throw stuff.



It can finally play throw and fetch now....with humans.
So beautiful
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Old March 10th, 2013, 04:47 AM   #36
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Web-based 'brain' for robots goes live



Robots confused about what they encounter in the world of humans can now get help online.



European scientists have turned on the first part of a web-based database of information to help them cope.

Called Rapyuta, the online "brain" describes objects robots have met and can also carry out complicated computation on behalf of a robot.

Rapyuta's creators hope it will make robots cheaper as they will not need all their processing power on-board.

The Rapyuta database is part of the European Robo Earth project that began in 2011 with the hope of standardising the way robots perceive the human world.

Instead of every robot building up its own idiosyncratic catalogue of how to deal with the objects and situations it encounters, Rapyuta would be the place they ask for help when confronted with a novel situation, place or thing.

In addition, the web-based service is able to do complicated computation on behalf of a robot - for example if it needs to work out how to navigate a room, fold an item of clothing or understand human speech.

The system could be particularly useful for drones, self-driving cars or other mobile robots who have to do a lot of number crunching just to get round, said Mohanarajah Gajamohan, technical head of the project at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich.

Cloud control
"On-board computation reduces mobility and increases cost." said Dr Heico Sandee, Robo Earth program manager at the Dutch University of Technology in Eindhoven in a statement. As wireless data speeds increase more and more robotic thinking could be offloaded to the web, he said.

Without access to such a database, roboticists fear machines will be restricted to working in very tightly controlled environments such as production lines and never live easily alongside humans.

The project, which involves researchers at five separate European research labs, has produced the database as well as software that robots can run to connect to and quiz Rapyuta.

The name Rapyuta is taken from the Japanese film by Hayao Miyazaki Castle in the Sky - in the film it is the place where all the robots live.

SOURCE: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-21714191
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Old March 10th, 2013, 05:29 AM   #37
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RoboEarth has some pretty nice ideas, I hope soon robots can be in every home. Its sad RoboEarth doesn't have a Youtube channel to sub to.
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Old March 11th, 2013, 06:19 PM   #38
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That’s Not A Droid, That’s My Girlfriend

Robotics in many parts of the world is driven by military aims. Pacifist Japan takes a different approach: This is a digital love story.

http://www.theglobalmail.org/feature...irlfriend/560/


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Old March 19th, 2013, 04:57 AM   #39
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ESA launches drone app to improve space robotics



The European Space Agency has released an app as part of a project to improve space robots' ability to rendezvous and navigate their environments.
The augmented reality game lets owners of Parrot AR.Drone quadcopters attempt dockings with a simulated International Space Station while flying their drones for real – in the process helping to improve robotic rendezvous methods.

This new AstroDrone app is part of a scientific crowdsourcing project by ESA’s Advanced Concepts Team, gathering data to teach robots to navigate their environments.



“People intuitively assess their position and motion in relation to their surroundings in various ways, based on what they see before them,” said team research fellow Guido de Croon.

“This new app lets us crowdsource examples of this process in practice, as a first step to reproducing it with artificial intelligence.

“For ESA, the result could be much more autonomous spacecraft that can reliably manoeuvre, dock or land themselves.”

Remote-controlled drones were once the province of the military, but technology advances make them accessible now to everybody.

“For ESA, this development opens up completely new ways of involving the public in scientific experiments,” said Leopold Summerer, head of the Advanced Concepts Team.



“We can obtain real-life data to train our algorithms in large amounts that would practically be impossible to get in any other way.

The AR.Drone is one example: around half a million have been sold since their introduction by France’s Parrot company in 2010.

Equipped with two cameras, the midget drone flies on four rotors and can be steered by iPhone or any other iOS device.

“We wanted to carry out robotic crowdsourcing, which meant selecting a robot that the public actually possesses in large numbers,” added de Croon.



“This is indeed a robot that people have at home and play games with, with the imaging capabilities we need.”

“In addition, the manufacturer has made the source code needed to communicate with the drone open to anyone to develop software.”

With AstroDrone, the controller places an augmented-reality marker on a real-world feature to serve as the Space Station docking port.

The challenge is then to place the drone onto a graphical version of the Station in as rapid but controlled a manner as possible, with bonus points for correct orientation and low speed on final approach.

“Here at ESA’s ESTEC technical centre in the Netherlands we happen to have a ceiling-mounted scale model of the Space Station to manoeuvre around – not everyone is so lucky,” said de Croon.

“But with AstroDrone anyone can share the same experience.”

Players are invited to contribute to the experiment via the Internet as they log their scores on the high-score table, while their inputs will be anonymous.

“We’re not interested in the places people are flying in," de Croon said.

"We will not receive any raw video images or GPS measurements, only the abstract mathematical image features that the drone itself perceives for navigation, along with velocity readings.”

A three-person team developed the app – de Croon worked alongside with Paul Gerke and Ida Sprinkhuizen-Kuyper of Radboud University in the Netherlands.

Versions for other devices are planned as time permits, as well as future levels featuring other space rendezvous scenarios – such as ESA’s Rosetta probe rendezvousing with the 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko comet, which takes place for real next year.

SOURCE: http://eandt.theiet.org/news/2013/mar/drone-app.cfm
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Old March 19th, 2013, 05:42 PM   #40
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Clawed micro-drone swoops up prey mid-flight



Here's something you don't see everyday: a Micro Unmanned Aerial vehicle (MAV) that can grab objects on the fly with all the elegance of an eagle snatching a fish from the water's surface. Although MAVs and UAVs are increasingly being equipped to pick up, transport, and drop off payloads, we've never seen this incredibly precise form of grasping on the fly replicated – until now.

The similarity to an eagle's hunting ability is no coincidence – University of Pennsylvania research team members Justin Thomas, Joe Polin, Koushil Sreenath and Vijay Kumar, programmed the quadrotor MAV based on observations garnered from nature videos. They found that the bird of prey dramatically reduces the velocity of its claws in relation to its prey by sweeping its legs back at the point of impact, allowing it to grasp its intended target without slowing down. Since they're working with an MAV weighing just 500 grams, they had to design and fabricate an appropriately light weight arm and gripper.

Their solution is a arm weighing just 158 grams that attaches to a servo-driven swing to replicate the sweeping motion in their robot. To keep the weight down, they engineered a clever three-fingered claw that can naturally conform to different shapes but clenches and releases with just a single servo. These parts were then fabricated using a combination of 3D printing and laser-cut ABS and then covered with Dycem, which is a type of high-friction rubber that improves the robot's grip.

Besides looking damned impressive, they suggest that this sort of ability could be used in life or death situations where timing is everything. In a paper due to be presented at the International Design Engineering Technical Conferences & Computers and Information in Engineering Conference (IDETC/CIE 2013), the team writes that this ability could be "extended to achieve perching capabilities, which could be used to quickly escape high winds, achieve immediate silence in stealth operations, and improve mission duration by reducing hover time."

It seems the MAV's next trick will be clinging to a wire mid-flight, and thanks to its adaptive grippers it could also perch in tree branches (and other places). For now we can enjoy watching it grab a light cylinder (27 g) at up to three meters per second in the following video.

The eagle-like abilities of the latest MAV builds on the teams' earlier work that includes demonstrations of quadcopters swarming and even performing the theme from James Bond.

SOURCE: http://www.gizmag.com/eagle-mav-drone/26683/
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